Sample records for mitigating climate change

  1. Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change Robert Socolow Princeton University socolow should provide at least one wedge. #12;"The Wedge Model is the iPod of climate change: You fill/yr, 30 miles per gallon b) Fly 10,000 miles/yr c) Heat home Natural gas, average house, average climate d

  2. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

  3. Executive Summary Mitigation of Climate Change through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Executive Summary Mitigation of Climate Change through Land Reclamation with Biosolids: Carbon storage in reclaimed mine soils, life cycle analysis of biosolids reclamation, and ecosystem services; Pacala and Socolow, 2004). · Land reclamation with municipal wastewater solids (biosolids) can play

  4. Climate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    Science Global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide have increased from ice cores spanning many thousands of years. The global increases in carbon dioxide concentrationClimate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation with a Family Forest Perspective Baylor

  5. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impacts of climate change on California agriculture. Climateby climate change in California, such as agriculture areas agriculture. Without proactive climate change mitigation

  6. Agriculture, Climate Change and Climate Change Mitigation Bruce A. McCarl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Agriculture, Climate Change and Climate Change Mitigation Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University mccarl@tamu.edu ageco.tamu.edu/faculty/mccarl Let's Let Climate Change Happen Let's Avoid Climate Change Mitigation Effects Presented at Texas Recycling

  7. Mediterranean Seagrass Meadows: Resilience and Contribution to Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudouresque, Charles F.

    Mediterranean Seagrass Meadows: Resilience and Contribution to Climate Change Mitigation A Short to Climate Change Mitigation, A Short Summary / Les herbiers de Magnoliophytes marines de Méditerranée: 1 Evolution of the average temperature and level of the sea since 1850 (after Climate Change 2007

  8. Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

  9. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mitigate 21 MtCO 2 . Cogeneration (also called Combined Heatefficiencies. Industrial cogeneration is an important partpotential for industrial cogeneration is estimated at almost

  10. Mitigating Climate Change Through Green Buildings and Smart Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL; Southworth, Frank [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-efficient buildings are seen by climate change experts as one of the least-cost approaches to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper summarizes a study done for the Pew Center on Global Climate Change that takes a broader look at the potential role of a climate-friendly built environment including not only considerations of how buildings are constructed and used, but also how they interface with the electric grid and where they are located in terms of urban densities and access to employment and services. In addition to summarizing mechanisms of change (barriers and drivers), the paper reviews a set of policies that could bring carbon emissions in the building sector in 2025 back almost to 2004 levels. By mid-century, the combination of green buildings and smart growth could deliver the deeper reductions that many believe are needed to mitigate climate change.

  11. REVIEW ARTICLE Legumes for mitigation of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    activity, and meeting the increasing demand for energy in the face of dwindling reserves of fossil energy to the mitigation of climate change by reducing fossil fuel use or by providing feedstock for the emerging biobased from fossil fuels. Experimental measures of total N2O fluxes from legumes and N-fertilized systems were

  12. JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits Approach to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: JICA's Assistance for...

  13. Implications of simultaneously mitigating and adapting to climate change: Initial experiments using GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically climate impacts research and climate mitigation research have been two separate and independent domains of inquiry. Climate mitigation research has investigated greenhouse gas emissions assuming that climate is unchanging. At the same time climate mitigation research has investigated the implications of climate change on the assumption that climate mitigation will proceed without affecting the degree of climate impacts or the ability of human and natural systems to adapt. The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) has largely been employed to study climate mitigation. Here we explore the development of capabilities to assess climate change impacts and adaptation within the GCAM model. These capabilities are being developed so as to be able to simultaneously reconcile the joint implications of climate change mitigation, impacts and adaptive potential. This is an important step forward in that it enables direct comparison between climate mitigation activities and climate impacts and the opportunity to understand interactions between the two.

  14. Integrated energy planning: Strategies to mitigate climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, J.N.; Sheffield, J.W.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Framework Convention on Climate Change, signed by more than 150 governments worldwide in June 1992, calls on parties to the Convention to undertake inventories of national sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and to develop plans for responding to climate change. The energy sector is comprised of the major energy demand sectors (industry, residential and commercial, transport, and agriculture), and the energy supply sector, which consists of resource extraction, conversion, and delivery of energy products. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions occur at various points in the sector, from resource extraction to end use application, and accordingly, options for mitigation exist at various points. In most countries, the energy sector will be a major focus of GHG mitigation analysis. The primary focus of this paper is on the identification of strategies that can mitigate climate changes on the basis of integrated energy planning analysis. The overall approach follows a methodology developed by the U.S. Country Studies Program under the framework of the Convention`s commitments. It involves the development of scenarios based on energy end uses and evaluation of specific technologies that can satisfy demands for energy services. One can compare technologies based on their relative cost to achieve a unit of GHG reduction and other features of interest. This approach gives equal weight to both energy supply and energy demand options. A variety of screening criteria including indicators of cost-effectiveness as well as non-economic analysis concerns, can be used to identify and assess promising options, which can then be combined to create one or more mitigation scenario. Mitigation scenarios are evaluated against the backdrop of a baseline scenario, which simulates the events assumed to take place in the absence of mitigation efforts. Mitigation scenarios can be designed to meet specific emission reduction targets or to simulate the effect of specific policy interventions.

  15. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  16. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

  18. Role of Biochar in Mitigation of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmann, Johannes C.; Amonette, James E.; Roberts, Kelli G.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    By virtue of the large fraction of the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle controlled by human activities, agroecosystems are both sources and sinks for greenhouse gases. Their potential role in mitigation of climate change thus depends on a dual strategy of decreasing greenhouse gas emissions while increasing sinks so that the net impact on climate warming is less than at present. Emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide arise from various agricultural activities, ranging from land clearing to ploughing, fertilization, and animal husbandry. Reductions in these emissions can be achieved by decreasing the heterotrophic conversion of organic C to carbon dioxide, and by better management of agricultural waste streams to minimize release of methane and nitrous oxide. Current sinks include C stored in standing biomass and soil organic matter, and the oxidation of atmospheric methane by soil bacteria. These sinks can be enhanced by increasing net primary productivity, thereby actively withdrawing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and by promoting more oxidation of methane by soils. Judicious biochar management may contribute to both strategies, reductions of emissions by agriculture and active withdrawal of atmospheric carbon dioxide, as part of a comprehensive scheme in agricultural and forestry watersheds. Biochar is a carbon-rich organic material generated by heating biomass in the absence, or under a limited supply, of oxygen. This so-called charring or pyrolysis process has been used to produce charcoal as a source of fuel for millennia. Recently, interest has grown in understanding the potential of this process to improve soil health by adding biochar as an amendment to soil, to manage agricultural and forestry wastes, to generate energy, to decrease net emissions of nitrous oxide and methane, and to store carbon (C). The main incentive of biochar systems for mitigation of climate change is to increase the stability of organic matter or biomass. This stability is achieved by the conversion of fresh organic materials, which mineralize comparatively quickly, into biochar, which mineralizes much more slowly. The difference between the mineralization of uncharred and charred material results in a greater amount of carbon storage in soils and a lower amount of carbon dioxide, the major greenhouse gas, in the atmosphere. The principle of creating and managing biochar systems may address multiple environmental constraints. Biochar may help not only in mitigating climate change, but also fulfill a role in management of agricultural and forestry wastes, enhancement of soil sustainability, and generation of energy. Pyrolysis is a comparatively low-technology intervention. Deployment on a global scale, however, must be done carefully if the full mitigation potential is to be reached. Critical aspects of a successful implementation are that: 1) the biochar is sufficiently stable to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere for an appropriate length of time. 2) the storage of carbon as biochar in soil is not offset by greenhouse gas emissions along the value chain of the system, such as mineralization of soil carbon or emissions of other greenhouse gases (e.g., methane and nitrous oxide). 3) net emission reductions are achieved for the entire life cycle of the system including indirect land use. 4) the biochar product does not cause unwanted side effects in soil. 5) the handling and production of biochar are in compliance with health and safety standards and do not pose hurdles to implementation. and 6) the biochar system is financially viable. This chapter discusses these issues in separate sections, identifies knowledge gaps, and proposes a road map to fully evaluate an environmentally and socially safe exploration of the biochar potential to mitigate climate change if adopted widely around the world.

  19. The Role of China in Mitigating Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, S.

    We explore short- and long-term implications of several energy scenarios of China’s role in efforts to mitigate global climate risk. The focus is on the impacts on China’s energy system and GDP growth, and on global climate ...

  20. Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology Michael L) In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground contributor to climate change (1). One promising technology to mitigate CO2 emissions is carbon cap- ture

  1. ASSESSING CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION WITH A HYBRID ENERGY-ECONOMY APPROACH FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSING CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION WITH A HYBRID ENERGY-ECONOMY APPROACH FOR AFRICA, THE MIDDLE Management Title of Thesis: Assessing Climate Change Mitigation with a Hybrid Energy-Economy Approach create a hybrid energy-economy model for developing countries in Africa, the Middle East and Latin

  2. Planning for mitigating climate change risk to metropolitan areas (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last couple of decades, there has been increasing evidence of changes in global climate. With urban areas identified as the primary contributors to the climate change, there is an impetus for initiatives to persuade major contributors...

  3. Planning for mitigating climate change risk to metropolitan areas (USA) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last couple of decades, there has been increasing evidence of changes in global climate. With urban areas identified as the primary contributors to the climate change, there is an impetus for initiatives to persuade major contributors...

  4. Climate change beliefs, concerns, and attitudes toward adaptation and mitigation among farmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    ). Because climate change-related threats to agriculture represent threats to quality of life on localLETTER Climate change beliefs, concerns, and attitudes toward adaptation and mitigation among and soybean revealed that 66 % of farmers believed climate change is occurring (8 % mostly anthropogenic, 33

  5. The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

  6. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: aJ. (2009). "Cities, Climate Change and Urban Heat Islandet al. (2006). Climate change in California: health,

  7. Three Essays On Agricultural and Forestry Offsets In Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Siyi

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    major crops. The implementation of climate change mitigation strategies, such as the expansion of bioenergy production, causes demand for the agricultural sector to increase substantially. The new demand would cause noticeable leakage effect if crop...

  8. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the...

  9. Three Essays on Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation in Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Wei

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    insecurity. This is done in three essays by applying mathematical programming. In the first essay, a modeling study is done on optimal temporal investment between climate change adaptation and mitigation considering their relative contributions to damage...

  10. CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change A White Paper Final Report DOE Order No. DE-AF22-96PC01257 Energy Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 5. Geological Storage Technology

  11. Review of geoengineering approaches to mitigating climate change* Zhihua Zhang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    . The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from a pre-industrial value of about 280Review of geoengineering approaches to mitigating climate change* Zhihua Zhang a , John C. Moore b 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Climate change Carbon emissions reduction Geoengineering Cleaner

  12. Climate change mitigation and co-benefits of feasible transport demand policies in Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    i n f o Keywords: Climate change mitigation Transport demand management External costs Urban and potential impacts of travel demand management help to define policy instruments that mitigate the damaging. The paper investi- gates the role of demand elasticities and demonstrates that joint demand and supply-side

  13. Official Merit Promotion System and Its Impact on Climate Change Mitigation Policy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Pei

    on mitigating carbon emission, strengthening performance standards to control carbon standards and implementing in a long term in carbon dioxides reduction is to use its "iron hand". "Iron hand" came from Premier WenOfficial Merit Promotion System and Its Impact on Climate Change Mitigation Policy in China

  14. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008). "Accountability of networked climate governance: Therise of transnational climate partnerships." GlobalBoard. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

  15. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  16. Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy Park at MethilGlobal Climate Change

  17. Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mitigation options adapted to the farming conditions of each country. In Uruguay, Argentina and Colombia, agriculture is the main contributor to greenhouse gas emissions,...

  18. DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An agreement aimed at improving cooperation and collaboration in the areas of oil and natural gas supply, delivery, and climate change mitigation, has been signed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC).

  19. Solar energy for heat and electricity: the potential for mitigating climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar energy for heat and electricity: the potential for mitigating climate change Dr N.J. EkiNs-DaukEs Executive summary Why are we interested in using solar energy? Sunlight provides the energy source. In developing countries, solar technologies are already in use to enhance the standard of living

  20. Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel Matthew Eisaman and their impact · Technology: Extracting CO2 from seawater · Application: Renewable liquid fuel #12;Outline: Renewable liquid fuel #12;The data on atmospheric CO2 2000 years ago http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/co2

  1. Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agricultural Technologies for Climate...

  2. Climate Change Mitigation: An Analysis of Advanced Technology Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Leon E.; Wise, Marshall A.; Placet, Marylynn; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Lurz, Joshua P.; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a scenario analysis that explores three advanced technology pathways toward climate stabilization using the MiniCAM model.

  3. Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    countries AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, -...

  4. Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Harvested wood products (HWP) · Contributions of biomass/HWP in Energy and Industrial sectors. #12;18 May mitigation potential (Europe) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Avoided deforestation Afforestation Forest deforestation rates in Europe are generally small Will tend to be relevant to MS with areas of land available

  5. The role of China in mitigating climate change* Sergey Paltsev, Jennifer Morris, Yongxia Cai, Valerie Karplus and Henry Jacoby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The role of China in mitigating climate change* Sergey Paltsev, Jennifer Morris, Yongxia Cai interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

  6. Climate change, insurance, and the buildings sector: Technological synergisms between adaptation and mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examining the intersection of risk analysis and sustainable energy strategies reveals numerous examples of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies that offer insurance loss-prevention benefits. The growing threat of climate change provides an added motivation for the risk community to better understand this area of opportunity. While analyses of climate change mitigation typically focus on the emissions-reduction characteristics of sustainable energy technologies, less often recognized are a host of synergistic ways in which these technologies also offer adaptation benefits, e.g. making buildings more resilient to natural disasters. While there is already some relevant activity, there remain various barriers to significantly expanding these efforts. Achieving successful integration of sustainable energy considerations with risk-management objectives requires a more proactive orientation, and coordination among diverse actors and industry groups.

  7. The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, En

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005 the highest global surface temperature ever was recorded. A virtual consensus exists today among scientists that global warming is underway and that human greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are a significant cause. Possible mitigation of climate...

  8. The Value of Advanced Technologies in the U.S. Buildings Sector in Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Smith, Steven J.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a wide body of research focused on the potential of advanced technologies to reduce energy consumption in buildings. How such improvements relate to global climate change, however, is less clear, due to the complexity of the climate change issue, and the implications for the energy system as a whole that need to be considered. This study uses MiniCAM, an integrated assessment model, to examine the contributions of several suites of advanced buildings technologies in meeting national carbon emissions reduction targets, as part of a global policy to mitigate climate change by stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 ppmv. Focal technology areas include building shells, heat pumps for HVAC and water heating applications, solid-state lighting, and miscellaneous electric equipment. We find that advanced heat pumps and energy-efficient miscellaneous electric equipment show the greatest potential to reduce aggregate building sector future energy consumption and policy costs, but that all focal areas are important for reducing energy consumption. Because of assumed availability of low-cost, emissions-reduced electricity generation technologies in these scenarios, heat pumps are especially important for facilitating fuel-switching towards electricity. Buildings sector energy consumption is reduced by 28% and policy costs are reduced by 17% in a scenario with advanced technologies in all focal areas.

  9. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  10. A Nuclear Renaissance: The Role of Nuclear Power in Mitigating Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winslow, Anne [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA and MonAme Scientific Research Center, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. N. Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for the stabilization of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at double the preindustrial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. To achieve this goal, carbon emissions in 2050 must not exceed their current level, despite predictions of a dramatic increase in global electricity demand. The need to reduce GHG emissions and simultaneously provide for additional electricity demand has led to a renewed interest in the expansion of alternatives to fossil fuels--particularly renewable energy and nuclear power. As renewable energy sources are often constrained by the intermittency of natural energy forms, scale-ability concerns, cost and environmental barriers, many governments and even prominent environmentalist turn to nuclear energy as a source of clean, reliable base-load electricity. Described by some as a ''nuclear renaissance'', this trend of embracing nuclear power as a tool to mitigate climate change will dramatically influence the feasibility of emerging nuclear programs around the world.

  11. iRESM INITIATIVE UNDERSTANDING DECISION SUPPORT NEEDS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION --US Midwest Region—

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Runci, Paul J.; Moss, Richard H.; Anderson, Kate L.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of climate change are already affecting human and environmental systems worldwide, yet many uncertainties persist in the prediction of future climate changes and impacts due to limitations in scientific understanding of relevant causal factors. In particular, there is mounting urgency to efforts to improve models of human and environmental systems at the regional scale, and to integrate climate, ecosystem and energy-economic models to support policy, investment, and risk management decisions related to climate change mitigation (i.e., reducing greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (i.e., responding to climate change impacts). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a modeling framework, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), to address regional human-environmental system interactions in response to climate change and the uncertainties therein. The framework will consist of a suite of integrated models representing regional climate change, regional climate policy, and the regional economy, with a focus on simulating the mitigation and adaptation decisions made over time in the energy, transportation, agriculture, and natural resource management sectors.

  12. The lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juanes, Ruben [MIT

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground into reservoirs like deep saline aquifers for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued use of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained world, the deployment of CCS has been hindered by uncertainty in geologic storage capacities and sustainable injection rates, which has contributed to the absence of concerted government policy. Here, we clarify the potential of CCS to mitigate emissions in the United States by developing a storage-capacity supply curve that, unlike current large-scale capacity estimates, is derived from the fluid mechanics of CO2 injection and trapping and incorporates injection-rate constraints. We show that storage supply is a dynamic quantity that grows with the duration of CCS, and we interpret the lifetime of CCS as the time for which the storage supply curve exceeds the storage demand curve from CO2 production. We show that in the United States, if CO2 production from power generation continues to rise at recent rates, then CCS can store enough CO2 to stabilize emissions at current levels for at least 100 years. This result suggests that the large-scale implementation of CCS is a geologically viable climate-change mitigation option in the United States over the next century.

  13. Three Essays on U.S. Agriculture under Climate Change: Active Engagement in Mitigation and Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuquan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    shows that climate change eases the burden of meeting the RFS2 mandates increasing consumer welfare while decreasing producer welfare. The results also show that climate change encourages a more diversified use of biofuel feedstocks for cellulosic...

  14. Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suite—as well as potential future suites—of thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sector’s water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

  15. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  16. The potential for a nuclear renaissance : the development of nuclear power under climate change mitigation policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osouf, Nicolas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are very likely to have already changed the Earth's climate, and will continue to change it for centuries if no action is taken. Nuclear power, a nearly carbon-free source of ...

  17. The Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under Climate Change and Policy Program #12;#12;The Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under the Earth's climate, and will continue to change it for centuries if no action is taken. Nuclear power

  18. Three Essays on U.S. Agriculture under Climate Change: Active Engagement in Mitigation and Adaptation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuquan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates: (1) the implications of including high-yielding energy sorghum under the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS2) program; (2) the effects of RFS2 with and without projected climate change scenarios on U.S. agriculture; (3...

  19. The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A changing climate will affect the energy system in a number of ways, one of which is through changes in demands for heating and cooling in buildings. Understanding the potential effect of climate on heating and cooling demands must take into account not only the manner in which the building sector might evolve over time - including, for example, movements from rural to urban environments in developing countries - but also important uncertainty about the nature of climate change itself and the growth and movements of populations over time. In this study, we explored the uncertainty in climate change impacts on heating and cooling by constructing estimates of heating and cooling degree days for both a reference (no-policy) scenario and a climate mitigation scenario built from 0.5 degree latitude by 0.5 degree longitude resolution output from three different Global Climate Models (GCMs) and three gridded scenarios of population distribution. The implications that changing climate and population distribution might have for building energy consumption in the U.S. and China were then explored by using the heating and cooling degree days results as inputs to a detailed, building energy model, nested in the long-term global integrated assessment framework, Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Across the climate models and population distribution scenarios, the results indicate that unabated climate change would cause total final energy consumption to decrease modestly in both U.S. and China buildings by the end of the century, as decreased heating consumption is more than balanced by increased cooling using primarily electricity. However, the results also indicate that when indirect emissions from the power sector are also taken into account, climate change may have negligible effect on building sector CO2 emissions in the two countries. The variation in results due to variation of population distribution is noticeably smaller than variation due to the use of different climate models.

  20. Public Awareness of Carbon Capture and Storage: A Survey of Attitudes toward Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Technology and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Public Awareness of Carbon Capture and Storage: A Survey in Technology and Policy Abstract The Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program in the LaboratoryPublic Awareness of Carbon Capture and Storage: A Survey of Attitudes toward Climate Change

  1. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  2. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M. (LBNL Earth Sciences Division) [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  3. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  4. Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options 2003 DEER Conference...

  5. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipley, and E. Brown, 2003. CHP Five Years Later: Federaland Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies. Lawrence112 Table 27. Potential GHG mitigation from CHP

  6. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  7. Mind the gap in SEA: An institutional perspective on why assessment of synergies amongst climate change mitigation, adaptation and other policy areas are missing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vammen Larsen, Sanne, E-mail: sannevl@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Lautrupvang 1A, 2750 Ballerup (Denmark); Kornov, Lone, E-mail: lonek@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, 9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Wejs, Anja, E-mail: wejs@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, 9220 Aalborg O (Denmark)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article takes its point of departure in two approaches to integrating climate change into Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA): Mitigation and adaptation, and in the fact that these, as well as the synergies between them and other policy areas, are needed as part of an integrated assessment and policy response. First, the article makes a review of how positive and negative synergies between a) climate change mitigation and adaptation and b) climate change and other environmental concerns are integrated into Danish SEA practice. Then, the article discusses the implications of not addressing synergies. Finally, the article explores institutional explanations as to why synergies are not addressed in SEA practice. A document analysis of 149 Danish SEA reports shows that only one report comprises the assessment of synergies between mitigation and adaptation, whilst 9,4% of the reports assess the synergies between climate change and other environmental concerns. The consequences of separation are both the risk of trade-offs and missed opportunities for enhancing positive synergies. In order to propose explanations for the lacking integration, the institutional background is analysed and discussed, mainly based on Scott's theory of institutions. The institutional analysis highlights a regulatory element, since the assessment of climate change synergies is underpinned by legislation, but not by guidance. This means that great focus is on normative elements such as the local interpretation of legislation and of climate change mitigation and adaptation. The analysis also focuses on how the fragmentation of the organisation in which climate change and SEA are embedded has bearings on both normative and cultural-cognitive elements. This makes the assessment of synergies challenging. The evidence gathered and presented in the article points to a need for developing the SEA process and methodology in Denmark with the aim to include climate change in the assessments in a more systematic and integrated manner. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synergies between climate change mitigation, adaptation and other environmental concerns are not addressed in Danish SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Institutional explanations relate to organisational set-ups and understandings of climate change as a new planning issue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper points to a need for developing SEA to include climate change in a more systematic and integrated manner.

  8. Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

  9. Composting projects under the Clean Development Mechanism: Sustainable contribution to mitigate climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogger, Cyrill [Department for Management, Technology, and Economics, ETH Zurich, Kreuzplatz 5, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Beaurain, Francois [South Pole Carbon Asset Management Ltd., Switzerland, Technoparkstr. 1, 8005 Zurich (Switzerland); Schmidt, Tobias S., E-mail: tobiasschmidt@ethz.ch [Department for Management, Technology, and Economics, ETH Zurich, Kreuzplatz 5, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries and at the same time to assist these countries in sustainable development. While composting as a suitable mitigation option in the waste sector can clearly contribute to the former goal there are indications that high rents can also be achieved regarding the latter. In this article composting is compared with other CDM project types inside and outside the waste sector with regards to both project numbers and contribution to sustainable development. It is found that, despite the high number of waste projects, composting is underrepresented and a major reason for this fact is identified. Based on a multi-criteria analysis it is shown that composting has a higher potential for contribution to sustainable development than most other best in class projects. As these contributions can only be assured if certain requirements are followed, eight key obligations are presented.

  10. Changing Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a wide range of academic areas are investigating the different compo- nents. More recently, they are taking information gleaned from the global climate models and applying them to research questions pertaining to Texas. Dr. Bruce Mc...Carl, Regents Professor of agricultural economics at Texas A&M University, has researched the economics of climate change for the last 20 years. McCarl, as a lead CHANGING CLIMATES tx H2O | pg. McCarl ] tx H2O | pg. 4 Changing Climates author...

  11. Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the cost-side income distribution impacts of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) Region of the United States utilizing a computable general equilibrium model. We find the aggregate impacts of a $25/ton carbon tax on the SRB economy are likely to be negative but modest-an approximately one-third of 1% reduction in Gross Regional Product (GRP) in the short-run and double that amount in the long-run. However, unlike many previous studies, we find that the carbon tax is mildly progressive as measured by income bracket changes, per capita equivalent variation, and Gini coefficient changes based on expenditure patterns. The dominant factors affecting the distributional impacts are the pattern of output, income and consumption impacts that affect lower income groups relatively less than higher income ones, an increase in transfer payments favoring lower income groups, and decreased corporate profits absorbed primarily by higher income groups.

  12. Climate mitigation and the future of tropical landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Chini, Louise Parsons; Hurtt, George; Edmonds, James A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Frolking, Steve; Wise, Marshall A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use change to meet 21st Century demands for food, fuel, and fiber will occur in the context of both a changing climate as well as societal efforts to mitigate climate change. This changing natural and human environment will have large consequences for forest resources, terrestrial carbon storage and emissions, and food and energy crop production over the next century. Any climate change mitigation policies enacted will change the environment under which land-use decisions are made and alter global land use change patterns. Here we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to explore how climate mitigation policies that achieve a climate stabilization at 4.5 W m-2 radiative forcing in 2100 and value carbon in terrestrial ecosystems interact with future agricultural productivity and food and energy demands to influence land use in the tropics. The regional land use results are downscaled from GCAM regions to produce gridded maps of tropical land use change. We find that tropical forests are preserved only in cases where a climate mitigation policy that values terrestrial carbon is in place, and crop productivity growth continues throughout the century. Crop productivity growth is also necessary to avoid large scale deforestation globally and enable the production of bioenergy crops. The terrestrial carbon pricing assumptions in GCAM are effective at avoiding deforestation even when cropland must expand to meet future food demand.

  13. Changing Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

  14. 150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

  15. Oil Shortages, Climate Change and Collective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newbery, David

    strategies, all provide tools to guide policy analysis. Stern (2006) took over 600 pages to both quantify and analyse the economics of climate change, specifically asking how to estimate the social cost of carbon and the benefits of mitigating climate...

  16. Essays on Agricultural Adaptation to Climate Change and Ethanol Market Integration in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aisabokhae, Ruth 1980-

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    to reduce the current and future extent of climate change. Biofuels production, for instance, expands agriculture’s role in climate change mitigation. This dissertation encompasses adaptation and mitigation strategies as a response to climate change...

  17. Renewable Energy and Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chum, H. L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued the Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) at http://srren.ipcc-wg3.de/ (May 2011 electronic version; printed form ISBN 978-1-107-60710-1, 2012). More than 130 scientists contributed to the report.* The SRREN assessed existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change within a portfolio of mitigation options including energy conservation and efficiency, fossil fuel switching, RE, nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS). It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies - bioenergy, direct solar, geothermal, hydropower, ocean and wind, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems. It also takes into consideration the environmental and social consequences associated with these technologies, the cost and strategies to overcome technical as well as non-technical obstacles to their application and diffusion.

  18. The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change Marie Lynn Miranda, Douglas A. Hastings to mitigate the severe impacts of climate change predicted to occur in the twenty-first century. Many with climate change. This study investigates the varying degrees to which developing and developed nations

  19. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  20. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  1. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  2. Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 °C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36°C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

  3. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future - How Much Can Efficiency Achieve? ECEEE Summeron Enhanced Energy Efficiency. Energy Synergy Dialogue.Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate

  4. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  5. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  6. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  7. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  8. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

  9. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mercato. Nessun settore o tecnologia da sola può mitigare leza energetica implementando una tecnologia o una pratica chedell’anidride carbonica, è una tecnologia che si propone di

  10. The monitoring, evaluation, reporting, and verification of climate change mitigation projects: Discussion of issues and methodologies and review of existing protocols and guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, E.; Sathaye, J.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of concerns with the growing threat of global climate change from increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, the US and other countries are implementing, by themselves or in cooperation with one or more other nations (i.e., joint implementation), climate change mitigation projects. These projects will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or sequester carbon, and will also result in non-GHG impacts (i.e., environmental, economic, and social impacts). Monitoring, evaluating, reporting, and verifying (MERV) guidelines are needed for these projects in order to accurately determine their net GHG, and other, benefits. Implementation of MERV guidelines is also intended to: (1) increase the reliability of data for estimating GHG benefits; (2) provide real-time data so that mid-course corrections can be made; (3) introduce consistency and transparency across project types and reporters; and (4) enhance the credibility of the projects with stakeholders. In this paper, the authors review the issues and methodologies involved in MERV activities. In addition, they review protocols and guidelines that have been developed for MERV of GHG emissions in the energy and non-energy sectors by governments, nongovernmental organizations, and international agencies. They comment on their relevance and completeness, and identify several topics that future protocols and guidelines need to address, such as (1) establishing a credible baseline; (2) accounting for impacts outside project boundaries through leakage; (3) net GHG reductions and other impacts; (4) precision of measurement; (5) MERV frequency; (6) persistence (sustainability) of savings, emissions reduction, and carbon sequestration; (7) reporting by multiple project participants; (8) verification of GHG reduction credits; (9) uncertainty and risk; (10) institutional capacity in conducting MERV; and (11) the cost of MERV.

  11. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  12. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; E. Letschert, Virginie; E. McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael A.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption in the most cost-effective way. A major difference between the current study and some others is that we focus on individual equipment types that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. “Short term” market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while “long-term” energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. The 15-year time frame is significant for many products however, indicating that delay of implementation postpones impacts such as net economic savings and mitigation of emissions of carbon dioxide. Such delays would result in putting in place energy-wasting technologies, postponing improvement until the end of their service life, or potentially resulting in expensive investment either in additional energy supplies or in early replacement to achieve future energy or emissions reduction targets.

  13. Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries AgencyCompany...

  14. Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Annual Grasslands: Effects of Management and Potential for Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryals, Rebecca

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    organic wastes at different composting stages during theirbiological changes during composting of different organicand nitrogen dynamics in composting and in compost?amended

  15. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; Qin, Yining; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Fridley, David; Letschert, Virginie E.; McMahon, James E.

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption cost-effectively. We focus on individual end use equipment types (hereafter referred to as appliance groups) that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. As the study title suggests, the high efficiency or Business Case scenario is constructed around a model of cost-effective efficiency improvement. Our analysis demonstrates that a significant reduction in energy consumption and emissions is achievable at net negative cost, that is, as a profitable investment for consumers. Net savings are calculated assuming no additional costs to energy consumption such as carbon taxes. Savings relative to the base case as calculated in this way is often referred to as 'economic savings potential'. Chinese energy demand has grown dramatically over the last few decades. While heavy industry still plays a dominant role in greenhouse gas emissions, demand from residential and commercial buildings has also seen rapid growth in percentage terms. In the residential sector this growth is driven by internal migration from the countryside to cities. Meanwhile, income in both urban and rural subsectors allows ownership of major appliances. While residences are still relatively small by U.S. or European standards, nearly all households own a refrigerator, a television and an air conditioner. In the future, ownership rates are not expected to grow as much as in other developing countries, because they are already close to saturation. However, the gradual turnover of equipment in the world's largest consumer market provides a huge opportunity for greenhouse gas mitigation. In addition to residences, commercial floor space has expanded rapidly in recent years, and construction continues at a rapid pace. Growth in this sector means that commercial lighting and HVAC will play an increasingly important role in energy demand in China. The outlook for efficiency improvement in China is encouraging, since the Chinese national and local governments have implemented significant policies to contain energy intensity and announced their intention to continue and accelerate these. In particular, the Chinese appliance standards program, first established in 1989, was significantly strengthened and modernized after the passage of the Energy Conservation Law of 1997. Since then, the program has expanded to encompass over 30 equipment types (including motor vehicles). The current study suggests that, in spite of these efforts, there is significant savings to be captured through wide adoption of technologies already available on the Chinese market. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. 'Short-term' market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while 'long-term' energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. Early in 2011, the Chinese government announced a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions intensity (per unit GDP) by 16% by 2015 as part of the 12th five year plan. These targets are consistent with longer term goals to reduce emissions intensity 40-45% relative to 2005 levels by 2020. The efforts of the 12th FYP focus on short-term gains to meet the four-year targets, and concentrate mainly in industry. Implementation of cost-effective technologies for all new equipment in the buildings sector thus is largely complementary to the 12th FYP goals, and would provide a mechanism to sustain intensity reductions in the medium and long term. The 15-year time frame is significant for many products, in the sense that delay of implementation postpones economic benefits and mitigation of emissions of carbon dioxide. Such delays would result in putting in place energy-wasting technologies, postponin

  16. programs in climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

  17. Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize...

  18. Local Promise for Climate Mitigation: An Empirical Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feiock, Richard C.; Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This interdisciplinary work contributes empirical grounding to the growing literature in law and public policy on local governments and climate mitigation. Much of the recent scholarship presents an optimistic view of the potential in local climate...

  19. Green rating tools and climate resilient buildings Understanding the role of the built environment in mitigating and adapting to climate change is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    1 Green rating tools and climate resilient buildings Understanding the role of the built, as the requirement for a demonstrable level of best practice performance becomes more common, such green building targets1 , as well as for the long-term resilience and viability of both new and existing buildings. So

  20. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  1. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  2. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    net impact of climate change on agriculture in California,of Climate Change on California Agriculture. ” PresentationEffects of Climate Change on California Agriculture Positive

  3. Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

  4. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  5. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  6. Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management in Wisconsinin Wisconsin NASECA February 3, 2011 David S. Liebl #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing climate · Expected impacts · Adaptation strategies #12;Visible Light Energy in = Energy out Absorbed

  7. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  8. Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994 that will address climate change. Scientists tell us that the climate of the earth is warming, and that the warming into the foundation of the world economy and into the everyday things we do (driving) and use (electricity). Thus

  9. Greenhouse gas mitigation by agricultural intensification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burney, J. A; Davis, S. J; Lobell, D. B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. (2007) Agriculture. Climate Change 2007: Mitigationagriculture’s future contributions to climate change,agriculture greenhouse gas emissions mitigation carbon price | land use change | climate

  10. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  11. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  12. Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters Ellen MosleyPolar/ByrdPolarhttp://bprc.osu.edu/ Understanding Climate Change Risks and Identifying Opportunities for Mitigation & Adaptation in Ohio Ohio State University, May 15, 2014 #12;Key Points Earth's climate is changing - the world is warming ­ that debate

  13. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  14. Natural resources: the climate change challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Worldwide, agricultural soils are being heavily degraded by inappropriate cultivation and grazing practices a potential both to mitigate climate change and to adapt to its effects through good natural resource change by sustaining dry season flows downstream. n Good water management is of increasing importance

  15. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  16. Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

  17. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  18. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  19. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  20. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  1. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  2. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  3. Global climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, R.A.; Woodwell, G.M.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. It discusses the expected changes from the increases in trace gases and the extent to which the expected changes can be found in the climate record and in the retreat of glaciers. The use of ice cores in correlating atmospheric composition and climate is discussed. The response of terrestrial ecosystems as a biotic feedback is discussed. Possible responses are discussed, including reduction in fossil-fuel use, controls on deforestation, and reforestation. International aspects, such as the implications for developing nations, are addressed.

  4. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    climate and cultural changes are observed in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East [e.g., Bookman et1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 112 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2012) 112:769-789 DOI

  5. Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

  6. Debating Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Debating Climate Change explores, both theoretically and empirically, how people argue about climate change and link to each other through various elements in their arguments. As science is a central issue in the debate, the arguments of scientists and the interpretations and responses of non-scientists are important aspects of the analysis. The book first assesses current thinking about the climate change debate and current participants in the debates surrounding the issue, as well as a brief history of various groups’ involvements. Chapters 2 and 3 distill and organize various ways of framing the climate change issue. Beginning in Chapter 4, a modified classical analysis of the elements carried in an argument is used to identify areas and degrees of disagreement and agreement. One hundred documents, drawn from a wide spectrum of sources, map the topic and debate space of the climate change issue. Five elements of each argument are distilled: the authority of the writer, the evidence presented, the formulation of the argument, the worldview presented, and the actions proposed. Then a social network analysis identifies elements of the arguments that point to potential agreements. Finally, the book suggests mechanisms by which participants in the debate can build more general agreements on elements of existing agreement.

  7. Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide of the surface energy budget can affect the local, regional, and global climate. Given the goal of mitigatingClimate Policy 3 (2003) 149­157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon management

  8. Case Studies on the Effects of Climate Change on Water, Livestock and Hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chin-Hsien

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates the agricultural impacts of climate change in three ways addressing water implications of mitigation strategies, feedlot livestock productivity vulnerability induced by climate change and dust and welfare effects...

  9. Status of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status of Climate Change 2013 CaTee Conference San Antonio 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Menu for Today • IPCC 2013: Assessment Report #5 • Facts about Climate Change... • Who will Win, Who will Lose • What Needs to be Done ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 IPCC #5 • No great surprises - Sharper language • Uncertainties are still large • Essentially...

  10. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  11. IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Chapter 4 Geothermal Energy Chapter 5 Hydropower Chapter 6 Ocean Energy Chapter 7 Wind Energy Chapter 8#12;IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation Edited Summary Chapter 1 Renewable Energy and Climate Change Chapter 2 Bioenergy Chapter 3 Direct Solar Energy

  12. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concerns about rising energy demand and cost, diminishing oil reserves, and climate change, Central to prioritize enhancing national legislation, developing risk prevention plans, creating supply and demand side depend exclu- sively on oil products, gasoline and diesel. Oil is imported mostly from the Middle East

  13. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

  14. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

  15. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean0ClimateClimate Change

  16. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  17. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Climate Change Climate Change September 16, 2014 C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers Women clean energy leaders convene in Boston for the Women in Clean Energy...

  18. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of climate change, energy security and economic stability.DoD is improving U.S. energy security and national security.www.greenpacks.org • Energy Security & Climate Change:

  19. Climate Change Science Institute | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Science Institute SHARE Climate Change Science Institute To advance understanding of the Earth system, describe the consequences of climate change, and evaluate and...

  20. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  1. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  2. 4, 28752899, 2007 Climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 4, 2875­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Climate change impact­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  3. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  4. NGOs & climate change campaigns : understanding variations in motivations and activities of environmental and development organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeve, Kara E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unequal distribution of climate change impacts exploits the existing vulnerabilities of developing nations. This inequity, coupled with an inadequate, climate mitigation-focused response, has prompted a growing movement ...

  5. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  6. Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress Purdue Climate Change Research Center, 2010 #12;Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress Presentation Overview: Global Climate Change...and Agriculture Policy Landscape: US and International Agricultural Offsets and Policy

  7. Climate Change Response

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEAN AIR ACT §CleantechClimate ChangeInterior

  8. Engi 9601, In Class Assignment, 25 Sept. 2012 Shindell et al., 2012, Simultaneously Mitigating Near-Term Climate Change and Improving Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    ) Coal mining, oil and gas production, long distance gas transmission, municipal waste and landfills, wastewater, livestock manure, rice paddies, diesel vehicles, clean-burning biomass stoves, brick kilns, coke Change. (3 marks) coal mining in China, oil and gas production in Central Africa, the Middle East

  9. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts on California’s Water Supply Source Medellin-AzuaraClimate Change on Yields and Water use of Major Californiawith Less: Agricultural Water Conservation and Efficiency in

  10. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make theworld leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, has beenexperimenting with "in situ" gasification, where the coal is

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research effort. Created to help resolve scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, ARM focuses on studying the role of clouds and aerosols in atmospheric and...

  12. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make thethe world leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, haswill not occur. If not coal gasification, then perhaps fuel

  13. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  14. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  15. Climate Change Major information sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ipcc.ch/ Vital Climate Graphics, at http://www.grida.no/climate/vital/ Climate Change Impacts on US, at http://www.gcrio.org/NationalAssessment/ Greenhouse Warming Prediction #12;Energy Predictions 2 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA); International Energy Agency (IEA) 2% growth per year, or doubling in 35 years (shortcut: 70/%=doubling) Fossil

  16. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  17. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  18. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about Global Climate Change. Public Understanding of ScienceFoundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter of SurvivalFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  19. Form 20 Heriot-Watt University -Module Descriptor Template (RAY) Version 3.0 (2007/2008) Module Title Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures School School of Life Sciences On or Off-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    -term): renewable energy generation, nuclear fission and fusion, etc. · Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology. Aims This Module aims to: - · enable students to understand the various technological and political. Syllabus · Technological solutions to mitigate changes and impacts: · Energy efficiency measures (personal

  20. Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Thomas R.

    Whether the characteristics of tropical cyclones have changed or will change in a warming climate — and if so, how — has been the subject of considerable investigation, often with conflicting results. Large amplitude ...

  1. Climate Change and Place Roundtable Discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Urban Development and Climate Change,” 2007. The fullThink about what runaway climate change would mean where youWorld Changing Seattle, WA Climate change is global in scale

  2. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

  3. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes that the most genetically diverse populations are the ones most at risk from climate change, so that global warming will erode the species' genetic variability faster than it curtails the species' geographic

  4. Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government A Resource Guide June 2011 Jenny Fraser, Adaptation to Climate Change Team, Simon Fraser University #12;Page 1 of 26 Climate Change Adaptation for Local: RESOURCES THAT SUPPORT CLIMATE CHANGE ASSESSMENT 3. Past and Future Climate Change and Its Impacts 4

  5. CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction Richard Allan, Department of Meteorology r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk #12;Text Books and References · Henson, B., Rough Guide to Climate Change http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climate-Change-Guides-Reference- Titles/dp/1858281059 · Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2007, www

  6. A new scenario framework for climate change research: The concept of Shared Climate Policy Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Edmonds, James A.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Ebi, Kristie L.; Kram, Tom; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the concept of shared climate policy assumptions as an important element of the new scenario framework. Shared climate policy assumptions capture key climate policy dimensions such as the type and scale of mitigation and adaptation measures. They are not specified in the socio-economic reference pathways, and therefore introduce an important third dimension to the scenario matrix architecture. Climate policy assumptions will have to be made in any climate policy scenario, and can have a significant impact on the scenario description. We conclude that a meaningful set of shared climate policy assumptions is useful for grouping individual climate policy analyses and facilitating their comparison. Shared climate policy assumptions should be designed to be policy relevant, and as a set to be broad enough to allow a comprehensive exploration of the climate change scenario space.

  7. Climate Change Mitigation: Case Studies from Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    October Climate Change; Sergei Avdiushin; Inna Gritsevich; Susan Legro (editor; Alexander Kolesov; Svetlana Sorokina; William U. Chandler

    Metallurguichesky District of Chelyabinsk Background 3 Approach 4 Project Evaluation 6 Case Study 2: An Industrial

  8. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Bates (2001) Economic evaluation of carbon dioxideevaluation. Kim and Worrell (2002a) estimated socio-economic

  9. Mitigating climate change through land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    , offsetting the use of fossil fuels and reducing carbon emissions. Avoiding deforestation, increasing plant storage through afforestation or plant management, and substituting bioenergy for fossil fuels all use increasing deforestation by increasing demand for crop land, undermining the primary GHG emissions reduction

  10. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,WBCSD), Geneva, Switzerland. IEA (1997) Voluntary actions

  11. Road transport technology and climate change mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cell hybrids and electric vehicles (evs). · the uptake of electric vehicles is critically dependent on the high cost of batteries, range limitations, and the trade-offs between them. about 93% of car trips. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHevs) attempt to address this, but incur the extra costs

  12. Climate Change 2007: Causes, impacts, mitigation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    il Rapporto il ruolo del governo nella mitigazione deiclimatici è importante. Il governo, attraverso i contributi

  13. Climate Change 2007: Causes, impacts, mitigation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    livelli. Nessun settore o tecnologia da sola può mitigare lee per la diffusione di tecnologia. Notevoli risultati sono

  14. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel used in the primary smelter, but exclude PFC emissionto current state-of-the art smelter electricity use and 50%

  15. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency and energy awareness in Botswana; ESI,awareness and training was the most frequently identified opportunity for improved energy

  16. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

  17. Forestry and ClimateForestry and Climate ChangeChange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    and Forests:Climate Change and Forests: The GoodThe Good ·Forests as carbon sinks ·Longer growing season · CO2 · Reduced emissions ­ DNR too! · Enhanced sequestration · Bio-energy #12;What to Do?What to Do

  18. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON FLOODING IN WISCONSIN Ken Potter and Zach Schuster flood scenarios in Wisconsin · Potential impact of climate change on Wisconsin flooding · Ongoing #12;WISCONSIN INITIATIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS · Partnership between the University of Wisconsin

  19. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal needs, funding opportunities, and more.

  20. Climate Change and Tourism Dr David Viner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Climate Change and Tourism éCLAT Dr David Viner Climatic Research Unit University of East Anglia d.viner@uea.ac.uk Tourism has a strong international dimension and is sensitive to any changes of climate that alter to attract visitors are likely to be vulnerable to climate change and the implementation of climate change

  1. The Effect of Municipal Initiatives on State Climate Change Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenton, Barbara Parsons

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Faced with near-unanimous scientific consensus that climate change is being accelerated by human activity and no decisive federal policy on the issue, U.S. states and municipalities are taking the initiative to mitigate the problem despite the lack...

  2. Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour;1 Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour? Thomas D. Lowe 1 these kinds of messages (which have recently been dubbed `climate porn' (Ereaut and Segnit, 2006)), can

  3. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  4. Nature Climate Change features Los

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research February 27, 2013 New print edition of journal tags tree-stress project for cover story LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 27, 2013-The print...

  5. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  6. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of disturbances caused by climate change (e.g., Ojima et al. 1991).Yet modeling studies indicate the im- portance of climate effects on disturbance regimes (He et al. 1999). Local, regional, and global changes in temperature and precipitation can influence... circulation models (GCMs)—one de- veloped by the Hadley Center in the United Kingdom (HADCM2SUL) and one by the Canadian Climate Center (CGCM1)—have been selected for this national assessment (MacCracken et al. 2000). These transient GCMs simulate at...

  7. Climate Change: The Sun's Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2007-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The sun's role in the earth's recent warming remains controversial even though there is a good deal of evidence to support the thesis that solar variations are a very significant factor in driving climate change both currently and in the past. This precis lays out the background and data needed to understand the basic scientific argument behind the contention that variations in solar output have a significant impact on current changes in climate. It also offers a simple, phenomenological approach for estimating the actual-as opposed to model dependent-magnitude of the sun's influence on climate.

  8. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean0ClimateClimate

  9. White House Conference on Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

  10. ADAPTATION OF FORESTS AND PEOPLETO CLIMATE CHANGE 1 Forest Ecosystem Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    and inertia in the climate system. Sea level rise, melting of the polar ice caps and increased fre- quency) will affect the size of future changes. Re- gardless of mitigation activities implemented, today

  11. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

  12. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  13. Dalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    University Climate Change Plan 2010 -- 4 Campus Energy Systems Green Buildings Sustainable TransportDalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010 #12;Dalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010 -- 2 The Climate Change Plan was prepared by The Dalhousie Office of Sustainability with advice from

  14. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  15. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  16. Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Environment 193:37-41 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2014.04.020 Spatial heterogeneity stabilizes livestock productivity in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allred, Brady

    .04.020 Spatial heterogeneity stabilizes livestock productivity in a changing climate Brady W Allred,1, John D in adapting to climate change and in mitigating livestock productivity loss caused by climatic variability variability email: allredbw@gmail.com and climate change on livestock productivity. Knowing how to mitigate

  17. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  18. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean0Climate

  19. Climate Change and Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rottle, Nancy; Alberti, Marina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ments and infrastructure; water shortages and higher tem-changes will also affect water availability and depriveof mil- lions of people of water. Food security will also be

  20. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  1. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

  2. CHANGING OUR WAYS SCOTLAND'S CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction 15 Overview of emission trends at sector level 15 Energy sector 18 Transport sector 29 Agriculture, forestry and land use sector 37 Business sector 44 Residential sector 51 Public sector 56 Waste management in light of sound scientific evidence that Scotland's climate will change significantly over the coming

  3. BPA prepares for a changing climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    both generally and as part of events such as El Nio. Evidence of global and regional climate change is mounting. The recently released National Climate Assessment confirmed...

  4. Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

  5. Challenges of Adapting to a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Brian H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Global Climate Change on Agriculture: An Interpretiveon U.S. Agriculture, in THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THEclimate change and the potential roles for adaptation are more severe for ecosystems than they are for managed systems like agriculture.

  6. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  7. Internalizing Climate Change—Scientific Resource Management and the Climate Change Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dettinger, Michael D.; Culberson, Steven

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council. 2001. Climate change sci- ence: an analysis of someNWT, Dracup JA. 2004. Climate change impacts uncertainty forVR, Kusler J. 2000. Climate change: Potential impacts and

  8. Climate Change Worksheet Energy Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    of distance from the equator). The tropics are net absorbers of energy as the amount of absorbed solar energyClimate Change Worksheet «» Energy Budget For any balanced budget, what comes in must equal what goes out. In the case of planets orbiting the Sun, this means that the incoming solar radiation must

  9. Climate Change and Indiana Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contribute to changes in global climate patterns. Global warming can occur from a variety of causes, both, rainfall or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Global Warming: An increase in the average natural and human induced. #12;7/23/2009 3 A Brief History of "Global Warming" Source: National Center

  10. The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley Research Boulder, Colorado, USA #12;2 Prior Research on Absorption and Climate Field Experiments: · Central · Climate with enhanced cloud absorption Synthesis of models and aerosol observations: · Development

  11. Special Issue On Estimation Of Baselines And Leakage In Carbon Mitigation Forestry Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Carbon Mitigation Forestry Projects Jayant A. Sathaye*,climate change. Interest in forestry mitigation activitiesled to the inclusion of forestry practices at the project

  12. TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators Kris Wilson Ph.D. School of Journalism University. 2012) #12;TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators On-line survey (n=571) (52% response rate change more frequently in the future #12;TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators "As a TV

  13. Summary for Policy Makers: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report Renewable Energy Sources (SRREN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvizu, Dan; Bruckner, Thomas; Christensen, John; Devernay, Jean-Michel; Faaij , Andre; Fischedick, Manfred; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Gerrit; Huckerby , John; Jager-Waldau, Arnulf; Kadner, Susanne; Kammen, Daniel; Krey, Volker; Kumar, Arun; Lewis , Anthony; Lucon, Oswaldo; Matschoss, Patrick; Maurice, Lourdes; Mitchell , Catherine; Moomaw, William; Moreira, Jose; Nadai, Alain; Nilsson, Lars J.; Nyboer, John; Rahman, Atiq; Sathaye, Jayant; Sawin, Janet; Schaeffer, Roberto; Schei, Tormod; Schlomer, Steffen; Sims, Ralph; von Stechow, Christoph; Verbruggen, Aviel; Urama, Kevin; Wiser, Ryan; Yamba, Francis; Zwickel, Timm

    2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Working Group III Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) presents an assessment of the literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of the contribution of six renewable energy (RE) sources to the mitigation of climate change. It is intended to provide policy relevant information to governments, intergovernmental processes and other interested parties. This Summary for Policymakers provides an overview of the SRREN, summarizing the essential findings. The SRREN consists of 11 chapters. Chapter 1 sets the context for RE and climate change; Chapters 2 through 7 provide information on six RE technologies, and Chapters 8 through 11 address integrative issues.

  14. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  15. NEW WORK AND STUDY OPPORTUNITIES IN CLIMATE CHANGE Climate System Analysis Group (CSAG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    . - Postdoc: Climate modeling - Postdoc: Climate change information communication and dissemination - Research Associate: Climate change information communication and dissemination - PhD: Climate change information communication and dissemination - MSc/PhD: Physical science of climate change What to expect: Successful

  16. Overlooked Issues in theOverlooked Issues in the Climate Change DebateClimate Change Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the environment change as well. Decision makers need assessments of how climate vulnerability has changed. 2 of ClimateViews of Climate Change ScienceChange Science #12;Climate change including regional impacts can of rioting and nuclear war; Britain will be 'Siberian' in less than 20 years; Threat to the world is greater

  17. Essays on climate change, energy, and independence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comerford, David

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis contains three separate papers. A balance of questions: what can we ask of climate change economics? is a critical analysis of the economics of climate change literature. It concludes that much more research ...

  18. Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, J. G.

    Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities Jim Crawford Trane jim.crawford@trane.com www.trane.com Abstract Atmospheric scientists tell us that mankind is changing the climate, and is setting in motion forces that can... make essentially irreversible changes in the climate of the future. Naysayers dispute whether mankind is even capable of changing the climate. Today we are hearing more from the scientists and less from the naysayers. This presentation will review...

  19. President Obama on Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    President Obama on Climate Change President Obama on Climate Change Addthis Speakers President Barack Obama Duration 2:46 Topic Energy Sector Jobs Renewables Solar Climate Change...

  20. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalthe context of predicted climate change. Madroño 54(3):234–18–20. Dettinger MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to

  1. Stakeholder Engagement in Climate Change Policymaking in American Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiack, Duran; Kamieniecki , Sheldon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the dimensions of climate change communication by conductingdynamics around climate change communication at thethe dimensions of climate change communication by conducting

  2. Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the affects of climate change on agriculture in irrigatedmarket impacts from climate change on US agriculture and onimpacts of climate change on US agriculture. The first set

  3. Seawalls Are Not Enough: Climate Change & U.S. Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Jody; Guzman, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of climate change on agriculture, for example, isthe impacts of climate change on agriculture. The reasonsimpact of climate change on agriculture, forestry, coastal

  4. CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    Year CO2concentration(ppm) 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 320 340 360 380 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 underlies much of the assessment of climate change over the industrial period. #12;INCREASES IN CO2 OVER THE INDUSTRIAL PERIOD #12;ATMOSPHERIC CO2 EMISSIONS Time series 1700 - 2003 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0

  5. Kiran Maharjan Climate change and floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    management processes by providing many kinds of information. The level of vulnerability of people towardsKiran Maharjan Climate change and floods Climate change and floods Vulnerability analysis of people, in the livelihoods of people. Hence, climate change is making everyone vulnerable to its impacts. Most of the people

  6. Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012 Southwestern US trees face rising drought, and several other partner organizations. 3:01 Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connection Described in a paper published in Nature Climate Change this week, "Temperature as a potent driver of regional forest

  7. Distinguished Lecturer Series Understanding Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Distinguished Lecturer Series Understanding Climate Change: Opportunities and Challenges for Data A Climate change is the defining environmental challenge facing our planet, yet there is considerable.Anew and transformative approach is required to understand the potential impact of climate change. Data driven approaches

  8. Simulation of Recent Southern Hemisphere Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of Recent Southern Hemisphere Climate Change Nathan P. Gillett1 * and David W. J. Thompson2 Recent observations indicate that climate change over the high latitudes of the Southern's surface as well. Recent climate change in the Southern Hemi- sphere (SH) is marked by a strengthening

  9. Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis 2010 CTS Research Conference Carissa impact analysis (EIA) as a tool to address climate change ·! Consider approaches to measuring and addressing climate change at the project scale #12;Purpose ·! Funded by U of M Institute on the Environment

  10. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC Climate change will affect both sea level and the temporal and spatial distribution of runoff

  11. BIODIVERSITY The geography of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Nathan

    BIODIVERSITY REVIEW The geography of climate change: implications for conservation biogeography D. J. B. Kraft1 INTRODUCTION It is widely recognized that climate change poses a grave threat., 2007). The impacts of climate change are broadly detectable in many taxa, including shifts in phenology

  12. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  13. Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change: The Role of NOAA Sea Grant Extension years and generations about how to adapt to a changing climate. Effective preparation for possible effects of climate change includes engagement of resource managers, planners, public works officials

  14. Abrupt Climate Change R. B. Alley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Abrupt Climate Change R. B. Alley,1 J. Marotzke,2 W. D. Nordhaus,3 J. T. Overpeck,4 D. M. Peteet,5. Wallace8 Large, abrupt, and widespread climate changes with major impacts have occurred repeatedly in the past, when the Earth system was forced across thresholds. Although abrupt climate changes can occur

  15. Climate Change Laws of the World Project Columbia Center for Climate Change Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Laws of the World Project Columbia Center for Climate Change Law Monica Molina, Columbia College '14 Supervisor Meredith Wilensky, J.D. Introduction The Climate Change Laws of the World Project is an ongoing effort at the Center for Climate Change Law (CCCL) to aggregate existing domestic

  16. UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Sponsored By UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative Co Conference Description This conference will discuss the global issue of climate change in the regional

  17. A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century Miche`le B; accepted 30 November 2006; published 10 January 2007. [1] A Climate Change Index (CCI) is developed to a single index that is a measure for the strength of future climate change relative to today's natural

  18. Asset management and climate change Andrew Dlugolecki andMark Mansley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    TECHNIQUES 8 ENERGY EFFICIENCY 9 POLICY IMPLICATIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE 10 UK Mitigation Policy 10 Climate 626351 07940 538781 andlug@btopenworld.com mark@claros.co.uk #12;2 Contents SUMMARY 3 INTRODUCTION commentators) to guide corporate strategy, but so far this has not happened (Mansley,2000). Other studies have

  19. Climate change: Evolving technologies, U.S. business, and the world economy in the 21. century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harter, J.J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Climate Change Partnership presents this report as one of its efforts to present current information on climate change to the public. One often hears about the expenses entailed in protecting the environment. Unfortunately, one hears less about the economic benefits that may be associated with prudent actions to counter environmental threats. This conference is particularly useful because it focuses attention on profitable business opportunities in the United States and elsewhere that arise from practical efforts to mitigate the risks of climate change. The report contains a brief synopsis of each speaker`s address on climate change.

  20. European-Led Climate Policy versus Global Mitigation Action: Implications on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change (CMCC) Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore, 30124 Venezia, Italy, Amit Kanudia, Sergey Paltsev, Ronald D. Sands and Katja Schumacher *Reprinted from Climate Change and predictions of the risks of climate change and the challenges of limiting human influence on the environment

  1. The Trade and Climate Change Joint Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Trade and Climate Change Joint Agenda CEPS Working Document No. 295/June 2008 Thomas L. Brewer Abstract Climate change, international trade, investment and technology transfer are all issues that have............................................................................ 6 3.2 Coverage of the Multilateral Climate and Trade Regimes

  2. OUR CHANGING CLIMATE Research that matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucarini, Valerio

    , for the benefit of society. The Institute spans a range of disciplines including weather and climate, agriculture | 3 The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has used results from our work, on the impacts key advice to the UK Government on avoiding dangerous climate change. Our input was based on research

  3. CO2 emissions mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Mejean, Aurelie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; Calvin, Katherine V.; Wada, Kenichi; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher and decrease with mitigation. A first deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes global emission targets until 2030, in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges and regionally-specific low-carbon technology targets. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increases strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger - twice and more - than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because leakage and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.

  4. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIES Thematerials |PhysicsClimate Change

  5. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1900–93, Journal of Climate, 10 (5), 1004–1020, 1997. Zhou,University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (Jones etand those from WCRP “Climate of the Twentieth Century”

  6. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  7. Climate change and energy security: an analysis of policy research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Marcus Dubois [George Washington University] [George Washington University; Gulledge, Jay [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The literature on climate change's impacts on energy security is scattered across disparate fields of research and schools of thought. Much of this literature has been produced outside of the academy by scholars and practitioners working in "think tanks," government agencies, and international/multilateral institutions. Here we reviewed a selected set of 58 articles and reports primarily from such sources and performed textual analysis of the arguments. Our review of this literature identifies three potential mechanisms for linking climate change and energy security: Climate change may 1) create second-order effects that may exacerbate social instability and disrupt energy systems; 2) directly impact energy supply and/or systems or 3) influence energy security through the effects of climate-related policies. We identify emerging risks to energy security driven by climate mitigation tech-nology choices but find less evidence of climate change's direct physical impacts. We used both empirical and qualitative selection factors for choosing the grey literature sample. The sources we selected were published in the last 5 years, available through electronic media and were written in language accessible to general policy or academic readers. The organi-zations that published the literature had performed previous research in the general fields of energy and/or climate change with some analytical content and identified themselves as non-partisan. This literature is particularly valuable to scholars because identifies understudied relationships that can be rigorously assessed through academic tools and methodologies and informs a translational research agenda that will allow scholars to engage with practitioners to address challenges that lie at the nexus of climate change and energy security.

  8. NIH Portfolio Analysis on Climate Change and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madey, Gregory R.

    NIH Portfolio Analysis on Climate Change and Health Total studies that in some way relate to climate change 1,357 > Directly relate to climate change 7 > Examine the climate variables on health 85 response to climate change By David Taylor Climate change and its relationship to health research

  9. Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation Plans in the Pacific Northwest: A Review Climate Change and Impacts Mitigation versus Adaptation Impacts of Climate Change: Nation & the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Planning Efforts Transportation Sector Response - Survey Recommendations Continued

  10. Boston University Seminar Series on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Boston University Seminar Series on Climate Change Free and open to the public Thursdays, September for Societal Change Matthew Nisbet, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, Public Policy and Urban National Assessments of Climate Change Tony Janetos, Professor of Earth and Environment and Director

  11. Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    . Appreciate the main aspects of hydropower resource estimation, turbine design, deployment and environmental AND ASSESSMENTS Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society I am a Civil Hydraulic

  12. Approaches for Effective Climate Change Communication (NPS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register here. Join us for a webinar exploring the importance of effective communication strategies as a key component of climate change response. The presentation will highlight examples and...

  13. Climate - Monitoring changes in Alaskan permafrost ... | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLIMATE - Monitoring changes in Alaskan permafrost ... An Oak Ridge National Laboratory-led team is observing how thawing of permafrost, or frozen soil, affects the carbon cycle in...

  14. Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning: A Guide for Practitioners Agency...

  15. Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industry Day - Energy Performance Contracting 24 February 2015 Key Points Up Front * Climate change is real and will have significant impacts * The emissions that drive the...

  16. Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

  17. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture in2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture infuture climate change impacts on water for agriculture and

  18. Advanced Review Greenland climate change: from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    Advanced Review Greenland climate change: from the past to the future Val´erie Masson-Delmotte,1 cores in and around Greenland allow us to place the current trends in regional climate, ice sheet lake sediments in southern Greenland document major environmental and climatic conditions during

  19. Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    10/21/11 Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client Needs Climate, Water and Ecosystems- Shaping the Great Plains October 13, 2011 #12;10/21/11 Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client NeedsClimate Science ­ 2011 ·Yes, the climate is changing. ·Climate science is changing

  20. Stormwater ManagementStormwater Management and Climate Change:and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater ManagementStormwater Management and Climate Change:and Climate Change: Implications for · Wisconsin's changing climate · Stormwater management · Impacts and adaptation #12;WICCI Identifying impacts as weather #12;High water impacts June 1-15, 2008 38 River gauges broke records 810 Square miles of land

  1. Oceanic oxygen changes as a bellwether of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Oceanic oxygen changes as a bellwether of climate change Term paper in Biogeochemistry@ethz.ch] Tutor: Prof. Dr. Nicholas Gruber [nicholas.gruber@env.ethz.ch] Abstract The response of oceanic oxygen of climate change. Recent publications indicate that the oceanic oxygen outgassing is substaintially larger

  2. What is the Economic Cost of Climate Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W. Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact of Climate Change on Irrigated Agriculture,” Climaticclimate change yields positive benefits to US agriculture.that climate change will entail losses to US agriculture of

  3. Innovation That Matters Mapping Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    to implement emissions reduction measures, stabilisation at 450 ppmv CO2e is estimated to only provide between, with annual CO2 and greenhouse gas emission reductions of only 1% (excluding the increasing emissions from #12;Executive Summary Climate Change Climate change resulting from emissions of CO2 as well as other

  4. Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Saving Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE Edited by Lee Hannah ISLANDPRESS-in-Publication Data Saving a million species : extinction risk from climate change / edited by LeeHannah. p. cm. ISBN, extinction, extinction risk, biodiversity,freshwater, marine, biology, coral bleaching, species area

  5. Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem/survival #12;NE Pacific Ocean fisheries productivity, 200 BC to 2000 AD (by Finney et al. 2002 Nature) Main

  6. Climate change: Update on international negotiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, L. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Policy

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the following: United Nations` framework convention on climatic change; the United States` climate change action plan; current issues to be resolved (targets/timetables, policies, advancing commitments of all parties, and compliance); and implications for clean coal technologies.

  7. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change conference. The conference will share tribal strategies, plans, and regional, national, and international policies on climate change, energy and carbon emissions as well as discuss tribal needs and funding opportunities.

  8. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial PollutionCONSIDERATIONS IN CLIMATE POLICY . A.pollutant Considerations into Climate Policy 1.

  9. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seas, droughts and fresh water shortages. ? Risk Assessmentinse- curity, water and food shortages, and climate-drivenalso struggle with shortages in fresh water, food and other

  10. Massachusetts Takes On Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmell, Ken; Laurie, Burt

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumers and business with their energy costs by removingintegrated energy and climate policies lead to real businessas for energy efficiency measures in homes, businesses and

  11. ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    , economic development, and agriculture policy must be made at local, regional, and international levels depends on healthy energy policy today. His work suggests that nuclear energy can play a critical role­including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change­to examine the impact of climate change on agriculture, water resources

  12. Long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change Instructor: Dr. Igor Kamenkovich, associate professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change Instructor: Dr. Igor Kamenkovich, associate students to learn about existing theories of abrupt climate changes and climate variability on time scales of long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change. This course compliments current MPO courses

  13. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Communication. IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change).climate change are planned, but not yet under way (Knowles, personal communication.Communication. Greg Fishman and Dave Hawlkins. California Climate Change

  14. Stakeholder Engagement in Climate Change Policymaking in American Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiack, Duran; Kamieniecki , Sheldon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008) State and Municipal Climate Change Plans: The Firstand the governing of climate change in Germany and the UK.Local action plan for climate change. City of Philadelphia,

  15. Truths We Must Tell Ourselves to Manage Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1455 Truths We Must Tell Ourselves to Manage Climate Change By Robert H. Socolow I. INTRODUCTION............................................................ 1455 II. COMMUNICATING CLIMATE CHANGE .............................. 1458 III. DEMAND of climate change (see Figure 1). The curve oscillates and rises. The annual oscillations (whose details

  16. Water resources planning under climate change and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    costs from climate change exist in agriculture becauseagriculture studies for calculating costs associated with climate changeClimate change adaptation studies have been undertaken in sectors as diverse as agriculture (

  17. MSc Climate Change A cross-disciplinary degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    MSc Climate Change A cross-disciplinary degree www.geog.ucl.ac.uk/climate LONDON'S GLOBAL of climatic change and to develop adaptation strategies. The UCL MSc Climate Change provides rigorous scientific and vocational training for the next generation of climate change professionals. Students

  18. accident mitigation issues: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 CRED Newsletter Inside this issue: Adaptation and Mitigation Reponses to Climate Change: Complements or Substitutes? CiteSeer Summary: Traditionally these two responses to...

  19. activation effects mitigated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy conversion technologies which ultimately remain essential to mitigate long-term climate change. However, additional study is needed to confirm the estimates reported here...

  20. A climate of change Radoslav Dimitrov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    A climate of change Radoslav Dimitrov University ofWestern Ontario October 25, 2013 Balsillie neutral 2030" Russia" 20-25 percent" Switzerland" 20-30 percent" United States" Extension of the Kyoto Protocol Ã? Launch of the Green Climate Fund Ã? New negotiating mandate 9 #12;New

  1. The carbon question Debate The carbon question Comment/Q&A he key to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The carbon question Debate The carbon question Comment/Q&A T he key to climate change mitigation arguing incessantly about the details of carbon trading, we should befocusingonpublicpoliciestospeedthe research, development, demonstration, and diffusion of low-emission technolo- gies. Carbon capture

  2. Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector Online Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for...

  3. Registration for the 3rd Annual Climate Change and Indigenous...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Registration for the 3rd Annual Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Conference Registration for the 3rd Annual Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Conference December 2, 2014...

  4. Carbon Disclosure Project Webinar: Climate Change: A Challenge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Disclosure Project Webinar: Climate Change: A Challenge for Bond Analysts Carbon Disclosure Project Webinar: Climate Change: A Challenge for Bond Analysts April 8, 2015...

  5. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  6. Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on...

  7. Vietnam-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts)...

  8. Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes Not surprisingly significant changes in climate leave their imprint on the landscape. During the last glacial maximum, 20,000...

  9. Uganda-UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda AgencyCompany...

  10. avoid climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes 12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature 12; Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing...

  11. Climate change and the conservation of marmots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Climate change, an indirect human impact, threatens marmot survival through global warming and extreme weather events. Most marmot species occupy a harsh environment characterized by a short growing season and a long, cold season without food. Marmots cope...

  12. ACEEE Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), the Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference is a three-day event focused on understanding individual and...

  13. Towards a sciart prospectus for climate change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ormston, Andrew

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross disciplinary collaboration and exchange between scientists and artists has grown rapidly over the last twenty years and is providing material and evidence employed in the understanding of, and responses to climate change. The sciart field...

  14. Introducing the climate change effects on Mediterranean forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gracia, Carlos

    357 Introducing the climate change effects on Mediterranean forest ecosystems: observation, Joan LLUSIÃ? & Jordi SARDANS Current and projected climate change trends in the Mediterranean region of climate change in the frame of global change If the combination of climate change, asso- ciated

  15. How Climate Change is Playing Out in Minnesota: Extreme Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    How Climate Change is Playing Out in Minnesota: Extreme Weather Dr. Mark Seeley Dept of Soil, Water Climate Headlines Data Sources Changing Minnesota Climate Features Climate Consequences Implications for Severe Weather #12;Three Reasons to Accept That Climate Change is Real #12;#12;Stationary (1) Cyclical (2

  16. The climate change and energy security nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Marcus Dubois [George Washington University; Gulledge, Jay [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the impacts of climate change on national and interna-tional security has grown as a research field, particularly in the last five years. Within this broad field, academic scholarship has concentrated primarily on whether climate change is, or may become, a driver of violent conflict. This relationship remains highly contested. However, national security policy and many non-governmental organizations have identified climate change as a threat multiplier in conflict situations. The U.S. Department of Defense and the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defense have incorporated these findings into strategic planning documents such as the Quadrennial Defense Review and the Strategic Defence and Security Review. In contrast to the climate-conflict nexus, our analysis found that academic scholarship on the climate change and energy security nexus is small and more disciplinarily focused. In fact, a search of social science litera-ture found few sources, with a significant percentage of these works attribut-able to a single journal. Assuming that policymakers are more likely to rely on broader social science literature than technical or scientific journals, this leaves a limited foundation. This then begged the question: what are these sources? We identified a body of grey literature on the nexus of climate change and energy security of a greater size than the body of peer-reviewed social science literature. We reviewed fifty-eight recent reports, issue briefs, and transcripts to better understand the nexus of climate change and energy security, as well as to gain insight about the questions policymakers need answered by those undertaking the research. In this article, we describe the nature of the sources reviewed, highlight possible climate change and energy security linkages found within those sources, identify emerging risks, and offer conclusions that can guide further research.

  17. CLIMATE CHANGE Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve #12;OUTLINE Earth's energy balance Perturbations Keyquestions Influence of aerosols Climate research ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter Schwartz, 1996, modified sensitivity can result in huge averted costs. #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO

  18. Stakeholder Engagement in Climate Change Policymaking in American Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiack, Duran; Kamieniecki , Sheldon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008) State and Municipal Climate Change Plans: The Firstand the governing of climate change in Germany and the UK.43:2237-2259. C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group (2011)

  19. Climate Change and Flood Operations in the Sacramento Basin, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Ann D.; Lund, Jay R.; Townsley, Edwin S.; Faber, Beth A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coast streamflow. Journal of Climate 5(12):1468–1483. [DWR]Washington, D.C. : Climate Change Science Program anddrier: The West’s changed climate. Denver ( CO): The Rocky

  20. "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." The study of climate impacts notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." 1 #12;The study of climate impacts notes how scientists generally agree that humans are changing the climate, and that if we continue pumping carbon we learn from past climate variations? How can we best adapt to climate change? This report attempts

  1. Assessing the effects of ocean diffusivity and climate sensitivity on the rate of global climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    sensitivity and ocean heat uptake on the rate of future climate change. We apply a range of values for climate a significant effect on the rate of transient climate change for high values of climate sensitivity, while values of climate sensitivity and low values of ocean diffusivity. Such high rates of change could

  2. The impact of climate change changes over time Cleo Bertelsmeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    the species' niche to future climatic sce- narios, based on different combinations of CO2 emission scenarios to a subsequent reduction or vice versa, depending on the date projected to. In some cases, these changes were

  3. Climate Change Impacts in the Amazon. Review of scientific literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Amazon's hydrological cycle is a key driver of global climate, and global climate is therefore sensitive to changes in the Amazon. Climate change threatens to substantially affect the Amazon region, which in turn is expected to alter global climate and increase the risk of biodiversity loss. In this literature review the following subjects can be distinguished: Observed Climatic Change and Variability, Predicted Climatic Change, Impacts, Forests, Freshwater, Agriculture, Health, and Sea Level Rise.

  4. Hidden Benefits of Electric Vehicles for Addressing Climate Change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore »the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.946C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO2 emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  5. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindtranath, N.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches to analysis of climate change impacts on forestsand adaptation to climate change in the forest sector.the Climate Economics Branch, Climate Change Division, U.S.

  6. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  7. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  8. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron-Gafford, Greg

    PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS BE USED TO PREDICT in photosynthesis, and thus substrate supply, influence the rate of ecosystem respiration (Re). Further- more in photosynthesis might result in concomitant changes in both the rate, and temperature-sensitivity, of Re. Re

  9. Questions about how plants die leads to climate change answers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Questions about how plants die leads to climate change answers March 12, 2012 How trees die in drought key to plant, climate change questions How plants die during drought is one of the largest uncertainties in determining how plants will succumb to changing climate. 3:01 Tree Death Study's Climate Change

  10. Heidi Cullen Director of External Communications, Climate Change Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidi Cullen Director of External Communications, Climate Change Central Seeing Climate, Seeing will explore the difficulties of communicating the science of climate change and look at the current state Change Abstract If seeing is believing, then how do you show people this phenomenon called climate change

  11. Political Interference with Government Climate Change Science Testimony of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Interference with Climate Change Science A. Communication of Climate Change Threat B. Delay of ActionPolitical Interference with Government Climate Change Science Testimony of James E. Hansen;2 Political Interference with Government Climate Change Science Contents 1. Rationale of Presentation 2. My

  12. Climate change: impacts and adaptation in England's woodlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change: impacts and adaptation in England's woodlands The changing climate presents associated with climate change, and the likely impact on trees, silviculture and forest operations that increase resilience whatever climate change brings, or that are likely to reap the greatest rewards

  13. Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory A multidisciplinary research the consequences of climate change, and evaluate and inform policy responses to climate change Highlights of CCSI research include · Participation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report

  14. Climate Change: What Are We Arguing About? Professor Mike Hulme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Climate Change: What Are We Arguing About? Professor Mike Hulme School of Environmental Sciences climate change is serious, it is urgent and it is growing ... we will be judge by history Climate change thing If you could vote for a change of climate, you would always vote for a warmer one The global

  15. Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmsen, E.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. Climate Change in the Caribbean: Water, Agriculture,role of agriculture in climate system and in climate change.

  16. Toward economic evaluation of climate change impacts : a review and evaluation of studies of the impact of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to access climate change have generally been unsuccessful in describing the economic damages (or benefits) associated with climate change or the functional relationship of damage (or benefits) to climate. Existing ...

  17. Propaganda about Climate Change: Is anyone really

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCready, Mark J.

    ://tierneylab.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/03/06/global-warming- payola/ http://www.opinionjournal.com/extra/?id=110008220 #12;mjm to uncontrolled forcings (solar changes, variations in orbit or changes in carbon dioxide levels) On the global available. #12;mjm@nd.edu What definitive things can be said about the climate? Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels

  18. Phenotypic Plasticity, Ecophysiology, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    9/24/2010 1 Phenotypic Plasticity, Ecophysiology, and Climate Change Loren Albert Image is plasticity?p y · Examples · Limitations to plasticity: Valladares et al. 2007 ·Ecophysiological when the habitat changes? Habitat Tracking Ackerly 2003 #12;9/24/2010 3 Evolution Plasticity #12

  19. How will changes in global climate influence California?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weare, B C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    future climate change impacts on water for agriculture andclimate change that will be important for California agriculture

  20. Framing a Comprehensive Approach to Climate Change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boggs, Jay W.; Chellinsky, Andrew; Ege, David; Hodges, Allen; Reynolds, Tripp; Williams, Andy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ohio State University in 2004 with a B.A. in International Relations. Between his junior and senior years, Andrew spent the summer in Tomsk, Russia, studying the Siberian environment and transition economies. In addition to concentrating... in international political discourse. Despite the net positive effect on the U.S. due to climate change in 2025, the devastating climate effects across Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia; the beginnings of a resurgent Russia regaining great power...

  1. Update on Climate Change Climate Change: Resetting Plant-Insect Interactions1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    . Ecologically, the acceleration of plant phenology by warming is generating mismatches between plants and insect of generations per year, thus increasing damage to plant communities. The suitability of plant tissues as foodUpdate on Climate Change Climate Change: Resetting Plant-Insect Interactions1 Evan H. De

  2. Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

  3. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    across California’s electricity sector, nor will changes inDWR, 2005). As in the electricity sector, financing andin California. The electricity sector itself is a small

  4. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Changes in Hydropower Production from Globalon high elevation hydropower generation in California’s7 reduction in the state’s hydropower resources, which last

  5. Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    a comprehensive greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory, which the Florida Department of Environmental Protection will develop over the next year. In addition to a GHG inventory and mitigation tools, a state climate action to increasingly dominate urban climate. · Florida ranks sixth in the US for total GHG emissions. The agricultural

  6. Review Paper: Brown carbon changes environment, climate | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    brown carbon's impact on environment, climate Brown carbon is an important contributor to air pollution and climate change. A recently published comprehensive review article...

  7. Characterizing and responding to uncertainty in climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemoine, Derek Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change assessment. ” Water Science & Technology 52(of the dynamic nature of water vapor feedback in climate2004). “Quantifying the water vapour feedback as- sociated

  8. How to Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level Policy and Planning in the Water Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Integrate Climate...

  9. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's Remarks on Climate Change and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's Remarks on Climate Change and Resiliency at Columbia University, New York City - As Delivered Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's Remarks on Climate...

  10. Guyana-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework AgencyCompany Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom...

  11. Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual for Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Adaptation to Climate Variability and...

  12. Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Economic Evaluation of Climate...

  13. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  14. animations climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994 that will address climate...

  15. In the Heat of the Moment: Climate Change Now and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew D. Brown

    & technology communication -- communication and energy/environmental policy Kinsella--Climate Change in Society · A communication and rhetoric perspective · Living in a risk society · Anthropogenic "nature" of climate change as a communication challenge · Closing thoughts · Discussion Kinsella--Climate Change in Society/Society in Climate

  16. AWI Conference on Global Climate Change Conference Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    » slides (ppt) 10:15 » Break 10:45 » Food and Agriculture Issues How will climate change impact foodAWI Conference on Global Climate Change Conference Program APRU World Institute Workshop on Climate Board 2:30 » Climate Changes Overview Richard C.J. SOMERVILLE, Distinguished Professor, Scripps

  17. Climatic Change manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    study examines the likely impacts of climate change on agriculture with a view to8 propose directions Changing Climate · Agriculture · Adaptation25 O. Crespo, S. Hachigonta, M. Tadross Climate Systems Analysis-010-9924-4 #12;2 1 Introduction26 Several studies have focussed on the impacts of climate change on agriculture

  18. The land use climate change energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

  19. Effects of Climate Change on the Hydroelectric The Council is not tasked, nor does it have the resources to resolve existing uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at hydroelectric dams when Northwest demands and power market values are likely to grow due to higher airEffects of Climate Change on the Hydroelectric System SUMMARY The Council is not tasked, nor does impacts of climate change to the power system and to recommend mitigating actions whenever possible. While

  20. Climate Change Adaptation: A Collective Action Perspective on Federalism Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.; Levy, Richard E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    adaptation to minimize the adverse effects of climate change. Climate change adaptation is designed to increase the resilience of natural and human ecosystems to the threats posed by a changing environment. Although an extensive literature concerning...

  1. Climatic change at high elevation sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Henry F. Diaz

    1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A Workshop on climatic change at high elevation sites was held September 11-15, 1995 in Wengen, Switzerland. The meeting was sponsored by both U.S. (Department of Energy, National Science Foundation and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) and European (Swiss National Science Foundation, European Science Foundation, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) agencies. The goals of the workshop were to (1) focus the attention of the world climate community on the existence of unique high elevation geophysical records around the world, (2) highlight the value of these observing sites for climate change detection efforts and to help insure the continued support of governments and of relevant institutions in the maintenance of these high elevation data gathering efforts, (3) discuss and evaluate climatic trends that may be present in these records, and to compare the information with available paleoenvironmental records of glaciers, tree-rings and varved sediments from the alpine zones, and (4) discuss and evaluate information about elevational differences in current and projected greenhouse-gas induced climatic changes in coupled General Circulation Models.

  2. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  3. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    Change (2012) 112:901­923 DOI 10.1007/s10584-011-0264-9 Y. Ashkenazy (*) :H. Yizhaq Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, The J. Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben Gurion University and Environmental Development, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel Author's personal copy #12

  4. Constraining Climate Model Parameters from Observed 20th Century Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest, Chris Eliot

    We present revised probability density functions for climate model parameters (effective climate sensitivity, the rate of deep-ocean heat uptake, and the strength of the net aerosol forcing) that are based on climate change ...

  5. Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis ­ How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic There are a number of structural and conceptual differences between the information provided by climate change models of economic concepts applied to climate change impact and adaptation policy assessment, and to illustrate how

  6. Impacts of Climate Change on Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M. [Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research project was to improve and use our biogeochemistry model, TEM, to simulate the effects of climate change and other environmental changes on the production of biofuel feedstocks. We used the improved version of TEM that is coupled with the economic model, EPPA, a part of MIT’s Earth System Model, to explore how alternative uses of land, including land for biofuels production, can help society meet proposed climate targets. During the course of this project, we have made refinements to TEM that include development of a more mechanistic plant module, with improved ecohydrology and consideration of plant-water relations, and a more detailed treatment of soil nitrogen dynamics, especially processes that add or remove nitrogen from ecosystems. We have documented our changes to TEM and used the model to explore the effects on production in land ecosystems, including changes in biofuels production.

  7. IDENTIFYING AND OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Studies A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center and for policy-makers. To fulfill these goals, an in-depth study of five California case studies in the San, but still very limited activities in the case studies. Institutional and attitudinal barriers dominate

  8. Arnold Schwarzenegger DATA SOURCES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    funding efforts are focused on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies The California Climate Change Center (CCCC) is sponsored by the PIER program and coordinated by its Energy

  9. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  10. Waste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste prevention, recycling and reuse, biological treatment with land use of products, energy recoveryWaste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER #12;Preface 3 Re-evaluating waste: ISWA key messages 4 ISWA Commitments 6 Introduction 7 Technologies 8 Material recovery 14 Organic recovery 16 Energy

  11. Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Toward Predictions that Incorporate, Pocatello, Idaho 83209, USA; 2 Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA; 3, and debris flows) and shift distributions of terrestrial ecosystems on a global basis. Although

  12. Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate Craig R. Allen Nebraska Cooperative Fish ecosystems for critical services #12;What Do Species Do? · regulate biogeochemical cycles ­ e.g., moose.g., predation / herbivory · provide ecological services ­ e.g., pollination #12;Ecosystem Services - Supporting

  13. Ohio Farmer Attitudes About Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    of Academics, Office of Energy and the Environment The Ohio State University Moore.11@osu.edu 3rd National5/16/2014 1 Ohio Farmer Attitudes About Climate Change Thursday, May 15, 2014 Byrd Polar Research://www.camelclimatechange.org/ SPEED SCIENCE VIDEOS BACKGROUND ON OHIO's AGRICULTURE #12;5/16/2014 6 Ohio Agricultural Crop Values

  14. Perception of climate change James Hansena,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    the significance of human- made global warming. Actions to stem emissions of the gases that cause global warming the season when climate change will have its biggest impact on humanity. Global warming causes spring warmth global warming. The distribution of seasonal mean temperature anomalies has shifted toward higher tempera

  15. Our Changing Climate 2012 Vulnerability & Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /EPA, Natural Resources Agency, Department of Water Resources, Energy Commission, Air Resources Board, Ocean of climate change on the California economy. Cal/EPA entrusted the California Energy Commission and its insights for the energy, water, agriculture, public health, coastal, transportation, and ecological

  16. America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and developing emissions trading mechanisms to connect andand development of emissions trading or cap-and-tradesector market-based emissions trading system in the Western

  17. America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify thelarge conventional hydroelectric power is not included (this

  18. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource...

  19. Modelling Innovation and Threshold Effects In Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    for Substitution, Investment, Costs, Prices and Emissions: 12.1 Solid Fuels 12.2 Oil Fuels 12.3 Gas 12.4 Hydrogen historical data since energy statistics are widely gathered and collated according to these classifications Technologies 5. Demand and Investment 6. Cost Dynamics 7. Prices, and Lags in the Effects of Policies 8

  20. Mitigating Climate Change with Managed Forests: Balancing Expectations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    with anticipation regarding how managed forests will be able to par- ticipate in emerging markets for carbon offsets. Carbon markets may in the future offer some potential for com- pensating forest landowners for actions (Bell 2008). Forestry projects can influence CO2 sequestration in essentially three ways: (i

  1. Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE JumpAeroWindcapital GmbH Jump to:MRV of

  2. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALTexas: Energy ResourcesKooskia,Korea Solar

  3. Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean EconomyLLC SmartTracker

  4. Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag" |Energysoil and debris disposed ofW

  5. Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987)issues and

  6. Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling FarmCenter,Dolliver,

  7. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseekerTallahatchie Valley ETaurusInformation for

  8. Climate and Institutional Change ADVANCE efforts to improve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate and Institutional Change ADVANCE efforts to improve departmental climate #12;Why Climate? Recruitment--women more likely to come to a department with good climate Retention--women faculty more likely to stay in a department with good climate Advancement--women more likely to be promoted

  9. ARM - Climate Change Through History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to heargovInstrumentstdma Comments?History Organization ParticipantsChange

  10. Climate mitigation’s impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sector’s use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sector’s water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

  11. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  12. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  13. Biofuels: A Solution for Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, S.

    1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Our lives are linked to weather and climate, and to energy use. Since the late 1970s, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invested in research and technology related to global climate change. DOE's Office Fuels Development (OFD) manages the National Biofuels Program and is the lead technical advisor on the development of biofuels technologies in the United States. Together with industry and other stakeholders, the program seeks to establish a major biofuels industry. Its goals are to develop and commercialize technologies for producing sustainable, domestic, environmentally beneficial, and economically viable fuels from dedicated biomass feedstocks.

  14. Climate Change Science Institute | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S.Climate Action PlanClimate Change

  15. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  16. CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Changes A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC are that the aspects of Bay Area agriculture most sensitive to climate change are not yields, but subtler nuances

  17. The uses and limits of economic models as a climate change policy tool: A summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, M.B.; Nitze, W.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance to Save Energy initiated this workshop as a means of bringing climate change policy makers and economists together on the eve of the opening negotiating session for a climate change convention. The one and one-half day workshop was attended by 16 analysts who provided presentations on modeling approaches. There is a need for policy makers to be better able to evaluate the growing literature estimating the potential cost of policy options. Our hope is that this report, to be presented at the conclusion of the negotiations on the framework convention on climate change at the Earth Summit in Brazil, will help policy makers in the US and elsewhere evaluate the costs and benefits of national climate change mitigation policies. Although it is still unclear how far the convention will go in requiring emissions reductions, many countries are proceeding with detailed plans to reduce domestic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. Our goal in holding the workshop and writing this report is to spark a new level of dialogue between the producers and users of information on the costs and benefits of climate mitigation policies leading to the development of more cost-effective policy solutions at the national and international levels.

  18. The uses and limits of economic models as a climate change policy tool: A summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, M.B.; Nitze, W.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance to Save Energy initiated this workshop as a means of bringing climate change policy makers and economists together on the eve of the opening negotiating session for a climate change convention. The one and one-half day workshop was attended by 16 analysts who provided presentations on modeling approaches. There is a need for policy makers to be better able to evaluate the growing literature estimating the potential cost of policy options. Our hope is that this report, to be presented at the conclusion of the negotiations on the framework convention on climate change at the Earth Summit in Brazil, will help policy makers in the US and elsewhere evaluate the costs and benefits of national climate change mitigation policies. Although it is still unclear how far the convention will go in requiring emissions reductions, many countries are proceeding with detailed plans to reduce domestic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. Our goal in holding the workshop and writing this report is to spark a new level of dialogue between the producers and users of information on the costs and benefits of climate mitigation policies leading to the development of more cost-effective policy solutions at the national and international levels.

  19. From Climate-change Spaghetti to Climate-change Distributions for 21st-Century California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dettinger, Michael D.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects of climate change on water resources in the West:U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations Reportwarming and California’s water future. UC Davis Center for

  20. Local Response to Global Climate Change: The Role of Local Development Plans in Climate Change Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is possibly the greatest threat facing human society in this century. The response to this challenge has been dominated by international negotiations for controlling greenhouse gas emissions. More recently there are efforts...

  1. Climate Change in Arizona: Current Knowledge and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    's premier climate scientists discuss the impacts of climate change on Arizona's water, energy, healthClimate Change in Arizona: Current Knowledge and Future Collaborations Among the State Universities 230 Arizona State University, Tempe Campus Join us for a cross-university climate forum, as Arizona

  2. Joshua Klobas' interest in the implications of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Joshua Klobas' interest in the implications of climate change and the physical basis) particles contribute to many processes implicated in climate change. A challenge in describing SOA-climate University. Atmospheric particles have a disproportionally strong effect on the Earth's climate despite

  3. Climate change impact on the Mediterranean Sea circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Climate change impact on the Mediterranean Sea circulation: a regional modelling approach Samuel number of studies about the stability of the THC in climate change scenario. A large range of climate Sea (Artegiani et al., 1997) which is the main source of the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water. Past-climate

  4. The Impact of Climate Change on Electricity Demand in Thailand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkpoom, Suchao Jake

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is expected to lead to changes in ambient temperature, wind speed, humidity, precipitation and cloud cover. As electricity demand is closely influenced by these climatic variables, there is likely to be ...

  5. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997. “Climate Change and Water Resources. ” Climatic Change2006. Cost and Value of Water Use at Combined-Cycle Power2006. Cost and Value of Water Use at Combined-Cycle Power

  6. Improving understanding of climate change dynamics using interactive simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Aguirre, Juan Francisco

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate change is one of the most complex problems that human kind will face during the 21st century. Long delays in changing greenhouse gas emissions and in the response of the climate to anthropogenic forcing mean ...

  7. IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION anthropogenic climate change on residential electricity consumption for the nine San Francisco Bay Area counties with different meant temperatures on households' electricity consumption. The estimation uses a comprehensive

  8. Economics and Decision-Making for Climate Change and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    Economics and Decision-Making for Climate Change and Sustainability Subtitle: Climate Change is an Economic Problem­ source and solutions lie in realm of social science Susan M. Capalbo Professor and Head, Applied Economics (formerly

  9. HYDROPOWER RELICENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE1 Joshua H. Viers2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    HYDROPOWER RELICENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE1 Joshua H. Viers2 ABSTRACT: Hydropower represents impacts to natural and human communities, future long-term fixed licenses of hydropower operation. (KEY TERMS: climate change; environmental regulations; hydropower; relicensing; water law; water policy

  10. Seawalls Are Not Enough: Climate Change & U.S. Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Jody; Guzman, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    communication and cooperation – likely will be significantly stressed by the myriad impacts of climate change.climate change in other countries, because such efforts are dependent on information and communication

  11. Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on...

  12. Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change January 15, 2015 9:00AM PST to January 16, 2015 1:00PM PST Doubletree Lloyd Center, Portland Oregon...

  13. "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab By the end of the century, the woodlands...

  14. commentary: Is climate change making plants go up mountains?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovett, Jon C.; Hemp, Andreas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    update Jon C. Lovett Andreas Hemp CSTM - Twente Centre forto climate change impacts (Hemp 2005). But the ecologicalJetz et al. 2007). References Hemp, A. (2005) Climate change

  15. When Climate is Changing: Effects of Phenology and Local Climate on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When Climate is Changing: Effects of Phenology and Local Climate on Individual Fitness Meit Öberg-91-576-7973-4 © 2014 Meit Öberg, Uppsala Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2014 Cover: Meit Öberg #12;When Climate is Changing: Effects of Phenology and Local Climate on Individual Fitness Abstract The fitness impacts

  16. Climate Change at the University of Wisconsin-Madison: What changed,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change at the University of Wisconsin-Madison: What changed, and did ADVANCE have. The climate for women in my department is good * Women Faculty Men Faculty Dept. Chairs * #12;Climate CHANGE climate indicates movement along stages of change contemplation, preparation and even action stage #12

  17. Climate Change Projections of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Sain, Steve; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bukovsky, M. S.; McGinnis, Seth; Biner, S.; Caya, Daniel; Arritt, R.; Gutowski, William; Takle, Eugene S.; Snyder, Mark A.; Jones, Richard; Nunes, A M B.; Tucker, S.; Herzmann, D.; McDaniel, Larry; Sloan, Lisa

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate major results of the NARCCAP multiple regional climate model (RCM) experiments driven by multiple global climate models (GCMs) regarding climate change for seasonal temperature and precipitation over North America. We focus on two major questions: How do the RCM simulated climate changes differ from those of the parent GCMs and thus affect our perception of climate change over North America, and how important are the relative contributions of RCMs and GCMs to the uncertainty (variance explained) for different seasons and variables? The RCMs tend to produce stronger climate changes for precipitation: larger increases in the northern part of the domain in winter and greater decreases across a swath of the central part in summer, compared to the four GCMs driving the regional models as well as to the full set of CMIP3 GCM results. We pose some possible process-level mechanisms for the difference in intensity of change, particularly for summer. Detailed process-level studies will be necessary to establish mechanisms and credibility of these results. The GCMs explain more variance for winter temperature and the RCMs for summer temperature. The same is true for precipitation patterns. Thus, we recommend that future RCM-GCM experiments over this region include a balanced number of GCMs and RCMs.

  18. Climate Ethics and Responsibility A Study of Environmental Virtue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Climate Ethics and Responsibility A Study of Environmental Virtue Institute for Botany. Theoretical Concept 2.1. General Concept of Climate Ethics 2.2. Responsibility for Climate Change Mitigation2.2. Responsibility for Climate Change Mitigation 2.3. Moral Transformational Leadership 3. Application to Carbon

  19. Calls to Action -- The CABE Climate Change Festival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandergert, Paula

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change—rather than its threat—there were celebratory tours of newly refurbished buildings, eco-conversions, green

  20. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindtranath, N.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches to analysis of climate change impacts on forestsimpacts and adaptation to climate change in the forestABORATORY LBNL Pending Climate change and forests in India:

  1. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massmore suscep- tible to climate change stressors (Hughes and

  2. Climate Change, Mortality, and Adaptation: Evidence from Annual Fluctuations in Weather in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschênes, Olivier; Greenstone, Michael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007. “The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence fromH. Sanstad. 2006. “Climate Change and Electricity Demand inInternational Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). 1996. Special

  3. Three Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Weather Extremes on the United States' Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Phu Viet

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Climate Changes on California Agriculture”, CaliforniaImpact of Climate Change on Irrigated Agriculture inrange, climate change impact on agriculture Introduction

  4. Thunderstorms in a changing climate: A cloudresolving modeling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    prediction of surface water and groundwater dynamics under projected climate change scenarios Thunderstorms in a changing climate: A cloudresolving modeling study Joseph Galewsky@unm.edu One of the potential impacts of a changing climate is an increase in the severity of thunderstorms

  5. Communicating Coastal Risk Analysis in an Age of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communicating Coastal Risk Analysis in an Age of Climate Change TR-11-04 Brian Blanton, John Mc in an Age of Climate Change Brian Blanton, John McGee, Oleg Kapeljushnik Renaissance Computing Institute of climate change complicates matters further. An immersive visualization environment integrating data from

  6. Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions Karen of modeling practice in the field of integrated assessment of climate change and ways forward. Past efforts assessments of climate change have concentrated on developing baseline emissions scenarios and analyzing

  7. Holocene Treeline History and Climate Change Across Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    . Key Words: treeline; climate change; Holocene; arctic; Russia; Siberia; macrofossils. INTRODUCTIONHolocene Treeline History and Climate Change Across Northern Eurasia Glen M. MacDonald Departments The establishment of forests in northern Eurasia contributed to Holocene warming and climate change by lowering high

  8. Conflict or Cooperation? Arctic Geopolitics and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruby, Byron

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change Byron Ruby arms, it is not a complete surprise to see that Russia—Climate Change Byron Ruby On August 2, 2007, a mini-submarine carrying two members of Russia’Climate Change Byron Ruby quantitative simulations were the chances for militarized conflict above 10%, and one of those disputes—Russia

  9. Vulnerability of Hydropower Projects to Climate Change Revision: 20th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    Vulnerability of Hydropower Projects to Climate Change Revision: 20th December 2001 Dr Gareth P and increased use of renewable sources including hydropower. Paradoxically, climate change itself may alter role in whether emissions cuts are achieved. 2. Climate Change and Hydropower A rising demand

  10. Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California Katharine Hayhoea,b , Daniel Cayanc emission pathways we choose. Here we explore the implications of the highest and lowest Intergovern- mental Panel on Climate Change emissions pathways for climate change and associated impacts in California

  11. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

  12. CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO REGION A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012042 Prepared for: California possible changes in regional climate over California. To accomplish this, the model simulations were

  13. CLIMATE CHANGE AND SEA LEVEL RISE SCENARIOS FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND SEA LEVEL RISE SCENARIOS FOR CALIFORNIA VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION ASSESSMENT A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center This white paper provides an evaluation of physical elements of climate change and sea level rise

  14. Climate change and British woodland: what does the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change and British woodland: what does the future hold? Mark Broadmeadow, Duncan Ray, Louise Sing and Liz Poulsom There is now convincing evidence that the climate is changing the last ice-age. The potentially serious consequences of predicted climate change for British woodland

  15. Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change and Human Health National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental and Prevention October 17, 2012 #12;Coastal flooding Climate change effects: ·Temperature ·Sea level,civil conflict Anxiety,despair,depression Civil conflict Climate Change Health Effects Food & water Malnutrition

  16. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  17. The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change Informing Decision Makers A Symposium #12;2THE INTERSECTION OF NATIONAL SECURITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE In his May commencement speech to newly commissioned second lieutenants at West Point's grad- uation, President Obama warned that climate change is "a

  18. Climate change and superstorm Sandy November 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Climate change and superstorm Sandy linked? November 1, 2012 By Erika Bolstad McClatchy Newspapers WASHINGTON -- There's no clear answer to the scientific debate over whether climate change, including impacts go from Florida to Maine," said Leonard Berry, the director of the Climate Change Initiative

  19. Will Climate Change Mathematics (?) Christopher K.R.T. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Will Climate Change Mathematics (?) Christopher K.R.T. Jones Warwick Mathematics Institute to climate change facing us are enormous and we will almost certainly have to harness all of our scienti complex calculations and predictions as are undertaken by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

  20. Global Climate Change: Opinions and Perceptions of Rural Nebraskans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Global Climate Change: Opinions and Perceptions of Rural Nebraskans 2008 Nebraska Rural Poll that they understand the issue of global climate change either fairly or very well. #12;Most rural Nebraskans believe climate change is already happening. #12;Most rural Nebraskans believe that our actions contribute

  1. CLIMATE CHANGE AND U.S. AGRICULTURE: SOME FURTHER EVIDENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND U.S. AGRICULTURE: SOME FURTHER EVIDENCE R. M. Adams Oregon State University for the Electric Power Research Institute as part of the Agricultural Impacts Project of the Climate Change Impacts Program (CCIP). #12;1 CLIMATE CHANGE AND U.S. AGRICULTURE: SOME FURTHER EVIDENCE There have been a number

  2. WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global?................................................................10 When you think of global warming / climate change, what comes first to mind

  3. How Can We Avert Dangerous Climate Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent analyses indicate that the amount of atmospheric CO2 required to cause dangerous climate change is at most 450 ppm, and likely less than that. Reductions of non-CO2 climate forcings can provide only moderate, albeit important, adjustments to the CO2 limit. Realization of how close the planet is to "tipping points" with unacceptable consequences, especially ice sheet disintegration with sea level rise out of humanity's control, has a bright side. It implies an imperative: we must find a way to keep the CO2 amount so low that it will also avert other detrimental effects that had begun to seem inevitable, e.g., ocean acidification, loss of most alpine glaciers and thus the water supply for millions of people, and shifting of climatic zones with consequent extermination of species. Here I outline from a scientific perspective actions needed to achieve low limits on CO2 and global warming. These changes are technically feasible and have ancillary benefits. Achievement of needed changes requires overcoming t...

  4. Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6 Re-direct Destination: The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical...

  5. Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    updated "National Action Plan Vision for 2025: A Framework for Change." Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy Efficient Future, November 18, 2008...

  6. Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector 2002 DEER Conference...

  7. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  8. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Livestock Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry of Environment Pacific Institute for Climate

  9. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Wine Grape & Tree Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry of Environment Pacific Institute for Climate

  10. Climate Change, Agriculture and Poverty Vulnerabilityand Poverty Vulnerability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change, Agriculture and Poverty Vulnerabilityand Poverty Vulnerability Presentation by-Medium-High productivity ­ Implications for agricultural production, trade and poverty · The issue of climate volatility ­ Impact of extreme climate events on poverty #12;Climate Science Debate Detection: - Little doubt about

  11. Understanding Climate Change: A Data-Driven Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    Understanding Climate Change: A Data-Driven Approach Alok Choudhary Northwestern University Use Cases: Extreme Events Prediction Climate-Meningitis OutlookNH Tropical Cyclone (TC) Activity West Forecasting NA Hurricane Tracks Slide 3 #12;Climate System Complexity Climate systems are complex

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE High-resolution climate change mapping with gridded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    RESEARCH ARTICLE High-resolution climate change mapping with gridded historical climate products of climate research and adaptation efforts around the world. High-resolution gridded historical climate (GHC products to produce high-resolution temperature trend maps for the US Northeast from 1980 to 2009

  13. Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (1975–1995) and future (1995–2100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 2–3°C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

  14. Climate change, migratory connectivity and changes in laying date and clutch size of the pied flycatcher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Climate change, migratory connectivity and changes in laying date and clutch size of the pied., Ahola, M., Eeva, T., Va¨isa¨nen, R. A. and Lehikoinen, E. 2006. Climate change, migratory connectivity Ficedula hypoleuca Pallas, and analysed whether potential changes were explained by changes in climatic

  15. STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE CHANGE Richard W. Katz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    analysis available within the open source statistical programming language R. #12;2 OUTLINE Lecture 1 (9STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE CHANGE Richard W. Katz Institute for Study of Society the application of the statistical theory of extreme values to climate, in general, and to climate change

  16. Truths we must tell ourselves to manage climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truths we must tell ourselves to manage climate change Robert Socolow socolow@princeton.edu CLAIRE Are fossil fuels hard to displace? NO YES Is climate change an urgent matter? NO A nuclear or renewables the door Steve Pacala calls the worst credible climate outcomes "monsters behind the door." The monsters

  17. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scarcity and climate change in the Mediterranean. Watermediterranean-climate regions, and species often respond to changes

  18. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scarcity and climate change in the Mediterranean. Watermediterranean-climate regions, and species often respond to changes

  19. Climate change sentiment on Twitter: An unsolicited public opinion poll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cody, Emily M; Mitchell, Lewis; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consequences of anthropogenic climate change are extensively debated through scientific papers, newspaper articles, and blogs. Newspaper articles may lack accuracy, while the severity of findings in scientific papers may be too opaque for the public to understand. Social media, however, is a forum where individuals of diverse backgrounds can share their thoughts and opinions. As consumption shifts from old media to new, Twitter has become a valuable resource for analyzing current events and headline news. In this research, we analyze tweets containing the word "climate" collected between September 2008 and July 2014. We determine how collective sentiment varies in response to climate change news, events, and natural disasters. Words uncovered by our analysis suggest that responses to climate change news are predominately from climate change activists rather than climate change deniers, indicating that Twitter is a valuable resource for the spread of climate change awareness.

  20. Climate Change Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEAN AIR ACT §CleantechClimate Change

  1. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel and Climate Change

  2. Funding for adaptation to climate change : the case of Surat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Toral

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for cities to adapt to climate change is widely acknowledged, yet the question of adaptation finance remains uncertain. Unable to access global climate funds, cities must seek out alternative sources to support ...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: accurate climate-change prediction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to address the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) is designed to accel-erate the development and applica-tion of...

  4. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

  5. PhotoYannArthus-Bertrand/Altitude CLIMATE CHANGE 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photo©YannArthus-Bertrand/Altitude CLIMATE CHANGE 2013 The Physical Science Basis WGI Technical). Observational and model studies of temperature change, climate feedbacks and changes in the Earth's energy in warming of the atmosphere and the ocean, in changes in the global water cycle, in reductions in snow

  6. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L., E-mail: jalonne@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 109 S. Observatory, SPH II, Rm. M6314, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Sanchez, Brisa N., E-mail: brisa@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Biostatistics Department, M4164 SPH II, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Jolliet, Olivier, E-mail: ojolliet@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 6622 SPH tower, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States)] [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 6622 SPH tower, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Zhang, Zhenzhen, E-mail: zhzh@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Biostatistics Department, M4164 SPH II, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States)] [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Biostatistics Department, M4164 SPH II, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Parker, Edith A., E-mail: Edith-Parker@uiowa.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Health Behavior and Health Education Department, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 (United States); Timothy Dvonch, J., E-mail: dvonch@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 1415 Washington Heights, 6642 SPH Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); O'Neill, Marie S., E-mail: marieo@umich.edu [University of Michigan School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department, 6631 SPH Tower, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods: We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures' responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results: Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 Degree-Sign C, 13.8 Degree-Sign C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions: Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings to improve heat exposure assessment for epidemiological investigations. Weatherizing homes and modifying home surroundings could mitigate indoor heat exposure among the elderly.

  7. Modeling the Uncertain Future of a Threatened Habitat: Climate Change and Urban Growth in California Sage Scrub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riordan, Erin Coulter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under projected climate change, mediterranean-climate in theland use and climate change in mediterranean regions,TO PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE IN A THREATENED, MEDITERRANEAN-

  8. Chapter 1 Climate monitoring The European Commission strategy for global climate change studies and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Chapter 1 Climate monitoring The European Commission strategy for global climate change studies, Jerusalem, Israel Precipitation as a centerpiece in Climate Change Water is the lifeblood of our livelihood on Earth. Temperature-driven inhabitable areas are due to too cold temperatures, and not due to excessively

  9. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Buffered climate change effects in a Mediterranean pine species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Buffered climate change effects in a Mediterranean pine Abstract Within-range effects of climatic change on tree growth at the sub-regional scale remain poorly- growth responses to climate change, the role of drought becomes even more complex in shaping communities

  10. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO[sub 2] and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

  11. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential and Costs of Forestry Options in Brazil, China,C), China, climate change mitigation potential, costs,in northeastern China. The cost of planting is relatively

  12. Book Review: Effects of Climate Change on Birds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of Climate Change on Birds.—Anders Pape Møller, Wolfgang Fieldler, and Peter Berthold, editors. 2010. Oxford University Press, New York. 321 pp. + 9 color plates. ISBN-978- 0-19-956975-5. $117.00 (hard cover). Certainly timely in light... of present climatic trends, this book sets out to assemble useful summaries of the full breadth of climate-change implications for birds in a single volume. It is or- ganized into sections treating the basics of climate, methods for studying climate-change...

  13. Session Title Sick about Climate Change: How Changing Environmental Conditions Impact Emerging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Environmental Conditions Impact Emerging Disease Session Date to climate change environmental impacts on pathogen persistence and the food web documenting the significant impact of climate change on human and animal disease

  14. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  15. Climate change legislation: what the Senate might do

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the speakers who spoke at the Coal-Gen conference, Charlotte, NC, USA on 19 August discussed climate change legislation currently under consideration in the US Congress. The so-called Waxman-Markey bill passed the House in June and is currently being considered by the Senate. The title of Thomas Hewson's talk was 'Climate change is likely to pass' and Neal Cabral discussed 'Geography and region influence climate change politics'.

  16. How will changes in global climate influence California?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weare, B C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis.climate change impacts on water for agriculture and otherincreased flooding and reduced water availability, higher

  17. Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  18. Understanding Recent Stratospheric Climate Change DAVID W. J. THOMPSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Recent Stratospheric Climate Change DAVID W. J. THOMPSON Department of Atmospheric: David Thompson, Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523

  19. arctic climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of global environment and energy challenges, thereby contributing to informed debate about climate change-Directors...

  20. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Act, and Industrial Pollution Professor Alice Kaswan* I.a. Existing Air Pollution. . b. Do Climate Policieson Cli- mate Change, Pollution, and the Clean Air Act." I

  1. Water resources planning under climate change and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

  2. Bridging the Divide Between Poverty Reduction and Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bridging the Divide Between Poverty Reduction and Climate Change Through Sustainable and Innovative Energy Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  3. Climate Change Simulations with CCSM and CESM Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of anthropogenic climate change. This work utilizes an emerging class of Earth System Models that include detailed physical, chemical, and biological processes as well as...

  4. DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 24: Live Webinar on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country: Natural Resources and Agriculture Webinar Webinar Sponsors: White House Office of Public Engagement, White...

  5. U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by...

  6. Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference David Conrad David Conrad Acting Director - Office of...

  7. Indonesia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References "Asia Regional" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIndonesia-SubNationalPlanningforClimateChange(cities,states,districts)&oldid700428...

  8. Cambodia-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References "Asia Regional" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCambodia-SubNationalPlanningforClimateChange(cities,states,districts)&oldid700434...

  9. Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage from the atmosphere (the carbon sink) may already be declining in response to climate change-induced reductions in precipitation and increases in temperature." Because...

  10. Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sub-national Planners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability and Impact Scenarios - A Guidebook for Sub-national Planners...

  11. Myanmar-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Myanmar-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) AgencyCompany Organization United Kingdom Department for...

  12. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

  13. assessing climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have rendered Debinski, Diane M. 23 Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change University of...

  14. assessment climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have rendered Debinski, Diane M. 23 Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change University of...

  15. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Grain & Oilseed Production Peace Region snapshot report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri

  16. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Fraser Valley & Metro Vancouver snapshot report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry

  17. Solar Forcing of Regional Climate Change During the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Forcing of Regional Climate Change During the Maunder Minimum Drew T. Shindell,1 Gavin A. Schmidt,1 Michael E. Mann,2 David Rind,1 Anne Waple3 We examine the climate response to solar irradiance long-term solar varia- tion, which would give a larger climate re- sponse (15). Initial conditions were

  18. Edmonton Journal URL: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/game+changing+sensors+revolutionize+methods+monitoring+climate+science+data/10396523/story.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    the environmental impacts of oilsands development or forestry companies and how to mitigate the impacts, he says. Next week, Sanchez will take the system, called EnviroNet, to a UN climate change conference in Lima, policymakers can watch in real time the changes and measure them against the baseline data. This Enviro

  19. Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Frontier The Role Played by Oceans in Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Department University of Arizona October 11, 2008 #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate, Undergraduate Students: 2. UQGQG #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty

  20. The Changing Climate of Cooperative Federalism: The Dynamic Role of the States in a National Strategy to Combat Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Jared; Binder, Jonathan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and local leadership has laid the foundation for an effective, efficient, and economically beneficial American climate change and clean energy strategy.

  1. Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Ben Santer Program for Climate Model Diagnosis of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate" "There is new and stronger evidence that most of the warming observed over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities" "Most

  2. Estimating the Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower and Power Marketing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sale, Michael J [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is currently preparing an assessment of the effects of climate change on federal hydropower, as directed by Congress in Section 9505 of the Secure Water Act of 2009 (P.L. 111-11). This paper describes the assessment approach being used in a Report to Congress currently being prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The 9505 assessment will examine climate change effects on water available for hydropower operations and the future power supplies marketed from federal hydropower projects. It will also include recommendations from the Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) on potential changes in operation or contracting practices that could address these effects and risks of climate change. Potential adaption and mitigation strategies will also be identified. Federal hydropower comprises approximately half of the U.S. hydropower portfolio. The results from the 9505 assessment will promote better understanding among federal dam owners/operators of the sensitivity of their facilities to water availability, and it will provide a basis for planning future actions that will enable adaptation to climate variability and change. The end-users of information are Congressional members, their staff, the PMAs and their customers, federal dam owners/operators, and the DOE Water Power Program.

  3. Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

  4. The impacts of climate changes in the renewable energy resources in the Caribbean region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson III, David J [ORNL

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of renewable energy resources such as surface solar radiation and wind current has great relevance in the development of local and regional energy policies. This paper examines the variability and availability of these resources as a function of possible climate changes for the Caribbean region. Global climate changes have been reported in the last decades, causing changes in the atmospheric dynamics, which affects the net solar radiation balance at the surface and the wind strength and direction. For this investigation, the future climate changes for the Caribbean are predicted using the parallel climate model (PCM) and it is coupled with the numerical model regional atmospheric modeling system (RAMS) to simulate the solar and wind energy spatial patterns changes for the specific case of the island of Puerto Rico. Numerical results from PCM indicate that the Caribbean basin from 2041 to 2055 will experience a slight decrease in the net surface solar radiation (with respect to the years 1996-2010), which is more pronounced in the western Caribbean sea. Results also indicate that the easterly winds have a tendency to increase in its magnitude, especially from the years 2070 to 2098. The regional model showed that important areas to collect solar energy are located in the eastern side of Puerto Rico, while the more intense wind speed is placed around the coast. A future climate change is expected in the Caribbean that will result in higher energy demands, but both renewable energy sources will have enough intensity to be used in the future as alternative energy resources to mitigate future climate changes.

  5. Local Response to Global Climate Change: The Role of Local Development Plans in Climate Change Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    in managing threats from natural hazards (Berke & Beatley, 1992; Brody, 2003a; Nelson & Steven), managing land use distribution (Kent & Jones, 1990), enhancing ecosystem management (Brody, 2003c; Brody, Carrasco, & Highfield, 2003; Brody, Highfield... & Godschalk, 2008; Brody, 2003b; Brody, Carrasco, et al., 2003; Burby, 1999; Burby, French, & Nelson, 1998; Burby & May, 1997; Dalton & Burby, 1994; Godschalk, Beatley, Berke, Brower, & Kaiser, 1999). Similarly, climate change researchers have identified...

  6. Selected Translated Abstracts of Chinese-Language Climate Change Publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Burtis, M.D.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains English-translated abstracts of important Chinese-language literature concerning global climate change for the years 1995-1998. This body of literature includes the topics of adaptation, ancient climate change, climate variation, the East Asia monsoon, historical climate change, impacts, modeling, and radiation and trace-gas emissions. In addition to the biological citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Chinese. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

  7. Climate impact metrics for energy technology evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Morgan Rae

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies depends on how their lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions compare to global climate stabilization goals. Current methods for comparing technologies, which assess ...

  8. Adapting to Climate Change in WisconsinAdapting to Climate Change in Wisconsin Strategies for Conservation ProfessionalsStrategies for Conservation Professionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adapting to Climate Change in WisconsinAdapting to Climate Change in Wisconsin ­ Strategies Association December 9, 2010 David S. Liebl #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing Vegetation indicators #12;Indicators of a changing climate J. Magnuson Source: IPCC 2007 Potter, et al

  9. Modeled climate change effects on distributions of Canadian butterfly species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Gonzá lez-Salazar, Constantino; Hall, Peter W.

    2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Climate change effects on biodiversity are being documented now frequently in the form of changes in phenology and distributional shifts. However, the form that these effects will take over a longer timespan is ...

  10. Global impacts of abrupt climate change: an initial assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    in progress". Whilst they are commented on by Tyndall researchers, they have not been subject to a full peer that the climate system has in the last few thousand years undergone a number of rapid or step changes, at regional of such abrupt climate changes1 include: · regional cooling following a shutdown of the thermohaline circulation

  11. Is God Green? An Interfaith Response to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Is God Green? An Interfaith Response to Climate Change Thursday, May 2, 2013 12:00 ­ 1:30 p people of faith in Arizona to reduce the causes of global climate change through education, advocacy, and others--to build an equitable and sustainable future for all. RSVP link: Download any free QR-Code reader

  12. DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay SURAJE DESSAI1, W. NEIL ADGER. Understanding what constitutes dangerous climate change is of critical importance for future concerted action and somewhat arbitrary definitions of danger based on a variety of assumptions and assessments generally

  13. Potential Climate Change Impacts to the NW Hydroelectric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 Potential Climate Change Impacts to the NW Hydroelectric System NW Power and Conservation Council Symposium on Greenhouse Gases June 4, 2013 1 Source of Data · 2009 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-4) data but prior to River Management Joint Operating Committee's (RMJOC) processing

  14. A Preliminary Proposal UWM Climate Change and Sustainable Development Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    . As these examples illustrate, the effects of global warming/climate change are wide-ranging, frightening, and continuing, which point to the critical need to understand human impact on climate change and what needs in issues associated with global warming can help address these complex issues. Institute Overview: Over

  15. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison through Coursera, this four-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change.

  16. Impacts of Climate Change Legislation on US Agricultural Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    July 2010 Impacts of Climate Change Legislation on US Agricultural Markets the impacts of climate change legislation. While input from USDAOCE was very valuable in identifying issues of a project sponsored by the US Department of Agriculture Office of the Chief Economist (USDAOCE) to examine

  17. Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe Luigi Maiorano1 to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing

  18. adopting global climate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and biomass which are environmentally clean is aimed at diversification of the energy matrix, mitigating against climate change and providing alternatives to the use of...

  19. EBRD-Sustainable Energy Initiative: Scaling Up Finance for Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type: Publications Website: www.ebrd.comdownloadsresearchfactsheetssei.pdf Cost: Free EBRD-Sustainable Energy Initiative: Scaling Up Finance for Climate Change Mitigation...

  20. Low Carbon Green Growth: Integrated Policy Approach to Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    scarcity and climate change and how adopting Low Carbon Green Growth can provide win-win solutions for fostering inclusive sustainable development while mitigating and...