Sample records for mississippi state oil

  1. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Mississippi as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  2. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese tallow tree and tung tree. High seed yields from these species are possible because, there stature allows for a third dimension in yield (up). Harvest regimes have already been worked out with tung, and the large seed makes shedding of the seed with tree shakers possible. While tallow tree seed yields can be mind boggling (12,000 kg seed/ha at 40% oil), genotypes that shed seed easily are currently not known. Efficient methods were developed to isolate polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters from bio-diesel. The hypothesis to isolate this class of fatty acids, which are used as popular dietary supplements and prescription medicine (OMACOR), was that they bind transition metal ions much stronger than their harmful saturated analogs. AgBF4 has the highest extraction ability among all the metal ions tested. Glycerol is a key product from the production of biodiesel. It is produced during the transesterification process by cleaving the fatty acids from the glycerol backbone (the fatty acids are used as part of the biodiesel, which is a fatty acid methyl ester). Glycerol is a non-toxic compound with many uses; however, if a surplus exists in the future, more uses for the produced glycerol needs to be found. Another phase of the project was to find an add-on process to the biodiesel production process that will convert the glycerol by-product into more valuable substances for end uses other than food or cosmetics, focusing at present on 1,3-propanediol and lactic acid.All three MSU cultures produced products at concentrations below that of the benchmark microorganisms. There was one notable isolate the caught the eye of the investigators and that was culture J6 due to the ability of this microorganism to co-produce both products and one in particularly high concentrations. This culture with more understanding of its metabolic pathways could prove a useful biological agent for the conversion of glycerol. Heterogeneous catalysis was examined as an alternative to overcome the disadvantages of homogeneous transesterification, such as the presence of salts in the glycer

  3. Mississippi Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mississippi has substantial natural resources, including biomass, oil, coal, and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on...

  4. Potential Mississippi oil recovery and economic impact from CO sub 2 miscible flooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moring, J.A.; Rogers, R.E. (Petroleum Engineering Dept., Mississippi State Univ., MS (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maturing of Mississippi oil reservoirs has resulted in a steady decline in crude oil production in the state. This paper reports that, to evaluate the potential of enhanced recovery processes, particularly in the use of the state's large CO{sub 2} reserves, for arresting this trend, the subject study was performed. A computer data base of over 1315 Mississippi reservoirs was established. All reservoirs were screened for applicability of the carbon dioxide miscible process. With models developed by the National Petroleum Council and DOE, incremental oil that could be produced from the carbon dioxide miscible process was calculated. Under selected economic conditions, carbon dioxide miscible flooding with utilization of carbon dioxide from the state's Norphlet formation (3-7 tcf reserves of high-purity CO{sub 2}) could produce 120 million barrels of incremental oil in Mississippi. Incremental state revenues as a consequence of this production were calculated to be $45 million of severance taxes, $50 million of corporate income taxes, and $60 million of royalty payments, expressed as present values.

  5. The industrial Center at Mississippi State University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    b.K. Hodge; Mary C. Emplaincourt

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippi State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) is one of 26 centers supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at universities across the country. The Mississippi State University IAC in existence since 1994 provides plant assessments at no cost to eligible small and mid-sized manufacturers categorized in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 20-39. Client eligibility is based on gross sales below $100 million, fewer than 500 employees at the plant, annual utility bills more than $100,000 and less than $2 million, and no in-house professional staff to perform an assessment. IAC assessment benefits include no cost to the clients, increased profitability and competitiveness, confidentiality, non-regulatory, nonobligatory, and student involvement.

  6. Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rules and Regulations Governing Leasing for Production or Extraction of Oil, Gas and Other Minerals From Onshore State-Owned Lands is applicable to the natural gas sector. This law delegates...

  7. Overview of Mississippi River - Louisiana State Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosselli, A.T.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are significant benefits to be obtained from providing deepdraft vessel access to the lower Mississippi River including savings in vessel transportation costs, increased export tonnage and consequent improvements of the U.S. balance of payments, increases in employment, and the opportunity for creation of marshlands and land reclamation in the river's eroding delta. The most effective course of action for the State of Louisiana to take is to plan and seek authorization to further deepen the channel in stages to 55 feet should actual increases in commerce equal the high level of commerce, but to dredge the present 40-foot channel to 45 feet initially from the Gulf via Southwest Pass to Mile 172 AHP to provide for two-way navigation of vessels. In addition, the State should encourage private interests to put into operation as soon as possible, facilities for loading and topping-off grain ships midstream and topping-off coal carriers in the Gulf in order to attract and establish patterns of trade in large ships.

  8. Overview of oil and gas potential in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devery, D.M.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, 2 geologic provinces in Mississippi are actively explored for hydrocarbons. These are the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and the Black Warrior Basin. Of these 2 basins, the Interior Salt Basin is by far the more productive. The Salt Basin is situated in central and S. Mississippi and is bounded to the north by the buried Ouachita Mountains and by the Wiggins Anticline to the south. There are 61 identified salt domes in this basin as well as countless unidentified deep-seated salt diapirs; the latter are marked by deformation of surrounding and overlying strata. Salt tectonics are closely related to formation of structural traps for hydrocarbon accumulation within the Salt Basin. The second exploration province is the Black Warrior Basin, a Paleozoic structural feature bounded by the buried Ouachita Mountains to the southwest and the buried Appalachian Mountains to the southeast.

  9. Geochemical studies of crude oil generation, migration, and destruction in Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sassen, R.; Moore, C.H.; Nunn, J.A.; Meendsen, F.C.; Heydari, E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main source for crude oil in the Mississippi salt basin is the laminated lime mudstone facies of the lower Smackover. Crude oil generation and migration commenced at a level of thermal maturity equivalent to about 0.55% vitrinite reflectance. Short-range lateral migration of crude oil was focused on upper Smackover and Norphlet reservoirs, but vertical migration also charged some overlying Cotton Valley, Rodessa, lower Tuscaloosa, and Eutaw reservoirs. Following migration from the lower Smackover, thermal maturity history of reservoir rocks controls the preservation of crude oil, gas condensate, and methane. Slow thermal cracking of crude oil occurred in deep upper Smackover reservoirs, resulting in formation of gas condensate and precipitation of solid bitumen. The maximum thermal maturity for preservation of condensate is equivalent to about 1.3% vitrinite reflectance. Only methane, pyrobitumen, and nonhydrocarbon gases, including hydrogen sulfide, persist at higher levels of thermal maturity. Early destruction of methane in deep upper Smackover reservoirs near the Wiggins arch is driven by thermochemical sulfate reduction. Lesser availability of sulfate in Norphlet reservoirs could account for methane preservation at higher levels of thermal maturity. One basic geochemical strategy for further exploration of the Mississippi salt basin is to focus exploration effort on traps with reservoirs in the thermal maturity window for hydrocarbon preservation. Another strategy is to avoid drilling traps with overmature reservoir rocks.

  10. STATE OF MISSISSIPPI 2401 D E

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A' 3 ct')s .STATE OF

  11. MISSISSIPPI ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    MISSISSIPPI ACADEMY OF SCIENCES SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING February 20-22, 2008 Whispering Woods of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences Volume 53 January 2008 Number 1 Boyle Mississippi State University The Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences (ISSN 0076

  12. The Mississippi CCS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doug Cathro

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

  13. Pathways of migration of oil and gas in south Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Mississippi salt basin is one of three interior basins characterized by structures formed by movement of the Late Jurassic Louann Salt. An analysis of pathways of migration within the basin has revealed that it is possible to explain why hydrocarbons have accumulated in some structures, yet are absent from others that would appear to be favorable. Seventy-four of the more than 840 fields within the basin, including the largest known accumulations, have hydrocarbons in stacked reservoirs belonging in more than one formation. These stacked reservoirs result from vertical migration facilitated by faulting. In more than 750 fields, hydrocarbons are confined to a single formation in traps associated with four distinct trends of production that decrease in age systematically from the margin of the basin into the interior. The hydrocarbons in these trends have accumulated by intrastratal migration (without the agency of faulting) from a nearby source in the same unit as the reservoir. On the northwest side of the basin, migration between units brought into contact along unconformities has resulted in 10 fields. Vertical migration brought about by faulting around shallow salt diapirs has allowed hydrocarbons to escape, so that only 5 of 56 such structures have produced oil or gas. These conclusions, derived from geologic deductions, are supported by preliminary geochemical data; more extensive and detailed geochemical analyses of oils from the various sources are under way.

  14. Evaluations of Radionuclides of Uranium, Thorium, and Radium Associated with Produced Fluids, Precipitates, and Sludges from Oil, Gas, and Oilfield Brine Injection Wells in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an unsurpassed lack of scientific data with respect to the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium, thorium, and radium in the produced formation fluids (brine), precipitates, and sludges generated with the operation of oil and gas wells in Mississippi. These radioactive elements when contained in the formation fluids have been given the term NORM, which is an acronym for naturally occurring radioactive materials. When they are technologically enhanced during oil and gas production activities resulting in the formation of scale (precipitates) and sludges they are termed TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials). As used in this document, NORM and TENORM will be considered equivalent terms and the occurrence of NORM in the oilfield will be considered the result of production operations. As a result of the lack of data no scientifically sound theses may be developed concerning the presence of these radionuclides in the fluid brine, precipitate (scale), or sludge phases. Over the period of just one year, 1997 for example, Mississippi produced over 39,372,963,584 liters (10,402,368,186 gallons or 247,675,433 barrels) of formation water associated with hydrocarbon production from 41 counties across the state.

  15. Mississippi Clean Energy Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2010, the Mississippi Legislature enacted [http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us/documents/2010/pdf/HB/1700-1799/HB1701S... HB 1701], establishing the Mississippi Clean Energy Initiative. This...

  16. Mississippi: Mississippi's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Mississippi.

  17. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.YearProved ReservesReservoirs

  18. Mississippi State Oil and Gas Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman Wind LLC Jump to:

  19. Mississippi Loan Guaranty Program (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mississippi Loan Guaranty Program, administered by the Mississippi Business Finance Corporation ("MBFC"), enables small businesses to obtain term financing through the use of loan guarantees....

  20. Mississippi State Axion Search: A Light Shining though a Wall ALP Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Formaggio, Joseph; Fowler, Nicholas; Gaerlan, Mikhail; Jiang, Yipeng; Madsen, John; Oblath, Noah; Powers, Adam; Ray, Amy; Riehle, Robertson

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The elegant solutions to the strong CP problem predict the existence of a particle called axion. Thus, the search for axion like particles (ALP) has been an ongoing endeavor. The possibility that these axion like particles couple to photons in presence of magnetic field gives rise to a technique of detecting these particles known as light shining through a wall (LSW). Mississippi State Axion Search (MASS) is an experiment employing the LSW technique in search for axion like particles. The apparatus consists of two radio frequency (RF) cavities, both under the influence of strong magnetic field and separated by a lead wall. While one of the cavities houses a strong RF generator, the other cavity houses the detector systems. The MASS apparatus looks for excesses in RF photons that tunnel through the wall as a signature of candidate axion-like particles. The concept behind the experiment as well as the projected sensitivities are presented here.

  1. Mississippi State Axion Search: A Light Shining though a Wall ALP Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prajwal Mohanmurthy; Dipangkar Dutta; Joseph Formaggio; Nicholas Fowler; Mikhail Gaerlan; Yipeng Jiang; John Madsen; Noah Oblath; Adam Powers; Amy Ray; Robertson Riehle

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The elegant solutions to the strong CP problem predict the existence of a particle called axion. Thus, the search for axion like particles (ALP) has been an ongoing endeavor. The possibility that these axion like particles couple to photons in presence of magnetic field gives rise to a technique of detecting these particles known as light shining through a wall (LSW). Mississippi State Axion Search (MASS) is an experiment employing the LSW technique in search for axion like particles. The apparatus consists of two radio frequency (RF) cavities, both under the influence of strong magnetic field and separated by a lead wall. While one of the cavities houses a strong RF generator, the other cavity houses the detector systems. The MASS apparatus looks for excesses in RF photons that tunnel through the wall as a signature of candidate axion-like particles. The concept behind the experiment as well as the projected sensitivities are presented here.

  2. State Heating Oil and Propane Program

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember 24,Feet)Year(DollarsState

  3. Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. ...

  4. State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Suite Arizona http www azogcc az gov Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Natural Resources Dr Ste Arkansas http www aogc state ar us JDesignerPro...

  5. ,"Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production (MillionCrude Oil + Lease

  6. Heterogeneity in Mississippi oil reservoirs, Black Warrior basin, Alabama: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Irvin, G.D. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four Mississippian sandstone units produce oil in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama: (1) Lewis; (2) Carter; (3) Millerella, and (4) Gilmer. Reservoir geometries differ for each producing interval, reflecting variation in depositional style during the evolution of a foreland basin. Widespread strike-elongate bodies of Lewis sandstone with complex internal geometry were deposited during destruction of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia carbonate ramp and represent inception of the foreland basin and initial forebulge migration. Synorogenic Carter sandstone is part of the first major deltaic foreland basin fill and accounts for more than 80% of oil production in the basin. Millerella sandstone was deposited as transgressive sand patches during the final stages of delta destruction. Gilmer sandstone occurs as imbricate sandstone lenses deposited in a constructive shoal-water delta and is part of the late relaxational basin fill. Interaction of siliciclastic sediment with ancestral and active carbonate ramps was a primary control on facies architecture and reservoir heterogeneity. Patterns of injection and reservoir fluid production, as well as field- to basin-scale depositional, petrological, petrophysical and geostatistical modeling reveal microscopic to megascopic controls on reservoir heterogeneity and hydrocarbon producibility. At a megascopic scale, isolation or continuity of reservoir bodies is a function of depositional topography and the degree of marine reworking of genetically coherent sandstone bodies. These factors result in amalgamated reservoir bodies or in compartments that may remain uncontacted or unconnected during field development. Within producing fields, segmentation of amalgamated sandstone bodies into individual lenses, grain size variations, depositional barriers, and diagenetic baffles further compartmentalize reservoirs, increase tortuosity of fluid flow, and affect sweep efficiency during improved recovery operations.

  7. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mago, Pedro; Newell, LeLe

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  8. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health,...

  9. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States. Appendix, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Overview of improved oil recovery methods (enhanced oil recovery methods and advanced secondary recovery methods); Benefits of improved oil recovery, selected data for the analyzed states; and List of TORIS fields and reservoirs.

  10. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    as they keep their gins going. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4 Past Remembered A glimpse of what life was like, MSU Extension Service George M. Hopper Dean, College of Forest Resources Director, Forest and Wildlife Research Center Director, Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Interim Dean, College

  11. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    , attended the Cloverbud Caper Camp, sponsored by the MSU Extension Service. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4. Jackson Director, MSU Extension Service George M. Hopper Dean, College of Forest Resources Director, Forest and Wildlife Research Center Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Director, Mississippi

  12. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    Center brought artwork and clients to the event. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4 Fresh Food Mississippians Service George M. Hopper Dean, College of Forest Resources Director, Forest and Wildlife Research Center Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Director, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry

  13. AgraPure Mississippi Biomass Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell,D.A; Broadhead, L.W.; Harrell, W.J.

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The AgraPure Mississippi Biomass project was a congressionally directed project, initiated to study the utilization of Mississippi agricultural byproducts and waste products in the production of bio-energy and to determine the feasibility of commercialization of these agricultural byproducts and waste products as feedstocks in the production of energy. The final products from this project were two business plans; one for a Thermal plant, and one for a Biodiesel/Ethanol plant. Agricultural waste fired steam and electrical generating plants and biodiesel plants were deemed the best prospects for developing commercially viable industries. Additionally, oil extraction methods were studied, both traditional and two novel techniques, and incorporated into the development plans. Mississippi produced crop and animal waste biomasses were analyzed for use as raw materials for both industries. The relevant factors, availability, costs, transportation, storage, location, and energetic value criteria were considered. Since feedstock accounts for more than 70 percent of the total cost of producing biodiesel, any local advantages are considered extremely important in developing this particular industry. The same factors must be evaluated in assessing the prospects of commercial operation of a steam and electrical generation plant. Additionally, the access to the markets for electricity is more limited, regulated and tightly controlled than the liquid fuel markets. Domestically produced biofuels, both biodiesel and ethanol, are gaining more attention and popularity with the consuming public as prices rise and supplies of foreign crude become less secure. Biodiesel requires no major modifications to existing diesel engines or supply chain and offers significant environmental benefits. Currently the biodiesel industry requires Federal and State incentives to allow the industry to develop and become self-sustaining. Mississippi has available the necessary feedstocks and is geographically located to be able to service a regional market. Other states have active incentive programs to promote the industry. Mississippi has adopted an incentive program for ethanol and biodiesel; however, the State legislature has not funded this program, leaving Mississippi at a disadvantage when compared to other states in developing the bio-based liquid fuel industry. With all relevant factors being considered, Mississippi offers several advantages to developing the biodiesel industry. As a result of AgraPure's work and plan development, a private investor group has built a 7,000 gallon per day facility in central Mississippi with plans to build a 10 million gallon per year biodiesel facility. The development of a thermochemical conversion/generation facility requires a much larger financial commitment, making a longer operational time necessary to recover the capital invested. Without a renewable portfolio standard to put a floor under the price, or the existence of a suitable steam host, the venture is not economically viable. And so, it has not met with the success of the biodiesel plan. While the necessary components regarding feedstocks, location, permitting and technology are all favorable; the market is not currently favorable for the development of this type of project. In this region there is an abundance of energy generation capacity. Without subsidies or a Mississippi renewable portfolio standard requiring the renewable energy to be produced from Mississippi raw materials, which are not available for the alternative energy source selected by AgraPure, this facility is not economically viable.

  14. EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

  15. Tea Oil Camellia: a New Edible Oil Crop for the United States John M. Ruter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    1 Tea Oil Camellia: a New Edible Oil Crop for the United States© John M. Ruter The University@uga.edu INTRODUCTION Camellia oleifera has been cultivated in China as a source of edible oil. oleifera as a commercial oil seed crop for the southeast (Ruter, 2002). Considerable research is being

  16. State of heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    California is unique in the United States because it has the largest heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees}API gravity) resource, estimated to be in excess of 40 billion barrels. Of the current 941,543 barrels/day of oil produced in California (14% of the U.S. total), 70% or 625,312 barrels/day is heavy oil. Heavy oil constituted only 20% of California`s oil production in the early 1940s, but development of thermal oil production technology in the 1960s allowed the heavy industry to grow and prosper to the point where by the mid-1980s, heavy oil constituted 70% of the state`s oil production. Similar to the rest of the United States, light oil production in the Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Region, and San Joaquin Valley peaked and then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Unlike other states, California developed a heavy oil industry that replaced declining light oil production and increased the states total oil production, despite low heavy oil prices, stringent environmental regulations and long and costly delays in developing known oil resources. California`s deep conversion refineries process the nation`s highest sulfur, lowest API gravity crude to make the cleanest transportation fuels available. More efficient vehicles burning cleaner reformulated fuels have significantly reduced the level of ozone precursors (the main contributor to California`s air pollution) and have improved air quality over the last 20 years. In a state where major oil companies dominate, the infrastructure is highly dependent on the 60% of ANS production being refined in California, and California`s own oil production. When this oil is combined with the small volume of imported crude, a local surplus of marketed oil exists that inhibits exploitation of California`s heavy oil resources. As ANS production declines, or if the export restrictions on ANS sales are lifted, a window of opportunity develops for increased heavy oil production.

  17. Biomarkers and carbon isotopes of oils in the Jurassic Smackover trend of the Gulf Coast states, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofer, Z. (Consultant, Austin, TX (USA))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geochemistry of 25 oils from 23 fields in Alabama and the Mississippi and Louisiana-Arkansas Jurassic salt basins was evaluated. Results show that the oils were generated by a carbonate source rock which was deposited under highly anoxic conditions, and which contains mainly marine derived organic matter. The Mississippi and Louisiana-Arkansas oils are geochemically similar, indicating similar depositional environments for the source. Although the Alabama oils were also derived from a carbonate source rock, they are dissimilar to the Mississippi and Louisiana-Arkansas oils. Terpane biomarkers suggest that in addition to marine derived organic matter, the source for the Alabama oils had an organic input from a more near shore (paralic) environment, i.e. with a component of terrestrially-derived kerogen. Within each area the oils are similar. Therefore, the Norphlet and Upper Smackover oils in Alabama share a common source and the Upper Smackover, Cotton Valley and some of the Lower Tuscaloosa oils (where production is from faulted structures) in Mississippi also share a common source. Maturities of the oils in the three areas vary from low in the updip Mississippi salt basin, high in the Louisiana-Arkansas salt basin, to very high in portions of Alabama. Based on the maturity of oils in Mississippi, oil generation and migration commenced during the Cretaceous when the source was at modest levels of thermal maturity. Oils migrated relatively short distances into nearby reservoir rocks. Some oils reached high maturities in the reservoirs, resulting in abundant late-forming bitumen and pyrobitumen deposition in pore spaces.

  18. MISSISSIPPI ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    MISSISSIPPI ACADEMY OF SCIENCES SIXTY-SIXTH ANNUAL MEETING February 21 & 22, 2002 BILOXI Mississippi #12;Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences-9436) is published in January (annual meeting abstracts), April, July, and October, by the Mississippi Academy

  19. Lower Tuscaloosa of southern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devery, D.M.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lower Tuscaloosa Formation of the upper Cretaceous currently is producing primarily oil from more than 50 fields in the interior salt basin of Mississippi. These fields are located within an area extending from east Louisiana into SW and S.-central Mississippi (Jefferson, Adams, Franklin, Lincoln, Amite, Pike, Walthall, Lamar, Forrest, and Pearl River Counties). Stratigraphically, the Lower Tuscaloosa unconformably overlies lower Cretaceous sediments of the Dantzler Formation and underlies lower Cretaceous shales of the Middle Tuscaloosa. The formation consists of a transgressive sequence that grades upward from alluvial plain through delta to marine deposits. Prospecting for oil and gas as well as developing new fields in the Lower Tuscaloosa can be difficult. There is generally a lack of strong structural closure; accumulation of oil and gas is controlled largely by stratigraphy, with lenticular sands pinching out into shales.

  20. Forestry Policies (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mississippi's forests are managed by the Mississippi Forestry Commission. The Commission issued in 2010 its Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources and Forest Resource Strategy document:

  1. Solar heating system at Security State Bank, Starkville, Mississippi. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on the Solar Energy Heating System (airtype) installed at the branch bank building, northwest corner of Highway 12 and Spring Street, Starkville, Mississippi. This installation was completed in June, 1979. The 312 square feet of Solaron flat plate air collectors provide for 788 square feet of space heating, an estimated 55 percent of the heating load. Solar heated air is distributed to the 96 cubic foot steel cylinder, which contains two inch diameter rocks. An air handler unit moves the air over the collector and into the steel cylinder. Four motorized dampers and two gravity dampers are also part of the system. A Solaron controller which has sensors located at the collectors, rock storage, and at the return air, automatically controls the system. Auxiliary heating energy is provided by electric resistance duct heaters. This project is part of the US Department of Energy's Solar Demonstration Program with the government sharing $14,201 of the $17,498 solar energy system installation cost. This system was acceptance tested February, 1980, and the demonstration period ends in 1985.

  2. Reservoir quality, sediment source, and regional aspects of Norphlet Formation, South State Line field, Greene County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, A.; Stancliffe, R.J.; Shew, R.D.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South State Line field, discovered in 1970, is centrally located in the productive Jurassic Norphlet trend of the eastern Gulf Coast. The Norphlet Formation at South State Line has produced gas and condensate from normally pressured eolian sandstones at depths of more than 17,900 ft (5455 m). The 600-ft- (183-m) thick Norphlet Formation is composed of 100% sandstone and consists of two reservoir types: a poorer quality upper sandstone having low permeability (0.6 md) and a good-quality lower sandstone with better permeability (15.5 md). The upper sandstone exhibits tighter compaction of framework grains and more cement than the lower sandstone. Significantly, the upper sandstone contains authigenic illite (which promotes pressure solution), whereas the lower sandstone contains authigenic chlorite (which inhibits cementation and possibly pressure solution). On a regional scale, illite is the principal diagenetic clay mineral in the western area of the Norphlet trend (Mississippi to Texas), whereas chlorite is the principal diagenetic clay mineral in the east (Alabama to Florida). Not surprisingly, reservoir quality is poorer in the western portion of the trend. A comparison of framework grains in the upper and lower sandstones shows no significant compositional differences. Both are mature arkosic sandstones with a transitional-continental source (eastern Appalachians). No evidence was seen of a quartz-rich Ouachita or cratonic source. Volcanic and plutonic rock fragments are slightly more abundant in the lower sandstone, possibly reflecting a shifting of compositional terranes within a single source area along the eastern side of the Appalachians. The lower Norphlet sandstone may have been derived from Triassic volcanics, whereas the upper sandstone may have been derived from a more metamorphic source.

  3. The value of United States oil and gas reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this research is to estimate a time series, starting in 1979, for the value of in-ground oil reserves and natural gas reserves in the United States. Relatively good statistics exist for the physical quantities. ...

  4. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    the Cover Eric Dibble, background, and University of Georgia graduate student Jennifer Linehan use a seine the furni- ture factories in the northern areas of the state to the fertile fields of the Delta

  5. Bitumen and heavy-oil resources of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crysdale, B.L.; Schenk, C.J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bitumen and heavy-oil deposits represent a significant hydrocarbon resource in the US. Bitumen deposits (10/sup 0/ API) are located in sandstone reservoirs at or near the surface along the margins of sedimentary basins. Heavy oils (10/sup 0/-20/sup 0/ API) are found predominantly in geologically young (Tertiary age and younger) shallow sandstone reservoirs and along the margins of sedimentary basins. Bitumen and heavy oil have high viscosities (10,000 cp for bitumen, 100-10,000 cp for heavy oil) and cannot be recovered by conventional recovery methods. Bitumen deposits have been evaluated in 17 states. The total bitumen resource for the conterminous US is estimated to be 57 billion bbl. Utah contains the largest resource, estimated to be 29 billion bbl, followed by California with 9 billion bbl, Alabama with 6 billion, Texas with 5 billion, and Kentucky with 3 billion. Heavy-oil deposits have been evaluated in 16 states, but most heavy oil is in California, Texas, and Arkansas. Total heavy oil in place for the conterminous US is estimated to be approximately 45 billion bbl; greater than 80% of this amount is in California. The giant Kuparuk deposit on the North Slope of Alaska contains a heavy oil-bitumen resource estimated as high as 40 billion bbl.

  6. The Thirty-First United States Congress and the development of the trans-Mississippi West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandergrift, Kennard Smith

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1850; the Oregon Donation Act; the Bounty Act of 1850; the settlement of the western boundary of Texas and the establishment of the Territory of New Piexico; the act es ablishing the Territory of Utah; and the act admitting California as a state... measure--the settlement of the western boundary of Texas and the creation of the Terri- tory of New Nexico; the admission of California as a state; and the creation of the Territory of Utah--which enhanced the development of the West. Chapter V...

  7. Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louay Chamra

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system specifications is observed. Case study data for various micro-CHP system configurations have been discussed and compared. Comparisons are made of the different prime mover/fuel combinations. Also, micro- CHP monthly energy cost results are compared for each system configuration to conventional monthly utility costs for equivalent monthly building power, heating, and cooling requirements.

  8. South Mississippi's Hosston, Sligo formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hosston and Sligo formations, of Early Cretaceous age, lie above the Cotton Valley group and below the Pine Island formation. The beds dip southwesterly and become thicker within the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, where virtually all of the Hosston/Sligo oil and gas production occurs. The 3500 ft of alternating sands and shales found at 10,000-17,000 ft depths have the attributes of fluvial deltaic sediments. The Newsom, Bowie Creek, and Seminary fields are representative of recent gas discoveries in the Hosston/Sligo.

  9. Antidegredation Implementation Methods (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental regulation is an addition to the Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water regulations. It separates Mississippi's water into 3 tiers. Tier 1 waters...

  10. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Baisn and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain: Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1997-March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.

    1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Part I (Inventory of Existing Data and Information Sources) objectives are to provide improved access to information available in the public domain by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format. The producers in the region maintain that the accessibility of oil and gas information is the single-most important factor to assist them in finding new hydrocarbon discoveries and in improving production from established fields. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with geologists for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. A subcontract has been executed between the University of Alabama and the Geological Survey of Alabama. A subcontract agreement is under review by the Mississippi Office of Geology. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with a number of faculty members from departments of geology in the region. A listing of theses and dissertations from the University of Alabama, Auburn University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Louisiana State University related to the petroleum geology of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been compiled. This list is accessible electronically through the Home Page of the Eastern Gulf Region of the Pertroleum Technology Transfer Council (EGRPTTC) (http://egrpttc.geo.ua.edu).

  11. Brine contamination of ground water and streams in the Baxterville Oil Field Area, Lamar and Marion Counties, Mississippi. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalkhoff, S.J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report defines the extent of oil-field-brine contamination in ground water and streams in the Baxterville oil field area. The report is based largely on data collected during the period October 1984 through November 1985. Water samples were collected from streams and wells in the study area. Data from a previous study conducted in the vicinity of the nearby Tatum Salt Dome were used for background water-quality information. Natural surface-water quality was determined by sampling streamflow from a nearby basin having no oil field activities and from samples collected in an adjacent basin during a previous study.

  12. Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Biomass Solutions (SBS) was formed by the Mississippi Technology Alliance in June 2009. The purpose of the SBS is to provide assistance to existing and potential companies, investors...

  13. Mississippi Public Utility Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mississippi Public Utility Act is relevant to any project that plans to generate energy. It requires that a utility must first obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN)...

  14. Trapping styles in Mississippi, Alabama Haynesville reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sticker, E.E. (Office of Geology, Jackson, MI (United States))

    1994-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jurassic Haynesville formation of Mississippi and Alabama has historically been just another stratigraphic unit to be penetrated before the underlying Smackover-Norphlet potential could be evaluated. But with recent production tests at rates in excess of 3,000 b/d of oil and individual wells that have produced more than 3 million bbl of oil equivalent, assuming a 6 Mcf/bbl ratio, many operators have reclassified the objectives status of the Haynesville from secondary to primary. The paper describes the structure and stratigraphy, the simple anticline, a complexly faulted anticline, a salt-breached anticline, depositional termination, and production projections.

  15. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Kansas and Oklahoma. Volume 5, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the states of Kansas, Illinois and Oklahoma for five other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to Kansas` known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technology, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could have even greater benefits to the state and the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, and energy security will benefit both the state of Kansas, Illinois and Oklahoma and the nation as a whole.

  16. State of Kuwait Ministry of Oil | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shrenik IndustriesState of Kuwait Ministry of Oil

  17. Category:State Oil and Gas Boards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd: China Datang Corporation Trina Solar JA SolarState Oil

  18. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Kansas: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of Kansas. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. Several major technical insights for state and Federal policymakers and regulators can be reached from this analysis. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to the nation`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, Kansas oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit the state of Kansas and the nation as a whole.

  19. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Oklahoma: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of Oklahoma. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. Several major technical insights for state and Federal policymakers and regulators can be reached from this analysis. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to Oklahoma`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, Oklahoma oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase and improvement in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit both the state of Oklahoma and the nation as a whole.

  20. Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria is to establish a minimum State Criteria under the Mississippi Solid Waste Law for all solid waste management...

  1. A report on state expenditures of oil overcharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before the enactment of the Petroleum Overcharge Distribution and Restitution Act of 1986 (PODRA), the Department of Energy's Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued orders directing that $76 million plus interest in unclaimed consent order funds be refunded through state governments for indirect restitution to persons injured by oil overcharges. To date, $73 million in second-stage'' refunds has been distributed in proceedings under OHA's refund regulations. Another $20 million remains to be disbursed. Before approving disbursements of second-stage refunds to the states, OHA requires the submission of restitutionary plans, to determine whether the proposed expenditures would benefit injured persons. In November 1988, OHA entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with DOE's Denver Support Office (DSO) to conduct a limited review of second-stage projects in ten representative states. The DSO was chosen for the task because its staff had similar experience reviewing DOE's State Energy Conservation Program. The reviewers were directed to assess the level of restitution to injured persons achieved by the projects, test the nature of the states' financial administration and technical management of the projects, and verify that they had been implemented as approved. The reviews took place in two groups of five states, which were selected on the basis of three factors: (1) amounts of second-stage refunds received; (2) types of projects undertaken; and (3) geographical diversity. Results are presented.

  2. Production of Fish Oil UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processing that will re- duce the oil content in the meal to a level acceptable to the market. In the pastProduction of Fish Oil UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU. Crowther, Director Production of Fish Oil By GEORGE M. PIGOTT Assistant Professor, Food Science Departm

  3. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States: Appendix. Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume ten contains the following appendices: overview of improved oil recovery methods which covers enhanced oil recovery methods and advanced secondary recovery methods; the benefits of improved oil recovery, selected data for the analyzed states; and list of TORIS fields and reservoirs.

  4. Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

  5. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  6. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  7. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 245 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  8. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic, social, and political benefits of improved oil recovery to the nation as a whole. Individual reports for major oil producing states have been separately published. The individual state reports include California, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to the nation`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, domestic oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase and improvement in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit the nation as a whole.

  9. State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity CorpSpringfield,WindForeign ExchangeStateBoard

  10. Peak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    the possibility of multiple maxima (peaks) There is no particular reason why peak oil in New Mexico or some to assume that these peaks will not occur at the same time. #12;The Oil Peak in New Mexico Source: Starbuck are Proved Reserves? "Proved reserves of crude oil are the estimated quantities which geological

  11. Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Waste oils offer a tremendous recycling potential. An important, dwindling natural resource of great economic and industrial value, oil products are a cornerstone of our modern industrial society. Petroleum is processed into a wide variety of products: gasoline, fuel oil, diesel oil, synthetic rubber, solvents, pesticides, synthetic fibres, lubricating oil, drugs and many more ' (see Figure 1 1. The boilers of Amercian industries presently consume about 40 % of the used lubricating oils collected. In Ontario, the percentage varies from 20 to 30%. Road oiling is the other major use of collected waste oils. Five to seven million gallons (50-70 % of the waste oil col1ected)is spread on dusty Ontario roads each summer. The practice is both a wasteful use of a dwindling resource and an environmental hazard. The waste oil, with its load of heavy metals, particularly lead, additives including dangerous polynuclear aromatics and PCBs, is carried into the natural environment by runoff and dust to contaminate soils and water courses.2 The largest portion of used oils is never collected, but disappears into sewers, landfill sites and backyards. In Ontario alone, approximately 22 million gallons of potentially recyclable lube oil simply vanish each year. While oil recycling has ad-114 Oil

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  13. South Mississippi Electric Power Association Smart Grid Project (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Mississippi Electric Power Associations (SMEPA) smart grid project involves the deployment of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and covers the Generation and Transmission (G&T)...

  14. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic, social, and political benefits of improved oil recovery to the nation as a whole. Individual reports for major oil producing states have been separately published. The individual state reports include California, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). TORIS is a tested and verified system maintained and operated by the Department of Energy`s Bartlesville Project Office. The TORTS system was used to evaluate over 2,300 major reservoirs in a consistent manner and on an individual basis, the results of which have been aggregated to arrive at the national total.

  15. EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS...

  16. Mississippi Public Service Commission Adopts Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mississippi Public Service Commission Adopts Energy Efficiency Rules Mississippi Public Service Commission Adopts Energy Efficiency Rules November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

  17. State heating oil and propane program, 1994--1995 heating season. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Propane prices and No. 2 fuel prices during the 1994-1995 heating season are tabulated for the state of Ohio. Nineteen companies were included in the telephone survey of propane prices, and twenty two companies for the fuel oil prices. A bar graph is also presented for average residential prices of No. 2 heating oil.

  18. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    45.5 49.2 W W 44.5 45.4 See footnotes at end of table. 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

  19. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    55.1 47.1 W W 55.1 46.2 See footnotes at end of table. 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

  20. EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, Mississippi EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi...

  1. Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal...

  2. Recovery Act State Memos Mississippi

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    are being used to hire or retrain staff, building in-house expertise in the areas of Smart Grids, critical energy infrastructure interdependencies and cyber-security....

  3. Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A'Salmon, Mississippi,

  4. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the 2012 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. A revised plan is in preparation. The Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site is intended for release in 2013. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi The State of Mississippi owns the surface real estate subject to certain restrictions related to subsurface penetration. The State is the surface operator; the Mississippi Forestry Commission is its agent. The federal government owns the subsurface real estate (including minerals and some surface features), shares right-of-entry easements with the State, and retains rights related to subsurface monitoring. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, is responsible for the long-term surveillance of the subsurface real estate

  5. Salmon, Mississippi Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salmon, Mississippi, Site, also called the Tatum Dome Test Site, is a 1,470-acre tract of land in Lamar County, Mississippi, 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg. The nearest town is Purvis, about 10 miles east of the site. The site is in a forested region known as the long-leaf pine belt of the Gulf Coastal Plain. Elevations in the area range from about 240 to 350 feet above sea level. The site overlies a salt formation called the Tatum Salt Dome. Land around the Salmon site has residential, industrial, and commercial use, although no one lives within the boundary of the site itself. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense conducted two underground nuclear tests at the site under the designation of Project Dribble, part of a larger program known as the Vela Uniform program. Two gas explosive tests, designated Project Miracle Play, were also conducted at the site.

  6. Does Ownership Matter? The Performance and Efficiency of State Oil vs. Private Oil (1987-2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, C

    -owned International Oil Companies (IOCs). The dataset, which is based on a survey published by Energy Intelligence and covers 1,001 firm observation years in the period 1987 to 2006, provides a unique corporate perspective on the industrys development. After... could enter into long-term supply contracts as a temporary measure, but ultimately the Admiralty should become the independent owner and producer of its own supplies of liquid fuel.2 In 1914, the British government therefore acquired a controlling...

  7. Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected FutureReservesBarrels) Crude Oil

  8. Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is...

  9. State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunton, G.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

  10. Ashland Oil Spill: A state of environmental perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osman, F.P. (Pennsylvania Dept. of environmental Resources, Harrisburg (USA))

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ashland Oil Spill, while certainly not the largest in history, may have been the most severe in terms of its potential impact on water supplies. This paper presents a case history of the spill from initial notification to the long-term environmental clean-up activities and underscores the need for additional regulation of above-ground storage tanks. On January 2, 1988, a tank containing 3.9 million gallons of diesel fuel collapsed and discharged three quarters of a million gallons into the Monongahela River in Floreffe, PA. The spill resulted in severe short-term environmental damage, the closing of a major inland port, and threatened the drinking water supplies of 500,000 people in Pennsylvania. The PA Dept. of Environmental Resources (DER) staff worked closely with local authorities to first contain the diesel fuel on site and then to provide additional warnings to downstream users as more information about the size of the spill became available. With the deployment of 20,000 feet of a river-wide containment boom, eleven vacuum trucks, three cranes, and over 150 people, about 30% of the product which entered the river through a 24-inch pipe was collected. One week after the spill, all PA water plants were back on line and treating water, albeit with modified processes. The Ashland tank failure led to numerous reviews of the response to the incident, the causes and effects of the incident, and the regulatory requirements for above-ground tank storage.

  11. State Oil and Gas Boards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity CorpSpringfield,WindForeign ExchangeStateBoardState

  12. Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) activities will be concentrated in two areas: (1) HCEI Working Groups will be formed and made up of private, state, and U.S. government experts in the areas of Transportation and Fuels, Electricity Generation, Energy Delivery and Transmission, and End-Use Efficiency; and (2) Partnership Projects will be undertaken with local and mainland partners that demonstrate and commercialize new technologies and relieve technical barriers.

  13. VES-0071- In the Matter of Mississippi Power Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 1, 2000, the Mississippi Power Company, of Gulfport, Mississippi (Mississippi Power), filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy an Application for...

  14. State Heating Oil and Propane Program, 1990--1991 heating season. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The following discussion summarizes the survey approach and results of the Department of Public Service`s survey of retail fuel oil and propane prices during the 1990--91 heating season. The semi-monthly phone surveys were conducted in cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s State Fuel Oil and Propane Program, which coordinated surveys of heating fuel prices by 25 eastern and midwest states. This federal/state program serves as a method for fast collection, analysis, and dissemination of information on current residential prices. No other information source meets needs for timely retail price information over the course of the heating season. For the 1990--91 heating season, the Minnesota Department of Public Service (MN/DPS) expanded the scope of its survey effort to include regional price data. Surveys were conducted with 160 retailers, including 59 respondents from the DOE samples, to provide a reasonable sample size for each region. Fuel oil retailers were also asked for updates on their secondary inventory levels.

  15. State Heating Oil and Propane Program, 1990--1991 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The following discussion summarizes the survey approach and results of the Department of Public Service's survey of retail fuel oil and propane prices during the 1990--91 heating season. The semi-monthly phone surveys were conducted in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's State Fuel Oil and Propane Program, which coordinated surveys of heating fuel prices by 25 eastern and midwest states. This federal/state program serves as a method for fast collection, analysis, and dissemination of information on current residential prices. No other information source meets needs for timely retail price information over the course of the heating season. For the 1990--91 heating season, the Minnesota Department of Public Service (MN/DPS) expanded the scope of its survey effort to include regional price data. Surveys were conducted with 160 retailers, including 59 respondents from the DOE samples, to provide a reasonable sample size for each region. Fuel oil retailers were also asked for updates on their secondary inventory levels.

  16. Exploration pace fast in Mississippi, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration in northern and southern Mississippi and adjacent northwestern Alabama is off to a fast start in 1991. A sample of activity in the area includes a potentially significant Cambro-Ordovician Knox dolomite play building in northern Mississippi and west of the Black Warrior basin. In northeastern Mississippi, two companies are kicking off a Knox exploratory program on a spread of more than 200,000 net acres.

  17. Entergy Mississippi- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Entergy Mississippi offers residential energy efficiency programs to help residential customers save energy by providing rebates for lighting, heating and cooling equipment, A/C tune ups, and...

  18. Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations...

  19. Public policy implications of deepening the lower Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cocchiara, J.G.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippi River and its tributary system serves the industrial and agricultural heartland of the United States. In terms of total tonnage, the deep water channel of the lower Mississippi, stretching 253 miles from the Gulf of Mexico to Baton Rouge, is the largest port complex in the world. The vast majority of the cargo carried on the river is carried in bulk, a major portion of which could benefit from a deeper river channel. The Corps of Engineers has recommended a 55 foot channel to Baton Rouge, but the Reagan administration has insisted that the federal government will no longer fully fund such projects. In response, the State of Louisiana, under the direction of Governor David C. Treen, has conducted its own independent in-depth evaluation of providing deeper draft access to the lower Mississippi. A special task force established for this purpose recently concluded a year long investigation. On September 2, it issued a recommendation for a phased deepening project, at a significantly lower cost than the Corps recommended plan, in combination with private development of offshore topping-off facilities.

  20. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  1. The bases of a new organisation of the Russian oil sector: between private and State S. Boussena,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . Boussena, Professor, University of Grenoble II, former Algerian Minister of Energy, C. Locatelli1 to use Russia's oil power in this international relationships with the United States, Europe and Asia cast serious doubt on the capacity of the State to regulate rent industries through classic market

  2. Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Larry, E.

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with much progress. However, the current state of biological technology is not deemed to be ready commercially. A preliminary estimate of capital and operating costs of a 12000 gallon per day gasification/biological facility was developed for comparison purposes. In addition, during the biological organism screening and testing, some possible alternative products were identified. One such possibility is the biological production of bio-diesel. Additional research is necessary for further evaluation of all of the biological concepts.

  3. State Heating Oil and Propane Program Expansion of Propane Data Collection

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember

  4. Mississippi Regulations For the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Mississippi Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes is to prevent the excessive buildup of air pollutants during air pollution episodes, thus...

  5. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    state oil companies, Saudi Aramco, Petroleos de Venezuela,state oil companies, Saudi Aramco, Petroleos de Venezuela,

  6. Upper Jurassic depositional systems and hydrocarbon potential of southeast Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meendsen, F.C.; Moore, C.H.; Heydari, E.; Sassen, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic sedimentation in southeast Mississippi was controlled by eustatic sea level fluctuations and locally modified by salt tectonism and basement structure. This study, using conventional core data and geophysical logs, indicates that a stable carbonate platform developed along the updip margin of the Mississippi interior salt basin. The basin was partially barred from the main Gulf of Mexico water mass by the Wiggins uplift, and became evaporitic during the Late Jurassic. Moldic, intercrystalline, and vuggy dolomite porosity is developed on the crests of intermediate and high-amplitude salt highs and on the Wiggins uplift. Jurassic source rocks are lower Smackover laminated lime mudstones. Migration into adjacent reservoirs postdated formation of porosity and the growth of salt anticlines, the most common trap type. A large potential Norphlet-Smackover gas play extends along the southern flank of the Wiggins uplift. Salt anticlines within the interior basin remain viable targets. Small oil discoveries should continue in stratigraphic traps, subtle salt structures, and basement blocks on the platform.

  7. Mississippi Power- EarthCents Financing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mississippi Power offers loans to residential customers to help pay for energy efficiency upgrades. The loan can be used for heat pumps, heating and cooling systems, electric water heaters,...

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    facilities in Mississippi, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  9. Mississippi

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40 60

  10. Sixty-sixth annual report of the state oil and gas supervisor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains tabulated oil and gas statistics compiled during 1980 in California. On-shore and off-shore oil production, gas production, reserves, drilling activity, enhanced recovery activity, unconventional heavy oil recovery, geothermal operations and financial data are reported. (DMC)

  11. Carbon dioxide source development, northeast Jackson Dome, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studlick, J.R.J.; Shew, R.D.; Basye, G.L.; Ray, J.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot conducted at Little Creek field Mississippi, in the 1970s indicated that the injection of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) could lead to the successful recovery of additional oil reserves even after waterflood operations. It was realized early that a large volume of CO/sub 2/ would be required for enhanced oil recovery operations Little Creek and other prospective fields. Shell's search for CO/sub 2/ in the area began in the early 1970s. Exploratory drilling for hydrocarbons as early as 1950 had indicated high concentrations of CO/sub 2/ present in central Mississippi. These occur in salt-generated structures north and east of the intrusive Jackson igneous dome; the area is therefore termed the N.E. Jackson Dome Source Area. CO/sub 2/ generation is believed to have occurred by the thermal metamorphism associated with the intrusion of Jurassic-age carbonates. The CO/sub 2/ migrated updip and is concentrated in the Buckner, Smackover, and Norphlet Formations at depths of 14,000 to 17,000 ft. The objectives are sandstones and dolomites that are interpreted as dune and sabkha deposits. Reservoir quality is variable (abundant illite locally in the Norphlet and highly compacted sandstones in the Buckner) but generally good. Rates of 20 MMCFGD have been tested from these wells. Many salt-related structures have been defined in the source area by seismic data. Leasing began in 1973 and drilling in 1977. Eight structures have been tested, with all but one encountering commercial CO/sub 2/ accumulations. Shell has drilled 15 wells (13 successful, 1 junked and abandoned, and 1 dry hole) on 640- and 1280-ac spacing. Gas compositions vary: Smackover CO/sub 2/ is sour and will require treatment, whereas the Buckner and Norphlet sands contain sweet and semisweet CO/sub 2/, respectively. Industry reserves in N.E. Jackson Dome exceed 6 tcf of gas.

  12. Land Cover Change of Louisiana and Mississippi produced by Hurricane Katrina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Land Cover Change of Louisiana and Mississippi produced by Hurricane Katrina WILMA N. PABN RAMREZ of the strongest and most devastating hurricanes in the history of the United States: the hurricane Katrina. INTRODUCTION Hurricane Katrina is the sixth strongest Atlantic hurricane ever recorded and is the third

  13. EIS-0385-S1: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since selecting the Richton site, DOE has engaged in further consultations with Federal and Mississippi state agencies and is now considering different locations from those addressed in DOE/EIS0385 for certain facilities associated with the Richton SPR expansion site.

  14. Obama Administration Awards More than $153 Million for State...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and renewable energy projects in Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Montana, New York, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Under DOE's State Energy Program, states and...

  15. Petrology and hydrocarbon reservoir potential of Mississippian (Chesterian) sandstones, Black Warrior basin, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.B.; Meylan, M.A.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The character and reservoir quality of six different Mississippian (Chesterian) sandstone units in frontier areas of the Black Warrior basin of Mississippi have been determined by core inspection, thin-section examination, and x-ray diffractometry. A total of 113 samples from ten wells was taken from cores of the following sandstones: the Lewis, a calcareous sandstone at the top of or just above the Lewis that the authors refer to as the Lewis limestone, the Evans, the Rea, the Sanders, and the Carter. Hydrocarbon production from the basin, which is located in northeastern Mississippi and northwestern Alabama, is mostly shallow gas (with minor gas condensate and oil) from the units. Sample depths range from about 2500 ft (762 m) in northern Chickasaw County to about 5500 ft (1676 m) in Monroe and Lowndes Counties, with the deepest samples coming from almost 11,000 ft (3353 m) in northern Clay County.

  16. State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, Betsy

    2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

  17. DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An agreement aimed at improving cooperation and collaboration in the areas of oil and natural gas supply, delivery, and climate change mitigation, has been signed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC).

  18. INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH Last year the Alaska Legislature made a controversial change in the oil production tax, the state's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    ;INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH 2 HOW THE PRODUCTION TAX WORKS Since 2007 the petroleum production change in the oil production tax, the state's largest source of oil revenue. The old tax, known as ACES (Alaska's Clear and Equitable Share), was replaced with MAPA (More Alaska Production Act, or SB21). How

  19. Mississippi Regulations for the Prevention of Significant Deterioration of Air Quality (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation applies to any stationary source or modification to which 40 CFR 52.21 applied as of the date of adoption of this regulation, but for which the Mississippi Environmental Quality...

  20. PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or by refin- ing and using shale Oil Mass balances and oil.shale retorting produces shale oil, mobility factors wereand retort operating shale, shale oil, retorting (LETC) con-

  1. Geophysical investigation, Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical surveys were conducted in 1992 and 1993 on 21 sites at the Salmon Site (SS) located in Lamar County, Mississippi. The studies are part of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) being conducted by IT Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). During the 1960s, two nuclear devices and two chemical tests were detonated 826 meters (in) (2710 feet [ft]) below the ground surface in the salt dome underlying the SS. These tests were part of the Vela Uniform Program conducted to improve the United States capability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The RI/FS is being conducted to determine if any contamination is migrating from the underground shot cavity in the salt dome and if there is any residual contamination in the near surface mud and debris disposal pits used during the testing activities. The objective of the surface geophysical surveys was to locate buried debris, disposal pits, and abandoned mud pits that may be present at the site. This information will then be used to identify the locations for test pits, cone penetrometer tests, and drill hole/monitor well installation. The disposal pits were used during the operation of the test site in the 1960s. Vertical magnetic gradient (magnetic gradient), electromagnetic (EM) conductivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to accomplish these objectives. A description of the equipment used and a theoretical discussion of the geophysical methods are presented Appendix A. Because of the large number of figures relative to the number of pages of text, the geophysical grid-location maps, the contour maps of the magnetic-gradient data, the contour maps of the EM conductivity data, and the GPR traverse location maps are located in Appendix B, Tabs I through 22. In addition, selected GPR records are located in Appendix C.

  2. State heating oil & propane program. Final report for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 1994--1995 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared by the Pennsylvania Energy Office (PEO) to summarize its activities under the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1994-95 heating season. The PEO is under a cooperative agreement, Agreement DE-7C01-91E122784, Amendment No. 3, with the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) to conduct these activities. The objective of the SHOPP program was to collect Pennsylvania-specific price information for residential No. 2 heating oil and propane and transmit this information to DOE/EIA for compilation into its various reports and publications. Under the PEO`s cooperative agreement with DOE/EIA, prices were collected on the first and third Mondays of each month, starting on October 3, 1994, and extending through March 20, 1995. Prices were obtained via telephone calls made by PEO staff. For each heating oil distributor in the survey sample, the PEO collected charge prices for a standard delivery quantity of No. 2 heating oil. For propane, dealers were requested to provide the price for a customer using between one thousand and fifteen hundred gallons of fuel during the heating season. The PEO agreed to forward the survey results to the DOE/EIA within three days of the date of each survey. DOE/EIA`s responsibility was to compile the data from all states and distribute a bi-weekly report. In addition, DOE/EIA took responsibility for the collection of primary stock information for No. 2 heating oil.

  3. Gunboat and musket: Civil War on the upper Mississippi River, 1861-1862

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Karl William

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's secessionist State Guard had been pushed west, the struggle for the Mississippi commenced in the southeastern regions of the state. Major General Leonidas Polk, commanding the Confederate river forces, and Major General John C. Fremont, commander... of the Union's western department, jockeyed for control of southeastern Missouri. During 1861 neither side ac- complished much, militarily speaking. A Confederate invasion of the area in the summer fizzled for want of firm direction from General Polk...

  4. University of Mississippi School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raucher, Drazen

    of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, MS Hayes Baker Internal Med University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA Hood Urology Wake Forest University School of Medicine Winston-Salem, NC Josh Hughes Neurosurgery Mayo Graduate School of Medicine Rochester, MN Joy Hughes Gen Surgery Mayo Graduate School of Medicine Rochester

  5. Mississippi Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercialper Thousand70 349252 254 245 276

  6. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)CommercialperSalesU.S.Feet) Year

  7. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)CommercialperSalesU.S.Feet)

  8. Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale Production

  9. Oil and Gas Production (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This...

  10. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  11. Mississippi Power- EarthCents Commercial Incentives Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mississippi Power offers rebates to commercial customers to help offset the cost of conversions from gas equipment to energy efficient electric equipment. Rebates are eligible for heat pumps,...

  12. Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport- Mississippi Power Partnership Success Story

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport - Mississippi Power Partnership success storygiven at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting...

  13. PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by interactions between the products (oil, gas, and reported1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents: thethat centage good product raw oil shale and input gases that

  14. PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. , 1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents:In- Situ Retorting of Oil Shale in a Controlled- Stateactivation: Archaeometry, oil-shale analysis v. 11, p.

  15. Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L. [Mississippi Office of Geology, Jackson, MS (United States)

    1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

  16. Dry Creek salt dome, Mississippi Interior Salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Ericksen, R.L.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent drilling of salt dome flanks in the Mississippi Salt basin has resulted in important new discoveries and the opening of a frontier play. This play is focused on gas/condensate reserves in several Cretaceous formations, most notably the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw and lower Tuscaloosa intervals and Lower Cretaceous Paluxy and Hosston formations. As many as eight domes have been drilled thus far; sandstones in the upper Hosston Formation comprise the primary target. Production has been as high as 3-5 Mcf and 500-1200 bbl of condensate per day, with estimated ultimate reserves in the range of 0.2 to 1.5 MBOE (million barrels oil equivalent) per well. As typified by discovery at Dry Creek salt dome, traps are related to faulting, unconformities, and updip loss of permeability. Previous drilling at Dry Creek, and in the basin generally, avoided the flank areas of most domes, due to geologic models that predicted latestage (Tertiary) piercement and breached accumulations. Recent data from Dry Creek and other productive domes suggest that growth was episodic and that piercement of Tertiary strata did not affect deeper reservoirs charged with hydrocarbons in the Late Cretaceous.

  17. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Grand Gulf Unit 1","1,251","9,643",100.0,"Syste...

  18. Nutrient Management, Mississippi 2004 Larry Oldham, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Cropping Management Systems for the Brown Loam Area of Mississippi Animal By-Product Related Nutrient Litter Management for Land Productivity and Water Quality: Forestry Component Comparison of PoultryNutrient Management, Mississippi 2004 Larry Oldham, Ph.D. Associate Extension Professor - Soils #12

  19. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Vehicle Rental Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Vehicle Rental Request Form Driver Name Date: Travel Destination: Account #: Vehicle Information 1995 Crown Victoria 1995 Crown Victoria 1995 with the MSU Authorized Vehicle Use Policy. You further acknowledge that you have executed the Mississippi

  20. Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces Krista Pursuing a degree within the Geology & Geological Engineering department Record of financial need the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Science degree in geological engineering in 1982. After earning

  1. EIS-0409: Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide funding for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project in Kemper County, Mississippi to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project proposed by Southern Power Company, through its affiliate Mississippi Power Company, which has been selected by DOE for consideration under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program.

  2. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The FY 2004 Annual Technical Report of the Mississippi Water Resources Research - GeoResources Institute of Nutrient and Pesticide Runoff Losses from Golf Courses and Residential Lawns in the South Atlantic

  3. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The FY 2005 Annual Technical Report for the Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute summarizes USGS and Pesticide Runoff Losses from Golf Courses and Residential Lawns in the South Atlantic-Gulf Region Basic

  4. EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a petroleum coke-to-substitute natural gas facility proposed to be built by Mississippi Gasification. The facility would be designed to produce 120 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. Other products would be marketable sulfuric acid, carbon dioxide, argon, and electric power.

  5. ,"Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDry NaturalCrudeGas,Crude Oil +

  6. ,"California--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDry NaturalCrude Oil Reserves

  7. ,"Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas, WetGas, WetCrude Oil +

  8. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

  9. Directional drilling used in Mississippi River crossing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuess, G.T.

    1988-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. recently completed its longest large-diameter directional bore and pulled nearly 3,000 feet of 20-in. replacement pipe under the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River. The replacement was necessary to allow for planned widening and deepening of Southwest Pass. This article explains why conventional dredging methods were not possible. It then explains how the directional drilling was done. Given favorable soil conditions such as found along much of the Gulf Coast, the speed of installation, environmental consideration of dredging eliminated, and the cost-competitive posture Tennessee found among the directional drilling contractors, Tennessee plans to utilize this technique increasingly in the future.

  10. Energy Incentive Programs, Mississippi | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogenDistributionFactIowa EnergyMaineMichiganMississippi

  11. Canton, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermits ManualCanisteo, New York:Canton,Mississippi: Energy

  12. Taylor, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0InformationBPLake Village,Mississippi:

  13. Mississippi County Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers Inc JumpFinancingMinnesotaMintMississippi

  14. Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers IncMississippi: Energy Resources Jump to:

  15. Ridgeland, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,Maze -Richton Park, Illinois:Ridgeland, Mississippi:

  16. Utica, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies and toolsoperation plans forMississippi:

  17. Vicksburg, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeter Logging Jump to:Vicksburg, Mississippi: Energy

  18. Assistance to state underground injection control programs and the oil and gas industry with class 2 injection well data management and technology transfer. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paque, M.J.

    1995-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Injection Practices Research Foundation (UIPRF) administered a grant project funded by the US Department of Energy relating to Class 2 injection well operations in various primacy and direct implementation states throughout the country. This effort provided substantial benefits to state regulatory agencies and oil and gas producing companies. It enhanced the protection of the environment through the protection of ground water resources and improved oil and gas production operations within affected states. This project involved the following accomplishment: (1) Completed the design and installation of the only comprehensive, fully relational PC-Based Oil and Gas regulatory data management system (the Risk Based Data Management System) in the country. Additionally, training and data conversion was conduced and the RBDMS User`s Guide and the RBDMS Administrator`s Guide were completed. (2) State wide Area-Of-Review (AOR) workshop were held in California and Oklahoma and a national three-day workshop was held in Kansas City, Missouri where 24 state oil and gas agencies were represented.

  19. Past, Present, and Future Production of Bio-oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Philip; Yu, Fei; Gajjela, Sanjeev

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-oil is a liquid product produced by fast pyrol-ysis of biomass. The fast pyrolysis is performed by heating the biomass rapidly (2 sec) at temperatures ranging from 350 to 650 oC. The vapors produced by this rapid heating are then condensed to produce a dark brown water-based emulsion composed of frag-ments of the original hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin molecules contained in the biomass. Yields range from 60 to 75% based on the feedstock type and the pyrolysis reactor employed. The bio-oil pro-duced by this process has a number of negative prop-erties that are produced mainly by the high oxygen content (40 to 50%) contributed by that contained in water (25 to 30% of total mass) and oxygenated compounds. Each bio-oil contains hundreds of chemi-cal compounds. The chemical composition of bio-oil renders it a very recalcitrant chemical compound. To date, the difficulties in utilizing bio-oil have limited its commercial development to the production of liq-uid smoke as food flavoring. Practitioners have at-tempted to utilize raw bio-oil as a fuel; they have also applied many techniques to upgrade bio-oil to a fuel. Attempts to utilize raw bio-oil as a combustion engine fuel have resulted in engine or turbine dam-age; however, Stirling engines have been shown to successfully combust raw bio-oil without damage. Utilization of raw bio-oil as a boiler fuel has met with more success and an ASTM standard has recently been released describing bio-oil characteristics in relation to assigned fuel grades. However, commercialization has been slow to follow and no reports of distribution of these bio-oil boiler fuels have been reported. Co-feeding raw bio-oil with coal has been successfully performed but no current power generation facilities are following this practice. Upgrading of bio-oils to hydrocarbons via hydroprocessing is being performed by several organizations. Currently, limited catalyst life is the obstacle to commercialization of this tech-nology. Researchers have developed means to increase the anhydrosugars content of bio-oil above the usual 3% produced during normal pyrolysis by mild acid pretreatment of the biomass feedstock. Mississippi State University has developed a proprietary method to produce an aqueous fraction containing more than 50% of anhydrosugars content. These anhydrosugars can be catalyzed to hydrogen or hydrocarbons; alter-nately, the aqueous fraction can be hydrolyzed to pro-duce a high-glucose content. The hydrolyzed product can then be filtered to remove microbial inhibitor compounds followed by production of alcohols by fer-mentation. Production of bio-oil is now considered a major candidate as a technology promising production of drop-in transportation and boiler fuels.

  20. Characterization of oil transport in the power cylinder of internal combustion engines during steady state and transient operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Przesmitzki, Steve (Steve Victor)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engine friction, wear, and oil consumption are some of the primary interests for the automotive industry. However, there is currently a lack of understanding of the fundamentals involving oil transport inside the power ...

  1. Final report of the Rhode Island State Energy Office on residential no. 2 heating oil and propane prices [SHOPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClanahan, Janice

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report on residential No.2 heating oil and propane prepared under grant. Summarizes the monitoring and analysis of heating oil and propane prices from October 2000 through March 2001.

  2. Dynamic analysis in productivity, oil shock, and recession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katayama, Munechika

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investment Capital Utilization Percent deviations from the steady state Oil (Investment Capital Utilization Percent deviations from the steady state Oil (Investment Capital Utilization Percent deviations from the steady state Oil (

  3. Bibliography, geophysical data locations, and well core listings for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, comprehensive basin analysis and petroleum system modeling studies have not been performed on any of the basins in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Of these basins, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been selected for study because it is the most petroliferous basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, small- and medium-size companies are drilling the majority of the exploration wells. These companies do not have the resources to perform basin analysis or petroleum system modeling research studies nor do they have the resources to undertake elaborate information searches through the volumes of publicly available data at the universities, geological surveys, and regulatory agencies in the region. The Advanced Geologic Basin Analysis Program of the US Department of Energy provides an avenue for studying and evaluating sedimentary basins. This program is designed to improve the efficiency of the discovery of the nation`s remaining undiscovered oil resources by providing improved access to information available in the public domain and by increasing the amount of public information on domestic basins. This report provides the information obtained from Year 1 of this study of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. The work during Year 1 focused on inventorying the data files and records of the major information repositories in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and making these inventories easily accessible in an electronic format.

  4. Role of halite in the evolution of sandstone porosity, upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of petrographic point-count data, cement paragenesis, and scanning electron microscopy examination of pores has shown that poikilitic halite cement in sandstones of the Norphlet Formation in a core from Wayne County, Mississippi, formed following cementation by quartz, feldspar, dolomite, and anhydrite. Intergranular volume ranges from 26 to 42%, averaging 35%, indicating that an average of 10% of the rock volume was lost to compaction, and a further 10-15%, was lost to cementation prior to halite cementation, assuming a depositional porosity of about 45%. Most halite occurs as intergranular cement, but some halite is present as intragranular cement within framework feldspars and lithic fragments. Halite is easily removed from a sandstone during coring, slabbing, and thin-section preparation techniques that do not use oil-based fluids and muds, so the amount of porosity in these samples that is a product of artificial removal of halite is unknown. Although the present and former distribution of halite is poorly known, natural halite dissolution could have produced about 20% secondary porosity in the Norphlet Formation at depth in this part of the Mississippi Salt basin.

  5. Mississippi Power- EarthCents Residential Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mississippi Power offers rebates to its residential customers to help offset the cost of conversions from gas equipment to energy efficient electric equipment. Rebates are eligible for heat pumps,...

  6. Mississippi Power- EarthCents New Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mississippi Power offers incentives to its residential customers to help offset the cost of installing energy efficient measures in new homes. A three-level program is offered to encourage the...

  7. FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Biloxi, Mississippi | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Katherine Hamilton, President of GridWise Alliance (PDF 876 KB) 12:00 pm Lunch Tony Smith, Manager, Plant Eaton, Mississippi Power's Renewable Generation Initiatives 1:15 pm...

  8. Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Surface and Groundwater Use and Protection is to ensure that Mississippi's public resource of water is safe and used properly. It requires that any person must obtain a permit...

  9. Distribution of cesium-137 in the Mississippi Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pflaum, Ronald Charles

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Commission Health and Safety Lab (HASL-329). The stations reporting Sr fallout data within the Mississippi drainage basin were located in Argoune, Ill. ; New Orleans, La. ; International Falls, Minn. ; Columbia, Mo. ; Williston, N. Dak. ; Tulsa...

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in Mississippi Fan sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandberg, William Allan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DISTRIBUTIONS IN MISSISSIPPI FAN SEDIMENTS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALLAN SANDBERG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Oceanography POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DISTRIBUTIONS IN MISSISSIPPI FAN SEDIMENTS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALLAN SANDBERG Approved as to style and content by: James M. Brooks (Chairman of Committee) Leis M...

  11. Host Plants of Xylosandrus mutilatus in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, W.D.; Nebeker, T.E. [Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Box 9775, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Gerard, P.D. [Experimental Statistics Unit, Mississippi State University, Box 9731, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Host range of Xylosandrus mutilatus (Blandford) in North America is reported here for the first time. Descriptive data such as number of attacks per host, size of stems at point of attacks, and height of attacks above ground are presented. Hosts observed in Mississippi were Acer rubrum L., Acer saccharum Marsh., Acer palmatum Thunb., Ostrya virginiana (Mill.) K. Koch., Cornus florida L., Fagus grandifolia Ehrh., Liquidamber styraciflua L., Carya spp., Liriodendron tulipifera L., Melia azedarach L., Pinus taeda L., Prunus serotina Ehrh., Prunus americana Marsh., Ulmus alata Michaux, and Vitus rotundifolia Michaux. Liquidamber styraciflua had significantly more successful attacks, significantly higher probability of attacks, and significantly higher number of adult beetles per host tree than did Carya spp., A. rubrum, and L. tulipifera. This information is relevant in determining the impact this exotic beetle may have in nurseries, urban areas, and other forestry systems where this beetle becomes established. (author) [Spanish] El rango de hospederos de Xylosandrus mutilatus (Blandford) en America del Norte esta reportado aqui por la primera vez. Se presentan datos descriptivos como el numero de ataques por hospederos, el tamano de los tallos en el punto de ataque y la altura por encima del nivel de tierra de los ataques. Los hospederos observados en el estado de Mississippi fueron Acer rubrum L., Acer saccharum Marsh., Acer palmatum Thunb., Ostrya virginiana (Mill.) K. Koch., Cornus florida L., Fagus grandifolia Ehrh., Liquidamber styraciflua L., Carya spp., Liriodendron tulipifera L., Melia azedarach L., Pinus taeda L., Prunus serotina Ehrh., Prunus americana Marsh., Ulmus alata Michaux y Vitus rotundifolia Michaux. Liquidamber styraciflua tuvo ataques significativamente mas exitosos, una probabilidad significativamente mas alta de ataques y un numero significativamente mayor de adultos de escarabajos por arbol hospedero que Carya spp., A. rubrum y L. tulipifera. Esta informacion es pertinente en determinar el impacto que pueda tener este escarabajo exotico en invernaderos, areas urbanas y otros sistemas forestales donde el escarabajo se establece. (author)

  12. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  13. State heating oil and propane program: Final report. Survey of No.2 heating oil and propane prices at the retail level, October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Efficiency Division of the Vermont Department of Public Service (DPS) monitored the price and inventory of residential heating oil and propane during the 1997--98 heating season under a grant from the US Department of Energy`s Energy Information Administration (EIA). DPS staff collected data biweekly between October 5, 1997 and March 16, 1998 on the retail price of {number_sign}2 home heating oil and propane by telephone survey. Propane price quoted was based on the rate for a residential home heating customer using 1,000+ per year. The survey included a sample of fuel dealers selected by the EIA, plus additional dealers and fuels selected by the DPS. The EIA weighted, analyzed, and reported the data collected from their sample.

  14. Environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic concerns associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits: state-of-knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

    1982-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tar-sand petroleum-extraction procedures undergoing field testing for possible commercial application in the US include both surface (above-ground) and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface tar-sand systems currently being field tested in the US are thermal decomposition processes (retorting), and suspension methods (solvent extraction). Underground bitumen extraction procedures that are also being field tested domestically are in situ combustion and steam-injection. Environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic concerns associated with construction and operation of 20,000-bbl/d commercial tar-sand surface and in situ facilities have been estimated and are summarized in this report. The principal regulations that commercial tar-sand facilities will need to address are also discussed, and environmental control technologies are summarized and wherever possible, projected costs of emission controls are stated. Finally, the likelihood-of-occurrence of potential environmental, health, and safety problems that have been determined are reviewed, and from this information inference is made as to the environmental acceptability of technologically feasible 20,000-bbl/d commercial tar-sand oil-extraction procedures.

  15. Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used throughout Penn State University. Chemicals may be loosely defined as any material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used, reactive, flammable, or toxic. This can include, for example, oil-based paints, alcohol, WD-40, and any number of laboratory materials. Oils include petroleum products, vegetable oils, hydraulic and mineral

  16. Aramco, the United States, and Saudi Arabia: a study of the dynamics of Foreign Oil Policy, 1933-1950

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, I.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A US oil policy towrad Saudi Arabia began emerging as the US moved from a net exporter of petroleum in the 1940s and as the US government realized that Saudi Arabia's vast reserves were under concession to an American Oil Company, Aramco. Anderson reconstructs the years between 1933 and 1950 and provides a case study of the evolution of US foreign oil policy and the complex relationships between the US government and the business world. He draws on diplomatic materials and corporate documents as well as interviews with former corporate and government officials to show that a de facto coalition of government agencies and oil companies had coalesced around the rapid development of Saudi oil by 1950. The policy grew out of a long series of confrontations among competing government agencies and domestic interest groups that finally produced a consensus and left policy implementation in the hands of private enterprise, setting the stage for the events to follow. 251 references, 9 tables.

  17. State of Maine residential heating oil survey: 1994--1995 Season summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994--95 heating season approached with more attention to petroleum products than experienced in some time. This year, however, the focus was on transportation fuels with the introduction of reformulated gasolines scheduled for the first of 1995. Last year transportation fuels had been in the spotlight in the Northeast as well, for the ills experienced with a new winter mix for diesel fuel. Would RFG have the same dubious entrance as diesel`s winter mix? Would RFG implementation work and what effect would the change in stocks have on the refineries? With worries related to transportation fuels being recognized, would there be reason for concern with heating fuels? As the new year approached, the refineries seemed to have no problem with supplies and RFG stocks were eased in about the second week of December. In Maine, the southern half of the state was effected by the gasoline substitution but seven of Maine`s sixteen counties were directed to follow the recommended criteria. Since the major population concentration lies in the southern three counties, concern was real. Attention paid to emission testing had come to a head in the fall, and RFG complaints were likely. There have been years when snow and cold arrived by Thanksgiving Day. In northern Maine, snow easily covers the ground before the SHOPP survey begins. The fall slipped by with no great shocks in the weather. December was more of the same, as the weather continued to favor the public. Normally the third week in January is considered the coldest time in the year, but not this year. By the end of January, two days were recorded as being more typical of winter. By March and the end of the survey season, one could only recognize that there were perhaps a few cold days this winter. Fuel prices fluctuated little through the entire heating season. There were no major problems to report and demand never placed pressure on dealers.

  18. Jurassic stratigraphy of the Wiggins Arch, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, J.A.; Maxwell, G.B. (Mobil Oil Company, Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobil and Shell jointly explored the Wiggins arch area in southern Mississippi from 1985 to 1991. The effort concentrated on the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations. Two wells were drilled into Paleozoic crystalline rocks and one well into the Pine Hill formation. Two of these wells were located on the southern side of the Wiggins arch and provide significant data for interpreting Jurassic stratigraphy. The Mobil No. 1 U.S.A. well encountered a complete Jurassic section, but with some significantly different facies than those encountered by wells to the north. A granite wash section is the equivalent to the Frisco City formation previously only found 100 mi to the north-northeast. All 300 ft of Smackover is crystalline dolomite. The Norphlet section is entirely granite wash. The Pine Hill anhydrite is unusually thick and interpreted to be equivalent to the Louann Salt. Correlations to other wells on the Wiggins arch, particularly the Conoco No. 1 Higgins, indicate that the Jurassic can be divided into three transgressive events separated by the Norphlet/Pine Hill and Frisco City/Buckner regressive events.

  19. Building for Oil: Corporate Colonialism, Nationalism and Urban Modernity in Ahmadi, 1946-1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alissa, Reem IR

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    state without its oil reserves that have long servedthe scramble for potential oil reserves in the Gulf region,still maintained massive oil reserves. In fact the discovery

  20. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

  1. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

  2. Used Oil, Antifreeze, and Car Battery Recycling in Centre County* Location Used Oil Used Antifreeze Car Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Used Oil, Antifreeze, and Car Battery Recycling in Centre County* Location Used Oil Used Antifreeze) 237-0121 Yes No No #12;Location Used Oil Used Antifreeze Car Batteries Valvoline Instant Oil Change-9929 Yes Yes Yes * See the DEP website, www.dep.state.pa.us/cgi_apps/oil, for used oil recycling locations

  3. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  4. The Role of Landscape in the Distribution of Deer-Vehicle Collisions in South Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, Jacob J [ORNL; Cochran, David [University of Southern Mississippi, The

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deer-vehicle collisions (DVCs) have a negative impact on the economy, traffic safety, and the general well-being of otherwise healthy deer. To mitigate DVCs, it is imperative to gain a better understanding of factors that play a role in their spatial distribution. Much of the existing research on DVCs in the United States has been inconclusive, pointing to a variety of causal factors that seem more specific to study site and region than indicative of broad patterns. Little DVC research has been conducted in the southern United States, making the region particularly important with regard to this issue. In this study, we evaluate landscape factors that contributed to the distribution of 347 DVCs that occurred in Forrest and Lamar Counties of south Mississippi, from 2006 to 2009. Using nearest-neighbor and discriminant analysis, we demonstrate that DVCs in south Mississippi are not random spatial phenomena. We also develop a classification model that identified seven landscape metrics, explained 100% of the variance, and could distinguish DVCs from control sites with an accuracy of 81.3 percent.

  5. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the 2011 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site1). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

  6. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  7. Mississippi - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40 60Mississippi Mississippi

  8. Mississippi - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40 60MississippiMississippi

  9. 5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for gasoline, diesel and other petroleum products. This chapter provides an overview of world oil trends agreements on export routes have limited development. Petroleum production in the United States, including half of petroleum supplies to the United States. OPEC petroleum production also increased in 1994

  10. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    growth. For data on world oil consumption and long- term oilOil Production Domestic Oil Consumption a variety of

  11. Favorable conditions noted for Australia shale oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After brief descriptions of the Rundle, Condor, and Stuart/Kerosene Creek oil shale projects in Queensland, the competitive advantages of oil shale development and the state and federal governments' attitudes towards an oil shale industry in Australia are discussed. It is concluded that Australia is the ideal country in which to start an oil shale industry.

  12. Shale oil by 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaac, E.D.; Svoboda, D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial processing of oil shale is currently being carried out in two countries, these being Manchuria and Estonia. Germany, Israel, Australia, Brazil and the United States are planning commercial development of oil shale during the 1980's. In the United States, developers currently pursuing production facilities in the Piceance Basin in Colorado are the Union Oil Company; Colony Development Company, now owned by Tosco and Exxon; Occidental Oil Shale Inc.; The Rio Blanco Shale Company (Amoco and Gulf) CA Tract; The Cathedral Bluff's Oil Shale Company (Oxy and Tenneco) at CB tract; The Anvil Points Bureau of Mines Site under the direction of DOE which has been leased to the Paraho Development Company to optimize their process; and Superior Oil. Superior Oil plans to recover Negcolite and Dowsonite that are associated with their oil shale. The processes used by these companies are described briefly. These are the Union B process, Tosco II process, Paraho process, and Occidental process. It is estimated that between 400,000 to 500,000 barrels per day (63,600 to 79,500 m/sup 3//day) production would be achieved by 1990 if all of the effects on the infrastructure are planned for and constructed in an orderly manner.

  13. Author's personal copy Gasoline prices and traffic safety in Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Author's personal copy Gasoline prices and traffic safety in Mississippi Guangqing Chi a, , Arthur November 2010 Keywords: Gasoline prices Traffic crashes Traffic safety Age Gender Race Problem: Limited literature suggests that gasoline prices have substantial effects on reducing fatal crashes. However

  14. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ); this could include the development of vegetation management plans for drainage canal systems; and 3) Human and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources development, contaminant transport;Water quality and other ecosystem services in wetlands managed for waterfowl in Mississippi Basic

  15. Fates of Eroded Soil Organic Carbon: Mississippi Basin Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. V.; Sleezer, R. O.; Renwick, W. H.; Buddemeier, Robert W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a mass balance analysis of organic carbon (OC) across the five major river subsystems of the Mississippi (MS) Basin (an area of 3.2 3 106 km2). This largely agricultural landscape undergoes a bulk soil erosion rate of ;480 tkm22...

  16. Low-Btu coal-gasification-process design report for Combustion Engineering/Gulf States Utilities coal-gasification demonstration plant. [Natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil or low Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, H E; Rebula, E; Thibeault, P R; Koucky, R W

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a coal gasification demonstration plant that was designed to retrofit an existing steam boiler. The design uses Combustion Engineering's air blown, atmospheric pressure, entrained flow coal gasification process to produce low-Btu gas and steam for Gulf States Utilities Nelson No. 3 boiler which is rated at a nominal 150 MW of electrical power. Following the retrofit, the boiler, originally designed to fire natural gas or No. 2 oil, will be able to achieve full load power output on natural gas, No. 2 oil, or low-Btu gas. The gasifier and the boiler are integrated, in that the steam generated in the gasifier is combined with steam from the boiler to produce full load. The original contract called for a complete process and mechanical design of the gasification plant. However, the contract was curtailed after the process design was completed, but before the mechanical design was started. Based on the well defined process, but limited mechanical design, a preliminary cost estimate for the installation was completed.

  17. The Seventh Mississippi State UAB Conference on Differential Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, YanYan

    Boateng University of Michigan Co-authors: Eitan Geva, Robert Krasny 11:25AM-11:45AM An Efficient Parallel

  18. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , economic modeling, bio-enrgy, and crop modeling at field, watershed, and regional scales. The selected Ph

  19. Mississippi State University Wins DOE and GM Challenge X 2008...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    into GM vehicles and powered by a variety of alternative fuels including B20 biodiesel, E85 ethanol, reformulated gasoline, and hydrogen. GM, DOE, and the Canadian...

  20. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.YearProved

  1. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.YearProvedReserves Based

  2. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.YearProvedReserves BasedFuture

  3. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.YearProvedReserves

  4. Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S.YearProvedReservesFeet)

  5. Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,

  6. Mississippi (with State off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic

  7. Mississippi (with State off) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale Production (Billion

  8. Energy Department Awards Cooperative Agreement to Mississippi State

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 inJohnSystems|in STEMTechnologies

  9. FILE6 STATE OF MISSISSIPPI PROJECT SALMON SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew 1325.8.Enaineer;/:4,4 (;%hEROF'$,by

  10. United States Department of Energy New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy. 1991--1992 Heating Oil and Propane Price Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In cooperation with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (DEPE), Office of Energy participated in a program to monitor retail prices of no. 2 heating oil and propane in New Jersey. According to program instructions, we conducted price surveys on a semi-monthly basis to obtain the necessary information from retail fuel merchants and propane dealers identified by the EIA. The period of the surveys was October 7, 1991 to March 16 1992. We submitted data collected as of specified reference dates to the EIA, within two working days of those dates.

  11. The Politics of Mexicos Oil Monopoly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huizar, Richard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the United States needs oil and Mexico has a surplus of itthe bilateral agenda, yet for Mexico oil is one of its fewfor reforming the oil industry in Mexico. Master Thesis.

  12. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Producer profits are for oil production from known fields,Actual Prudhoe Bay Oil Production, Historical and ModeledKaufmann, R. (1991) Oil production in the Lower 48 States:

  13. Use of comparative geothermometry to reconstruct burial history and timing of oil generation and migration in Niobrara Formation, Berthoud State 4 well, Denver basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crysdale, B.L.; Barker, C.E. (Geological survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum production from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara limestone in the Denver basin is largely restricted to the more permeable, fractured portions of the formation. Berthoud State 4 well cores from about 880 to 975 m (2,900-3,200 ft) depth contain zoned calcite in nearly vertical veins. Primary two-phase oil inclusions in these veins homogenize at a mean temperature of about 85{degree}C. Mean random vitrinite-reflectance (R{sub m}) over this same depth interval is 0.65%. Interpretation of this R{sub m}, using an empirical calibration with peak burial-temperature (T{sub peak}), indicates that these rocks reached at T{sub peak} of approximately 100{degree}c. Published clay mineral assemblage data suggest T{sub peak} was at least 100{degree}c. Burial history reconstruction for Berthoud State 4 suggests T{sub peak} was reached about 70 Ma, quickly followed by a 30{degree}-40{degree}C decrease due to uplift and erosion of approximately 3,000 ft of overburden. This short time at peak burial temperature fixes the time of oil migration at near-maximum burial.

  14. The end of the age of oil David Goodstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    (99 Quads) #12;Fossil Fuels Oil Natural gas Shale oil Methane hydrate Coal #12;Coal Hundreds, maybeOut of Gas The end of the age of oil David Goodstein Portland State University November 14, 2008 #12;Energy Myths $4.00 a gallon is too much to pay for gasoline Oil companies produce oil. We must

  15. Oil shale: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oil Shale Program as of the end of FY 86. The report consists of (1) a status of oil shale development, (2) a description of the DOE Oil Shale Program, (3) an FY 86 oil shale research summary, and (4) a summary of FY 86 accomplishments. Discoveries were made in FY 86 about the physical and chemical properties and behavior of oil shales, process chemistry and kinetics, in situ retorting, advanced processes, and the environmental behavior and fate of wastes. The DOE Oil Shale Program shows an increasing emphasis on eastern US oil shales and in the development of advanced oil shale processing concepts. With the award to Foster Wheeler for the design of oil shale conceptual plants, the first step in the development of a systems analysis capability for the complete oil shale process has been taken. Unocal's Parachute Creek project, the only commercial oil shale plant operating in the United States, is operating at about 4000 bbl/day. The shale oil is upgraded at Parachute Creek for input to a conventional refinery. 67 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Crude oil and shale oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrotra, A.K. [Univ. of Calgary (Canada)

    1995-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This year`s review on crude oil and shale oil has been prepared by classifying the references into the following main headings: Hydrocarbon Identification and Characterization, Trace Element Determination, Physical and Thermodynamic Properties, Viscosity, and Miscellaneous Topics. In the two-year review period, the references on shale oils were considerably less in number than those dealing with crude oils. Several new analytical methodologies and applications were reported for hydrocarbon characterization and trace element determination of crude oils and shale oils. Also included in this review are nine U.S., Canadian British and European patents. 12 refs.

  17. Oil, Gas, and Mining Leases (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains rules on oil, gas, and mining leases, and grants authority to the State of Nebraska and local governments to issue leases for oil and gas mining and exploration on their lands.

  18. Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the public policy of the state to conserve and control the natural resources of oil and gas, and their products; to prevent waste of oil and gas; to provide for the protection and adjustment...

  19. Energy Department Awards Cooperative Agreement to Mississippi...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to the Southern States Energy Board DOE Awards Support Service Contract DOE Seeks Contractor for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Operations at Ohio and Kentucky Facilities...

  20. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for IBM System 4 at Clinton, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IBM System 4 Solar Energy System was designed to provide 35 percent of the space heating and 62 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) preheating for a single-family residence located within the United States. The system is a prepackaged unit called the Remote Solar Assembly which has been integrated into the heating and DHW system in a dormitory in Clinton, Mississippi. The system consists of 259 square feet of Solaron 2001 Series flat-plate-air collectors, a rock thermal storage containing 5 1/2 ton of rock, heat exchangers, blowers, a 52 gallon preheat tank, controls, and associated plumbing, two 30 gallon electric water heaters draw water from the preheat tank. A 20 kilowatt, duct mounted, electric heater supplies auxiliary energy. This system which has three modes of system operation was activated September, 1978. A system performance assessment is presented.

  1. Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

  2. Assessment of environmental problems associated with increased enhanced oil recovery in the United States: 1980-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, E.; Garrell, M.; Royce, B.; Riedel, E.F.; Sathaye, J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water requirements and uncontrolled air emissions from well vents and steam generators were estimated for each technology based upon available literature. Estimates of best air emission control technologies were made using data for EOR steam generators actually in use, as well as control technologies presently available but used by other industries. Amounts of solid wastes were calculated for each air emission control technology. Estimates were also made of the heavy metal content of these solid wastes. The study also included environmental residuals which may be expected should coal be used instead of lean crude to produce steam for thermal EOR. It was concluded that from an environmental prospective tertiary oil is preferable in many respects to shale oil, coal and synfuels. Alternative sources of oil such as syncrude, new exploration, and primary production could cause far more environmental damage than incremental EOR. Future EOR in specific regions may be constrained because of environmental issues: air emissions, solid waste disposal, water availability, and aquifer contaminators. Competition for water and the scarcity of surface water or groundwater which are low in total diminutive solids will impede some EOR projects. Risks of groundwater contamination should be minimized particularly because of requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency's new underground injection control program. A quantitative environmental assessment will require a complete and consistent data base for all fields for which EOR is planned out in which tertiary production is taking place. This is particularly true for EOR which will occur in Alaska or in offshore areas, where environments are fragile and where operating conditions are severe. 147 references, 29 figures, 46 tables.

  3. Innovation in the management of upstream state oil contracts in the Republic of Congo : from transaction to Cooperation for Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moussa, Yaya

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the often competitive interests involved in oil contracts and the ensuing strategic dilemmas faced by both the Republic of Congo and international oil companies that operate in that country. Throughout ...

  4. The State, Corporations and Oil: Exploring the Manifestations of Sovereignty through the development of the Petroleum Industry in Ecuador since 1972

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateos Rodrguez, Pablo

    In 1972, oil was first produced in the Ecuadorian Amazon region of el Oriente. This region, sparsely populated by indigenous communities, was found to contain the largest oil reserves in Ecuador. That same year, Ecuador witnessed a military coup...

  5. Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet Ecosystem Prepared for Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Restoration Planning Center Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Ecosystem Restoration Plan

  6. Temporal variability of uranium concentrations and 234 activity ratios in the Mississippi river and its tributaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conservatively under oxic conditions. As a consequence, the uranium concentration of seawater is relativelyTemporal variability of uranium concentrations and 234 U/238 U activity ratios in the Mississippi/238 U activity ratios and total dissolved uranium concentrations in the Lower Mississippi River at New

  7. The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing), The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing on the fate of topography, winddriven and eddydriven circulation on the offshore removal of plume waters. A realistically

  8. The Copepods of the Mississippi Delta region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Juan Gerardo

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not identified as to species, and identification of one of the latter genera is uncertain. Two species of one genus sre parasitic copepods, C. B. Wilson (1950) listed the Copepoda collected by the United States Fisheries steamer "Alba. tross" at a station...

  9. Property Tax Fee-In-Lieu (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Property Tax Fee-In-Lieu allows for new or expansion projects in the state that have a private capital investment in excess of $100,000,000, a negotiated fee can be set that is paid in place of...

  10. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  11. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  12. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1997-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  13. Fish Oil Industry in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the international market. Refined anchovy oil is an excellent product for many applIcations or it can be transformedFish Oil Industry in South America UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Fish Oil Industry in South America By -J. R. SANCHEZ TORRES Chief

  14. Algeria's New Oil Strategy Lahouari ADDI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Economic Reforms and Liberalization in the Oil Industry Oil Strategy and the Rentier State Conclusion industrial base in the areas of hydrocarbons (condensates, liquefied natural gas, refined products, liquidAlgeria's New Oil Strategy Lahouari ADDI Professor of Political Sociology to the IEP of Lyon In H

  15. Characterization and Alteration of Wettability States of Alaskan Reserviors to Improve Oil Recovery Efficiency (including the within-scope expansion based on Cyclic Water Injection - a pulsed waterflood for Enhanced Oil Recovery)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhijit Dandekar; Shirish Patil; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous early reports on experimental works relating to the role of wettability in various aspects of oil recovery have been published. Early examples of laboratory waterfloods show oil recovery increasing with increasing water-wetness. This result is consistent with the intuitive notion that strong wetting preference of the rock for water and associated strong capillary-imbibition forces gives the most efficient oil displacement. This report examines the effect of wettability on waterflooding and gasflooding processes respectively. Waterflood oil recoveries were examined for the dual cases of uniform and non-uniform wetting conditions. Based on the results of the literature review on effect of wettability and oil recovery, coreflooding experiments were designed to examine the effect of changing water chemistry (salinity) on residual oil saturation. Numerous corefloods were conducted on reservoir rock material from representative formations on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The corefloods consisted of injecting water (reservoir water and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water) of different salinities in secondary as well as tertiary mode. Additionally, complete reservoir condition corefloods were also conducted using live oil. In all the tests, wettability indices, residual oil saturation, and oil recovery were measured. All results consistently lead to one conclusion; that is, a decrease in injection water salinity causes a reduction in residual oil saturation and a slight increase in water-wetness, both of which are comparable with literature observations. These observations have an intuitive appeal in that water easily imbibes into the core and displaces oil. Therefore, low-salinity waterfloods have the potential for improved oil recovery in the secondary recovery process, and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water is an attractive source of injection water or a source for diluting the high-salinity reservoir water. As part of the within-scope expansion of this project, cyclic water injection tests using high as well as low salinity were also conducted on several representative ANS core samples. These results indicate that less pore volume of water is required to recover the same amount of oil as compared with continuous water injection. Additionally, in cyclic water injection, oil is produced even during the idle time of water injection. It is understood that the injected brine front spreads/smears through the pores and displaces oil out uniformly rather than viscous fingering. The overall benefits of this project include increased oil production from existing Alaskan reservoirs. This conclusion is based on the performed experiments and results obtained on low-salinity water injection (including ANS lake water), vis-a-vis slightly altering the wetting conditions. Similarly, encouraging cyclic water-injection test results indicate that this method can help achieve residual oil saturation earlier than continuous water injection. If proved in field, this would be of great use, as more oil can be recovered through cyclic water injection for the same amount of water injected.

  16. Development of More Effective Biosurfactants for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInerney, M.J.; Mouttaki, H.; Folmsbee, M.; Knapp, R.; Nagle, D.

    2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research was to develop effective biosurfactant production for enhanced oil recovery in the United States.

  17. EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced its intent to prepare an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Jackson County Mississippi and modify related facilities to enable the terminal to liquefy natural gas for export. DOE is a cooperating agency in preparing the EIS. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  18. Lamar County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois:LakeIowa: EnergyClub,NewMississippi: Energy

  19. Lee County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana: EnergyLands inLechee,Georgia:Mississippi:

  20. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Mississippi Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb MarPricethethe

  1. Walthall County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthall County, Mississippi: Energy Resources Jump

  2. Carroll County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermitsGreenCarrizo Energy Solar FarmMississippi: Energy

  3. Scott County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformation Evaluation,SchmidNorthMississippi: Energy Resources

  4. Mississippi - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40 60Mississippi

  5. Jefferson County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias SolarJane Capital PartnersGeorgia:Iowa: EnergyMississippi:

  6. Harrison County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation HandbookOhio: Energy ResourcesMississippi: Energy

  7. Humphreys County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania:County,Ohio:Hughson,Hill,Mississippi: Energy

  8. Perry County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchP2Mississippi: Energy

  9. City of Okolona, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona, Mississippi (Utility Company) Jump to:

  10. City of Oxford, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona, Mississippi (UtilityCity ofCity

  11. City of Philadelphia, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona, MississippiPetersburg, Alaska

  12. Marshall County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,JemezMissouri: EnergyMarlboro,Mississippi: Energy Resources

  13. Mississippi County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanaoMinuanoIV JumpMotorsMississippi County,

  14. Mississippi County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanaoMinuanoIV JumpMotorsMississippi

  15. Mississippi's 4th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanaoMinuanoIVInformation Mississippi's

  16. Covington County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core AnalysisCouncil,Mississippi: Energy Resources Jump

  17. Mississippi Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts Regions National Science Bowl®Mississippi Regions

  18. Mississippi Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts Regions National Science Bowl®Mississippi

  19. Amite County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmite County, Mississippi: Energy Resources

  20. Attala County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to: navigation, searchInformation AtsunMississippi:

  1. City of Leland, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville, LouisianaLansing,Leland, Mississippi

  2. City of Macon, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville,Livingston, TexasMississippi (Utility

  3. Clarke County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation SmyrnaNew York: EnergyWashington: EnergyMississippi: Energy

  4. Oil and Gas Conservation (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes the state's interest in encouraging the development, production, and utilization of natural gas and oil resources in a manner which will prevent waste and lead to the...

  5. "Smart" Multifunctional Polymers for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles McCormick; Andrew Lowe

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent recommendations made by the Department of Energy, in conjunction with ongoing research at the University of Southern Mississippi, have signified a need for the development of 'smart' multi-functional polymers (SMFPs) for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes. Herein we summarize research from the period of September 2003 through March 2007 focusing on both Type I and Type II SMFPs. We have demonstrated the synthesis and behavior of materials that can respond in situ to stimuli (ionic strength, pH, temperature, and shear stress). In particular, Type I SMFPs reversibly form micelles in water and have the potential to be utilized in applications that serve to lower interfacial tension at the oil/water interface, resulting in emulsification of oil. Type II SMFPs, which consist of high molecular weight polymers, have been synthesized and have prospective applications related to the modification of fluid viscosity during the recovery process. Through the utilization of these advanced 'smart' polymers, the ability to recover more of the original oil in place and a larger portion of that by-passed or deemed 'unrecoverable' by conventional chemical flooding should be possible.

  6. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)CommercialperSalesU.S. Offshore U.S. State

  7. Tunica, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-StateTucson Estates,Tumwater,

  8. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

  9. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Tupelo quadrangle, Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tupelo quadrangle covers a region immediately east of the Mississippi River flood plain in the northernmost Gulf Coastal Physiographic Province. Sediments of Teritary and Paleozoic basins shoal eastward. Tertiary exposures dominate the western half of the quadrangle. Cretaceous strata are exposed over most of the eastern half. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. A total of eighty-six uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. Few were considered significant, and most appear to relate to some cultural feature. Magnetic data appears, for the most part, to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  10. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the Venezuelan Oil Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . .and Productivity: Evidence from the Oil Industry . .

  11. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and

  12. PERISHSaving an Oil Industry at Risk FEBRUARY 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    01 Global Demand Outlook for Crude Oil OVERVIEW 04 DEMAND BY COUNTRY 06 United States 06 China 06 supplies. On top of all that, demand for oil products in North America is falling. The continent's oilPIPEOR PERISHSaving an Oil Industry at Risk FEBRUARY 2013 MICHAEL HOLDEN, SENIOR ECONOMIST #12;The

  13. THE FISH LIVER OIL INDUSTRY FISH ERY LEAFLET 233

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of livers with respect to oil content and vitamin A potency Relationship of oil content and vitamin A by molecular dietillation Concentration of vitamin A by saponification Vitamin-oil specifications, pricesQY THE FISH LIVER OIL INDUSTRY FISH ERY LEAFLET 233 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE United States

  14. Trimble field, Mississippi; 100 bcf of bypassed, low resistivity cretaceous Eutaw pay at 7,000 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, P.L. Jr. (Cook Energy Inc., Jackson, MS (US)); Schneeflock, R.D.; Bush, J.D.; Marble, J.C. (Paramount Petroleum Co., Jackson, MS (US))

    1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Eutaw formation of Mississippi has produced almost 2 tcf of gas since its initial discovery at Gwinville field in 1944. Prior to Trimble field, the last major Eutaw gas discovery in the state was Maxie-Pistol Ridge field in 1951. Consequently, the Trimble discovery is the most important shallow gas find in the Interior Salt basin in nearly 40 years. Trimble field will likely develop into at least 20 wells with combined reserved in excess of 100 bcf of gas and a production rate of 40 MMcfd. The Trimble discovery was made on a faulted structural closure drilled twice before. Both operators drilled excellent locations but failed to detect low resistivity pay. The discovery of gas on the third attempt was facilitated by the 1987 accidental discovery of Eutaw gas at Gitano field, where a flow test of 2 MMcfd from an Environmental Protection Agency permitted salt water disposal well proved a new gas pay zone for the field. A petrophysical examination of the Gitano discovery and its implications to the dry holes at Trimble has initiated intensive industry activity in a renewed Eutaw play in Mississippi.

  15. DOE to Issue Second Solicitation for Purchase of Crude Oil for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    second of several solicitations planned to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the United States' crude oil reserve. The first solicitation, issued March 16,...

  16. Oil plays in Smackover reservoirs of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Kopaskamerkel, D.C.; Mann, S.D. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five Smackover (Upper Jurassic, Oxfordian) oil plays can be delineated in the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. These include the basement ridge play, the regional peripheral fault trend play, the Mississippi interior salt basin play, the Mobile graben fault system play, and the Wiggins arch complex play. Plays are recognized by basinal position, relationships to regional structural features, and characteristic petroleum traps. Within two plays, subplays can be distinguished based on oil gravities and reservoir characteristics. Reservoirs are distinguished primarily by depositional setting and diagenetic overprint. The geology and petroleum characteristics of these plays are discussed.

  17. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Twenty-six. Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of Mississippi governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  18. The Demographic Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Mississippi Gulf Coast: An Analysis by Zip Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, David A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    344-362. Cossman, R. 2006. Hurricane Katrina as a NaturalMississippi Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina: An In-depthInstitutions in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina. Journal of

  19. Rhetoric and heresthetic in the Mississippi Freedom Party controversy at the 1964 Democratic Convention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, Adria

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Democratic Convention. Specifically, the focus is on the rhetorical discourse presented by the members of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Fannie Lou Hamer in particular, at the Credentials Committee two days before the onset of the actual Convention...

  20. High-amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) of the Mississippi Fan, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jason Michael

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sediment volumes. Mississippi Fan HARP deposition can be described by three depositional models: the "avulsion" model, the "fill and spill" model, and the "transition" model. The "avulsion" depositional model, developed by Flood et al. (1991), describes...

  1. EIS-0385: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE announced the cancellation of a supplemental environmental impact statement for certain facilities associated with the 2007 selection of Richton, Mississippi, as the location of a new storage site for expanding the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

  2. Carbon flow and ecosystem dynamics in the Mississippi River plume described by inverse analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breed, Greg Allen

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2002 Major Subject: Oceanography CARBON FLOW AND ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER PLUME DESCRIBED BY INVERSE ANALYSIS A Thesis by GREG ALLEN BREED Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial... of Department) December 2002 Major Sublect: Oceanography ABSTRACT Carbon Flow and Ecosystem Dynamics in the Mississippi River Plume Described by Inverse Analysis. (December 2002) Greg Allen Breed, B. S. , University of Minnesota Chair of Advisory...

  3. Clay minerals of recent marine sediments to the west of the Mississippi Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Raymond Francis

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLAY MINERALS OF RECENT MARINE SEDIMENTS 10 THE WEST OP THE MISSISSIPPI DKLTA A Dissertation By RAYMOND ERANCIS McALLI9TER> Jr. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN OCEANOGRAPHY May* 1958 Major Subject: Geological Oceanography CLAY MINERALS OF RECENT MARINE SEDIMENTS TO THE WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA A Dissertation RAYMOND FRANCIS McALLISTER, Jr. Approved...

  4. Depositional environment of the "stringer sand" member, Lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Cretaceous), Mallalieu field, Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Billy Charles

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the lower Unit being subdivided into an upper "sand and shale section" a middle "marine section", and a lower "massive sand section". The Mississippi Geological Society (1957) subdivided the subsurface Tuscaloosa Group into the Upper, Marine, and Lower...) described the Lower Tuscaloosa Formation of southern Mississippi as a unit of "rapidly alternating sands and shales of shallow marine origin, overlying a nearly unbroken sand sec- tion of still shallower marine or continental origin". Braunstein ai. so...

  5. Phase III Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , two making approximately three trips per day, for approximately 15 weeks during peak tourist season to be reduced during the off-peak winter season. To support the project, passenger queuing areas one Horizon oil spill. ESTIMATED COST The estimated amount of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill early restoration

  6. Baseline ecological risk assessment Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salmon Site (SS), formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site, located in Mississippi was the site of two nuclear and two gas explosion tests conducted between 1964 and 1970. A consequence of these testing activities is that radionuclides were released into the salt dome, where they are presently contained. During reentry drilling and other site activities, incidental liquid and solid wastes that contained radioactivity were generated, resulting in some soil, ground water and equipment contamination. As part of the remedial investigation effort, a Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment was conducted at the SS. The purpose is to gauge ecological and other environmental impacts attributable to past activities at the former test facility. The results of this facility-specific baseline risk assessment are presented in this document.

  7. Mississippi DOE EPSCoR planning grant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, W.G.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippi DOE EPSCoR planning grant committee identified three focus areas for a proposal submitted on January 25, 1995, to the US DOE: Human Resource Development, Environmental Synergisms from Fuel Mixtures of Tire Particles and Low Rank Coals, and Energy Efficient Heat Transfer Equipment and Materials. In the human resources are, efforts were undertaken to identify and develop linkages with educational institutions, national laboratories, and industries and to identify strategies for attracting and involving students in areas leading to technical careers. The fuel mixtures project was directed toward developing ways to combine scrap tire particles and lignite coal into a blended fuel that could be used in electric power generation. In the energy efficient heat transfer area, analytical and experimental investigations were planned to increase the efficiency of heat exchangers and insulating materials.

  8. OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Holes from the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 R. D. Giauque,all of the known oil and gas reserves in the United States.cores from the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 were sectioned

  9. US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Montgomery, W.D. , 1982. Oil Prices, Energy Security, andPaik, I.K. , 2004. Oil price shocks and the macroeconomy:the United States from Oil Price Shocks? CRS 91-438E.

  10. Cost, Conflict and Climate: U.S. Challenges in the World Oil Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 and 1.1A Figure 6: Uses of Crude Oil in the UnitedStates Other Residual Fuel Oil (bunker fuel) PetrochemicalDiesel Fuel and Heating Oil Jet Fuel Figure 7: Sources of

  11. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,Particle Size on Retorting Oil in a Controlled~State Retort,residence of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River

  12. A review of "The Politics of Trade: The Overseas Merchant in State and Society, 1660-1720." by Perry Gauci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph P. Ward

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REVIEWS 305 Perry Gauci. The Politics of Trade: The Overseas Merchant in State and Society, 1660-1720. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. xvi + 302 pp. $65.00. Review by JOSEPH P. WARD, UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI. This book explores...

  13. Trench sampling report Salmon Site Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes trench excavation and sample-collection activities conducted by IT Corporation (IT) as part of the ongoing Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study at the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE, 1992). During construction, operation, and closure of the site wastes of unknown composition were buried in pits on site. Surface-geophysical field investigations were conducted intermittently between November 1992 and October 1993 to identify potential waste-burial sites and buried metallic materials. The geophysical investigations included vertical magnetic gradient, electromagnetic conductivity, electromagnetic in-phase component, and ground-penetrating radar surveys. A number of anomalies identified by the magnetic gradiometer survey in the Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc., (REECo) pits area indicated buried metallic objects. All of the anomalies were field checked to determine if any were caused by surface features or debris. After field checking, 17 anomalies were still unexplained; trenching was planned to attempt to identify their sources. Between December 8, 1993, and December 17, 1993, 15 trenches were excavated and soil samples were collected at the anomalies. Samples were collected, placed in 250- and 500-milliliter (m{ell}) amber glass containers, and shipped on ice to IT Analytical Services (ITAS) in St. Louis, Missouri, using standard IT chain-of-custody procedures. The samples were analyzed for various chemical and radiological parameters. Data validation has not been conducted on any of the samples. During excavation and sampling, soil samples were also collected by IT for the MSDEQ and the Mississippi Department of Radiological Health, in accordance with their instructions, and delivered into their custody.

  14. Re-refining of Waste Oil Solvent Is Used in Treatment/Distillation Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION. A combination solvent treatment/distillation process has been designed for re-refining industrial waste oil (such as equipment lubricants, metal-working oil, and process oil) and used automotive lubricants (engine oil, hydraulic oil, and gear oil) for reuse. WASTE ENERGY RECOVERY. Recycling of waste oil in the United States has the potential to save the energy equivalent of 7-12 million bbl of crude oil annually.1 WASTE OIL RECOVERY. Prior to 1960, a significant portion of the demand for automotive lubricating oil was met by re-relined used oil. At the time, 150 re-refineries produced 300 million gal of motor oil annually. Since 1960, however, the production of re-refined oil has steadily declined. In 1981, for example, out of about 1.2 billion gal of automobile lubricating oil and 1.6 billion gal of industrial lubricating oils purchased, 25 U.S. rerefineries

  15. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state`s total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation`s energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska`s 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  16. Estimating Upper Bounds for Occupancy and Number of Manatees in Areas Potentially Affected by Oil from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Petersburg, Florida, United States of America, 2 Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, United States Geological Panhandle, Alabama and Mississippi. Our method, which uses a Bayesian approach, allows for the propagation(3): e91683. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0091683 Editor: Andreas Fahlman, Texas A&M University

  17. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Helena quadrangle of Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Helena quadrangle covers a region largely within the Mississippi River flood plain in the extreme northern Gulf Coastal Province. Tertiary sediments in this area are relatively thick, and overlie a Paleozoic basin gradually shoaling to the northeast. The Oachita Tectonic Zone strikes southeasterly through the center of the quadrangle. The exposed sequence is almost entirely Quaternary sediments of the flood plain area. Older Cenozoic deposits crop out in upland areas on the west side of the river valley. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Sixty uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and all appeared to occur as the result of cultural and/or weather effects. Magnetic data appear to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  18. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  19. Perera Lam: An environmental justice assessment of the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor in Louisiana, U.S. APPLIED ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 11(4): 681-697.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera Lam: An environmental justice assessment of the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor to assess the status of environmental justice concerns in the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor injustice in the study area. The study approach allows preliminary assessment of environmental justice

  20. RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

  1. Steamflooding projects boost California's crude oil production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer and fall of 1981, the first time in more than a decade, US crude oil production in the lower 48 was higher than production in the preceding year. California is leading this resurgence. The state's oil production in October 1981 averaged 1,076,000 bpd, compared with 991,000 bpd in October 1980. Some of the increase comes from production in several offshore fields whose development had been delayed; some is due to greater output from the US Government's petroleum reserve at Elk Hills. However, a big portion of the state's increased production results from large steamdrive projects in heavy-oil fields of the San Joaquin Valley that were set in motion by decontrol of heavy-oil proces in mid-1979. California holds vast reserves of viscous, low-gravity oil in relatively shallow reservoirs. The methods used to produce heavy oil are discussed.

  2. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

  3. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  4. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  5. High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors for In-Situ Recovery of Oil from Oil Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is exhausting its supply of crude oil for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel). However, the United States has sufficient oil shale deposits to meet our current oil demands for {approx}100 years. Shell Oil Corporation is developing a new potentially cost-effective in-situ process for oil recovery that involves drilling wells into oil shale, using electric heaters to raise the bulk temperature of the oil shale deposit to {approx}370 deg C to initiate chemical reactions that produce light crude oil, and then pumping the oil to the surface. The primary production cost is the cost of high-temperature electrical heating. Because of the low thermal conductivity of oil shale, high-temperature heat is required at the heater wells to obtain the required medium temperatures in the bulk oil shale within an economically practical two to three years. It is proposed to use high-temperature nuclear reactors to provide high-temperature heat to replace the electricity and avoid the factor-of-2 loss in converting high-temperature heat to electricity that is then used to heat oil shale. Nuclear heat is potentially viable because many oil shale deposits are thick (200 to 700 m) and can yield up to 2.5 million barrels of oil per acre, or about 125 million dollars/acre of oil at $50/barrel. The concentrated characteristics of oil-shale deposits make it practical to transfer high-temperature heat over limited distances from a reactor to the oil shale deposits. (author)

  6. Method for enhanced oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comberiati, Joseph R. (Morgantown, WV); Locke, Charles D. (Morgantown, WV); Kamath, Krishna I. (Chicago, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for enhanced recovery of oil from relatively "cold" reservoirs by carbon dioxide flooding. In oil reservoirs at a temperature less than the critical temperature of 87.7.degree. F. and at a pore pressure greater than the saturation pressure of carbon dioxide at the temperature of the reservoir, the carbon dioxide remains in the liquid state which does not satisfactorily mix with the oil. However, applicants have found that carbon dioxide can be vaporized in situ in the reservoir by selectively reducing the pore pressure in the reservoir to a value less than the particular saturated vapor pressure so as to greatly enhance the mixing of the carbon dioxide with the oil.

  7. Post-Cretaceous faulting at head of Mississippi embayment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Harrison, R.W. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent mapping in southernmost Illinois and southeastern Missouri has revealed numerous faults that displace Cretaceous and Tertiary strata. Units as young as the Pliocene-Pleistocene( ) Mounds Gravel are deformed; some faults possibly displace Quaternary sediments. The faults strike northeast, dip nearly vertically, and exhibit characteristics of dextral strike-slip. Pull-apart grabens occur along right-stepping fault strands, they contain chaotically jumbled blocks of Paleozoic, Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks downdropped as much as 800 m relative to wall rocks. Faults at the head of the Mississippi embayment probably originated during Cambrian rifting (Reelfoot rift) and have a long, complex history of reactivation under different stress fields. Some faults are on strike with faults in the New Madrid seismic zone. Kinematics of post-Cretaceous displacements fit the contemporary stress regime of ENE-WSW compression. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as close proximity, suggest a close link between faulting at the head of the embayment and ongoing tectonism in the New Madrid seismic zone.

  8. Jurassic petroleum geology of southwestern Clarke County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.B.; Harris, P.M.

    1983-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jurassic stratigraphy of southwestern Clark County, Mississippi, is representative of the central Gulf Coast. Evaporites, carbonates, and siliciclastics were deposited in restricted marine, shallow marine, transitional, and continental environments; structural development during and after deposition by regional faulting, local faulting, and salt movement directly affected hydrocarbon accumulation. Subsurface electric log data were studied from West Nancy, Nancy, East Nancy, Prairie Branch, and Lake Utopia fields and from the surrounding wildcats for the structural relations in and between producing fields and for the thickness and stratigraphic relations that affect production in three major units: the Norphlet and Smackover formations and the Buckner member of the Haynesville formation. Results suggest that (1) the East Nancy field probably has the best potential for future development because the original depositional feature is larger and older than that at the other fields and faulting has not greatly influenced entrapment or deposition, (2) the Smackover pay zone in the Prairie Branch field may be successfully developed on the south flank, and (3) the Nancy field might be developed on its southeast and northwest flanks in the upper oolite zone seen in the flank wells.

  9. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  10. U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Monopolization of The World Oil Market, 19715-4991, ORNL-output. If the world oil market were free and competitive,Unfortunately, the world oil market is not always stable and

  11. U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there to protect world oil demand (in Plesch et al. , 2005,instability related to U.S. demand for oil. Although to ourassociated with U.S. demand for Persian Gulf oil. If this is

  12. U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15-1. S OURCES OF CRUDE OIL AND PRODUCTS SUPPLIED IN THE Uimported petroleum (crude oil and products) from the Persian15-1. S OURCES OF CRUDE OIL AND PRODUCTS SUPPLIED IN THE U

  13. U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the world's proven oil reserves 2 , and the countries ofof the worlds proven oil reserves it typically has producedthe largest proven oil reserves in the world. For example,

  14. U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only 57% of the worlds oil resources, and the Middle EastFree World access to oil resources, and the limitation offew years has made the oil resource in the Middle East more

  15. U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cost be allocated to oil consumption and production by otherthe value of U.S. consumption of oil from the Persian Gulf.production and consumption of Persian-Gulf oil. We believe,

  16. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes inspection and monitoring activities performed on and near the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2007. The Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities and the results of sample analyses. This report is submitted to comply with that requirement. The Tatum Salt Dome was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for underground nuclear testing during the cold war. The land surface above the salt dome, the Salmon Site, is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the successor to the AEC, is responsible for long-term surveillance and maintenance of the site. The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) was assigned this responsibility effective October 2006.

  17. EIS-0165: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the impacts of construction and operation for the range of alternatives being considered and focuses on oil and brine spill risk and impacts of brine disposal. The proposed action entails the development of a plan for 250 million barrels of new crude oil storage capacity in two Gulf Coast salt domes to expand the Strategic. Petroleum Reserve pursuant to Congressional directive (PL I 01-383 and PL 101-512). Storage capacity would he developed by solution-mining the salt which would require about two billion barrels of surface water and would generate about two billion barrels of salt brine.

  18. 2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued August 2011 DIVISION OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2010 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

  19. 2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued April 2013 OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2012 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

  20. Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Worldwide supplies of conventional oil will soon reach a peak production rate and begin an irreversible long-term decline. Options to augment liquid fuel supplies in the United States have once again begun to focus on oil shale as long-term source of reliable, affordable, and secure oil. The United

  1. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over time even if the oil market were perfectly competitive.a big role in world oil markets, that era is long past.and re?ning oil and delivering it to the market. We could

  2. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appeared in the world oil market in the last fifteen years.have on the world oil markets and international relationsthe stability of the oil markets. 11 This literature,

  3. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China made an Iranian oil investment valued at $70 billion.across Iran, Chinas oil investment may exceed $100 billionthese involving investment in oil and gas, really undermine

  4. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Income on Energy and Oil Demand, Energy Journal 23(1),the faster its growth in oil demand over the last half ofthe income elasticity of oil demand to fall signi?cantly.

  5. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    current pace of growth in oil demand as staying consistentthis point, Chinas demand Oil Demand vs. Domestic Supply inand predictions of oil supply and demand affected foreign

  6. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

  7. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. OPECs Optimal Crude Oil Price, Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crudein predicting quarterly real oil price change. variable real

  8. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq KuwaitEIA Table 1.2, OPEC Crude Oil Production (Excluding Lease2008, from EIA, Crude Oil Production. Figure 16. U.S.

  9. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    unfettered access to oil resources including the possibleChinas search for oil resources around the world. However,a survey of Chinas oil resources, while others focus

  10. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. OPECs Optimal Crude Oil Price, Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

  11. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline, NBER Working Paper.2006. Chinas Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand, Energy Journal 23(1),

  12. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of AmericasDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil, (Council on Foreign Relations,

  13. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in U.S. real GDP and oil consumption, 1949-2006. slope =Historical Chinese oil consumption and projection of trend.1991-2006: Chinese oil consumption in millions of barrels

  14. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait,day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.and the peak in U.S. oil production account for the broad

  15. Mississippi Canyon 252 Incident NRDA Tier 1 for Deepwater Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Damage Assessment. Each Party reserves its right to produce its own independent interpretation Statement The northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is a geologically diverse basin, described as the most complex, and are visible on Google Earth. With 3D seismic data obtained by the oil and gas industry for geophysical

  16. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

  17. Analysis of the Monitoring Network at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salmon site in southern Mississippi was the location of two underground nuclear tests and two methane-oxygen gas explosion tests conducted in the Tatum Salt Dome at a depth of 2,715 feet below ground surface. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]) and the U.S. Department of Defense jointly conducted the tests between 1964 and 1970. The testing operations resulted in surface contamination at multiple locations on the site and contamination of shallow aquifers. No radionuclides from the nuclear tests were released to the surface or to groundwater, although radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings were brought to the surface during re-entry drilling. Drilling operations generated the largest single volume of waste materials, including radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings and drilling fluids. Nonradioactive wastes were also generated as part of the testing operations. Site cleanup and decommissioning began in 1971 and officially ended in 1972. DOE conducted additional site characterization between 1992 and 1999. The historical investigations have provided a reasonable understanding of current surface and shallow subsurface conditions at the site, although some additional investigation is desirable. For example, additional hydrologic data would improve confidence in assigning groundwater gradients and flow directions in the aquifers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitored groundwater at the site as part of its Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program from 1972 through 2007, when DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) assumed responsibility for site monitoring. The current monitoring network consists of 28 monitoring wells and 11 surface water locations. Multiple aquifers which underlie the site are monitored. The current analyte list includes metals, radionuclides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  18. Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1998 359 Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  19. Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Marketing Annual 1999 359 Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  20. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Marketing Annual 1996 401 Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  1. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1997 401 Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  2. Compositional changes in heavy oil steamflood simulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolley, Christopher Scott

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    including distillation, vapor pressure, steam distillation and viscosity measurements, along with a commercial PVT simulator are used to tune equation-of-state (EOS) and viscosity parameters to properly model the PVT properties of the oil. The Peng...

  3. Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental Protection Division of the State Department of Natural Resources Emergency Operations Center when there is a spill or release of...

  4. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinas domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, Chinas demand Oil

  5. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    historical data for claiming to be able to predict oil pricehistorical data. The second is to look at the predictions of economic theory as to how oil prices

  6. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007. comparison, Mexico used 6.6 Chinese oil consumption17. Oil production from the North Sea, Mexicos Cantarell,

  7. A study of water driven oil encroachment into gas caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritch, Harlan J

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (frequently thin and commonly referred to as an oil rim). Prior to the introduction of sound conservation practices, large quantities of gas were often produced and vented by operators seeking to induce a flow of oil into wells initially productive only.... : "The Prediction of Oil Recovery by Water Flood, " Seconder Recover of Oil in the United States, API (1950), Second Edition, 160. Elliott, J. K. : "The Effect of Initial Gas Content and Distribution on the Residual Gas Content of Cores after Water...

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence fiber optic probe measurement of oil dilution by fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parks, II, James E [Knoxville, TN; Partridge, Jr., William P [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for detecting fuel in oil includes an excitation light source in optical communication with an oil sample for exposing the oil sample to excitation light in order to excite the oil sample from a non-excited state to an excited state and a spectrally selective device in optical communication with the oil sample for detecting light emitted from the oil sample as the oil sample returns from the excited state to a non-excited state to produce spectral indicia that can be analyzed to determine the presence of fuel in the oil sample. A method of detecting fuel in oil includes the steps of exposing a oil sample to excitation light in order to excite the oil sample from a non-excited state to an excited state, as the oil sample returns from the excited state to a non-excited state, detecting light emitted from the oil sample to produce spectral indicia; and analyzing the spectral indicia to determine the presence of fuel in the oil sample.

  9. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

  10. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

  11. New Demand for Old Food: the U.S. Demand for Olive Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Xiong; William Matthews; Daniel Sumner

    U.S. consumption of olive oil has tripled over the past twenty years, but nearly all olive oil continues to be imported. Estimation of demand parameters using monthly import data reveals that demand for non-virgin oil is income inelastic, but virgin oils have income elasticities above one. Moreover, demand for oils differentiated by origin and quality is price-elastic. These olive oils are highly substitutable with each other but not with other vegetable oils. News about the health and culinary benefits of olive oil and the spread of Mediterranean diet contribute significantly to the rising demand in the United States.

  12. New Mexico--West Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels) Liquids LeaseBarrels) Crude Oil

  13. Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81 JOHN M. WARD and JOHN R. POFFENBERGER Introduction Reports of ice shortages during the shrimp fishing season prompted a Na- tional closure regulation on ice plant production and sales. Like Texas, Louisiana controls the opening

  14. Our Mississippi is a quarterly newsletter of the U.S. Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    a ranking system for the proposed work by establishing an Index of Habitat Quality. Projects were ranked according to how they improve habitat quality and their cost-effectiveness; this information proved useful for project selection. Continued on page 2 >> ABOVE: Construction contractor Mississippi Limestone, Inc

  15. FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER if; Marine Biological LabofdiuryKay, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director FLUCTUATION IN TRAP NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER Gear used 3 Methods 5 Statistical considerations 5 Season trends in catch of trap nets 6 Black crappie

  16. The fate and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in northwestern Mississippi, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling . USA Introduction Nitrate is the primary form of dissolved nitrogen in natural waters (MuellerThe fate and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in northwestern Mississippi, USA Heather L. Welch & Christopher T. Green & Richard H. Coupe Abstract Agricultural contamination of groundwater

  17. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future Production (MillionCrude Oil +Price

  18. Application of Carbon Nanocatalysts in Upgrading Heavy Crude Oil Assisted with Microwave Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Application of Carbon Nanocatalysts in Upgrading Heavy Crude Oil Assisted with Microwave Heating, Stanford, California 94305, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Heavy crude oil can that by using carbon nano- catalysts, heavy crude oil can be efficiently upgraded to lighter oil at a relatively

  19. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J. (Rowland (P.) Associates (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA'') and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy's Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry's behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  20. Eco Oil 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

  1. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption would be reduced and incentives for production increased whenever the price of crude oil

  2. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  3. Diagenesis of Eolian and fluvial feldspathic sandstones, Norphlet formation (upper Jurassic), Rankin County, Mississippi, and Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, E.F.; Land, L.S.; Mack, L.E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Norphlet sandstones in seven cores from Mississippi and Alabama are arkoses and subarkoses deposited in eolian-dune, interdune, and fluvial environments. Similar to the deeply buried (> 5 km) Tertiary feldspathic sandstones of the Gulf basin, all detrital plagioclase that survived dissolution has been albitized. Fluvial red sandstone lost all initial porosity by the introduction of preburial pedogenic calcite and compaction. Initial porosity of eolian sands was reduced by compaction to an average of 29%; and later by cementation by quartz, carbonates, anhydrite, halite, K-feldspar, and illite. Quartz and anhydrite cements precipitated between 90/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/C (approximately 2.3 km deep), carbonates and halite cements formed below 120/sup 0/C (< 3 km), and late-stage illite cement formed between 130/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C (4-5 km deep). Cements are patchy, and some, especially quartz and anhydrite, are texture-selective, being more abundant in coarser laminae. Secondary porosity, which makes up approximately half the porosity in thin sections, formed by dissolution of detrital grains (feldspar, rock fragments) and cements (anhydrite, carbonate, halite). Reservoir bitumen records an early phase of oil entrapment. Reservoir quality is influenced by the abundance of reservoir bitumen and thread-like illite, both of which bridge pores. Isotopic data suggest that during the first 30 to 40 m.y. of burial, subsurface diagenesis of the Norphlet Formation was dominated by deep-circulating, hot, meteoric water. This phenomenon may be characteristic of the early diagenetic history of rifted basins. 10 figures, 5 tables.

  4. jeteas.scholarlinkresearch.org Journal of Emerging Trends in Engineering and Applied Sciences (JETEAS) 3(1):33-37(ISSN: 2141-7016) A Comparative Study of Soya Bean Oil and Palm Kernel Oil as Alternatives to Transformer Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. T. Henshaw

    This study investigated the use of soya bean oil and palm kernel oil as alternatives to mineral oil in a transformer system. Crude samples of these oils and their blend in varied proportions were tested for dielectric strength, pour point, flash point, kinematic viscosity, density and moisture content. The results showed that soya bean oil and palm kernel oil have good properties to act as insulating and cooling liquid in a transformer. These properties could be further improved when the oils are refined and purified. Soya bean oil and palm kernel oil have dielectric strengths of 39 kV and 25 kV respectively in their crude states compared with transformer (mineral) oil which has a maximum dielectric strength of 50 kV. Blend of soya bean oil and palm kernel oil showed synergy only in pour point and viscosity. The results of the study further showed that soya bean oil and palm kernel oil and their blends have very high flash points of 234C and 242C respectively. In terms of economic costs and environmental considerations, soya bean oil and palm kernel oil appear to be viable alternatives to transformer oils

  5. Oil and gas field code master list, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains data collected through October 1993 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  6. Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

  7. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include: water quality, surface and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Wetlands, Water Quality, Management and Planning Descriptors; to assist state agencies in the development and maintenance of a state water management plan

  8. Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water were created to embody both state and federal law. State law mandates the protection of public health and welfare and the...

  9. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Venezuelan Oil Industry Total Wells Drilled and InvestmentWells Drilled and Investment in the Venezuelan Oil Industryopenness of the oil sector to foreign investment contributes

  10. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is described below. Data Crude oil production data is fromproductivity measure is crude oil production per worker, andwhich is measured as crude oil production per worker, is

  11. Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and sources. Crude oil recovery includes improved oil recovery processes such as water flooding, infill drilling, and horizontal drilling, as well as enhanced oil recovery...

  12. Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and sources. Crude oil recovery includes improved oil recovery processes such as water flooding, infill drilling, and horizontal continuity, as well as enhanced oil recovery...

  13. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . . . .Oil Production and Productivity in Venezuela and Mexico . . . . . . . .2.6: Oil Production in Venezuela and Mexico 350 Productivity

  14. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptemberState Nuclear Profiles 2010

  15. Apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishido, T.; Sato, Y.

    1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for distilling shale oil from oil shale comprises: a vertical type distilling furnace which is divided by two vertical partitions each provided with a plurality of vent apertures into an oil shale treating chamber and two gas chambers, said oil shale treating chamber being located between said two gas chambers in said vertical type distilling furnace, said vertical type distilling furnace being further divided by at least one horizontal partition into an oil shale distilling chamber in the lower part thereof and at least one oil shale preheating chamber in the upper part thereof, said oil shale distilling chamber and said oil shale preheating chamber communication with each other through a gap provided at an end of said horizontal partition, an oil shale supplied continuously from an oil shale supply port provided in said oil shale treating chamber at the top thereof into said oil shale treating chamber continuously moving from the oil shale preheating chamber to the oil shale distilling chamber, a high-temperature gas blown into an oil shale distilling chamber passing horizontally through said oil shale in said oil shale treating chamber, thereby said oil shale is preheated in said oil shale preheating chamber, and a gaseous shale oil is distilled from said preheated oil shale in said oil shale distilling chamber; and a separator for separating by liquefaction a gaseous shale oil from a gas containing the gaseous shale oil discharged from the oil shale preheating chamber.

  16. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  17. Libyan oil industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddams, F.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of the growth and progress of Libya's oil industry since the first crude oil discovery in 1961 are: (1) relations between the Libyan government and the concessionary oil companies; (2) the impact of Libyan oil and events in Libya on the petroleum markets of Europe and the world; and (3) the response of the Libyan economy to the development of its oil industry. The historical review begins with Libya's becoming a sovereign nation in 1951 and traces its subsequent development into a position as a leading world oil producer. 54 references, 10 figures, 55 tables.

  18. REVIEW PAPER Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil derived

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appanna, Vasu

    , the majority of applied microbiologi- cal methods of enhanced oil recovery also dete- riorates oil and appearsREVIEW PAPER Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil derived products: a review Natalia A. Yemashova January 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Abstract Biodeterioration of crude oil and oil

  19. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the annual inspection, sampling, and maintenance activities performed on and near the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2009. The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities and the results of sample analyses. This report complies with the annual report requirement. The Salmon, MS, Site is located in Lamar County, MS, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis, MS, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, MS The site encompasses 1,470 acres and is not open to the general public. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the site. The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) was assigned responsibility for the site effective October 1, 2006

  20. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2010. The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon, MS, Site is a federally owned site located in Lamar County, MS, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis, MS, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, MS (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the 1,470-acre site. DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the operating agent for the surface and subsurface real estate.

  1. Using Oils As Pesticides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogran, Carlos E.; Ludwig, Scott; Metz, Bradley

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum and plant-derived spray oils show increasing potential for use as part of Integrated Pest Management systems for control of soft-bodied pests on fruit trees, shade trees, woody ornamentals and household plants. Sources of oils, preparing...

  2. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an alternative investment strategy to buying oil today andinvestments necessary to catch up. This was the view o?ered by oilinvestment strategy. date t) in order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil

  3. Gas and Oil (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the...

  4. Annotated bibliography of the Black Warrior basin area, northern Alabama - northern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward-McLemore, E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 1964 records related to the geology of the Black Warrior basin of northern Alabama and northern Mississippi. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; bauxite; iron ores; geologic correlations; earthquakes; fossils; gold deposits; geological surveys; hydrology; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (54) are themselves bibliographies.

  5. The Low-Income Housing Program in the Louisiana and Mississippi Gulf Opportunity Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christman, Casey; Johnson, David; Rho, Eunju; Stein, Eric; Taylor, Beth

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Texas A&M University The Bush School of Government and Public Service The Low-Income Housing Program in the Louisiana and Mississippi Gulf Opportunity Zone For The Congressional Research Service Contract... ............................................. 40? Table 24: Variance in Estimates - LIHTC Projects in Louisiana .......................... 40? 6 Table 25: Variance in Estimates - LIHTC Units in Selected Parishes ................. 42? Table 26: Proposed Block Counting (e.g. District Level...

  6. The Civil War diary of James J. Kirkpatrick, Sixteenth Mississippi Infantry, C.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Eugene Matthew

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee) Al an C. As craft (Member) Robert . Cornish (Member) Henry C. Dethlo (Head of Department) August 1984 '1 11 ABSTRACT The Civil War Diary of James J. Kirkpatrick Sixteenth Mississippi Infantry, C. S. A. (August 1984) Eugene Matthew Ott... of History for their support and, above all, patience. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER INTRODUCTION II 1861 III 1862 . IV 1863 . V 1864 VI CONCLUSION BIBLIOGRAPHY VITA 14 31 168 222 224 229 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION In 1931 John W. Kirkpatrick...

  7. Analysis of the salinity regime of the Mississippi River - Gulf Outlet Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amstutz, David E

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intersecting Channel Polynomial Coefficients (A ) n, m A Tendency Summary n, m Average Tidal Lag and Amplitude Change From Gage Station N-140A 16 30 35 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE NO. PAGE Area Map Mississippi River ? Gulf Outlet Channel Station... of salinity and tidal data gathering stations are shown in Figure 2. The average time required for tidal propagation be- tween these two stations is 5. 0 hours. The sampling programs began at station TABLE 1 ACCURACY OF CHANNEL SALINITY DATA Salinity...

  8. Supercomputing and Energy in China: How Investment in HPC Affects Oil Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WILSON, Jordan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these NOCs investments in international oil exploration andin China: How Investment in HPC Affects Oil Security Jordanoil compa- nies still apparently see foreign machines as preferable. Second, state investment

  9. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include: water quality, surface and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources, Water Quality, Management and Planning Descriptors: Principal Investigators: Todd Tietjen, Gary N. Ervin; to assist state agencies in the development and maintenance of a state water management plan

  10. Shale oil demetallization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, M. A.

    1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace metals, particularly As, Fe and Ni, are removed from hydrocarbonaceous oils, particularly shale oil by contacting the shale oil with quadrolobe alumina with or without a processing gas such as hydrogen or nitrogen at 500/sup 0/ F. to 800/sup 0/ F. at 250 to 750 psig and LHSV of 0.4 to 3.0 to deposit a portion of said trace metal onto said alumina and recover an oil product having substantially reduced amounts of trace metal.

  11. Oil Peak or Panic?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of coal and coalbed gas resource potential of western Clay County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, K.S.; Gazzier, C.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After reviewing all previously published data it appeared that if the Mississippi portion of the Black Warrior Basin contained potentially economic seams of coal the thicker downdip section was a more likely place to look. The generosity of several exploration companies in providing an extensive suite of logs that could be correlated with samples contained in the Bureau of Geology Sample Library allowed the authors to correlate and identify these upper Pottsville coal groups previously unknown in Mississippi. The purpose of this study was to identify the potential for coal resources in western Clay County, Mississippi, and to correlate laterally any coal seams identified in order to develop a gross volumetric estimate of in-place resources. It became apparent that many of the shallow coal seams (1,800 feet-3,700 feet) had appreciable quantities of gas, for they exhibited excellent gas shows when drilled. Efforts to determine rank for these coals were made by vitrinite reflectance and thus a preliminary estimate was also made for the potential coalbed methane reserves. 73 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Petrology and hydrocarbon reservoir potential of subsurface Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, Black Warrior basin, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, R.H.; Maylan, M.A.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of Mississippi and Alabama is a Paleozoic foreland basin developed between the North American craton and the Appalachian and Ouachita orogenic belts. The basin fill consists of a middle Mississippian to Lower Pennsylvanian clastic wedge, transitional in character, between Appalachian molasse and Ouachita flysch. Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, shales, coals, and thin conglomerates make up the greater part of the wedge, thickening to 11,000 ft in northeast Mississippi. Although the outcropping and near-surface Pottsville is economically importance as a source of coal in Alabama, only minor amounts of gas have been derived from the subsurface Pottsville of Mississippi (Clay and Monroe Counties). Production from the Black Warrior basin, mostly gas, is chiefly from Chesterian (Mississippian) sands and limestones in the shallower part of the basin, principally in Monroe County. Cores of Pottsville sandstones from four wells in the deeper part of the Black Warrior basin (Calhoun and Choctaw Counties) have been examined to determine their petrography, diagenetic history, and reservoir quality. This part of the basin is relatively unexplored, and the primary objective of the study was to determine if suitable hydrocarbon reservoirs are present.

  14. Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    , oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics Products 23. Sloan dolomite quarry 24. Weiser gypsum quarry Oil Fields 1. Blackburn field 2. North WillowMetals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada

  15. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  16. Exploiting heavy oil reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

  17. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

  18. Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

    1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

  19. Oil Price Volatility

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0

  20. Residual Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors forA2. For RenewableRTECSJanuary 2013

  1. Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2010 Materials Handling for Oilseed Press and Requirements for Pressing Food Grade Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    and Requirements for Pressing Food Grade Oil Overview Penn State Farm Operations has an expeller press for producing meal and oil from various seeds. The oil from the press is currently being used as biodiesel that needed to be replaced every two hours. The oil is worth two dollars per gallon as fuel, but if it can

  2. New insights into microbial responses to oil spills from the Deepwater Horizon incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, O.U.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 20, 2010, a catastrophic eruption of methane caused the Deepwater Horizon exploratory drill rig drilling the Macondo Well in Mississippi Canyon Block 252 (MC252) to explode. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was unprecendeted for several reasons: the volume of oil released; the spill duration; the well depth; the distance from the shore-line (77 km or about 50 miles); the type of oil (light crude); and the injection of dispersant directly at the wellhead. This study clearly demonstrated that there was a profound and significant response by certain members of the in situ microbial community in the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. In particular putative hydrocarbon degrading Bacteria appeared to bloom in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, even though the temperature at these depths is never >5 C. As the plume aged the shifts in the microbial community on a temporal scale suggested that different, yet metabolically important members of the community were able to respond to a myriad of plume constituents, e.g. shifting from propane/ethane to alkanes and finally to methane. Thus, the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the plume by Bacteria was a highly significant process in the natural attenuation of many compounds released during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

  3. Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

  4. Research and information needs for management of oil shale development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information and analysis to assist BLM in clarifying oil shale research needs. It provides technical guidance on research needs in support of their regulatory responsibilities for onshore mineral activities involving oil shale. It provides an assessment of research needed to support the regulatory and managerial role of the BLM as well as others involved in the development of oil shale resources on public and Indian lands in the western United States.

  5. Proceedings of the 1998 oil heat technology conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.J.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1998 Oil Heat Technology Conference was held on April 7--8 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under sponsorship by the US Department of Energy, Office of Building Technologies, State and Community Programs (DOE/BTS). The meeting was held in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America (PMAA). Fourteen technical presentations was made during the two-day program, all related to oil-heat technology and equipment, these will cover a range of research, developmental, and demonstration activities being conducted within the United States and Canada, including: integrated oil heat appliance system development in Canada; a miniature heat-actuated air conditioner for distributed space conditioning; high-flow fan atomized oil burner (HFAB) development; progress in the development of self tuning oil burners; application of HFAB technology to the development of a 500 watt; thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power system; field tests of the Heat Wise Pioneer oil burner and Insight Technologies AFQI; expanded use of residential oil burners to reduce ambient ozone and particulate levels by conversion of electric heated homes to oilheat; PMAA`s Oil Heat Technician`s Manual (third edition); direct venting concept development; evolution of the chimney; combating fuel related problems; the effects of red dye and metal contamination on fuel oil stability; new standard for above ground and basement residential fuel oil storage; plastic and steel composite secondary contained tanks; and money left on the table: an economic analysis of tank cleaning.

  6. Possible energy effects of a US ban on Libyan oil imports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peach, J.D.

    1982-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Under current slack market conditions, a ban on trade with Libya is not likely to have a major impact on US oil supplies or prices. Current US oil imports from Libya are small, and oil is readily available from other sources. Libya could experience a temporary loss of oil revenues until it found new customers. Tight market conditions - unlikely in 1982 - would maximize the potential adverse effects on the United States and minimize those on Libya. US oil companies - both those producing and refining Libyan oil - are more likely to feel the adverse effects of a trade ban than the United States as a whole. Although a ban would probably prevent direct imports of Libyan oil from entering the United States, some Libyan oil could still enter the country as products refined elsewhere.

  7. 4.2 COOL SEASON SIGNIFICANT (F2-F5) TORNADOES IN THE GULF COAST STATES Jared L. Guyer and David A. Imy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) found that 68% of all December through February tornadoes in the United States occur in the Gulf Coast4.2 COOL SEASON SIGNIFICANT (F2-F5) TORNADOES IN THE GULF COAST STATES Jared L. Guyer and David A, Wisconsin Kar'retta Venable Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 1. INTRODUCTION Tornadoes pose

  8. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  9. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  10. Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence: 2005 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    For thirty years, dependence on oil has been a significant problem for the United States. Oil dependence is not simply a matter of how much oil we import. It is a syndrome, a combination of the vulnerability of the U.S. economy to higher oil prices and oil price shocks and a concentration of world oil supplies in a small group of oil producing states that are willing and able to use their market power to influence world oil prices. Although there are vitally important political and military dimensions to the oil dependence problem, this report focuses on its direct economic costs. These costs are the transfer of wealth from the United States to oil producing countries, the loss of economic potential due to oil prices elevated above competitive market levels, and disruption costs caused by sudden and large oil price movements. Several enhancements have been made to methods used in past studies to estimate these costs, and estimates of key parameters have been updated based on the most recent literature. It is estimated that oil dependence has cost the U.S. economy $3.6 trillion (constant 2000 dollars) since 1970, with the bulk of the losses occurring between 1979 and 1986. However, if oil prices in 2005 average $35-$45/bbl, as recently predicted by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, oil dependence costs in 2005 will be in the range of $150-$250 billion. Costs are relatively evenly divided between the three components. A sensitivity analysis reflecting uncertainty about all the key parameters required to estimate oil dependence costs suggests that a reasonable range of uncertainty for the total costs of U.S. oil dependence over the past 30 years is $2-$6 trillion (constant 2000 dollars). Reckoned in terms of present value using a discount rate of 4.5%, the costs of U.S. oil dependence since 1970 are $8 trillion, with a reasonable range of uncertainty of $5 to $13 trillion.

  11. U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Office, Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Available Oil Canoil shocks. 7 The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) also isproducers, and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. They found

  12. Amphipods of the deep Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico: ecology and bioaccumulation of organic contaminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soliman, Yousria Soliman

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    factor in the degradation of the marine ecosystem (see Browsky, et al, 1993). Chronic exposure may be more detrimental to marine ecosystem than the more dramatic oil spills, because organisms can bioaccumulate oil even at low concentrations (see...

  13. Depositional environment of jurassic smackover sandstones, Thomasville field, Rankin County, Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Rebecca Sarah Penfield

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an ancient oil pool. Heat and burial cracked the oil, releasing the lighter, more volatile fractions and leaving a residue of pyrobitumen and heavy oil. On the basis of log character, it is possible to dis- tinguish between most sandstones, limestones... in the grammatical and quantitative editing of the manuscript. Hunt Energy Corporation provided funding, cores, and valuable information on Thomasville field. Hunt's aid to this study is greatly appreciated. Alan Thomson's (Shell Oil Co. ) comments on various...

  14. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    national attention to Yalobusha County. 6 Lean Times Mississippians who fish for shrimp in the Gulf is helping unlock the potential of biodiesel. 16 Focus Section Many MSU students earn while they continue

  15. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    share information about their management practices. 16 Focus Section Division of Agriculture, Forestry Good Deeds Jacqueline Deeds funds a new College of Agriculture and Life Sciences scholarship. #12;FALLResearch, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine n

  16. Research, Education and Outreach in the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    from the Vault exhibit. (Photo by Scott Corey) 4 Rebel Dog A family of Ole Miss alums turns to MSU, I served as director of the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station, as well as associate dean

  17. EcoCAR 2 Announces Year One Winner: Mississippi State University |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics4DimitriJune 30, 2015Vehicles|

  18. Mississippi State University Wins DOE and GM Challenge X 2008 Advanced

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4EnergyMission Mission Mission -Vehicle

  19. Mississippi State University Wins DOE and GM Challenge X 2008 Advanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,Official FileEnergyAERMOD-PRIME, Units 3, 1,Department

  20. World Oil: Market or Mayhem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is peak oil a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

  1. Near Shore Submerged Oil Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near Shore Submerged Oil Assessment September 2010 In the context of the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, submerged oil refers to near shore oil which has picked up sediments from very different physical and chemical processes. In this spill, the oil was released more than 5

  2. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J. [Rowland (P.) Associates (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  3. Oil spill response resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muthukrishnan, Shankar

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and development program. Title VIII concerns the amendments to the Trans Alaska Pipeline System Act. Title I deals with probably the most important part of OPA-90 ? liability and compensation. Claim procedures, federal authority, financial responsibility... minimum. LITERATURE REVIEW From the time that oil was discovered, drilled and transported, oil spills have been occurring. As long as crude oils and petroleum products are transported across the seas by ships or pipelines, there is the risk of spillage...

  4. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Blytheville quadrangle, Tennessee, Arkansas, Alabama, and Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blytheville quadrangle covers a region east of the Mississippi River in the northernmost Gulf Coastal Province. The Tertiary Mississippi Embayment and the older Black Warrior - Arkoma Basins all shoal to the northeast in this area. Surficial exposures are dominantly Cretaceous or younger. Older strata are exposed in the northeast. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Ninety uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. Few were considered significant,and almost all appear to relate to some cultural feature. Magnetic data appears, for the most part, to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  5. Understanding Crude Oil Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, James Douglas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    disruptions, and the peak in U.S. oil production account foroil increased 81.1% (logarithmically) between January 1979 and the peak

  6. Oil and Gas (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

  7. NETL: Oil & Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that address the unique nature and challenging locations of many of our remaining oil and natural gas accumulations. The National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL)...

  8. A multispectral scanner survey of the Salmon Site and surrounding area, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blohm, J.D.; Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Shines, J.E.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne multispectral scanner survey was conducted over the Salmon Site and the surrounding area in Lamar County, Mississippi, on May 8, 1992. Twelve-channel daytime multispectral data were collected from altitudes of 2,000 feet, 4,000 feet, and 6,000 feet above ground level. Large-scale color photography was acquired simultaneously with the scanner data. Three different composite images have been prepared to demonstrate the digital image enhancement techniques that can be applied to the data. The data that were acquired offer opportunity for further standard and customized analysis based on any specific environmental characterization issues associated with this site.

  9. A study in animation and visualization: consolidation of the Mississippi Fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parmley, Kelly Lynn

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Computer Science A STUDY IN ANIMATION AND VISUALIZATION: CONSOLIDATION OF THE MISSISSIPPI FAN A Thesis by KELLY LYNN PARMLEY Approved as to style and content by: Glen N. Williams (Chair of Committee... and effort expended, Malia Martin, Derek Spears, Debbie Carlson and Neal McDonald for help with portions of the research, and Dr. Childs, Susan Mengel, and Clay Williams for help in generating the LaTEX document. Thanks also go to Willis Marti, Donna...

  10. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearper ThousandGulf LNG, Mississippi LNG

  11. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) from Egypt (Dollars per Thousand

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearper ThousandGulf LNG, Mississippi

  12. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) from Egypt (Dollars per Thousand

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearper ThousandGulf LNG, MississippiCubic

  13. The Quarterly Publication of NCEER Volume 9, Number 3, July 1995 Crude Oil Transmission Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagarajaiah, Satish

    . The production and delivery of crude oil is critical to every major in- dustry and business sector in the UnitedThe Quarterly Publication of NCEER Volume 9, Number 3, July 1995 Crude Oil Transmission Study States. This nation's most crucial crude oil system traverses the midwest and is subject to seismic

  14. Disturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennings, Steven C.

    Disturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil of Houston, Houston, Texas, United States of America Abstract Oil spills represent a major environmental.S. Gulf of Mexico is a hub of oil and gas exploration activities that historically have impacted

  15. A Novel Process for Demulsification of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions by Dense Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    A Novel Process for Demulsification of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions by Dense Carbon Dioxide Nael N State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 CO2 was used to break several water-in-crude oil density and mole fraction. The proposed mechanism by which CO2 destabilizes water-in-crude oil emulsions

  16. Oil: Collection and Storage Procedure: 8.00 Version 3.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Oil: Collection and Storage Procedure: 8.00 Version 3.0 Effective Date: 11/12/2013 A. Purpose To ensure that all used oil is collected and stored in a manner consistent with all applicable Federal, State, and Local used oil regulations and Columbia University Spill Prevention, Control

  17. Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas By David Gardner Last updated at 11:32 AM on 3rd June 2010 BP's giant oil slick was bearing down on Florida holidaymakers a year visit Florida and state leaders fear the oil will devastate a tourist industry

  18. Yalobusha County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, New York:StateXining

  19. Oktibbeha County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOffice of StateOklahoma ElectricOktibbeha County,

  20. Tunica County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-StateTucson Estates,Tumwater, Washington:Tunica

  1. Environmental significance of biocatalytic conversion of low grade oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.; Lian, H.; Zhou, W.M.; Yablon, J.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies dealing with the interactions between extremophilic microorganisms and crude oils have led to the identification of biocatalysts which through multiple biochemical reactions catalyze desulfurization, denitrogenation, and demetalation reactions in oils. Concurrently, the oils are also converted to lighter oils. These complex biochemical reactions have served as models in the development of the crude oil bioconversion technology to be applied prior to the treatment of oils by conventional chemical processes. In practical terms, this means that the efficiency of the existing technology is being enhanced. For example, the recently introduced additional regulation for the emission of nitrogen oxides in some states restricts further the kinds of oils that may be used in burners. The biocatalysts being developed in this laboratory selectively interact with nitrogen compounds, i.e. basic and neutral types present in the oil and, hence, affect the fuel NOx production. This, in turn, has a cost-efficient influence on the processed oils and their consumption. In this paper, these cost-efficient and beneficial effects will be discussed in terms of produced oils, the lowering of sulfur and nitrogen contents, and the effect on products, as well as the longevity of catalysts due to the removal of heteroatoms and metal containing compounds found in crudes.

  2. Essays on Macroeconomics and Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAKIR, NIDA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reserves. In the data, crude oil reserve addi- tions consistForce and Proven Reserves in the Venezuelan Oil Industry .such as crude oil production, proved reserves, new reserves,

  3. The Legacy of Oil Spills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevors, J. T.; Saier, M. H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    010-0527-5 The Legacy of Oil Spills J. T. Trevors & M. H.workers were killed, and oil has been gushing out everday. It is now June, and oil continues to spew forth into

  4. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  5. Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Preston D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil ?elds and western Kern County population density by block group in 2000 (United States Census Bureau 2007) corrosion,

  6. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1998 295 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  7. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 337 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  8. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999 295 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  9. Oil and Gas- Leases to remove or recover (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states that a lease or agreement conveying the right to remove or recover oil, natural gas or gas of any other designation from lessor to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not...

  10. Montana Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State of Montana imposes a quarterly tax on the gross taxable value of oil and natural gas production. This tax replaces several previous taxes, simplifying fees and rates as well as compliance...

  11. Enhanced Oil Recovery Using the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musharova, Darya

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkaline Surfactant Polymer (ASP) process is a tertiary method of oil recovery that has promising results for future development. It has already been implemented in different areas of the United States such as Wyoming, west Texas, also in Canada...

  12. Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2...

  13. A BCience Service Feature Released oil receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A BCience Service Feature Released oil receipt but intended for use September 10, 1929. ? 'WXY TKE Canada, the United States (including Alaska and a West Indian service), Mexico, Costa Rica, Canal Zone there are services for Australia, New Zealand and Samoa& (All rights reserved- by---_Science--- Service, Inc

  14. OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Qian; J. Wang; S. Li

    In this paper history, current status and forecast of Chinese oil shale indus-try, as well as the characteristics of some typical Chinese oil shales are given.

  15. Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Balancing Oil and EnvironmentResponsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion

  16. Petroleum Oil | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Petroleum Oil Petroleum Oil The production of energy feedstock and fuels requires substantial water input. Not only do biofuel feedstocks like corn, switchgrass and agricultural...

  17. Synthetic aircraft turbine oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaffe, R.

    1982-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic lubricating oil composition having improved oxidation stability comprising a major portion of an aliphatic ester base oil having lubricating properties, formed by the reaction of pentaerythritol and an organic monocarboxylic acid and containing a phenylnaphthylamine, a dialkyldiphenylamine, a polyhydroxy anthraquinone, a hydrocarbyl phosphate ester and a dialkyldisulfide.

  18. Marathon Oil Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Marine oil shale from the Shenglihe oil shale section in the Qiangtang basin, northern Tibet, China, was dated by the Re-Os technique using Carius Tube digestion, Os distillation, Re extraction by acetone and ICP-MS measure-ment. An isochron was obtained giving an age of 10124 Ma with an initial

  19. Oil Quantity : The histori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    model for Prudhoe Bay. Figure 11: Historical Prudhoe Bay oil production data, modeled economically Production (million bbl per Month) Historical Production Best Fit (Hist. Tax w/ELF, Ref. P) High Price 120 140 160 19 Oil Quantity Con Wel N E A N N ng Results e Bay : The histori Bay over tim : Prudhoe Ba

  20. Long range weathering effects on the chemical properties of two Venezuelan crude oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bautz, Anton Frank

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    number and size of oil tankers carrying oil from South America and the Middle East to the United States and Western Europe increases the risk of future oil spills and the associated pollution of the open seas, estuaries, and harbors. Thus an Increase..., and c'!eanup of oil spills. Research is very intensive in the analysis of the spilled and weathered petroleum products found on the seas. When exposed to the marine environment, petroleum and its products undergo chemical and physical compositional...

  1. The effect on oil recovery of water flooding at pressures above and below the bubble point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Daniel Materson

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Dykstra, H. ~ and Parsons, R. L. , "The Predict ion of Oil Recovery by Water Flooding", Secondar Recovery of Oil in the United States, API, (1950), Second Edition. (4}. Bzeston, J. N. , "A Survey of Injection of Natural Gas Before and During Water... Pictures of Equipment 4. Physical Characteristics of Fluid A Physical Characteristics of Fluid B P V behavior of Natural Gas Effect of Flooding Pressure on Oil Recovery, Fluid A Effect of Initial Gas Saturation on Residual Oil Saturation After Flood...

  2. Ashland oil, Inc. v. Sonford Products Corp., Kelley v. Tiscornia, and United States v. Fleet Factors Corp.: Upholding EPA`s lender liability rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, W.D. Jr. [San Francisco`s Graham & James, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    John Grisham`s novel The Firm relates the story of Mitchell McDeere, a young law school graduate who believes that he is joining a {open_quotes}white shoe{close_quotes} Memphis, Tennessee, firm but discovers that the firm is controlled by the Mob. A similar, but different, {open_quotes}surprise{close_quotes} has befallen banks as a result of toxic waste cleanup cost claims. When the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund) was passed in 1980, banks had no cause for alarm because the Act provided an exemption from its ownership-based liability for any lender holding {open_quotes}indicia of ownership primarily to protect his security interest{close_quotes} in a hazardous waste facility. Based on the statutory language, it seemed reasonably clear that Congress did not intend to impose liability on secured creditors merely for securing a debt with a deed of trust or mortgage. Unfortunately, lender liability for CERCLA claims arose in the mid-1980s out of two lower federal court decisions and the Eleventh Circuit`s controversial, to say the least, 1990 decision in United States v. Fleet Factors Corp (Fleet Factors II). The major issues currently confronting lenders under CERCLA are (1) the extent to which a secured creditor may involve itself in the debtor`s operations, especially during a loan workout program, without becoming liable for cleanup costs as a CERCLA {open_quotes}owner or operator{close_quotes} and (2) whether a lender who forecloses on collateral and takes title is liable under CERCLA. 94 refs.

  3. Parameters controlling hydrocarbon distribution at Tatums Camp Field, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P. (Stephen F. Austin State Univ., Nacogdoches, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural setting, stratigraphy, diagenesis, and hydraulic pathways all have played an important role in the development of reservoir at Tatums Camp field in Lamar County, Mississippi. The field is a domal anticline located on the southern flank of Midway Salt Dome within the confines of the Mississippi Salt basin. Production is from the Booth Sandstone of the Lower Cretaceous Hosston Formation. The Booth Sandstone contains productive mouth bar sands that pinch out across the northeast half of the dome, and nonproductive channel sands on the west. The mouth bars appear to have been deposited in a marginal marine, perhaps, estuarine environment. Porosity is secondary in origin, the result of leaching of framework constituents. Diagenetic studies indicate that hydrocarbons migrated into the sands when they were at or close to their present depth of 15,700 15,800 ft (4,785-4,815 m). Hydraulic head estimates within the upper Hosston Formation decrease from north to south. This pattern suggests that fluid movement is to the south away from Midway Salt Dome. It is probable that these hydraulic pathways were established at the time of hydrocarbon migration. The reservoir at Tatums Camp field appears to be the result of hydrocarbon migration from the north into a stratigraphic pinchout lying across a structurally positive feature.

  4. An aerial radiological survey of the Salmon Site and surrounding area, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kernan, W.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the former Atomic Energy Commission Test Site at the Salmon Site and surrounding area between April 20 and May 1, 1992. The Salmon Site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the gamma-ray environment of the Salmon Site and adjacent lands. A contour map showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on a rectified aerial photograph of the area. The exposure rates within the area are between 5 and 8 {mu}R/h. The reported exposure rates include a cosmic-ray contribution estimated to be 3.7 {mu}R/h. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and in situ measurements, taken with a pressurized ion chamber and a high-purity germanium detector, were obtained at 4 locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of and are in agreement with the aerial data.

  5. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy in the Mississippi interior salt basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA) Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three depositional sequences associated with cycles of eustatic sea-level change and coastal onlap can be identified in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin of Alabama. In the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the lower depositional sequence is bounded by a basal unconformity and an upper Type 2 unconformity in the Callovian. This sequence includes Louann evaporites, Pine Hill anhydrites and shales, and Norphlet eolian sandstones. The middle depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Callovian. This sequence includes Norphlet marine sandstones and lower Smackover packstones and mudstones, middle Smackover mudstones and upper Smackover grainstones and anhydrites. The sequence has an upper Type 2 unconformity indicating relative sea-level fall in the Oxfordian. The upper depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Oxfordian. This sequence includes lower Haynesville evaporites and clastics (transgressive deposits), middle Haynesville carbonate mudstones and shales (condensed section), and upper Haynesville updip continental sandstones and downdip shales, limestones, and anhydrites (progradational highstand regressive deposits). The sequence has an upper Type 1 unconformity indicating abrupt sea-level fall in the late Kimmeridgian. In these depositional sequences, progradational highstand regressive deposits are the principal petroleum reservoirs. Condensed section deposits have the potential to be source rocks if subjected to proper burial conditions; however, only the lower and middle Smackover mudstones were deposited and buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. An understanding of sequence stratigraphy can serve as an aid to identifying potential hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  6. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

  7. Tracking the sea-level signature of the 8.2 ka cooling event: New constraints from the Mississippi Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trnqvist, Torbjrn E.

    Tracking the sea-level signature of the 8.2 ka cooling event: New constraints from the Mississippi sparked immense interest in an abrupt, century-scale cooling around 8200 years ago, with a focal point in the North Atlantic and with hemispheric teleconnections. Despite considerable progress in the unraveling

  8. Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontempi, Paula Susan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was an average flow year for the Mississippi River, were compared with observations from 1993, which was a record flow year. Water samples for phytoplankton determinations were examined at 22 locations on cross-shelf transacts from 90.5' to 94.0'W longitude...

  9. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

  10. The Transport of Heavy Metals by the Mississippi River and Their Fate in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trefry, John Harold

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Average Si02, AI2O 3 and K2O concentrations in Mississippi River particulates are similar to crustal abundances. Particulate Na20, CaO and MgO values are 60-80% below crustal levels; however a high river dissolved load of these elements offsets the low...

  11. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  12. Oil removal from water via adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, William Edward

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION I I. LITERATURE REVIEW Significance of Oil Spill Proble. ". . s Growth of Marine Commerce Superport Oil Spills Oil Spills and the Law Oil Spill Control Methods Physical Removal of Oil III. MATERIALS... IV Table V Table VI Significant Facts about Major Oil Spills Viscosity of Test Oils Determined by Capillary Viscometer Percent of Oil Remaining in Water After Removal of Oil-Carrier Combination Maximum Oil Adsorption Capacity for Light Crude...

  13. New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric...

  14. H. R. 4847: a bill to require that United States companies cease their participation in the production, marketing, or distribution of Libyan oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, May 19, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bill requiring all US companies to discontinue any participation in the production, marketing, or distribution of Libyan oil revokes all previous authority for such activity. The Act would become effective on June 30, 1986 or 30 days after enactment.

  15. Depositional environment of the "stringer sand" member, Lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Cretaceous), Mallalieu field, Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Billy Charles

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resi- due deposits are found around a number of these domes, indicating that at one time there were accumulations of oil. The cause of the volatile material escaping and leaving these "fossil oil fields" has not been definitely established... showing the location of Mallalieu field and other nearby oil fields . 14 Structure ma. p of Mallalieu field Mallalieu field electric log correlation secrion. Legend for grain size and lithology logs. 40 49 Quartz grain size, electric log...

  16. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Preparedness of the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on S. 1810, September 29, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Captain Myron E. Smith, Jr., Director of the DOE Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, testified at a hearing on S. 1810, which authorizes funds relating to the petroleum and oil shale reserves. Smith reviewed revenues and expenditures since legislation was passed in 1976, noting that production at Elk Hills and Teapot Dome are at peak levels, in his justification of the budget request of $266.1 million. Questions from the committee and Smith's responses follow his formal testimony.

  17. Spot-Oiling Johnsongrass.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Fred C.; Norris, M. J.; Rea, H. E.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kerosene or diesel fuel oil reduced the stand of the grass 95 percent following 4 applications in each of 4 tests. Ten thousand gallons of this mixture were used at College Station for crown-oiling scattered second gowth Johnsongrass in 49 1 acres... and kerosene kill tender second-growth ~hnsongrass when temperatures are high. lowever, they are slow in killing the grass uring low temperatures and when the grass .ears the boot stage. Oil-soluble dinitro and :her proved fortifiers can be added to diesel...

  18. Materials Characterization Paper In Support of the Proposed Rulemaking: Identification of Nonhazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Waste Used Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA defines used oil as any oil that has been refined from crude oil, or any synthetic oil, that has been used and as a result of such use is contaminated by physical or chemical impurities. 1 EPAs criteria for used oil: Origin: Used oil must have been refined from crude oil or made from synthetic materials (i.e., derived from coal, shale, or polymers). Examples of crude-oil derived oils and synthetic oils are motor oil, mineral oil, laminating surface agents, and metal working oils. Thus, animal and vegetable oils are not included. Bottom clean-out from virgin fuel oil storage tanks or virgin oil recovered from a spill, as well as products solely used as cleaning agents or for their solvent properties, and certain petroleum-derived products such as antifreeze and kerosene are also not included. Use: The oil must have been used as a lubricant, coolant, heat (non-contact) transfer fluid, hydraulic fluid, heat transfer fluid or for a similar use. Lubricants include, but are not limited to, used motor oil, metal working lubricants, and emulsions. An example of a hydraulic fluid is transmission fluid. Heat transfer fluids can be materials such as coolants, heating media, refrigeration oils, and electrical insulation oils. Authorized states or regions determine what is considered a similar use on a site-specific basis according to whether the material is used and managed in a manner consistent with Part 279 (e.g., used as a buoyant). Contaminants: The used oil must be contaminated by physical (e.g., high water content, metal shavings, or dirt) or chemical (e.g., lead, halogens, solvents or other hazardous constituents) impurities as a result of use. 2. Annual Quantities of Used Oil Generated and Used

  19. Code of Regulations State of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Regulation, and Conservation of Oil and Gas Resources (includes Subchapter 4. Statewide Geothermal DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION DEREK CHERNOW, Acting Director #12;Department of Conservation Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Elena M. Miller, State Oil and Gas Supervisor #12;CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS

  20. States economy consumes 25% of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    an ever increasing flow of petroleum, yet oil production in the United States peaked in 1971, and has.S. domestic oil and natural gas production will be almost non-existent.1 Since 1983, consumption of oil always been additional global production capacity to meet U.S. demand. But there is strong evidence

  1. Oil shale research in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

  2. Production of Shale Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loper, R. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

  3. Oil Market Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

  4. Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelghani, A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

  5. Cost of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Tishchishyna, N.I.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

  6. Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

  7. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  8. Diesel Generator Fuel Oil, Diesel Generator Lubricating Oil, and Diesel Generator Starting Air Requirements"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omaha Public; Power Distrct

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (ISTS) and adds requirements for DG Lubricating Oil, and DG Starting Air. The proposed changes will assure that required quality and quantity of DG Fuel Oil is maintained and also will assure that sufficient DG Lubricating Oil and DG Starting Air is maintained. This proposed amendment imposes limits on DG support system parameters to ensure the DGs will be able to perform their design function. This proposed amendment also brings the current TS on DG Fuel Oil into alignment with the ISTS. This amendment is modeled after the ISTS, Section 3.8.3. This amendment also incorporates into the FCS TS improvements to ISTS Sections 3.8.3 and 5.5 consistent with those provided in Technical Specification Task Force (TSTF) travelers TSTF-254, Rev. 2 and TSTF-374, Rev. 0. FCS also requests approval of reduction in commitments with respect to the FCS Quality Assurance (QA) Program associated with this License Amendment Request. This License Amendment Request adds a Surveillance [Table 3-5, Item 9c] stating that the DG Fuel Oil Properties are required to be verified within limits in accordance with the Diesel Fuel Oil Testing Program. These tests are to be conducted prior to adding the new fuel to the storage tank(s), but in no case is the time between receipt of new fuel and conducting the tests to exceed 31 days.

  9. Testing for market integration crude oil, coal, and natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmeier, L.J.; Griffin, J.M. [Texas A& amp; M Univ, College Station, TX (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompted by the contemporaneous spike in coal, oil, and natural gas prices, this paper evaluates the degree of market integration both within and between crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets. Our approach yields parameters that can be readily tested against a priori conjectures. Using daily price data for five very different crude oils, we conclude that the world oil market is a single, highly integrated economic market. On the other hand, coal prices at five trading locations across the United States are cointegrated, but the degree of market integration is much weaker, particularly between Western and Eastern coals. Finally, we show that crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets are only very weakly integrated. Our results indicate that there is not a primary energy market. Despite current price peaks, it is not useful to think of a primary energy market, except in a very long run context.

  10. Expectations for Oil Shale Production (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that contain relatively large amounts of kerogen, which can be converted into liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons (petroleum liquids, natural gas liquids, and methane) by heating the rock, usually in the absence of oxygen, to 650 to 700 degrees Fahrenheit (in situ retorting) or 900 to 950 degrees Fahrenheit (surface retorting). (Oil shale is, strictly speaking, a misnomer in that the rock is not necessarily a shale and contains no crude oil.) The richest U.S. oil shale deposits are located in Northwest Colorado, Northeast Utah, and Southwest Wyoming. Currently, those deposits are the focus of petroleum industry research and potential future production. Among the three states, the richest oil shale deposits are on federal lands in northwest Colorado.

  11. BASIN ANALYSIS OF THE MISSISSIPPI INTERIOR SALT BASIN AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM MODELING OF THE JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A,. Mancini

    1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 2 (Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin) objectives are to provide a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin in Years 2 and 3 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work accomplished so far: (Task 1) Tectonic History--Petroleum traps in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been characterized. (Task 2) Depositional History--The depositional systems for Mesozoic strata in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been identified and characterized. (Task 3) Fluid Flow--Modeling of 1-D burial and thermal history profiles for 48 wells in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been completed. Multidimensional thermal maturity modeling has been initiated. (Task 4) Underdeveloped Plays--Three major exploration plays have been identified. These include the basement ridge play, the regional peripheral fault trend play, and the salt anticline play. (Task 5) Technology Transfer--No work was performed on this task for this quarter. (Task 6) Topical Reports--The topical reports on the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal histories of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been completed and sent to DOE.

  12. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pride, S.R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic wavesbe expected to enhance oil production. INTRODUCTION The hopethe reservoir can cause oil production to increase. Quite

  13. Water Heaters (Storage Oil) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil) Water Heaters (Storage Oil) Water Heater, Storage Oil - v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) Water Heaters (Storage Electric)...

  14. Oil and Gas Commission General Rules and Regulations Continued(Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The General Rules have been adopted by the Oil and Gas Commission in accordance with applicable state law requirements and are General Rules of state-wide application, applying to the conservation...

  15. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Used oil (40 CFR part 266, subparts E, and part 279) updated as of 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides an overview of the used oil management program and explains the different regulatory scenarios that can apply to used oil. It distinguishes between Used Oil Management Standards of Part 279 and the former Used Oil Regulations under Part 266, Subpart E. It identifies the different types of used oil handlers and their requirements under the used oil management standards, and summarizes the requirements for the used oil handlers under the former program. It explains the difference between on- and off-specification used oil and distinguishes between the recycling presumption and the rebuttable presumption. It describes how present regulations will become effective in both authorized and unauthorized states. It explains under what circumstances used oil filters may be disposed of as non-hazardous. It also describes four pathways of potential regulation of used oil under the former program and compares differences with the present used oil management standards.

  16. Report Title: Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth In New Mexico Type of Report: Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Report Title: Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth In New Mexico Type of Report: Technical agency thereof. #12;Page | ii Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth in New Mexico James Peach and C Mexico's marketed value of oil and gas was $19.2 billion (24.0 percent of state GDP). This paper

  17. Nigeria: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Middle East events have renewed interest in Nigeria's proven and potentially productive oil basins and fueled an upsurge in exploration and production activity. Increased oil revenues during the Gulf crisis were a bonus that will help pay for projects to boost production. Official goals are to increase production from current levels to 2.2 million bopd by the end of 1991 and 2.5 million bopd by 1995, and to raise reserves to 22 billion bbl by 1995. Shell, the largest operator, will spend $6.6 billion over five years on exploration and production to up its capacity from 1 million bopd to 1.3 million bopd, primarily with a $750-million investment for four new fields in South Forcados permit. Shell also announced reserve estimates of 400 million bbl of crude and 500 Bcf of gas for the Gharan structure onshore in Rivers State north of Yenogoa. Initial discovery was in January 1967, but the field was considered to be gas until Gbaran 4 was drilled in May 1990.

  18. Inflow performance relationships for oil-water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukerji, Parijat

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for undersaturated oils J(P P f) . . 17 where J is defined as kh 141. 2)1oRo ln (0. 61re/rw) . . 18 This relation is based on Darcy's law for single, incompressible fluid flow and is valid for undersaturated oils above the bubble point. Hawkins's equation... (PI) which is defined as the ratio of production rate to the pressure drawdown. This straight line relationship can be derived from Darcy's law for the steady-state flow of a single, incompressible fluid. This concept is useful when the oil...

  19. Microbial enhancement of oil recovery: Recent advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Woodhead, A.D.; Vivirito, K.J. (eds.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During recent years, systematic, scientific, and engineering effort by researchers in the United States and abroad, has established the scientific basis for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) technology. The successful application of MEOR technology as an oil recovery process is a goal of the Department of Energy (DOE). Research efforts involving aspects of MEOR in the microbiological, biochemical, and engineering fields led DOE to sponsor an International Conference at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1992, to facilitate the exchange of information and a discussion of ideas for the future research emphasis. At this, the Fourth International MEOR Conference, where international attendees from 12 countries presented a total of 35 papers, participants saw an equal distribution between research'' and field applications.'' In addition, several modeling and state-of-the-art'' presentations summed up the present status of MEOR science and engineering. Individual papers in this proceedings have been process separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the ninth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1990 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. There are 54,963 field records in this year's Oil and Gas Field Code Master List (FCML). This amounts to 467 more than in last year's report. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes: Field records for each state and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides;field records for each alias field name; fields crossing state boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective state naming authorities.