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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys Title U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon...

2

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2...

3

U.S. Miscellaneous Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin ... and Gabon withdrew from OPEC in July 1996. Crude oil and petroleum products are reported by the PAD District of entry.

4

Plastic Product Manufacturing (NAICS 3261)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. plastics product manufacturing industry (NAICS 3261), which consists of more than 12,000 firms with combined annual revenues of about $170 billion, is one of the ten largest manufacturing industries in the country in terms of sales. A large amount of electricity is consumed by the plastics products industry, with more than half of their usage going to machine drives; therefore, it is with motors and drives that the greatest opportunities for energy savings lie. Several electric technology option...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Miscellaneous Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 24   Room temperature values of miscellaneous properties of beryllium...10 -6 (diamagnetic) Photoelectric work function, eV 3.92 Electron work function (polycrystal), eV 4.98 (depends on surface cleanliness) Ionization potential for neutral atom, eV 9.3227 Electron-binding energy for 1s (K) level, eV 111.5 Source: Ref 1 , 4 , 11 , 32...

6

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refrigeration products use vapor compression technology toicemakers and non-vapor compression refrigerators and+4.5) million non-vapor compression refrigerators in U.S.

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electronics Come of Age: A Taxonomy for Miscellaneous and Low Power Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

professionals, e.g. dishwasher or TV, CRT. Product typeselectronic devices (e.g. dishwasher controls) unless it is aelectric Cooktop, gas Dishwasher Freezer Oven, electric

Nordman, Bruce; Sanchez, Marla C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

9

Quality Improvement of Recycled Plastic Products Using Mixture Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling plastic has several advantages such as reducing consumption of energy, non-renewable fossil fuels use, and global emissions of carbon dioxide. In this study, the manufacturer would like to improve product quality and decrease cost of the products ... Keywords: recycled plastics, plastic properties, quality, mixture experiment, response surface methodology

Charnnarong Saikaew; Panita Sripaya

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Plastic Products Weights in MSW by Category, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plastic Products Weights in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) by Category, 2005 (Thousand Tons) ... with energy recovery, discards to landfill, and other disposal.

11

Miscellaneous Forms | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miscellaneous Forms Miscellaneous Forms Miscellaneous Forms The following miscellaneous forms are provided in PDF fillable and/or Word format. Click the link in the "Format" column to open a copy of the form or right-click to download. Number* Title/Description Format** SF-85 Questionnaire for Non-Sensitive Positions PDF-fil UCN-13A Relocation Expense Report PDF-fil, PDF print UCN-15436 Gifts and Grants Request PDF-fil, Word UCN-16708 Request for Authorization to Ship SNM or Non-SNM Material (U) Word UCN-16790A Approval of Product Returned for Accountable Material and Non-Accountable Weapons Material (U) PDF print UCN-20650 Statement of Interest in Maintaining Section 3161 Employment Eligibility PDF-fil UCN-20904 Supplier Qualification Questionnaire Word

12

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes Title Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in...

13

Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hobbs, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Hobbs, D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

SciTech Connect

Historically, residential energy and carbon saving efforts have targeted conventional end uses such as water heating, lighting and refrigeration. The emergence of new household appliances has transformed energy use from a few large and easily identifiable end uses into a broad array of ''miscellaneous'' energy services. This group of so called miscellaneous appliances has been a major contributor to growth in electricity demand in the past two decades. We use industry shipment data, lifetimes, and wattage and usage estimates of over 90 individual products to construct a bottom-up end use model (1976-2010). The model is then used to analyze historical and forecasted growth trends, and to identify the largest individual products within the miscellaneous end use. We also use the end use model to identify and analyze policy priorities. Our forecast projects that over the period 1996 to 2010, miscellaneous consumption will increase 115 TWh, accounting for over 90 percent of future residential electricity growth. A large portion of this growth will be due to halogen torchiere lamps and consumer electronics, making these two components of miscellaneous electricity a particularly fertile area for efficiency programs. Approximately 20 percent (40 TWh) of residential miscellaneous electricity is ''leaking electricity'' or energy consumed by appliances when they are not performing their principal function. If the standby power of all appliances with a standby mode is reduced to one watt, the potential energy savings equal 21 TWh/yr, saving roughly $1-2 billion annually.

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Miscellaneous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NETL has developed a design and control philosophy for the addition of nitrogen to austenitic and ferritic steels. The design approach uses CALPHAD as the...

17

Miscellaneous  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

THE PEAK OIL DEBATE THE PEAK OIL DEBATE As The EIA Turns 30 EIA 2008 Energy Conference Washington, DC April 7, 2008 By: Matthew R. Simmons, Chairman Simmons & Company International EIA 2008 Energy Conference Washington, DC April 7, 2008 By: Matthew R. Simmons, Chairman Simmons & Company International SIMMONS & COMPANY INTERNATIONAL Should We Debate "Peak Oil" Should We Debate "Peak Oil" n Oil seems non-renewable. n High percentage comes from "mature fields." n High percentage of new fields are offshore with sharp peaks. n Oil supply will peak, someday. n Timing is only debate. n Fog of non-transparency creates the debate. n With precise supply data, the debate would end. SIMMONS & COMPANY INTERNATIONAL Can The EIA Give The World A

18

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

19

Methods for the continuous production of plastic scintillator materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for producing plastic scintillating material employing either two major steps (tumble-mix) or a single major step (inline-coloring or inline-doping). Using the two step method, the polymer pellets are mixed with silicone oil, and the mixture is then tumble mixed with the dopants necessary to yield the proper response from the scintillator material. The mixture is then placed in a compounder and compounded in an inert gas atmosphere. The resultant scintillator material is then extruded and pelletized or formed. When only a single step is employed, the polymer pellets and dopants are metered into an inline-coloring extruding system. The mixture is then processed under a inert gas atmosphere, usually argon or nitrogen, to form plastic scintillator material in the form of either scintillator pellets, for subsequent processing, or as material in the direct formation of the final scintillator shape or form.

Bross, Alan (Downers Grove, IL); Pla-Dalmau, Anna (Naperville, IL); Mellott, Kerry (Malta, IL)

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. Miscellaneous electricity use in the U.S. residentialMiscellaneous Uses of Electricity in Homes'. Presented atThe Latest In "Leaking Electricity" in Homes. Davis Energy

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

Stickney, R.G.

1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluation of Miscellaneous and Electronic Device Energy Use...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

loads, energy utilisation intensity, healthcare facilities, hospital energy use, energy consumption. Abstract Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about...

24

Miscellaneous Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Miscellaneous includes ...

25

Miscellaneous | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Miscellaneous Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific...

26

MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRICITY USE IN THE U.S. RESIDENTIAL SECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2010). Our study has two components: a historical analysis of miscellaneous electricity use (1976- 1995 consumption increased at an annual rate of 4.6%. In 1995, miscellaneous electricity consumption totaled 235LBNL-40295 UC-1600 MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRICITY USE IN THE U.S. RESIDENTIAL SECTOR M. C. Sanchez, J. G

27

Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous Easement...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous EasementROW Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

28

Miscellaneous States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

+ Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

29

,"Miscellaneous States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Miscellaneous States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

30

,"Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

31

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

company data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Natural Gas Liquids Proved...

32

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

33

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Huber, Wolfgang. (1997), Standby Power Consumption in U.S.of Technical Potential Standby Power in Miscellaneous Endprincipal function. If the standby power of all appliances

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

35

Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Misc. Products - Fuel Use Misc. Products - Nonfuel...

36

Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaMiscellaneous FloorAreaMiscellaneous Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Miscellaneous Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous" Showing 25 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 360 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 110 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 445 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 250 + Sweden Building 05K0025 + 254 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,629 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 175 + Sweden Building 05K0040 + 869 + Sweden Building 05K0044 + 1,234 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,039 + Sweden Building 05K0051 + 1,489.92 + Sweden Building 05K0052 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 140 + Sweden Building 05K0063 + 654 + Sweden Building 05K0068 + 746 + Sweden Building 05K0071 + 293 +

37

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Release date: January 6, 2014 Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) comprise a growing portion of delivered energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings. Recently, the growth of MELs has offset some of the efficiency gains made through technology improvements and standards in major end uses such as space conditioning, lighting, and water heating. Miscellaneous end uses, including televisions, personal computers, security systems, data center servers, and many other devices, have continued to penetrate into building-related market segments. Part of this proliferation of devices and equipment can be attributed to increased service demand for entertainment, computing, and convenience appliances.

38

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

39

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Sales (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

40

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Decreases...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

42

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

43

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

44

Assessing and Reducing Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) in Lodging  

SciTech Connect

Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are the loads outside of a building's core functions of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and water heating. This report reviews methods to reduce MELs in lodging.

Rauch, Emily M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

future residential electricity growth. Low growth rates forrate of 2.7%, accounting for over 90% of future residential electricityresidential end uses. From 1976-1995, miscellaneous electricity increased at an annual rate

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Refinery Net Production of Miscellaneous Products - Nonfuel Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

La. Gulf Coast: 425: 481: 507: 495: 568: 511: 2005-2013: N. La., Ark: 13: 18: 17: 19: 14: 18: 2005-2013: New Mexico: 3: 12: 12: 12: 11: 10: 2006-2013: ...

47

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

62440 Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneousof California. Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, anduses (appliances, lighting, electronics, and miscellaneous

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Use of plastic construction materials in small-scale fuel alcohol production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several general designs for small-scale fuel alcohol plants that have been published primarily use conventional materials of construction (steel, copper, etc.). A fuel alcohol plant owned by Dixie Fuels, Inc. Valley Park, Mississippi, and a farm-scale alcohol plant being developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority have incorporated plastic materials in several areas of their plants; results have been excellent in terms of reduced materials, labor, and operating costs. However, plastics were not used in the distillation step. This work investigated the suitability of small-scale distillation equipment made entirely or partially from plastics. A low-cost alcohol distillation system can be constructed using chlorinated poly(viny chloride) (CPVC) pipe or poly(vinly chloride) (PVC) plastic pipe for the column and heat-exchanger shells. Although pipe made from CPVC is preferred, schedule 80 PVC pipe can be used if external supports are used to provide rigidity. 3 figures, 1 table. (DP)

Lightsey, G.R.; Kadir, O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads Energy Efficiency Opportunities for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads Energy Efficiency Opportunities for Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads Energy Efficiency Opportunities for Commercial Buildings: A Collaborative Study by the United States and India Title Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads Energy Efficiency Opportunities for Commercial Buildings: A Collaborative Study by the United States and India Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6287E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Iris H. Y. Cheung, and Steven Lanzisera Secondary Authors Wardell, Bob, Manoj Deshpande, Jayraj Ugarkar, and Infosys Technologies Limited Date Published 04/2013 Keywords Electronic loads, energy efficiency opportunities for commercial buildings Short Title MELs Refereed Designation Unknown Attachment Size PDF 1.44 MB Google Scholar BibTex

50

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

online: www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/esr/esr_sum.html.Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes RichardMiscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes Richard

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

,"Miscellaneous Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

52

Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial Office Building Title Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial Office Building Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6384E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Lanzisera, Steven, Stephen Dawson-Haggerty, Iris H. Y. Cheung, Jay Taneja, David Culler, and Richard E. Brown Date Published 04/2013 Keywords Commercial Office Building, Data Collection, Electronic loads Abstract Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and this share is projected to increase for the foreseeable future. Our understanding, however, of which devices are most responsible for this energy use is still rudimentary due to the difficulty and expense of performing detailed studies on MELs and their energy use. In order to better understand the energy use of MELs and the design of MELs field metering studies, we conducted a year-long study of MELs in an 89,500 sq. ft. (8310 m2) office building.

53

Using Wireless Power Meters to Measure Energy Use of Miscellaneous and Electronic Devices in Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miscellaneous and electronic devices consume about one-third of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and their energy use is increasing faster than other end-uses. Despite the success of policies, such as Energy Star, that promote more efficient miscellaneous and electronic products, much remains to be done to address the energy use of these devices if we are to achieve our energy and carbon reduction goals. Developing efficiency strategies for these products depends on better data about their actual usage, but very few studies have collected field data on the long-term energy used by a large sample of devices due to the difficulty and expense of collecting device-level energy data. This paper describes the development of an improved method for collecting device-level energy and power data using small, relatively inexpensive wireless power meters. These meters form a mesh network based on Internet standard protocols and can form networks of hundreds of metering points in a single building. Because the meters are relatively inexpensive and do not require manual data downloading, they can be left in the field for months or years to collect long time-series energy use data. In addition to the metering technology, we also describe a field protocol used to collect comprehensive, robust data on the miscellaneous and electronic devices in a building. The paper presents sample results from several case study buildings, in which all the plug-in devices for several homes were metered, and a representative sample of several hundred plug-in devices in a commercial office building were metered for several months.

UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA USA; Brown, Richard; Lanzisera, Steven; Cheung, Hoi Ying (Iris); Lai, Judy; Jiang, Xiaofan; Dawson-Haggerty, Stephen; Taneja, Jay; Ortiz, Jorge; Culler, David

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

Cold Sterilization of Plastic Containers  

The sterilization of plastic containers for beverage, food and pharmaceutical products is a significant cost to the associated industries. Currently, ...

55

Process for remediation of plastic waste - Energy Innovation ...  

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing ...

56

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 156 1980's 180 193 74 81 77 77 136 66 84 87 1990's 72 76 93 96 67 69 68 44 39 67 2000's 42 83 100 134 110 132 139 241 272 349 2010's 363 393 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

57

Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 142 1980's 146 181 47 50 63 52 95 53 56 48 1990's 50 62 82 87 56 37 40 13 22 13 2000's 23 64 80 120 98 118 120 226 263 271 2010's 353 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

58

Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic loads in a commercial office building Title Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic loads in a commercial office building Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Lanzisera, Steven, Stephen Dawson-Haggerty, Iris H. Y. Cheung, Jay Taneja, David Culler, and Richard E. Brown Journal Building and Environment Volume 65 Start Page 170 Pagination 170 - 177 Date Published 7/2013 ISSN 03601323 Keywords benchmarking, field study, MELs, office buildings, Plug-loads Abstract Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and this share is projected to increase for the foreseeable future. Our understanding, however, of which devices are most responsible for this energy use is still rudimentary due to the difficulty and expense of performing detailed studies on MELs and their energy use. In order to better understand the energy use of MELs and the design of MELs field metering studies, we conducted a year-long study of MELs in an 89,500 sq. ft. (8310 m2) office building. We present insights obtained from this study using 455 wireless plug-load power meters including the study design process, the tools needed for success, and key other methodology issues. Our study allowed us to quantify, for the study buildings, how many devices we needed to inventory and meter as well as for how long we needed to collect meter data. We find that the study design of earlier work would not have yielded accurate results in our study building. This paper presents these findings along with a brief summary of the energy related results.

59

Plastic Magen Industry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plastic products with a lifetime guarantee, including the Heliocol and Sunstar-brand solar water heating systems. References Plastic Magen Industry1 LinkedIn Connections...

60

Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessing and Reducing Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) in Banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are loads outside of a building's core functions of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, lighting, and water heating. MELs are a large percentage of total building energy loads. This report reviews methods for reducing MELs in Banks. Reducing MELs in a bank setting requires both local and corporate action. Corporate action centers on activities to prioritize and allocate the right resources to correct procurement and central control issues. Local action includes branch assessment or audits to identify specific loads and needs. The worksheet at the end of this guide can help with cataloging needed information and estimating savings potential. The following steps provide a guide to MEL reductions in Bank Branches. The general process has been adapted from a process developed for office buildings the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, 2011).

Rauch, Emily M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 34 12 27 31 14 25 41 13 28 39 1990's 22 14 11 9 11 32 28 31 17 54 2000's 19 19 20 14 12 14 19 15 9 78 2010's 10 104 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

63

After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

Upcycling: A Green Solution to the Problem of Plastic ...  

Developing a Process to Transform Waste Plastic into a Valuable Commodity Plastics productssuch as grocery bags, packaging foam, plates, and cupsare lightweight ...

65

Recycle plastics into feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation and remelting of polymers for film and molding applications. A European consortium of academia and refiners have investigated if it is possible and profitable to thermally crack plastics into feedstocks for refining and petrochemical applications. Development and demonstration of pyrolysis methods show promising possibilities of converting landfill garbage into valuable feedstocks such as ethylene, propylene, BTX, etc. Fluidized-bed reactor technologies offer HPI operators a possible avenue to meet recycling laws, conserve raw materials and yield a profit. The paper describes thermal cracking for feedstocks and pyrolysis of polyolefins.

Kastner, H.; Kaminsky, W. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

After-hours power status of office equipment and energy use of miscellaneous plug-load equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of miscellaneous plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. For most types of miscellaneous equipment, we also estimated typical unit energy consumption in order to estimate total energy consumption of the miscellaneous devices within our sample. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from sixteen commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: four education buildings, two medical buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees each), and five small business offices (< 50 employees each). Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay are a of California, nine (including the five small businesses) are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Marageret J.; Busch, John F.

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

67

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

68

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G. (Westmont, IL); Thiyagarajan, Pappannan (Germantown, MD)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

SciTech Connect

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Plastic Mounts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Typical properties of plastics suitable for metallographic mounts...metals is in the range 1??3 ? 10 -5 mm/mm/°C. (c) Wood-filled grade, preferably with low filler content. (d) A liquid epoxy resin with an aliphatic amine hardener. (e) Depends on the curing schedule;

71

U.S. Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Asphalt and Road Oil-5: 0: 1: 0: 0: 1: 2009-2013: Miscellaneous Products : 2009-2009: Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2009-2013

72

MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE OF EARTH AND ROCK-FILL DAMS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE OF EARTH AND ROCK-FILL DAMS Report 2 ANALYSIS OF RESPONSE O F RIFLE.GAP D A M TO PROJECT RULISON UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATION bv J. E. Ahlberg, J. Fowler, L W. Heller ........ . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . - ...... *- , .... . . . - ->-w-J- * - : - . . June 1972 s~omsored by Office, Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army Conducted by U. S. A m y Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Soils and Pavements Laboratory Vicksburg, Mississippi APPROVED FOR WBLlC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED L i s t o f Associated Reports Previous reports under Engineering Study 540 are: "A Comparative Summary o f Current Earth Dam Analysis Methods for Earthquake Response," issued by Office, Chief o f Engineers, a s Inclosure 1 to Engineer

73

Recovering Plastics from Retired Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shredded plastic materials recovered Shredded plastic materials recovered from retired cars and trucks can be used to manufacture new vehicle parts and other plastic products. Left: Items from shredder residue, recovered polyethylene and polypropylene, and a knee bolster manufactured from recovered plastics. Right: Argonne's froth flotation pilot plant. Background For years vehicle manufacturers have been designing and building new cars and trucks with the goal that structural materials in ELVs will be recycled, reducing the flow of material into the solid-waste stream. At the same time, automakers must ensure that the design materials selected for their ability to be recycled do not impair the safety, reliability, and performance of the completed vehicle. In the United States between 12 and 15 million vehicles reach

74

Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes  

SciTech Connect

A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Plastics Processing Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...steps: Feed and melting of the plastic pellets Metering of the plastic melt Injection of the plastic melt into the mold Cooling and solidifying of the plastic in the mold Ejection or removal of the molded part from the mold The following description of these steps is based on the processing

76

Power Quality for the Plastics Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ TechWatch provides an overview of common plastics manufacturing processes and examines the types of power quality (PQ) phenomena to which they are most susceptible. Descriptions of investigative methods, cost-effective solutions, and illustrative case studies provide important details on how effectively dealing with common PQ issues can enhance the productivity of plastics manufacturing processes.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Miscellaneous publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Laser Cooling to the Zero Point Energy of Motion ... Precise Test of Quantum Jump Theory," Phys ... Spatial Anisotropy by Use of Nuclear-Spin-Polarized ...

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

Miscellaneous Concerns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Typical Day at the Center. Parents often ask What does my child do all day? This is a wonderful question! The activities ...

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

North Louisiana and Arkansas Refinery and Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,036: 994: 892: 921: 1,047: 963: 1993-2013: ... Miscellaneous Products: 17: 19: 14: 18: 21: 22: 1995-2013: Processing Gain(-) ...

80

Replex Plastics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Replex Plastics Replex Plastics Jump to: navigation, search Name Replex Plastics Address 11 Mount Vernon Ave Place Mount Vernon, Ohio Zip 43050 Sector Services, Solar Product Manufacturing; Research and development Phone number 740-397-5535 Website http://www.replex.com Coordinates 40.386266°, -82.483755° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.386266,"lon":-82.483755,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass  

SciTech Connect

The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials.

Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

icemakers and non-vapor compression refrigerators and2.5,+4.5) million non-vapor compression refrigerators inthe existence of non-vapor compression freezers. Moreover,

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bosch Emerson Franklin GE KitchenAid Obama Scotsman TresantiBosch Emerson Franklin GE KitchenAid Obama Scotsman TresantiIgloo JennAir Kalorik Kenmore KitchenAid Koldfront Koolatron

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EIA (2012). Annual Energy Outlook 2012. Energy Information9.580.74%. Given the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 estimate of

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Electronics Come of Age: A Taxonomy for Miscellaneous and Low Power Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric Oven, gas Refrigerator Water heating Water heating,Heating pad Hot plate (kitchen) Iron Juicer Kettle Knife Mug warmer Oven,

Nordman, Bruce; Sanchez, Marla C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Electronics Come of Age: A Taxonomy for Miscellaneous and Low Power Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consult. 2004. Appliance Standby Power Consumption: StoreHuber, Wolfgang. 1997. Standby Power Consumption in U.S.62301 Ed 1: Measurement of Standby Power. 2005. Kawamoto,

Nordman, Bruce; Sanchez, Marla C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refrigerator operate with propane as well as electricity? [freezer operate with propane as well as electricity? [cooler operate with propane as well as electricity? [

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerson Franklin Frigidaire GE Haier Igloo JennAir KalorikEmerson Franklin Frigidaire GE Haier Igloo JennAir KalorikEmerson Franklin Frigidaire GE Haier Igloo JennAir Kalorik

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Mechanical Testing of Plastics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 7   ASTM and ISO mechanical test standards for plastics...by pendulum method D 1938 6383-1 Tear propagation resistance of plastic film and thin

90

Plastic encapsulated parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plastic semiconductor packages were characterized as possible alternatives for canned devices, which are susceptible to internal shorts caused by conductive particles. Highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) as well as electrical and mechanical testing were conducted on plastic technology devices.

Castillo, T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Plastic packaging: Migration of plastics into foods. March 1972-November 1989 (Citations from the Food Science and Technology Abstracts data base). Report for March 1972-November 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the leaching of plastics and plasticizers from packaging materials into foods. Measurement of plastics in oils and dairy products is emphasized. Analytical methods, toxicology, and legislation concerning plastic migration and food safety are included. (This updated bibliography contains 191 citations, 27 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. IV. Miscellaneous aspects. [Transport; fuel fabrication; decay; policy; economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses seven aspects of actinide partitioning-transmutation (P-T) which are important in any complete evaluation of this waste treatment option but which do not fall within other major topical areas concerning P-T. The so-called miscellaneous aspects considered are (1) the conceptual design of a shipping cask for highly neutron-active fresh and spent P-T fuels, (2) the possible impacts of P-T on mixed-oxide fuel fabrication, (3) alternatives for handling the existing and to-be-produced spent fuel and/or wastes until implementation of P-T, (4) the decay and dose characteristics of P-T and standard reactor fuels, (5) the implications of P-T on currently existing nuclear policy in the United States, (6) the summary costs of P-T, and (7) methods for comparing the risks, costs, and benefits of P-T.

Alexander, C.W.; Croff, A.G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Flammable Gases in Inactive Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the field measurements for a screening of flammable gases in the vapor space of the inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs) currently assigned to the River Protection Project (RPP). If a measurement exceeds 25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), vapor grab samples will be collected for laboratory analysis. This SAP also specifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), and reporting objectives for grab sampling. Technical bases for the sampling objectives are provided in the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objectives (Dukelow et al 1995). The screening data will be used to determine if additional data are needed to support closure of a flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities.

NGUYEN, D.M.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Continuum Computational Plasticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 2, 2011 ... Microstructural Evolution and Its Effect on Plastic Flow and Strain .... Pb-free interconnects are being used extensively in Electronic Packaging.

95

plastics | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plastics plastics Dataset Summary Description These data files contain volume, mass, and hardness changes of elastomers and plastics representative exposed to gasoline containing various levels of ethanol. These materials are representative of those used in gasoline fuel storage and dispensing hardware. All values are compared to the original untreated condition. The data sets include results from specimens exposed directly to the fuel liquid and also a set of specimens exposed only to the fuel vapors. Source Mike Kass, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords compatibility elastomers ethanol gasoline plastics polymers Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon plastics_dma_results_san.xlsx (xlsx, 4.9 MiB)

96

Miscellaneous equipment in commercial buildings: The inventory, utilization, and consumption by equipment type  

SciTech Connect

The nature of the miscellaneous equipment (devices other than permanently installed lighting and those used for space conditioning) in commercial buildings is diverse, comprising a wide variety of devices that are subject to varied patterns of use. This portion of the commercial load is frequently underestimated, and widely hypothesized to be growing. These properties make it a particularly difficult load to characterize for purposes of demand-side management. In the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), over 100 commercial sites in the Pacific Northwest have been metered at the end-use level for several years. Detailed inspections of the equipment in them have also been conducted. This paper describes how the ELCAP data have been used to estimate three fundamental properties of the various types of equipment in several classes of commercial buildings: (1) the installed capacity per unit floor area, (2) utilization of the equipment relative to the installed capacity, and (3) the resulting energy consumption by building type and for the Pacific Northwest commercial sector as a whole. Applications for the results include assessment of conservation potential, prediction of equipment loads from survey data, estimating equipment loads for energy audits, targeting of conservation technology development, and disaggregating building total or mixed end-use data. 4 tabs., refs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In order to meet whole-house energy savings targets beyond 50% in residential buildings, it will be essential that new technologies and systems approaches be developed to address miscellaneous electric loads (MELs). These MELs are comprised of the small and diverse collection of energy-consuming devices found in homes, including what are commonly known as plug loads (televisions, stereos, microwaves), along with all hard-wired loads that do not fit into other major end-use categories (doorbells, security systems, garage door openers). MELs present special challenges because their purchase and operation are largely under the control of the occupants. If no steps are taken to address MELs, they can constitute 40-50% of the remaining source energy use in homes that achieve 60-70% whole-house energy savings, and this percentage is likely to increase in the future as home electronics become even more sophisticated and their use becomes more widespread. Building America (BA), a U.S. Department of Energy research program that targets 50% energy savings by 2015 and 90% savings by 2025, has begun to identify and develop advanced solutions that can reduce MELs.

Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains a minimum of 80 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap, that are used in the injection molding process, are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. The reuse of plastic scrap culled from junk automobiles and packaging materials is discussed, and waste byproducts from polyurethane production are described. (Contains a minimum of 88 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Status report for inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks at Hanford Site 200 Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this status report is to summarize updated data and information from the FY 1994 strategy plan that is associated with inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs). Assumptions and processes to assess potential risks and operational concerns are documented in this report. Safety issue priorities are ranked based on a number of considerations. Sixty-three IMUSTs have been Identified and placed on the official IMUST list. All the tanks are associated with past Hanford Site operations. Of the 63 tanks., 19 are catch tanks, 20 are vault tanks, 3 are neutralization tanks, 8 are settling tanks, 2 are solvent makeup tanks used to store hexone, 2 are flush tanks, 3 are decontamination tanks, 1 is a diverter station, 1 is a receiver tank, 1 is an experimental tank, and 3 are waste handling tanks. It is important to proactively deal with the risks Imposed by these 63 tanks, and at the same time not jeopardize the existing commitments and schedules for mitigating and resolving identified safety issues related to the 177 SSTs and DSTS. Access controls and signs have been placed on all but the three official IMUSTs added most recently. An accelerated effort to identify authorization documents and perform unreviewed safety question (USQ) screening has been completed. According to a set of criteria consistent with the safety screening data quality objective (DQO) process, 6 IMUSTs are ranked high related to the hydrogen generation potential safety Issue, 1 is ranked high related to the ferrocyanide potential safety issue, 6 are ranked high related to the flammability potential safety issue, and 25 are ranked high related to the vapor emissions potential safety issue.

Powers, T.B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 547 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 547 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 3, and 9 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; AND (3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly Closure activities began in August 2011 and were completed in June 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for CAU 547 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 was closure in place with administrative controls. The following closure activities were performed: (1) Open holes were filled with concrete; (2) Steel casings were placed over vertical expansion joints and filled with cement; (3) Engineered soil covers were constructed over piping and exposed sections of the gas sampling system components; (4) Fencing, monuments, Jersey barriers, radiological postings, and use restriction (UR) warning signs were installed around the perimeters of the sites; (5) Housekeeping debris was picked up from around the sites and disposed; and (6) Radiological surveys were performed to confirm final radiological postings. UR documentation is included in Appendix D. The post-closure plan was presented in detail in the CADD/CAP for CAU 547 and is included as Appendix F of this report. The requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this report. The proposed post-closure requirements consist of visual inspections to determine the condition of postings and radiological surveys to verify contamination has not migrated. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 547; and (2) The transfer of CAU 547 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--1480, dated July 2012, documents repairs of erosion and construction of engineered erosion protection features at Corrective Action Site (CAS) 02-37-02 (MULLET) and CAS 09-99-06 (PLAYER). The final as-built drawings are included in Appendix A, and photographs of field work are included in Appendix B. Field work was completed on March 11, 2013.

none,

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Process for Recovering Usable Plastics from Mixed Plastic Waste  

appliances, auto shredder residue, disassembled car parts, industrial scrap plastics, and consumer electronics ... specifications of automobile manufacturers.

106

Microelectronics plastic molded packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

Johnson, D.R. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Polymers go full circle in new plastics recycling process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling waste, especially post-consumer plastic packaging waste, is a growing issue. Pressure to find alternatives to landfilling and conserve resources has prompted governments to limit the amount of material that can be disposed in traditional ways. One approach, chemical recycling of mixed plastics back to the feedstock for virgin plastic products, is receiving increased attention. British-based BP Chemicals, in collaboration with other polymer producers, is pioneering this alternative. The process involves cracking polymers to a hydrocarbon intermediate suitable for feeding to existing petrochemical plants, such as the steam crackers that produce the basic building blocks for plastics. BP's recycled product already can be used with four leading steam-cracking processes.

Lock, J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Energy Conservation standards for Wine Chillers and Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45 Feb 10, 2012 45 Feb 10, 2012 Jkt 226001 PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 E:\FR\FM\13FEP1.SGM 13FEP1 erowe on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS-1 7547 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 29 / Monday, February 13, 2012 / Proposed Rules that have tribal implications or preempt tribal laws. Rural Development has determined that the rule does not have a substantial direct effect on one or more Indian tribe(s) or on either the relationship or the distribution of powers and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. Thus, this rule is not subject to the requirements of Executive Order 13175. If a tribe determines that this rule has implications of which Rural Development is not aware and would like to engage with Rural Development on this rule, please contact Rural

109

Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO); Maness, Pin-Ching (Golden, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer. 3 figures.

Weaver, P.F.; Pinching Maness.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

111

The cycle of plastic waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study deals with the informal plastic recovery system in Addis Ababa. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the organization and the (more)

Bjerkli, Camilla Louise

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of plastic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of different samples: real waste, simulated and real waste + catalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the effects of inorganic components in the pyrolysis products. - Abstract: Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products.

Adrados, A., E-mail: aitziber_adrados@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Lopez, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.; Torres, A. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Small-Business Guide: Plastics Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the challenges faced by small business owners can be addressed through efficient use of electric technology. Each volume in the Small Business Guide describes the current state of a business type and details new or alternative electric equipment that can help it meet its characteristic problems.

1997-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics May 20, 2013 - 1:31pm Addthis Novomer’s thermoplastic pellets incorporate waste CO2 into a variety of consumer products. Novomer's thermoplastic pellets incorporate waste CO2 into a variety of consumer products. Why is this important? By using CO2 that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere, the process has the potential to cut greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously reducing petroleum consumption and producing useful products for American consumers. The world's first successful large-scale production of a polypropylene carbonate (PPC) polymer using waste carbon dioxide (CO2) as a key raw material has resulted from a projected funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy.

115

Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AR No. 5 Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action Separate scrap plastic bag waste from solid waste stream and recycle. This can be accomplished by either arranging for no-cost pick-up of loose waste or by selling baled waste material. Assessment Recommendation Summary Recommended Waste Cost Implementation

Tullos, Desiree

116

Plastics' Color Problem: How a New Device Will Prevent Waste | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plastics' Color Problem: How a New Device Will Prevent Waste Plastics' Color Problem: How a New Device Will Prevent Waste Plastics' Color Problem: How a New Device Will Prevent Waste July 22, 2010 - 3:20pm Addthis This is a probe for use in an extruder, similar to the one being developed by Guided Wave of Rancho Cordova, Calif. | Photo courtesy of Guided Wave. This is a probe for use in an extruder, similar to the one being developed by Guided Wave of Rancho Cordova, Calif. | Photo courtesy of Guided Wave. What are the key facts? Commercial plastics made at 752 degrees Fahrenheit and 2,000 psi Conventional plastic color detectors break at high temps and pressures Plastics with incorrect colors, require rerunning production - wasting energy $250,000 DOE grant to support development of improved probe Color can make or break commercial plastics. And commercial or extruded

117

Choose building products that avoid toxic emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Choose building products that avoid toxic emissions. ... (PVC or vinyl) products have a wide range of chlorine that ... and also the plasticizers in ...

118

Plasticizers Derived from Vegetable Oils  

This technology addresses the known health issues of commonly used petroleum-based plasticizers used in polyvinyl chloride (PVC), a high volume thermoplastic material (one that is moldable and formed by heating) by providing a biobased and renewable ...

119

New Class of Plastic Scintillators  

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a class of plastic scintillators capable of detecting fission neutrons, while discriminating against interfering gamma rays, enabling their use as a replacement for liquid scintillator neutron detector ...

120

Deformation Mechanisms and Polycrystal Plasticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... New high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction tools, capable of structural and ... aimed at measuring the gamma-prime precipitate size, morphology, ... propagating and hopping bands are vivid examples of plastic bursts at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Field evaluation of recycled plastic lumber (RPL) pallets. Final project report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One significant component of the waste stream, discarded plastic products and packaging, continues to be a growing portion of the municipal solid waste (MSW). There has been considerable work done in characterizing the quantity and types of plastics in different waste streams, collection methods, separation, sorting as well as technologies for processing post-consumer mixed plastics. The focus in recent years has been the development of markets for recycled plastic products, which constitutes the second half of the material flow diagram cycle shown in Figure 1. One key product that holds significant promise for plastics recycling to be both technically feasible and economically viable is Recycled Plastic Lumber (RPL). The contents of this report forms the second phase of a two-phase pilot project on developing specifications and standards for a product fabricated from RPL. Such standards and specifications are needed to prepare procurement guidelines for state and federal agencies interested in purchasing products made from recycled materials. The first phase focused on establishing a procedure to evaluate RPL product,s such as pallets, in a laboratory setting while this phase focuses on field evaluation of RPL pallets in service. This effort is critical in the development of new markets for RPL products. A brief summary of the findings from Phase 1 of this effort is presented next.

Krishnaswamy, P.; Miele, C.R.; Francini, R.B. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Yuracko, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yerace, P. [Dept. of Energy, Fernald, OH (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Harbec Plastics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harbec Plastics Harbec Plastics Facility Harbec Plastics Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Northern Developments LLC Developer Harvest the Wind Location Ontario NY Coordinates 43.2260525°, -77.36176372° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2260525,"lon":-77.36176372,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade  

SciTech Connect

An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in MIPP) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 {micro}s respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 second spill and read them out in {approx}50 seconds between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab. An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

Baldin, Boris; /Fermilab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Detailed search Miscellaneous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Nuclear Fusion France and Japan disagree over outcome of ITER meeting [Date: 2005-05-09] Discussions over the eventual site of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) have become more heated after. 'This well-balanced agreement could lead Japan to decide not to be the host country for the reactor

127

Composition of plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) by direct sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article shows WEEE plastics characterization from a recycling unit in Portugal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recycling unit has low machinery, with hand sorting of plastics elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most common polymers are PS, ABS, PC/ABS, HIPS and PP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most plastics found have no identification of plastic type or flame retardants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ecodesign is still not practiced for EEE, with repercussions in end of life stage. - Abstract: This paper describes a direct analysis study carried out in a recycling unit for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) in Portugal to characterize the plastic constituents of WEEE. Approximately 3400 items, including cooling appliances, small WEEE, printers, copying equipment, central processing units, cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors and CRT televisions were characterized, with the analysis finding around 6000 kg of plastics with several polymer types. The most common polymers are polystyrene, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polycarbonate blends, high-impact polystyrene and polypropylene. Additives to darken color are common contaminants in these plastics when used in CRT televisions and small WEEE. These additives can make plastic identification difficult, along with missing polymer identification and flame retardant identification marks. These drawbacks contribute to the inefficiency of manual dismantling of WEEE, which is the typical recycling process in Portugal. The information found here can be used to set a baseline for the plastics recycling industry and provide information for ecodesign in electrical and electronic equipment production.

Martinho, Graca [Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pires, Ana, E-mail: ana.lourenco.pires@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Saraiva, Luanha; Ribeiro, Rita [Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Intrinsic constraints on cross-modal plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last two decades numerous examples have demonstrated the remarkable plasticity of the developing brain. This plasticity occurs from the level of a single synapse to the repatterning of sensory input. One paradigm ...

Ellsworth, Charlene

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ice Crystal Replication with Common Plastic Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of common plastics, i.e., polystyrene, Plexiglas (polymethyl methacrylate) and Lexan (polycarbonate), was investigated for ice crystal replication. The results suggest that all common plastics tested are usable for ice crystal replication ...

Tsuneya Takahashi; Norihiko Fukuta

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH Han and GB McKenna, Polymers Division, Building 224, Room ...

131

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 121: Storage Tanks and Miscellaneous Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 121, Storage Tanks and Miscellaneous Sites. CAU 121 is currently listed in Appendix III of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO, 1996) and consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS): CAS 12-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 12-01-02, Aboveground Storage Tank; and CAS 12-22-26, Drums; 2 AST's. CASs 12-01-01 and 12-01-02 are located to the west of the Area 12 Camp, and CAS 12-22-26 is located near the U-12g Tunnel, also known as G-tunnel, in Area 12 (Figure 1). The aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) present at CASs 12-01-01 and 12-01-02 will be removed and disposed of at an appropriate facility. Soil below the ASTs will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted with chemicals or radioactivity above action levels. If impacted soil above action levels is present, the soil will be excavated and disposed of at an appropriate facility. The CAS 12-22-26 site is composed of two overlapping areas, one where drums had formerly been stored, and the other where an AST was used to dispense diesel for locomotives used at G-tunnel. This area is located above an underground radioactive materials area (URMA), and within an area that may have elevated background radioactivity because of containment breaches during nuclear tests and associated tunnel reentry operations. CAS 12-22-26 does not include the URMA or the elevated background radioactivity. An AST that had previously been used to store liquid magnesium chloride (MgCl) was properly disposed of several years ago, and releases from this tank are not an environmental concern. The diesel AST will be removed and disposed of at an appropriate facility. Soil at the former drum area and the diesel AST area will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted by releases, from the drums or the AST, with chemicals or radioactivity above action levels. CAS 12-22-26 has different potential closure pathways that are dependent upon the concentrations and chemicals detected. If only petroleum hydrocarbons are detected above action levels, then the area will be use-restricted. It will not be excavated because of the more significant hazard of excavating within a URMA. Similarly, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will only be excavated for concentrations of 50 parts per million (ppm) or greater, if there are no other factors that require excavation. For PCBs at concentrations above 1 ppm, the area will be use-restricted as required by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 761 for PCBs (CFR, 2006), in the ''Toxic Substances Control Act'' (TSCA). Other chemicals at concentrations above the final action levels (FALs) will be excavated. If radioactivity is above action levels, then the soil will be excavated only to a depth of 1 foot (ft) below ground surface (bgs) and replaced with clean fill. This action is intended to remove the ''hot spot'' on the surface caused by leakage from a drum, and not to remediate the URMA.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Is combustion of plastics desirable?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing waste will always entail some tradeoffs. All of the three options--recycling, landfilling and combustion--have some disadvantages. Even landfilling, which produces no emissions, fails to take advantage of the energy value inherent in plastic. Waste combustion, on the other hand, recovers the energy in plastic materials and reduces the volume of disposed solid waste by up to 90% of its initial preburn volumes. However, this management option generates emissions and produces an ash residue that must be managed. As demonstrated by recent test burns, improvements in combustion and air-pollution-control technology have dramatically reduced the health risks from emissions and ash. Recent studies have shown that plastics--in quantities even higher than those normally found in municipal solid waste--do not adversely affect levels of emissions or the quality of ash from waste-to-energy facilities. In addition, waste-to-energy facilities may be a relatively economical source of fuel, and may be a more economic solution to waste management than the other available options. A waste-to-energy plant generally produces electricity that is sold to the electric utilities for approximately six cents per kilowatt-hour, a rate that is competitive with those offered by nuclear power plants and power plants that generate energy by burning fossil fuels.

Piasecki, B.; Rainey, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Lally School of Management and Technology; Fletcher, K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Materials for Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... Co-Production of Pure Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal Syngas via the .... and plastic deformations in the crack tip energy rate formulate.

135

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 1, Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This first volume provides a summary of the entire project. The study utilized the talents of a large number of participants, including a significant number of peer reviewers from industrial companies, government agencies, and research institutes. in addition, an extensive analysis of relevant literature was carried out. In considering the attractiveness of recycling technologies that are alternatives to waste-to-energy combustion units, a systems approach was utilized. Collection of waste streams containing plastics, sortation, and reclamation of plastics and plastic mixtures, reprocessing or chemical conversion of the reclaimed polymers, and the applicability of the products to specific market segments have been analyzed in the study.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Resource variation and the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource variation and species interactions require organisms to respond behaviorally, physiologically, and morphologically within and among generations to compensate for spatial and temporal environmental variation. One successful evolutionary strategy to mitigate environmental variation is phenotypic plasticity: the production of alternative phenotypes in response to environmental variation. Phenotypic plasticity yields multiple characters that may enable organisms to better optimize phenotypic responses across environmental gradients. In this thesis, I trace the development of thought on phenotypic plasticity and present two empirical studies that implicate phenotypic plasticity in producing morphological variation in response to resource variation. The first empirical study addresses trophic plasticity, population divergence, and the effect of fine-scale environmental variation in western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis). Offspring from two populations were fed either attached or unattached food items offered in three orientations: (1) water surface, (2) mid-water, (3) benthic, and (4) a daily rotation of the former three (fine-grained variation). Attached food induced wide heads, blunt snouts and rounded pectoral fins relative to morphology in the unattached treatment. Mid-water feeding induced elongated heads and deeper mid-bodies relative to benthic and surface feeding induced morphologies. The rotating treatment produced intermediate morphologies. Population divergence seemed related to both trophic and predation ecology. Ecomorphological consequences of induced morphologies and the need for inclusion of greater ecological complexity in studies of plasticity are discussed. The second study examines induced morphological plasticity and performance in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). I fed hatchery fish either hard or soft food for two months. Performance trials were designed to measure their ability to manipulate and consume hard food items. External morphology and the mass of pharyngeal crushing muscles were assessed for variation among treatments. A hard food diet induced deeper bodies and larger heads, more massive pharyngeal muscles, and initially more efficient consumption of hard food than fish receiving soft food. The observed morphological variation is in accordance with variation among species. Determining evolutionary mechanisms operating within red drum populations should eventually aid in developing and optimizing conservation efforts and ease the transition from hatchery facilities to estuaries.

Ruehl, Clifton Benjamin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method to separate and recover oil and plastic from plastic contaminated with oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method to separate and recover oils and recyclable plastic from plastic contaminated with oil. The invention utilizes the different solubility of oil in as liquid or supercritical fluid as compared to a gas to effect separation of the oil from the plastic.

Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS); Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Olson, Ronald B. (Kansas City, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

Method to separate and recover oil and plastic from plastic contaminated with oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method to separate and recover oils and recyclable plastic from plastic contaminated with oil. The invention utilizes the different solubility of oil in a liquid or supercritical fluid as compared to a gas to effect separation of the oil from the plastic. 3 figs.

Smith, H.M.; Bohnert, G.W.; Olson, R.B.; Hand, T.E.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fiberglass plastics in power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Crystal plasticity analysis of constitutive behavior of 5754 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystal plasticity analysis of constitutive behavior of 5754 ... of crystal plasticity based analyses (Hu et al ... used includes an axisymmetric ram 200 mm ...

2013-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

Plastic Deformation of Metal Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion of Mild Steel in Extreme Oil and Gas Environments Corrosion ... Fluorescent Nanoparticle Tracers for Oil Exploration and Production Formation of...

143

Characteristics of process oils from HTI coal/plastics co-liquefaction runs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide timely analytical support to DOE`s liquefaction development effort. Specific objectives of the work reported here are: (1) to determine the fate of the plastics feedstocks, relative to coal-only operation; (2) to determine the conversion of the feedstocks; (3) to determine the product streams to which the feedstocks are converted (bottoms vs. distillate); (4) to determine interactions of feedstocks; (5) to determine how use of plastics feedstocks affect product quality; and (6) to determine to what degree property differences reflect feedstock differences vs. other (process) condition changes, such as unit operations, space velocity, and catalyst age.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Manure Management: Beef Cattle, Sheep, and Miscellaneous Livestock: Industry Profiles and Marketing Tool for the State of New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal agriculture is a crucial component of the food and fiber system in the State of New York and in the U.S. in general. Animal agriculture also produces a significant by-product in the form of manure. Animal manure is a valuable resource that contains essential plant nutrients, and has the potential to replace a substantial amount of chemical fertilizers in this country. Other beneficial uses of manure are as soil amendment for improving the physical and biological properties of soils, as a fuel for ...

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Technology and future prospects for lightweight plastic vehicle structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state of the technology and the materials and processing issues of using plastics in vehicle body applications (structural and semistructural) were assessed. Plastics are significantly lighter in weight, more easily fabricated into complex shapes, and more corrosion resistance than sheet steel, high-strength steel, or aluminum. However, at their current stage of development, plastics are deficient in one or more necessary properties: heat resistance and dimensional stability, stiffness and tensile strength, toughness, and impact resistance. To upgrade their physical properties for automotive chassis/body applications, plastics need to be compounds with suitable reinforcing fibers. As a short-term approach, the material of choice is a composite structure made with low-cost glass-fiber reinforcement, such as that made in the resin-transfer-molding (RTM) process and used in the body of the Dodge Viper. However, RTM technology based on thermosets requires a processing cycle time that is too long for large production runs. Adaptation of RTM to the formation of thermoplastic composite bodies could have a significant advantage over thermoset technology. Cyclic oligomers, which are precursors to thermoplastic matrix polymers, show promise for this application. Farther on the horizon are advanced composites compounds with the much more expensive (but stronger and stiffer) carbon-fiber reinforcement. However, significant price reductions of precursor materials and advances in processing and fabrication would be needed. Other materials holding promise are liquid crystal polymers (LCP) and LCP blends with other polymers (molecular composites). However, the cost of monomers and the subsequent polymerization technology also remains a considerable drawback to the widespread and increasing acceptance of LCPs.

Stodolsky, F.; Cuenca, R.M.; Bonsignore, P.V.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Monitoring Precipitation in Severely Plastically Deformed Aluminum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Dynamics and Viscosity in the Liquid ... Measuring Strains In Operando in Alloy-based Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries Using X-ray Diffraction ... Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of the Plasticity of Bulk Metallic Glass Composites.

147

Renewable Plastic from Glucose-Fed Microbes  

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are a class of polyesters naturally produced by bacteria. PHA has structural properties that make it attractive as a renewable plastic. Especially promising is medium chain-length PHA (mcl-PHA), which consists of fatty ...

148

Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

NONE

1991-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has responsibility for environmental restoration at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site). This includes remediation at locations where past testing activities have resulted in the release of plutonium to the environment. One of the current remediation efforts involves a site where an underground subcritical nuclear safety test was conducted in 1964. The underground test was vented through a steel pipe to the surface in a closed system where gas samples were obtained. The piping downstream of the gas-sampling apparatus was routed belowground to a location where it was allowed to vent into an existing radioactively contaminated borehole. The length of the pipe above the ground surface is approximately 200 meters. This pipe remained in place until remediation efforts began in 2007, at which time internal plutonium contamination was discovered. Following this discovery, an assessment was conducted to determine the quantity of plutonium present in the pipe. This site has been identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites. The quantity of plutonium identified at CAU 547 exceeded the Hazard Category 3 threshold but was below the Hazard Category 2 threshold specified in DOE Standard DOE-STD-1027-92. This CAU, therefore, was initially categorized as a Hazard Category 3 environmental restoration site. A contaminated facility or site that is initially categorized as Hazard Category 3, however, may be downgraded to below Hazard Category 3 if it can be demonstrated through further analysis that the form of the material and the energy available for release support reducing the hazard category. This is an important consideration when performing hazard categorization of environmental restoration sites because energy sources available for release of material are generally fewer at an environmental restoration site than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews (N-I)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, L.J.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Methods for minimizing plastic flow of oil shale during in situ retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an in situ oil shale retorting process, plastic flow of hot rubblized oil shale is minimized by injecting carbon dioxide and water into spent shale above the retorting zone. These gases react chemically with the mineral constituents of the spent shale to form a cement-like material which binds the individual shale particles together and bonds the consolidated mass to the wall of the retort. This relieves the weight burden borne by the hot shale below the retorting zone and thereby minimizes plastic flow in the hot shale. At least a portion of the required carbon dioxide and water can be supplied by recycled product gases.

Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Opportunities and Barriers in the Implementation of Energy Efficiency Measures in Plastic Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The plastic industry in the U.S. employs approximately 9% [1] of the manufacturing work force and consumes approximately 6% [1] of the total energy used by the U.S. industries. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), manufacturers of plastic and other resins are consuming nearly 1,070 trillion Btu [1] of energy in their operations every year, valued at $6.0[1] billion. As escalating energy prices continue to be a concern for industry, many plastic manufacturers are striving to reduce their energy consumption to stay competitive. An alternative to reduced energy consumption is to put in place an energy efficiency strategy. However, while most plastic manufactures are aware of the energy efficiency opportunities in their facilities, the implementation of these opportunities face certain market barriers. These barriers are identified as customers lack the information about energy efficiency technologies, and have limited capital funding to implement the energy efficiency measures. Additionally, it is hard to identify the energy savings opportunities and difficult to quantify their impacts. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the various energy efficiency opportunities in plastic manufacturing and address the market barriers in implementing them. We will identify the energy savings opportunities in plastic manufacturing that can be introduced to reduce energy consumption and decrease production costs, thus giving the customers more competitive edge in both the regional and global markets. We will also discuss various popular energy efficiency measures, the energy savings associated with each measure and their projected simple payback. In terms of policy implication, this paper will discuss various strategies of mitigating potential market barriers in implementing energy efficiency measures on plastic manufacturing industries.

Kanunho, A; Yong, J. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Co-conversion of coal/waste plastic mixtures under various pyrolysis and liquefaction conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For strategic and economic reasons the conversion of coal to liquid fuels has been a constant goal of the coal science community. Although the economics of coal liquefaction are primarily governed by the price of crude oil, other factors such as the need for large quantities of hydrogen gas, play an important role. If methods could be found that reduce the amount of hydrogen gas required for liquefaction, considerable benefits would be realized. To explore this possibility the use of waste plastics as materials capable of upgrading coal into liquid fuel products has been investigated. The use of waste plastics for this purpose could become possible because over 30 million tons of synthetic polymer material is produced in the United States every year. In this study, several pyrolysis and liquefaction experiment were performed on an Illinois No. 6 coal and coal/plastic blends.

Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.; Tandon, D.; Blankenship, M. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Miscellaneous multimedia - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multimedia Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Engineering Development & Applications...

155

Miscellaneous Waste-Form FEPs  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE must provide a reasonable assurance that the performance objectives for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) potential radioactive-waste repository can be achieved for a 10,000-year post-closure period. The guidance that mandates this direction is under the provisions of 10 CFR Part 63 and the US Department of Energy's ''Revised Interim Guidance Pending Issuance of New US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulations (Revision 01, July 22, 1999), for Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (Dyer 1999 and herein referred to as DOE's Interim Guidance). This assurance must be demonstrated in the form of a performance assessment that: (1) identifies the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that might affect the performance of the potential geologic repository; (2) examines the effects of such FEPs on the performance of the potential geologic repository; (3) estimates the expected annual dose to a specified receptor group; and (4) provides the technical basis for inclusion or exclusion of specific FEPs.

A. Schenker

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications  

SciTech Connect

Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A plastic damage approach for confined concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many situations in which it is necessary to increase the capacity of structures in use. This need maybe either for a change of use or because the structures have suffered some damage or have shown little resistance in case of extreme loads ... Keywords: Concrete, Confinement, Damage, Dilation, Fiber reinforced composites, Plasticity

B. M. Luccioni; V. C. Rougier

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Thermally stable, plastic-bonded explosives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By use of an appropriate thermoplastic rubber as the binder, the thermal stability and thermal stress characteristics of plastic-bonded explosives may be greatly improved. In particular, an HMX-based explosive composition using an oil-extended styrene-ethylenebutylene-styrene block copolymer as the binder exhibits high explosive energy and thermal stability and good handling safety and physical properties.

Benziger, Theodore M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics May 20, 2013 - 1:31pm Addthis Novomers thermoplastic pellets incorporate waste CO2 into a...

160

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Effects of coal type on coal plasticity are investigated. Seven coals, from the Argonne premium sample bank ranging from lignite to low volatile bituminous, are studied. Different indices and structural data of a coal are shown to affect its plastic behavior. A coal-specific parameter incorporating the effects of labile bridges, oxygen, and hydrogen on plasticity has been used to successfully correlate measured values of maximum plasticity (i.e. minimum apparent viscosity) at elevated temperature with coal type.

Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Plastics and Extrusion - Manufacturing Facilities, Systems and Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ TechWatch presents steps to improving power quality (PQ) in plastics manufacturing facilities, systems, and equipment. The following sections are included: PQ and EMC for Plastics Manufacturing and Facility Equipment Financial Implications of PQ and EMC Problems Standards Distributed Generation and Energy Storage Power Conditioning in the Plastics Manufacturing Environment Mini Cases in Power Quality

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ohio Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Miscellaneous includes ...

163

California Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Miscellaneous includes ...

164

Texas Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Miscellaneous includes ...

165

Colorado Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Miscellaneous includes ...

166

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Blender Net Production & Blender Net Production Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha For Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils For Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

167

Method of coextruding plastics to form a composite sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a method of producing a composite sheet of plastic materials by means of coextrusion. Two plastic materials are matched with respect to their melt indices. These matched plastic materials are then coextruded in a side-by-side orientation while hot and soft to form a composite sheet having a substantially uniform demarkation therebetween. The plastic materials are fed at a substantially equal extrusion velocity and generally have substantially equal viscosities. The coextruded plastics can be worked after coextrusion while they are still hot and soft.

Tsien, Hsue C. (Chatham Township, Morris County, NJ)

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

Method of cleaning plastics using super and subcritical media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a plastic, such as polyethylene or polypropylene, to remove at least a portion of at least one contaminant includes combining the plastic with a supercritical medium, such as carbon dioxide or sulfur hexafluoride, whereby at least a portion of the contaminant dissolves in the supercritical medium. Alternatively, the plastic can be combined with a suitable liquid medium, such as carbon dioxide or liquid sulfur hexafluoride. At least a portion of the medium, containing the dissolved contaminant, is separated from the plastic, thereby removing at least a portion of the contaminant from the plastic.

Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Spall, W. Dale (Los Alamos, NM); Talhi, Abdelhafid (Nashua, NH)

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

Heavy oil/plastic co-processing - subtask 4.1. Topical report, February 1, 1994--February 1, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a low-temperature thermal decomposition process to alleviate the problems associated with disposal of waste plastics and at the same time generate a product stream in the gasoline boiling range for use in the refining and petrochemical industries. The technology being developed by WRI is significantly different from conventional thermal decomposition processes used to recover distillates from waste plastics. The key to this difference is the application of a decomposition initiator concept that allows operation of the process at temperatures below those used in other thermal decomposition processes. The WRI technology utilizes the decomposition initiator to enhance thermal decomposition of waste plastics in the presence of a low-value heavy oil at temperatures below those normally used for thermal decomposition. Operation of the process at lower temperatures produces higher yields of distillate product and lower yields of gaseous and char products than conventional processes. The activity of the initiator was identified in earlier research studying the thermal decomposition of polymers. This activity was observed to result in a decrease in the temperature required to thermally decompose plastics in the presence of a heavy oil. These early experiments indicated that the initiator was native to the plastics matrix, but the identity and possible mode of action were not determined. This study was undertaken to identify the active initiator in the plastics matrix and define its activity. The experiments performed in this study were conducted in a batch-type reactor. The particular elements of the activity that were addressed included: (1) the kinetics of the reaction, (2) the effects of diluting the plastics with the heavy oil, and (3) the effects of using different types of heavy oil.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Profile Plastic Deformation Joining2006.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JOINING ADVANCED MATERIALS BY PLASTIC FLOW JOINING ADVANCED MATERIALS BY PLASTIC FLOW PROVIDES SOLUTION FOR OXYGEN SENSOR APPLICATIONS The Challenge: Industry has sought robust and less expensive sensors to more accurately monitor and control combustion processes. Improved control can be obtained by positioning the sensors closer to the combustion environment in applications such as coal-fired power plants, petrochemical plants, blast furnaces, glass processing equipment, industrial burners, and even in internal combustion engines. Typically, operation in such environments has necessitated an external supply of conditioned air to provide a reference source necessary for the sensor to determine the constituents of the combustion process. This complexity has imposed significant cost and maintenance difficulties on

171

Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Special Naphthas Lubricants Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

172

Development of Improved Chemicals and Plastics from Oilseeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop technology that can be applied to the production of various chemicals and plastics from seed oils. This research and development program included activities in all four key barrier areas identified in the US DOE Technology Roadmap for Plant/Crop-Based Renewable Resources, namely Plant Science, Production, Processing, and Utilization. Participants in the project included The Dow Chemical Company, Castor Oil, Inc., and the USDA Western Regional Research Center (WRRC). The objective of this production task was to evaluate and develop metathesis catalyst technology as a means of utilizing seed oils as feedstocks for the chemical industry. Specifically, ethenolysis of fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs, leads to functionalized derivatives. These serve as valuable starting points for materials which cascade into a variety of applications, many of which have a current market presence. The relatively recent discovery and commercial availability of a family of metathesis catalysts which are tolerant of polar functional groups and the acquisition and implementation of high throughput synthesis and screening infrastructure led to a prime opportunity to investigate this project area.

Nugent, Patricia A.; Lysenko, Zenon

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

173

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

174

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Pipeline between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline between PAD Districts Pipeline between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Renewable Diesel Fuel Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

175

Quick Plastic Forming of Aluminum Sheet Metal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Motors' President North America, Gary Cowger, General Motors' President North America, Gary Cowger, reviews the 2004 Chevy Malibu Maxx after introducing it to the media at the New York Auto Show. (photo courtesy of General Motors) Quick Plastic Forming of Aluminum Sheet Metal Background Aluminum automotive components made using a hot blow forming process are reducing vehicle weight and increasing the fuel efficiency of today's cars. However, before General Motors (GM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research in this technol- ogy, blow forming of aluminum was not a viable process for automakers. The prior blow forming process,

176

TTRDC - Publications - Transforum 10.2 - Plastic Bags  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Trash to Treasure: Turning Plastic Bags into Battery Anodes From Trash to Treasure: Turning Plastic Bags into Battery Anodes Vilas Pol and plastic bag research Plastic bags are burned in a vessel at high temperatures. Turning an environmental nuisance into a potential energy solution - now, that's innovation! After much trial and error, Argonne Scholar Vilas Pol has figured out a way to convert those pesky plastic grocery bags into carbon nanotubes, which could be used as components of lithium-ion batteries for many applications, including cars. Plastic bags have taken over the grocery market since they were introduced more than 30 years ago. Billions of them are used around the world each year. The bags are recyclable, but a majority of them still end up in landfills. "They take hundreds of years to decompose," said Pol.

177

Microstructure Sensitive Design Framework for Elastic-Plastic Multi ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study, a microstructure sensitive design (MSD) framework for elastic-plastic ... Elastic Deformation Mechanics of Cellulose Nanocrystals.

178

Upcycling: A Green Solution to the Problem of Plastic ...  

... a wide range of waste plastics can be converted into a fine black carbon powder or carbon nanotubes. This carbon-based substance has numerous ...

179

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Plastic Gloves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gloves Plastic Gloves Description Color Finish Chemical Compatibility FNAL Stock Number Disposable polyethylene gloves Non-sterile, for food contact Clear Smooth, seamless Chemical...

180

Stories of Discovery & Innovation: Just One Word-Plastics | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Just One Word-Plastics Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC Events DOE Announcements Publications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Renewable Plastic from Glucose-Fed Microbes - Energy ...  

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are a class of polyesters naturally produced by bacteria. PHA has structural properties that make it attractive as a renewable plastic.

182

Effect of Plastic Deformation on Sn Whisker Growth in Electroplated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Pb-free Solders and Emerging Interconnect and Packaging Technologies. Presentation Title, Effect of Plastic Deformation on Sn Whisker Growth in...

183

Presentation to the Plastics Developers Association North America...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Developers Association North America Conference More Documents & Publications Fossil Energy Today - Third Quarter, 2012 Presentation to the Plastics Developers Association North...

184

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

185

Deactivation and regeneration of ZSM-5 zeolite in catalytic pyrolysis of plastic wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Pyrolysis transforms plastic wastes in valuable liquids and gases useful as fuels or source of chemicals. > The use of ZSM-5 zeolite in pyrolysis favours the production of gases and of lighter and more aromatic liquids. > ZSM-5 zeolite is almost completely deactivated after one plastics pyrolysis experiment. > ZSM-5 zeolite used in plastic wastes pyrolysis can be regenerated by burning the deposited coke in an air stream. > Regenerated ZSM-5 recovers its activity and produces liquids and gases equivalent to those obtained with fresh catalyst. - Abstract: In this work, a study of the regeneration and reuse of ZSM-5 zeolite in the pyrolysis of a plastic mixture has been carried out in a semi-batch reactor at 440 deg. C. The results have been compared with those obtained with fresh-catalyst and in non-catalytic experiments with the same conditions. The use of fresh catalyst produces a significant change in both the pyrolysis yields and the properties of the liquids and gases obtained. Gases more rich in C3-C4 and H{sub 2} are produced, as well as lower quantities of aromatic liquids if compared with those obtained in thermal decomposition. The authors have proved that after one pyrolysis experiment the zeolite loses quite a lot of its activity, which is reflected in both the yields and the products quality; however, this deactivation was found to be reversible since after regeneration heating at 550 deg. C in oxygen atmosphere, this catalyst recovered its initial activity, generating similar products and in equivalent proportions as those obtained with fresh catalyst.

Lopez, A., E-mail: alex.lopez@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Adrados, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant JM Eagle 10807 U.S. 59 Road Wharton, TX 77488 The Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant, located on an old cattle field, opened in 1985 by first manufacturing PVC pipe. The manufacturing of injection molding was added in 1988, corrugated pipe was added in 2009, and corrugated fittings were added in 2011. There are expectations for the plant to expand into manufacturing PE pipe fittings in the future. The Wharton plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. The plant achieved a 15.5% reduction in energy intensity in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge for Industry came principally from an energy conservation program that focused on not operating equipment other than that needed for current production,

187

METHOD OF USING AND MANUFACTURING PLASTIC EQUIVALENT TO ORGANIC MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter that have the radiation response of animal muscle tissue, bone, or air were prepared. These compositions are composed of specific proportions of three or more of the following constituents: polyethylene plastic, polyamide plastic, oil furnace black, silica, and calcium fluoride. (AEC)

Shonka, F.R.; Rose, J.E.; Failla, G.

1961-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mechanisms of ocular dominance plasticity in the juvenile and adult mouse visual cortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity is a classic example of bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the primary visual cortex. This form of plasticity is most robust during early postnatal development (termed the ...

Khibnik, Lena A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Nonmetallic Plastic Pipe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Nonmetallic Plastic Pipe Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,839,282 entitled "Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Nonmetallic Plastic Pipe." Disclosed in this patent is an analysis of materials using a capacitive sensor to detect anomalies in nonmetallic plastic pipe through comparison of measured capacitances. The capacitive sensor is used in conjunction with a capacitance measurement device, a location device, and a processor to generate a capacitance versus location output for the detection and localization of anomalies

190

High reliability plastic packaging for microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goal was Assembly Test Chips (ATCs) which could be used for evaluating plastic encapsulation technologies. Circuits were demonstrated for measuring Au-Al wirebond and Al metal corrosion failure rates during accelerated temperature and humidity testing. The test circuits on the ATC02.5 chip were very sensitive to extrinsic or processing induced failure rates. Accelerated aging experiments were conducted with unpassivated triple track Al structures on the ATC02.6 chip; the unpassivated tracks were found to be very sensitive to particulate contamination. Some modifications to existing circuitry were suggested. The piezoresistive stress sensing circuitry designed for the ATC04 test chip was found suitable for determining the change in the state of mechanical stress at the die when both initial and final measurements were made near room temperature (RT). Attempt to measure thermal stress between RT and a typical polymer glass transition temperature failed because of excessive die resistor- substrate leakage currents at the high temperature end; suitable circuitry changes were developed to overcome this problem. One temperature and humidity experiment was conducted with Sandia developed static radom access memory parts to examine non-corrosion CMOS failures; this objective was not achieved, but corrosion failure at the metal to Si contacts on the die surface could be detected. This 2-year effort resulted in new designs for test circuits which could be used on an advanced ATC for reliability assessment in Defense Programs electronics development projects.

Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.; Hsia, A.H.; Tuck, M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model piloted ignition times of wood and plastics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is applied on a packed bed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When the air flow is above a critical level, no ignition can take place. - Abstract: To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The incoming radiative heat flux, sample thickness and moisture content are some of the used variables. Not only the ignition time can be calculated with the model, but also the mass flux and surface temperature at ignition. The ignition times for softwoods and PMMA are mainly under-predicted. For hardwoods and PVC the predicted ignition times agree well with experimental results. Due to a significant scatter in the experimental data the mass flux and surface temperature calculated with the model are hard to validate. The model is applied on the startup of a municipal waste incineration plant. For this process a maximum allowable primary air flow is derived. When the primary air flow is above this maximum air flow, no ignition can be obtained.

Blijderveen, Maarten van [TNO, Schoemakerstraat 97, 2628 VK Delft (Netherlands); University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Bramer, Eddy A. [University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Brem, Gerrit, E-mail: g.brem@utwente.nl [University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Precision Grinding of Diallyl Phthalate Thermosetting Plastic  

SciTech Connect

A semiautomatic grinder was designed and built at Mound Laboratory to grind molded plastic detonator heads to close tolerances. It uses a vertical spindle, dry grinding technique to decrease grinding time of some diallyl phthalate (DAP) detonator heads with wire inserts and to eliminate the problem of error in repeatability which is characteristic of the manual grinding process. The semiautomatic grinder is essentially air-operated with electrical control and was primarily designed using standard components for ease of manufacture and maintenance. As development of the semiautomatic grinder progressed, DAP detonator heads with wire inserts ground using the manual surface grinder were evaluated along with the same type of detonator heads ground using the semiautomatiac grinder. Also, a time study was conducted to determine the cost savings of grinding miniature DAP detonator heads with wire inserts using the semiautomatic grinder. Inspection and analytical results and radiographic sections of ground detonator head surfaces from each grinding technique indicated that the semiautomatic grinding technique provides acceptable ground DAP detonator heads with wire inserts at a cost savings of 83.5% and a significant reduction in grinding time.

Weeks, J. E.; Osborne, J. M.

1969-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Influence of High Temperature Elastic-Plastic Small Crack Growth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom .... of some of the conditions is still present. This indicates that the global plasticity is. 1o-2. 1 o+ . q. 0. 0. II. 0.

194

Gap junction-mediated electrical transmission: Regulatory mechanisms and plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gap junction-mediated electrical transmission: Regulatory mechanisms and plasticity Alberto E of synaptic transmission: chemical and electrical. While most efforts have been dedicated to the understanding of synaptic transmission: chemical and electrical. In chemical synapses, presynaptic electrical currents

Rash, John E.

195

Providing Plastic Zone Extrusion - Oak Ridge National Laboratory ...  

First, stock may be placed in a chamber. Then frictional heat may be generated within the stock to heat the stock to a plastic zone of the stock in the chamber.

196

Cyclic Plasticity under Shock Loading in an HCP Metal  

SciTech Connect

Plate impact experiments with pressures from 2 to 20 GPa, including one shock-partial release-reshock experiment, were performed on vacuum hot-pressed S-200F Beryllium. This hexagonal close-packed (HCP) metal shows significant plasticity effects in such conditions. The experiments were modeled in a Lagrangian hydrocode using an experimentally calibrated Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) constitutive model. By using the shock data to constrain a high rate portion of PTW, the model was able to generally match plasticity effects on the measured wave profile (surface velocity) during the shock loading, but not unloading. A backstress-based cyclic plasticity model to capture the quasi-elastic release (Bauschinger-type effect) was explored in order to match the unloading and reloading portions of the measured wave profiles. A comparison is made with other approaches in the literature to capture the cyclic plasticity in shock conditions.

Prime, Michael B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hunter, Abigail [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Canfield, Thomas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adams, Chris D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Molecular Mimicry: Plastic, Steel Line Up Like Kin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Molecular Mimicry: Plastic, Steel Line Up Like Kin OCTOBER 20, 2010 Bookmark and Share Tasty...

198

Questions and Answers - Why does rubbing plastic and wool together...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the word atom come
from and who first used this word? Why does rubbing plastic and wool together create electricity? In the more technical writings, this phenomenon is called...

199

Harbec Plastic Wind Turbine Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harbec Plastic Wind Turbine Wind Farm Harbec Plastic Wind Turbine Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Harbec Plastic Wind Turbine Wind Farm Facility Harbec Plastic Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Harbeck Plastic Developer Lorax Energy Systems Energy Purchaser Harbeck Plastic Location Rochester NY Coordinates 43.226039°, -77.361776° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.226039,"lon":-77.361776,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Conventional Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

202

Injection Molding of Plastics from Agricultural Materials  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to conduct a systematic study to relate injection molding parameters to properties of blends of starch and synthetic polymer. From this study, we wished to develop a thorough understanding of the injection molding process and gain significant insight into designing molds and aiding in developing products cheaply and efficiently.

Bhattacharya, M.; Ruan, R.

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

Review article Ruminant milk fat plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with protected or unprotected vegetable or fish oils. Dose-res- ponse curves of milk CLA are reviewed consumption of fat from rumi- nant animals. Although dairy products (which have a very low cholesterol content fat [46, 116]. The regulation of the lipid composition of ruminant meat (adipose tissue and muscle

Recanati, Catherine

204

Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries Resources with Additional Information · Patents Alan MacDiarmid ©Alan MacDiarmid/ University of Pennsylvania Photo by Felice Macera Until 1987, the billions of batteries that had been marketed in myriad sizes and shapes all had one thing in common. To make electricity, they depended exclusively upon chemical reactions involving metal components of the battery. But today a revolutionary new type of battery is available commercially. It stores electricity in plastic. Plastic batteries are the most radical innovation in commercial batteries since the dry cell was introduced in 1890. Plastic batteries offer higher capacity, higher voltage, and longer shelf-life than many competitive designs. Companies are testing new shapes and configurations, including flat batteries, that can be bent like cardboard. Researchers expect that the new technology will free electronic designers from many of the constraints imposed by metal batteries such as limited recharging cycles, high weight, and high cost.

205

A nonlocal, ordinary, state-based plasticity model for peridynamics.  

SciTech Connect

An implicit time integration algorithm for a non-local, state-based, peridynamics plasticity model is developed. The flow rule was proposed in [3] without an integration strategy or yield criterion. This report addresses both of these issues and thus establishes the first ordinary, state-based peridynamics plasticity model. Integration of the flow rule follows along the lines of the classical theories of rate independent J{sub 2} plasticity. It uses elastic force state relations, an additive decomposition of the deformation state, an elastic force state domain, a flow rule, loading/un-loading conditions, and a consistency condition. Just as in local theories of plasticity (LTP), state variables are required. It is shown that the resulting constitutive model does not violate the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The report also develops a useful non-local yield criterion that depends upon the yield stress and horizon for the material. The modulus state for both the ordinary elastic material and aforementioned plasticity model is also developed and presented.

Mitchell, John Anthony

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Continuous Severe Plastic Deformation Processing of Aluminum Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Metals with grain sizes smaller than 1-micrometer have received much attention in the past decade. These materials have been classified as ultra fine grain (UFG) materials (grain sizes in the range of 100 to 1000-nm) and nano-materials (grain size <100-nm) depending on the grain size. This report addresses the production of bulk UFG metals through the use of severe plastic deformation processing, and their subsequent use as stock material for further thermomechanical processing, such as forging. A number of severe plastic deformation (SPD) methods for producing bulk UFG metals have been developed since the early 1990s. The most promising of these processes for producing large size stock that is suitable for forging is the equal channel angular extrusion or pressing (ECAE/P) process. This process involves introducing large shear strain in the work-piece by pushing it through a die that consists of two channels with the same cross-sectional shape that meet at an angle to each other. Since the cross-sections of the two channels are the same, the extruded product can be re-inserted into the entrance channel and pushed again through the die. Repeated extrusion through the ECAE/P die accumulates sufficient strain to breakdown the microstructure and produce ultra fine grain size. It is well known that metals with very fine grain sizes (< 10-micrometer) have higher strain rate sensitivity and greater elongation to failure at elevated temperature, exhibiting superplastic behavior. However, this superplastic behavior is usually manifest at high temperature (> half the melting temperature on the absolute scale) and very low strain rates (< 0.0001/s). UFG metals have been shown to exhibit superplastic characteristics at lower temperature and higher strain rates, making this phenomenon more practical for manufacturing. This enables part unitization and forging more complex and net shape parts. Laboratory studies have shown that this is particularly true for UFG metals produced by SPD techniques. This combination of properties makes UFG metals produced by SPD very attractive as machining, forging or extrusion stock, both from the point of view of formability as well as energy and cost saving. However, prior to this work there had been no attempt to transfer these potential benefits observed in the laboratory scale to industrial shop floor. The primary reason for this was that the laboratory scale studies had been conducted to develop a scientific understanding of the processes that result in grain refinement during SPD. Samples that had been prepared in the laboratory scale were typically only about 10-mm diameter and 50-mm long (about 0.5-inch diameter and 2-inches long). The thrust of this project was three-fold: (i) to show that the ECAE/P process can be scaled up to produce long samples, i.e., a continuous severe plastic deformation (CSPD) process, (ii) show the process can be scaled up to produce large cross section samples that could be used as forging stock, and (iii) use the large cross-section samples to produce industrial size forgings and demonstrate the potential energy and cost savings that can be realized if SPD processed stock is adopted by the forging industry. Aluminum alloy AA-6061 was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach used. The CSPD process developed using the principles of chamber-less extrusion and drawing, and was demonstrated using rolling and wire drawing equipment that was available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In a parallel effort, ECAE/P dies were developed for producing 100-mm square cross section SPD billets for subsequent forging. This work was carried out at Intercontinental Manufacturing Co. (IMCO), Garland TX. Forging studies conducted with the ECAE/P billets showed that many of the potential benefits of using UFG material can be realized. In particular, the material yield can be increased, and the amount of material that is lost as scrap can be reduced by as much as 50%. Forging temperatures can also be reduced by over 150C, resulting in energy savings in the ope

Raghavan Srinivasan (PI); Prabir K. Chaudhury; Balakrishna Cherukuri; Qingyou Han; David Swenson; Percy Gros

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

208

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

209

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

210

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

211

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

212

Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

213

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

214

Application of Desiccant Drying in Plastic Molding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desiccants are materials that have an affinity, after heating, for water vapor. Desiccant materials have long been applied in industrial processes requiring low humidity environments. A gas-fired desiccant system improved the productivity of one blowmolding process by reducing the number of defects and allowing an increase in line speed. The environmental impact of the operation improved because electrical usage did not increase incrementally and CFC usage did not change. A comparison of the efficiency of desiccant and refrigeration dehumidification is presented.

Brown, M.; Connors, G.; Moore, D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Method for formation of thin film transistors on plastic substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for formation of thin film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates replaces standard thin film transistor fabrication techniques, and uses sufficiently lower processing temperatures so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The process relies on techniques for depositing semiconductors, dielectrics, and metals at low temperatures; crystallizing and doping semiconductor layers in the TFT with a pulsed energy source; and creating top-gate self-aligned as well as back-gate TFT structures. The process enables the fabrication of amorphous and polycrystalline channel silicon TFTs at temperatures sufficiently low to prevent damage to plastic substrates. The process has use in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Portola Valley, CA); Aceves, Randy C. (Livermore, CA)

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

Soft plastic bread packaging: lead content and reuse by families  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of lead in labels painted on soft plastic bread packaging was evaluated. Lead was detected on the outside of 17 of 18 soft plastic bread bags that were analyzed, with an average of 26 +/- 6 mg per bag with lead. Of 106 families questioned, 16 percent of respondents reported turning the bags inside out before reusing for food storage, thus putting food in contact with the lead paint. We estimate that a weak acid, such as vinegar, could readily leach 100 micrograms of lead from a painted plastic bag within 10 minutes. Further, lead and other metals painted on food packaging of any type becomes part of the municipal waste stream subject to incineration and to land-filling. The use of lead in packaging presents an unnecessary risk to public health.

Weisel, C.; Demak, M.; Marcus, S.; Goldstein, B.D. (Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators  

SciTech Connect

Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, 11 cote du palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, 11 cote du palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Automobile materials competition: energy implications of fiber-reinforced plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The embodied energy, structural weight, and transportation energy (fuel requirement) characteristics of steel, fiber-reinforced plastics, and aluminum were assessed to determine the overall energy savings of materials substitution in automobiles. In body panels, a 1.0-lb steel component with an associated 0.5 lb in secondary weight is structurally equivalent to a 0.6-lb fiber-reinforced plastic component with 0.3 lb in associated secondary weight or a 0.5-lb aluminum component with 0.25 lb of secondary weight. (Secondary weight refers to the combined weight of the vehicle's support structure, engine, braking system, and drive train, all of which can be reduced in response to a decrease in total vehicle weight.) The life cycle transportation energy requirements of structurally equivalent body panels (including their associated secondary weights) are 174.4 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 104.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. The embodied energy requirements are 37.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 22.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. These results can be combined to yield total energy requirements of 211.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 126.7 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 174.3 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. Fiber-reinforced plastics offer the greatest improvements over steel in both embodied and total energy requirements. Aluminum achieves the greatest savings in transportation energy.

Cummings-Saxton, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Gap junction-mediated electrical transmission: Regulatory mechanisms and plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gap junction-mediated electrical transmission: Regulatory mechanisms and plasticity Alberto E of synaptic transmission: chemical and electrical. While most efforts have been dedicated to the understanding in revised form 16 May 2012 Accepted 23 May 2012 Available online 31 May 2012 Keywords: Electrical synapse

Rash, John E.

220

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate is disclosed. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900 C), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180 C for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180 C) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide. 5 figs.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Truher, J.B.; Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900.degree. C.), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180.degree. C. for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180.degree. C.) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Truher, Joel B. (Palo Alto, CA); Weiner, Kurt H. (Campbell, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The broad objective of this project is to obtain improved, quantitative understanding of the transient plasticity of bituminous coals under high heating rates and other reaction and pretreatment conditions of scientific and practical interest. To these ends the research plan is to measure the softening and resolidification behavior of two US bituminous coals with a rapid-heating, fast response, high-temperature coal plastometer, previously developed in this laboratory. Specific measurements planned for the project include determinations of apparent viscosity, softening temperature, plastic period, and resolidificationtime for molten coal: (1) as a function of independent variations in coal type, heating rate, final temperature, gaseous atmosphere (inert, 0{sub 2} or H{sub 2}), and shear rate; and (2) in exploratory runs where coal is pretreated (preoxidation, pyridine extraction, metaplast cracking agents), before heating. The intra-coal inventory and molecular weight distribution of pyridine extractables will also be measured using a rapid quenching, electrical screen heater coal pyrolysis reactor. The yield of extractables is representative of the intra-coal inventory of plasticing agent (metaplast) remaining after quenching. Coal plasticity kinetics will then be mathematically modeled from metaplast generation and depletion rates, via a correlation between the viscosity of a suspension and the concentration of deformable medium (here metaplast) in that suspension. Work during this reporting period has been concerned with re-commissioning the rapid heating rate plastometer apparatus.

Darivakis, G.S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Plastic limit analysis of frames using ant colony systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, heuristic algorithms such as simulated annealing, genetic and ant colony algorithms have found many applications in optimization problems. In this paper, ant colony systems (ACSs) are used to optimize the process of finding the collapse ... Keywords: Ant colony systems, Collapse load factor, Planar frames, Plastic limit analysis

A. Kaveh; M. Jahanshahi

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Plasticity constrained: over-generalized induction cues cause maladaptive phenotypes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than shell-crushing predators. Thus the induced responses entail costs but award no advantages involve costs or limits (DeWitt et al., 1998). Costs of plasticity are indicated when a phenotype produced­environment matching ability relative to the theoretical maximum (DeWitt et al., 1998). Costs and limits have received

Langerhans, Brian

225

Silated acidic copolymers for nanoimprint lithography on flexible plastic substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new silated acidic polymer was developed as the resist for nanoimprint lithography on flexible substrates. This polymer was synthesized from methylmethacrylate, n-butylacrylate, methacrylic acid and 3-[tris(trimethylsiloxy)silyl]propyl methacrylate ... Keywords: Flexible plastic substrate, Nanoimprint lithography, Reactive ion etching resistability, Silated acidic polymer

Wen-chang Liao; Steve Lien-Chung Hsu; Jui-Chen Lin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The unfinished miracle : how plastics came to be lost at sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plastic trash is an increasingly significant source of pollution in the world's oceans. In some remote ocean regions, it is aggregating by the ton. This thesis investigates plastic trash as an emerging marine contaminant, ...

Martinez, Amanda Rose

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves Acquisitions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Available; W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions...

228

CONTAM Libraries - Appendix C2: Miscellaneous Residential ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... item, C2. CPEN_RAV, Residential, HVAC ceiling penetration, typical value, ELA4, 5 cm 2 /item, C2. CPEN_RMN, Residential, ...

229

Measuring Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leading the effort to decipher MELs impacts on buildings Understanding and reducing the energy use of MELs is a significant problem. The buildings industry is working towards...

230

Miscellaneous Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

28 29 41 17 16 17 2005-2011 Adjustments 1 2 3 2009-2011 Revision Increases 0 0 0 2009-2011 Revision Decreases 24 2 0 2009-2011 Sales 0 0 1 2009-2011 Acquisitions 0 0 0 2009-2011...

231

,"Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

232

CONTAM Libraries - Appendix C4: Miscellaneous Commercial ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1976. "Studies on Exterior Wall Air Tightness and Air Infiltration of Tall Buildings," ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 82, Part 1, 122-134. C10. ...

233

ORNL and Miscellaneous Reports CYs 19992001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wyrick, A. E. Adamson, L. N. Yust, and S. A. Martin, "Human Genome Program Report: Part 1, Overview, "Human Genome Program Report: Part 2, 1996 Research Abstracts" (2001). Mansfield, B. K., J. M. Wyrick, A. E. Adamson, D. K. Casey, M. Mills, S. A. Martin, and L. N. Yust, "Human Genome News, Vol. 10, Nos. 1

234

A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 2, Project report. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second volume contains detailed information on a number of specific topics relevant to the recovery/recycling of plastics.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Conversion of historic waste treatment process for production of an LDR and WIPP/WAC compliant TRU wasteform  

SciTech Connect

In support of the historic weapons production mission at the, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), several liquid waste treatment processes were designed, built and operated for treatment of plutonium-contaminated aqueous waste. Most of these @ processes ultimately resulted in the production of a cemented wasteform. One of these treatment processes was the Miscellaneous Aqueous Waste Handling and Solidification Process, commonly referred to as the Bottlebox process. Due to a lack of processing demand, Bottlebox operations were curtailed in late 1989. Starting in 1992, a treatment capability for stabilization of miscellaneous, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous, plutonium-nitrate solutions was identified. This treatment was required to address potentially unsafe storage conditions for these liquids. The treatment would produce a TRU wasteform. It thus became necessary to restart the Bottlebox process, but under vastly different conditions and constraints than existed prior to its curtailment. This paper provides a description of the historical Bottlebox process and process controls; and then describes, in detail, all of the process and process control changes that were implemented to convert the treatment system such that a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and a Land Disposal Requirements (LDR) compliant wasteform would be produced. The rationale for imposition of LDRs on a TRU wasteform is discussed. In addition, this paper discusses the program changes implemented to meet modem criticality safety, Conduct of Operations, and Department of Energy Nuclear Facility restart requirements.

Dunn, R.P.; Wagner, R.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Copper coated carbon fiber reinforced plastics for high and ultra high vacuum applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used copper-coated carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CuCFRP) for the construction of high and ultra-high vacuum recipients. The vacuum performance is found to be comparable to typical stainless steel used for this purpose. In test recipients we have reached pressures of 2E-8 mbar and measured a desorption rate of 1E-11 mbar*liter/s/cm^2; no degradation over time (2 years) has been found. Suitability for baking has been found to depend on the CFRP production process, presumably on the temperature of the autoclave curing. Together with other unique properties of CuCFRP such as low weight and being nearly non-magnetic, this makes it an ideal material for many high-end vacuum applications.

Burri, F; Feusi, P; Henneck, R; Kirch, K; Lauss, B; Ruettimann, P; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Schnabel, A; Voigt, J; Zenner, J; Zsigmond, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Alan J. Heeger, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Solar Cells  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alan J. Heeger, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Solar Cells Alan J. Heeger, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Solar Cells Resources with Additional Information · Patents · Videos After receiving 'his physics Ph.D. at the University of California at Berkeley in 1961, [Alan J.] Heeger would spend the next 20 years teaching the subject at the University of Pennsylvania - while also designing and then launching one of the nation's premiere scientific think tanks: the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter. Alan J. Heeger Courtesy of Randy Lamb, UCSB It was there in the Penn experimental lab, during the fall and early winter of 1976, that Heeger and two colleagues would first begin to explore the possibility of manipulating "long chains of polymers" with an eye to "altering their properties" so that they could be coaxed into conducting electricity.'1

238

Plastic deformation of ordered intermetallic alloys: Fundamental aspects  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental aspects of plastic deformation in ordered intermetallic alloys are reviewed by directly comparing the temperature-dependent yield stresses of Ni{sub 3}Al and Ni{sub 3}Si (the L1{sub 2} structure), NiAl and FeAl (the B2 structure), and TiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al (non-cubic L1{sub 0} and D0{sub 19} structures, respectively). While the yield strength anomaly observed in Ni{sub 3}Al is consistent with the prevailing dislocation models, that found in stoichiometric Ni{sub 3}Si is not. The strong plastic anisotropy observed in NiAl stems from the high antiphase boundary energy, and that found in two-phase {gamma}-TiAl/{alpha}{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al is due to the exceptionally high compressive yield strength along the c-axis of Ti{sub 3}Al.

Yoo, M.H. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Eisenforschung, Duesseldorf (Germany)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The plastic bottle: A multi-industry impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent changes in motor oil packaging project the future rate of change for packaging operations of companies committed to the marketing of motor oil. Highlighted by the widespread conversion to the plastic bottle as a new standard container for motor oil is the need for the development of higher speed, more cost effective packaging machinery which will meet and eventually exceed historical line speeds and operating efficiencies. The significant investments required for evolving equipment and packaging systems require rethinking of traditional manufacturing concepts and relationships; onetime investments in packaging plants are decisions of the past. The plastic bottle for motor oil truly impacts packaging operations, distribution networks, retail outlets and packaging machinery manufacturers. It is a multi-industry impact.

Noel, J.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with engineering plastics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All seven oil immersion studies are complete at both temperatures. Nine out of ten refrigerant ambient immersion studies are complete including 60C (140F) for R-123. All 22 plastic test materials have been molded into test bars. All test bars have been quality controlled for physical consistency and integrity. All 22 test chambers are functional. Creep loads have been increased to 25% of ultimate tensile. Refrigerant has solubilities of Emery 2927 with R-22 and 134a are complete.

Cavestri, R.C.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices. The method can include encapsulating the MEMS device in a transfer molded plastic package. Next, a perforation can be made in the package to provide access to the MEMS elements. The non-ablative material removal process can include wet etching, dry etching, mechanical machining, water jet cutting, and ultrasonic machining, or any combination thereof. Finally, the MEMS elements can be released by using either a wet etching or dry plasma etching process. The MEMS elements can be protected with a parylene protective coating. After releasing the MEMS elements, an anti-stiction coating can be applied. The perforating step can be applied to both sides of the device or package. A cover lid can be attached to the face of the package after releasing any MEMS elements. The cover lid can include a window for providing optical access. The method can be applied to any plastic packaged microelectronic device that requires access to the environment, including chemical, pressure, or temperature-sensitive microsensors; CCD chips, photocells, laser diodes, VCSEL's, and UV-EPROMS. The present method places the high-risk packaging steps ahead of the release of the fragile portions of the device. It also provides protection for the die in shipment between the molding house and the house that will release the MEMS elements and subsequently treat the surfaces.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Conley, William R. (Tijeras, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices. The method can include encapsulating the MEMS device in a transfer molded plastic package. Next, a perforation can be made in the package to provide access to the MEMS elements. The non-ablative material removal process can include wet etching, dry etching, mechanical machining, water jet cutting, and ultrasonic machining, or any combination thereof. Finally, the MEMS elements can be released by using either a wet etching or dry plasma etching process. The MEMS elements can be protected with a parylene protective coating. After releasing the MEMS elements, an anti-stiction coating can be applied. The perforating step can be applied to both sides of the device or package. A cover lid can be attached to the face of the package after releasing any MEMS elements. The cover lid can include a window for providing optical access. The method can be applied to any plastic packaged microelectronic device that requires access to the environment, including chemical, pressure, or temperature-sensitive microsensors; CCD chips, photocells, laser diodes, VCSEL's, and UV-EPROMS. The present method places the high-risk packaging steps ahead of the release of the fragile portions of the device. It also provides protection for the die in shipment between the molding house and the house that will release the MEMS elements and subsequently treat the surfaces.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Conley, William R. (Tijeras, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have displayed impressive mechanical properties, but the use and dimensions of material have been limited due to critical cooling rate requirements and low ductility. The application of severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) for consolidation of bulk amorphous metals (BAM) and amorphous metal matrix composites (AMMC) is investigated in this dissertation. The objectives of this research are a) to better understand processing parameters which promote bonding between particles and b) to determine by what mechanisms the plasticity is enhanced in bulk amorphous metal matrix composites consolidated by ECAE. To accomplish the objectives BAM and AMMCs were produced via ECAE consolidation of Vitreloy 106a (Zr58.5Nb2.8Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3-wt%), ARLloy #1 (Hf71.3Cu16.2Ni7.6Ti2.2Al2.6 -wt%), and both of these amorphous alloys blended with crystalline phases of W, Cu and Ni. Novel instrumented extrusions and a host of postprocessing material characterizations were used to evaluate processing conditions and material properties. The results show that ECAE consolidation at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region gives near fully dense (>99%) and well bonded millimeter scale BAM and AMMCs. The mechanical properties of the ECAE processed BMG are comparable to cast material: Ï?f = 1640 MPa, ?µf = 2.3%, E = 80 GPa for consolidated Vitreloy 106a as compared to Ï?f = 1800 MPa, ?µf = 2.5%, E = 85 GPa for cast Vitreloy 106, and Ï?f = 1660 MPa, ?µf = 2.0%, E = 97 GPa for ARLloy #1 as compared to Ï?f = 2150 MPa, ?µf oxides and crystalline phase morphology and chemistry. It is demonstrated that the addition of a dispersed crystalline phase to an amorphous matrix by ECAE powder consolidation increases the plasticity of the amorphous matrix by providing locations for generation and/or arrest of adiabatic shear bands. The ability of ECAE to consolidated BAM and AMMCs with improved plasticity opens the possibility of overcoming the size and plasticity limitations of the monolithic bulk metallic glasses.

Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

245

Bio-Based Product Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often require less energy to produce than petroleum-based ones. Researchers have discovered that the process for making biofuels also can be used to make antifreeze, plastics, glues, artificial sweeteners, and gel for toothpaste. Other important building blocks for bio-based products are carbon monoxide and hydrogen. When biomass is heated with a small amount of oxygen, these two gases are produced in abundance. Scientists call this mixture biosynthesis gas. Biosynthesis gas can be used to make plastics and acids,

246

Bio-Based Product Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often require less energy to produce than petroleum-based ones. Researchers have discovered that the process for making biofuels also can be used to make antifreeze, plastics, glues, artificial sweeteners, and gel for toothpaste. Other important building blocks for bio-based products are carbon monoxide and hydrogen. When biomass is heated with a small amount of oxygen, these two gases are produced in abundance. Scientists call this mixture biosynthesis gas. Biosynthesis gas can be used to make plastics and acids,

247

The PCB Information Manual: Volume 1: Production, Uses, Characteristics, and Toxicity of PCBs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although production of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the United States ended in 1977, many types of in-service equipment, such as utility transformers, and many products, such as paints, caulking, and plastics, still contain PCBs. This Volume of the PCB Information Manual provides information concerning the production, uses, characteristics, and toxicity of PCBs.

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Recovery and separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop a cost- effective and environmentally acceptable process for the separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances. The process under development has separated individual high purity (greater than 99.5%) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and high- impact polystyrene (HIPS) from commingled plastics generated by appliance-shredding and metal-recovery operations. The process consists of size-reduction steps for the commingled plastics, followed by a series of gravity-separation techniques to separate plastic materials of different densities. Individual plastics of similar densities, such as ABS and HIPS, are further separated by using a chemical solution. By controlling the surface tension, the density, and the temperature of the chemical solution we are able to selectively float/separate plastics that have different surface energies. This separation technique has proven to be highly effective in recovering high-purity plastics materials from discarded household appliances. A conceptual design of a continuous process to recover high-value plastics from discarded appliances is also discussed. In addition to plastics separation research, Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop cost-effective techniques for improving the mechanical properties of plastics recovered from appliances.

Karvelas, D.E.; Jody, B.J.; Poykala, J.A. Jr.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.; Arman, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.]|[Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Stress Intensity Factor Plasticity Correction for Flaws in Stress Concentration Regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasticity corrections to elastically computed stress intensity factors are often included in brittle fracture evaluation procedures. These corrections are based on the existence of a plastic zone in the vicinity of the crack tip. Such a plastic zone correction is included in the flaw evaluation procedure of Appendix A to Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Plasticity effects from the results of elastic and elastic-plastic explicit flaw finite element analyses are examined for various size cracks emanating from the root of a notch in a panel and for cracks located at fillet fadii. The results of these caluclations provide conditions under which the crack-tip plastic zone correction based on the Irwin plastic zone size overestimates the plasticity effect for crack-like flaws embedded in stress concentration regions in which the elastically computed stress exceeds the yield strength of the material. A failure assessment diagram (FAD) curve is employed to graphically c haracterize the effect of plasticity on the crack driving force. The Option 1 FAD curve of the Level 3 advanced fracture assessment procedure of British Standard PD 6493:1991, adjusted for stress concentration effects by a term that is a function of the applied load and the ratio of the local radius of curvature at the flaw location to the flaw depth, provides a satisfactory bound to all the FAD curves derived from the explicit flaw finite element calculations. The adjusted FAD curve is a less restrictive plasticity correction than the plastic zone correction of Section XI for flaws embedded in plastic zones at geometric stress concentrators. This enables unnecessary conservatism to be removed from flaw evaluation procedures that utilize plasticity corrections.

Friedman, E.; Wilson, W.K.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Production Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hall (2005), Prices, Production, and Inventories over theProduction Targets ? Guillermo Caruana CEMFI caruana@cem?.esthe theory using monthly production targets of the Big Three

Caruana, Guillermo; Einav, Liran

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Pottery Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul T. Nicholson. ) Pottery Production, Nicholson, UEE 2009Short Citation: Nicholson 2009, Pottery Production. UEE.Paul T. , 2009, Pottery Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Nicholson, Paul T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Cordage Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

294: fig. 15-3). Cordage Production, Veldmeijer, UEE 2009Short Citation: Veldmeijer, 2009, Cordage Production. UEE.Andr J. , 2009, Cordage Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Veldmeijer, Andr J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Final Report: Development of Renewable Microbial Polyesters for Cost Effective and Energy- Efficient Wood-Plastic Composites  

SciTech Connect

In this project, we proposed to produce wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (WFRTCs) using microbial thermoplastic polyesters in place of petroleum-derived plastic. WFRTCs are a rapidly growing product area, averaging a 38% growth rate since 1997. Their production is dependent on substantial quantities of petroleum based thermoplastics, increasing their overall energy costs by over 230% when compared to traditional Engineered Wood Products (EWP). Utilizing bio-based thermoplastics for these materials can reduce our dependence on foreign petroleum. We have demonstrated that biopolymers (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) can be successfully produced from wood pulping waste streams and that viable wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite products can be produced from these materials. The results show that microbial polyester (PHB in this study) can be extruded together with wastewater-derived cell mass and wood flour into deck products having performance properties comparable to existing commercial HDPE/WF composite products. This study has thus proven the underlying concept that the microbial polyesters produced from waste effluents can be used to make cost-effective and energy-efficient wood-plastic composites. The cost of purified microbial polyesters is about 5-20 times that of HDPE depending on the cost of crude oil, due to high purification (40%), carbon substrate (40%) and sterilized fermentation (20%) costs for the PHB. Hence, the ability to produce competitive and functional composites with unpurified PHA-biomass mixtures from waste carbon sources in unsterile systemswithout cell debris removalis a significant step forward in producing competitive value-added structural composites from forest products residuals using a biorefinery approach. As demonstrated in the energy and waste analysis for the project, significant energy savings and waste reductions can also be realized using this approach. We recommend that the next step for development of useful products using this technology is to scale the technology from the 700-L pilot reactor to a small-scale production facility, with dedicated operation staff and engineering controls. In addition, we recommend that a market study be conducted as well as further product development for construction products that will utilize the unique properties of this bio-based material.

David N. Thompson, Robert W. Emerick, Alfred B. England, James P. Flanders, Frank J. Loge, Katherine A. Wiedeman, Michael P. Wolcott

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the production of uranium by the autothermic reduction of an anhydrous uranium halide with an alkaline earth metal, preferably magnesium One feature is the initial reduction step which is brought about by locally bringing to reaction temperature a portion of a mixture of the reactants in an open reaction vessel having in contact with the mixture a lining of substantial thickness composed of calcium fluoride. The lining is prepared by coating the interior surface with a plastic mixture of calcium fluoride and water and subsequently heating the coating in situ until at last the exposed surface is substantially anhydrous.

Crawford, J.W.C.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

(Discussion of plastic media blasting): Foreign trip report, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The visit to MBB was to see and discuss the plastic media blasting equipment developed and manufactured as a cooperative effort by Schlick and MBB. The Germans emphasized a systematic approach and complete control over most parameters. The goal is to achieve conditions which do not cause damage to the aircraft. To arrive at the goal the air pressure that delivers the air to entrain the media, the flow rate of media, and the media itself are carefully and accurately controlled. Distance of nozzle and angle of blasting were systematically investigated. The wet (freon) cleanup system under development at Schlick was not discussed.

Gat, U.

1988-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

Just One Word-Plastics | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Just One Word-Plastics Just One Word-Plastics Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 09.24.12 Just One Word-Plastics A "universal" plastic coating could lead to lower cost, more flexible electronic devices. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Using polymers to develop new low work function materials, EFRC researchers created the first completely plastic solar cell, where not just the cell itself but also its electrodes are made of plastic. Photo courtesy of Virginie Drujon-Kippelen Using polymers to develop new low work function materials, EFRC researchers

260

Assessment of Cracks in Stress Concentration Regions with Localized Plastic Zones  

SciTech Connect

Marty brittle fracture evaluation procedures include plasticity corrections to elastically computed stress intensity factors. These corrections, which are based on the existence of a plastic zone in the vicinity of the crack tip, can overestimate the plasticity effect for a crack embedded in a stress concentration region in which the elastically computed stress exceeds the yield strength of the material in a localized zone. The interactions between the crack, which acts to relieve the high stresses driving the crack, plasticity effects in the stress concentration region, and the nature and source of the loading are examined by formulating explicit flaw finite element models for a crack emanating from the root of a notch located in a panel subject to an applied tensile stress. The results of these calculations provide conditions under which a crack-tip plasticity correction based on the Irwin plastic zone size overestimates the plasticity effect. A failure assessment diagram (FAD) curve is used to characterize the effect of plasticity on the crack driving force and to define a less restrictive plasticity correction for cracks at notch roots when load-controlled boundary conditions are imposed. The explicit flaw finite element results also demonstrate that stress intensity factors associated with load-controlled boundary conditions, such as those inherent in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code as well as in most handbooks of stress intensity factors, can be much higher than those associated with displacement-controlled conditions, such as those that produce residual or thermal stresses. Under certain conditions, the inclusion of plasticity effects for cracks loaded by displacement-controlled boundary conditions reduces the crack driving force thus justifying the elimination of a plasticity correction for such loadings. The results of this study form the basis for removing unnecessary conservatism from flaw evaluation procedures that utilize plasticity corrections.

Friedman, E.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

262

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

263

Process planning for rapid manufacturing of plastic injection mold for short run production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a process planning methodology for a rapid injection mold tool manufacturing system that involves additive and subtractive techniques, whereby slabs are sequentially (more)

Karthikeyan, Rajesh Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe to a stainless steel flange  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) to a stainless steel flange (12, 16), in which the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) is accommodated in a ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) in the flange (12, 16), the groove conforming to the dimensions of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18), where the gap remaining between the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) and the ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) is filled with a sealant (19).

Allais, Arnaud (D-30625 Hannover, DE); Hoffmann, Ernst (D-30855 Langenhagen, DE)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Effect of Low Plasticity Burnishing on X65 Line Pipe Girth Welds ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, The Effect of Low Plasticity Burnishing on X65 Line Pipe Girth Welds and Heat Affected Zones. Author(s), Peter Moore, Jeremy Scheel, Doug...

266

In-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity modeling of ?-Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study uses a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity modeling to elucidate the deformation mechanisms active in ?-Uranium.

267

High-Speed, Stereoselective Polymerization for Renewable, Bio-Derived Plastics  

Fabrication of polymers and plastics from naturally renewable feedstocks offers the potential for a cost-effective and sustainable alternative to ...

268

Current and target recovery rates for plastics packaging in Oregon. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study focuses on the generation and recovery of post-consumer plastic packaging manufactured from six common plastic resins. The study includes information on current recycling rates; economic, regulatory and technological trends; and collection and processing costs. It also projects recovery rates by resin type by utilizing assumptions for voluntary and regulatory changes in current Oregon plastics recovery programs. The study will be used by the ORDEQ to develop recommendations on effective recycling rates for plastic resins for the years 1992 to 2000.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A First Step towards Large-Scale Plants to Plastics Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Scientists may be able to produce plastic through a sustainable process based on the energy found in sunlight and carbon dioxide by optimizing the accumulation of fatty acids.

270

Elastic consequences of a single plastic event: A step towards the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 25, 2004 ... ementary process of such a flow, a plastic event, and compute the long-range perturbation it ... the medium, and can trigger other local events.

271

Management of Contaminated Autologous Grafts in Plastic Surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Contamination of autologous grafts unfortunately occurs in plastic surgery, but the literature provides no guidance for management of such incidents. Methods: American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery members were asked to complete an online survey that asked about the number and causes of graft contaminations experienced, how surgeons dealt with the problem, the clinical outcomes, and patient disclosure. Results: Nineteen hundred surgeons were asked to participate in the survey, and 223 responded. Of these, 70 % had experienced at least 1 graft contamination incident, with 26 % experiencing 4 or more. The most frequently reported reason for graft contamination was a graft falling on the floor (reported by 75%). Nearly two thirds of the contaminated grafts related to craniofacial procedures. Ninety-four percent of grafts were managed with decontamination and completion of the operation. The most common method of decontamination was washing with povidone-iodine, but this practice is contrary to recommendations in the literature. Only 3 surgeons (1.9%) said a clinical infection developed following decontaminated graft use. Patients were not informed in 60 % of graft contamination incidents. The survey results and review of the literature led

Robert F. Centeno; A Ankit R. Desai; Marla E. Watson; Ma C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Detecting corrosion in plastic encapsulated micro-electronics packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past, most defense microelectronics components were packaged in ceramic, hermetic enclosures. PEMs are not hermetic because the plastic molding compounds are permeable to moisture. This lack of hermeticity creates an unknown liability, especially with respect to corrosion of the metallization features. This potential liability must be addressed to ensure long-term reliability of these systems is maintained under conditions of long-term dormant storage. However, the corrosion process is difficult to monitor because it occurs under the encapsulating plastic and is therefore not visible. The authors have developed techniques that allow them to study corrosion of Al bondpads and traces under relevant atmospheric corrosion conditions. The cornerstone of this capability is the ATC 2.6, a microelectronic test device designed at Sandia National Laboratories. Corrosion tests were performed by exposing test chips to aggressive environments. The electrical response of the ATC indicated an increase in bondpad resistance with exposure time. Note that the change in resistance is not uniform from one bondpad to another. This illustrates the stochastic nature of the corrosion process. The change in resistance correlated with visual observation of corrosion of the bondpads on the unencapsulated test chips.

Sorensen, N.R.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Crack tip plasticity in single crystal UO2: Atomistic simulations  

SciTech Connect

The fracture behavior of single crystal uranium dioxide is studied using molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature. Initially, an elliptical notch is created on either {111} or {110} planes, and tensile loading is applied normal to the crack planes. For cracks on both planes, shielding of crack tips by plastic deformation is observed, and crack extension occurs for crack on {111} planes only. Two plastic processes, dislocation emission and phase transformation are identified at crack tips. The dislocations have a Burgers vector of ?110?/2, and glide on {100} planes. Two metastable phases, the so-called Rutile and Scrutinyite phases, are identified during the phase transformation, and their relative stability is confirmed by separate density- functional-theory calculations. Examination of stress concentration near crack tips reveals that dislocation emission is not an effective shielding mechanism. The formation of new phases may effectively shield the crack provided all phase interfaces formed near the crack tips are coherent, as in the case of cracks residing on {110} planes.

Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks; Bulent Biner; Xiang-Yang Liu; David A. Andersson

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

MANUFACTURING CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANUFACTURING MANUFACTURING CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov Industrial Gas Manufacturing 325120 All Other Basic Inorganic Chemical Manufacturing 325188 Plastics Material and Resin Manufacturing 325211 Explosives Manufacturing 325920 All Other Plastics Product Manufacturing 326199 Nonferrous Metal (except Copper and Aluminum) Rolling, Drawing, and Extruding 331491 Fabricated Structural Metal Manufacturing 332312 Metal Tank (Heavy Gauge) Manufacturing 332420 Other Metal Container Manufacturing 332439 Machine Shops 332710 Electroplating, Plating, Polishing, Anodizing, and Coloring 332813 Industrial valve Manufacturing 332911 Other Ordnance and Accessories Manufacturing 332995 All Other Miscellaneous Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing

275

Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E. [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Antiohos, S.K., E-mail: santiohos@titan.gr [Titan Cement Company S.A., Group R and D and Quality Department, Kamari Plant, P.O. Box 18, 19200 Elefsina (Greece); Papadi, C., E-mail: c.papadi@polyeco.gr [Polyeco S.A., 16 km National Road Athens-Korinthos, Aspropyrgos 19300 (Greece)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Delamination in Thermohyperelastic Plastic IC Packaging Material Due to Thermal Load and Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lamination failure as popcorn form of plastic electronic packages under thermal stress induced by heat mismatch and vapor pressure induced by the moisture during the solder-reflow process is studied. When plastic electronic packages are ... Keywords: popcorn failure, thermohyperelastic material, vapor pressure

Zhigang Li; Xuexia Yang; Xuefeng Shu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Steel vs. Plastics: The Competition for Light-Vehicle Fuel Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of the various plastic and steel alternatives indicates that steel ... By comparison, the European market uses 70-90% plastic tanks, and the Japanese .... Two years later, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 encouraged the use of ..... For more information, contact P.J. Alvarado, U.S. Steel, 201 W. Big Beaver...

278

Two stochastic mean-field polycrystal plasticity methods  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we develop two mean-field polycrystal plasticity models in which the L{sup c} are approximated stochastically. Through comprehensive CPFEM analyses of an idealized tantalum polycrystal, we verify that the L{sup c} tend to follow a normal distribution and surmise that this is due to the crystal interactions. We draw on these results to develop the STM and the stochastic no-constraints model (SNCM), which differ in the manner in which the crystal strain rates D{sup c} are prescribed. Calibration and validation of the models are performed using data from tantalum compression experiments. Both models predict the compression textures more accurately than the FCM, and the SNCM predicts them more accurately than the STM. The STM is extremely computationally efficient, only slightly more expensive than the FCM, while the SNCM is three times more computationally expensive than the STM.

Tonks, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Distributed Generation Study/Harbec Plastics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

< Distributed Generation Study < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Ontario, New York Site Description Industrial-Plastics Processing Study Type Long-term Monitoring Technology Microturbine Prime Mover Capstone C30 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer Northern Development System Enclosure Indoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 25 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 750 kW0.75 MW 750,000 W 750,000,000 mW 7.5e-4 GW 7.5e-7 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 3750000 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller Manufacturer-Integrated Component Integration Factory Integrated Start Date 2005/10/06 Monitoring Termination Date 1969/12/31 Primary Power Application Based Load

280

COLLOQUIUM: Are Mushrooms the Next Polymers?: Growing Plastic Replacements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 20, 2013, 4:15pm to 6:30pm March 20, 2013, 4:15pm to 6:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Are Mushrooms the Next Polymers?: Growing Plastic Replacements with Fungi Mr. Gavin McIntyre Ecovative Design LLC Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 2013-2014 Colloquium Committee is comprised of the following people. Please feel free to contact them by e-mail regarding any possible speakers or topics for future colloquia. Carol Ann Austin caustin@pppl.gov John Greenwald, Chair jgreenwa@pppl.gov Charles H. Skinner cskinner@pppl.gov Daren Stotler dstotler@pppl.gov Carol Ann Austin 609-243-2484 Contact Information Coordinator(s): Ms. Carol Ann Austin caustin@pppl.gov Host(s): Ms. Kelsey Tresemer ktreseme@pppl.gov PPPL Entrance Procedures Visitor Information, Directions, Security at PPPL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electrical separation of plastics coming from special waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimisation of waste to landfilling is recognised as a priority in waste management by European rules. In order to achieve this goal, developing suitable technologies for waste recycling is therefore of great importance. To achieve this aim the technologies utilised for mineral processing can be taken into consideration to develop recycling systems. In particular comminution and separation processes can be adopted to recover valuable materials from composite waste. In this work the possibility of recycling pharmaceutical blister packaging has been investigated. A suitable comminution process has been applied in order to obtain the liberation of the plastic and aluminium components. Experiments of electrical separation have been carried out in order to point out the influence of the process parameters on the selections of the different materials and to set up the optimum operating conditions.

Gente, Vincenzo; La Marca, Floriana; Lucci, Federica; Massacci, Paolo

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

On a solvability of hydro-mechanical problem based on contact problem with visco-plastic friction in Bingham rheology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the solvability and numerical solution of contact problem with a local visco-plastic friction in the visco-plastic Bingham rheology. The model problem discussed represents a simple hydro-mechanical model of the global project on ... Keywords: Bingham rheology, Contact problems with friction, FEM, Geomechanics, Hydromechanics, Variational inequalities, Visco-plasticity

Ji? Nedoma; Lubo Tomek

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Feasibility study of the separation of chlorinated films from plastic packaging wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes the possible separation of chlorinated plastic films (PVC and PVDC) from other heavy plastic packaging waste (PPW) by selective twist formation and gravity separation. Twists formation was mechanically induced in chlorinated plastic films, whereas twist formation did not occur in PS and PET films. After twist formation, all the films had the apparent density of less than 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and floated in water even though the true density was more than 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}. However, the apparent density of the PS and the PET films increased with agitation to more than 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, whereas that of chlorinated plastic films was kept less than 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}. The main reason would be the air being held inside the chlorinated plastic films which was difficult to be removed by agitation. Simple gravity separation after twist formation was applied for artificial film with 10 wt.% of the chlorinated films and real PPW films with 9 wt.% of the chlorinated films. About 76 wt.% of the artificial PPW films and 75 wt.% of real PPW films after the removal of PP and PE were recovered as settling fraction with 4.7 wt.% and 3.0 wt.% of chlorinated plastic films, respectively. These results indicate that simple gravity separation process after twist formation can be used to reduce the chlorinated plastic concentration from mixed heavy PPW films.

Reddy, Mallampati Srinivasa, E-mail: srireddys@hiroshima-u.ac.j [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima-739-8527 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Takefumi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima-739-8527 (Japan); Okuda, Tetsuji; Tsai, Tsung-Yueh [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima-739-8513 (Japan); Nakai, Satoshi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima-739-8527 (Japan); Nishijima, Wataru [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima-739-8513 (Japan); Okada, Mitsumasa [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima-739-8527 (Japan)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline  

SciTech Connect

In 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory began a series of experiments to evaluate the compatibility of fueling infrastructure materials with intermediate levels of ethanol-blended gasoline. Initially, the focus was elastomers, metals, and sealants, and the test fuels were Fuel C, CE10a, CE17a and CE25a. The results of these studies were published in 2010. Follow-on studies were performed with an emphasis on plastic (thermoplastic and thermoset) materials used in underground storage and dispenser systems. These materials were exposed to test fuels of Fuel C and CE25a. Upon completion of this effort, it was felt that additional compatibility data with higher ethanol blends was needed and another round of experimentation was performed on elastomers, metals, and plastics with CE50a and CE85a test fuels. Compatibility of polymers typically relates to the solubility of the solid polymer with a solvent. It can also mean susceptibility to chemical attack, but the polymers and test fuels evaluated in this study are not considered to be chemically reactive with each other. Solubility in polymers is typically assessed by measuring the volume swell of the polymer exposed to the solvent of interest. Elastomers are a class of polymers that are predominantly used as seals, and most o-ring and seal manufacturers provide compatibility tables of their products with various solvents including ethanol, toluene, and isooctane, which are components of aggressive oxygenated gasoline as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1681. These tables include a ranking based on the level of volume swell in the elastomer associated with exposure to a particular solvent. Swell is usually accompanied by a decrease in hardness (softening) that also affects performance. For seal applications, shrinkage of the elastomer upon drying is also a critical parameter since a contraction of volume can conceivably enable leakage to occur. Shrinkage is also indicative of the removal of one or more components of the elastomers (by the solvent). This extraction of additives can negatively change the properties of the elastomer, leading to reduced performance and durability. For a seal application, some level of volume swell is acceptable, since the expansion will serve to maintain a seal. However, the acceptable level of swell is dependent on the particular application of the elastomer product. It is known that excessive swell can lead to unacceptable extrusion of the elastomer beyond the sealed interface, where it becomes susceptible to damage. Also, since high swell is indicative of high solubility, there is a heightened potential for fluid to seep through the seal and into the environment. Plastics, on the other hand, are used primarily in structural applications, such as solid components, including piping and fluid containment. Volume change, especially in a rigid system, will create internal stresses that may negatively affect performance. In order to better understand and predict the compatibility for a given polymer type and fuel composition, an analysis based on Hansen solubility theory was performed for each plastic and elastomer material. From this study, the solubility distance was calculated for each polymer material and test fuel combination. Using the calculated solubility distance, the ethanol concentration associated with peak swell and overall extent of swell can be predicted for each polymer. The bulk of the material discussion centers on the plastic materials, and their compatibility with Fuel C, CE25a, CE50a, and CE85a. The next section of this paper focuses on the elastomer compatibility with the higher ethanol concentrations with comparison to results obtained previously for the lower ethanol levels. The elastomers were identical to those used in the earlier study. Hansen solubility theory is also applied to the elastomers to provide added interpretation of the results. The final section summarizes the performance of the metal coupons.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sequential pyrolysis of plastic to recover polystyrene, HCl and terephthalic acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for pyrolyzing plastic waste feed streams containing polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene terephthalate, polystyrene and polyethylene to recover polystyrene, HCl and terephthalic acid comprising: heating the plastic waste feed stream to a first temperature; adding an acid or base catalyst on an oxide or carbonate support; heating the plastic waste feed stream to pyrolyze polyethylene terephthalate and polyvinyl chloride; separating terephthalic acid or HCl; heating to a second temperature to pyrolyze polystyrene; separating styrene; heating the waste feed stream to a third temperature to pyrolyze polyethylene; and separating hydrocarbons. 83 figs.

Evans, R.J.; Chum, H.L.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

Contamination monitors for nuclear power plants; Plastic scintillators vs. proportional detectors  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on trends in monitoring for radioactive material (contamination) on or in waste, tools, laundry and personnel at nuclear power stations which have been towards the increased use of large-area gas-flow proportional detectors and large plastic scintillators. Solid plastic scintillators can be made sensitive primarily to beta, gamma only, or both beta and gamma radiation. Proportional detectors can be made sensitive to alpha, beta, or alpha plus beta. They also can detect gamma radiation but with less efficiency than plastic scintillators. Both types of detectors have certain advantages, and the proper choice of detector depends on the application.

Geiger, E.; Phyfe, L. (Eberline Instrument Corp., Santa Fe, NM (US)); Fisher, W. (National Nuclear Corp., Mountain View, CA (US))

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

A group of 40 hvb coals, mostly from western Kentucky fields, has been examined with regard to ASTM Gieseler plastometric properties. Twenty-nine of these coals have also been studied over a range of temperatures by isothermal Gieseler plastometry. Raw Gieseler data provide melting and coking slopes and readily calculable fluidity spans. Maximum fluidity by slope intersection is a more consistent measure than observed maximum fluidity. Isothermal slopes and maximum fluidities follow Arrhenius temperature dependencies, with activation energies related systematically to fluid properties. These freshly sampled coals are also characterized by chemical, physical and petrographic criteria, by quantitative solvent extractions, by pyrolysis gas chromatography, by Fourier Transform infrared analysis of coals and extraction residues, by the HPLC analysis of coal extracts, and by optical microscopy of coals and Gieseler semi-coke residues. Multiple linear regression analysis yields three-term expressions which estimate maximum fluidities (both ASTM and isothermal) with R values of .90 to .92. Slopes and critical temperatures are similarly predictable. Plastometer experiments with selected coals under superatmospheric pressures show both melting slopes and maximum fluidities to be sharply increased, the latter by one to three orders of magnitude. Some suggestions are offered to accommodate this new information into the general body of knowledge concerning the phenomenon of plasticity in mid-ranked coals. 81 references, 28 figures, 40 tables.

Lloyd, W. G.; Reasoner, J. W.; Hower, J. C.; Yates, L. P.; Clark, C. P.; Davis, E.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Irefin, A.; Jiminez, A.; Jones, T. M.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The effect of smoke from plastics on digital communications equipment  

SciTech Connect

Smoke from plastics can cause immediate problems in electrical equipment in the form of shorting and increased leakage currents, as well as long-term corrosion (metal loss). The short-term problems can be especially serious for critical control instrumentation such as that found in nuclear reactors or telecommunications systems. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Sandia National Laboratories are sponsoring a program to determine the modes and probabilities of digital equipment failure during exposure to smoke and up to 24 hours after the exposure. Early tests on computer systems have shown that the most common immediate problems are temporary and are likely to be caused by increased leakage currents. High-voltage circuits are especially vulnerable since the charged particles in smoke are drawn to those surfaces. To study failure probabilities, smoke exposure tests with real-time measurements will be carried out to determine how the electrical properties of the environment are affected by smoke concentration and content. Digital communication cable will be included in the tests because temporary shorts that cannot be detected through dc measurements may cause interruptions in communications between computers. The reaction of the equipment to changed electrical properties of the environment will be modeled. Equipment that can be used for testing and modeling is being solicited.

Tanaka, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Accident and Consequence Analysis Dept.; Chapin, J.T. [Lucent Technologies, Norcross, GA (United States). Bell Labs.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Effects of simulant Hanford tank waste on plastic packaging components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors describe a chemical compatibility testing program for packaging components which might be used to transport mixed wastes. They mention the results of the screening phase of this program and then present the results of the second phase of this experimental program. This effort involved the comprehensive testing of five plastic liner materials in the aqueous mixed waste simulant. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately} 140, 290, 570, and 3,670 krads of gamma radiation followed by 7, 14, 28, 180 day exposures to the waste simulant at 18, 50, and 60 C. From the data analysis performed to date in this study, they have identified the fluorocarbon Kel-F{trademark} as having the greatest chemical compatibility after being exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of Teflon under these conditions. The data obtained from this testing program will be available to packaging designers for the development of mixed waste packagings. The implications of the testing results on the selection of appropriate materials as packaging components are discussed.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Glass, Plastic and Semiconductors: Packaging Techniques for Miniature Optoelectric Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, they have extensive experience with the design and development of miniature photonic systems which require novel packaging schemes. Over the years they have developed silicon micro-optical benches to serve as a stable platform for precision mounting of optical and electronic components. They have developed glass ball lenses that can be fabricated in-situ on the microbench substrate. They have modified commercially available molded plastic fiber ribbon connectors (MT) and added thin film multilayer semiconductor coatings to create potentially low-cost wavelength combiners and wavelength selective filters. They have fabricated both vertical-cavity and in-plane semiconductor lasers and amplifiers, and have packaged these and other components into several miniature photonics systems. For example, they have combined the silicon optical bench with standard electronic packaging techniques and the custom-made wavelength-selective filters to develop a four-wavelength wavelength-division-multiplexing transmitter module mounted in a standard 120-pin ceramic PGA package that couples light from several vertical-cavity-surface-emitting-laser arrays into one multimode fiber-ribbon array. The coupling loss can be as low as 2dB, and the transmitters can be operated at over 1.25 GHz. While these systems were not designed for biomedical or environmental applications, the concepts and techniques are general and widely applicable.

Pocha, M.D.; Garrett, H.E.; Patel, R.R.; Jones II, L.M.; Larson, M.C.; Emanuel, M.A.; Bond, S.W.; Deri, R.J.; Drayton, R.F.; Peterson, H.E.; Lowry, M.E.

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

RMOTC - Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production RMOTC Pumpjack in action During the process of the sale of NPR-3, RMOTC will focus on maximizing the value of the NPR-3 site and will continue with its Production Optimization Projects. NPR-3 includes 9,481 acres with more than 400 oil-producing wells. Current oil production is at approximately 240 barrels of oil per day. In July 2013, RMOTC began working on a number of Production Optimization Projects within the NPR-3 field, with the goal to optimize and improve flow and efficiency. Production Optimization Projects include repairing and replacing existing infrastructure with new infrastructure in order to optimize current wells and bring additional wells online. These Production Optimization Projects will continue throughout 2013 and are focused on improving current production and creating revenue for the America tax payer.

292

Antihydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

Antihydrogen production in ATHENA is analyzed more carefully. The most important peculiarities of the different experimental situations are discussed. The protonium production via the first matter-antimatter chemical reaction is commented too.

Rizzini, Evandro Lodi; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l'Ingegneria e per i Materiali, Universita di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Tin Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...descending order, Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Bolivia, and Australia. These countries supply more than 85% of total world production....

294

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: 7Be Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Developed at: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF)

295

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SABIC INNOVATIVE PLASTICS FOR WAIVER OF U.S.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SABIC INNOVATIVE PLASTICS FOR WAIVER OF U.S. SABIC INNOVATIVE PLASTICS FOR WAIVER OF U.S. AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN AN IDENTIFIED INVENTION, DOE DOCKET NO . S-109,544 MADE UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE-FC36-03G013000, SUBCONTRACT 60105 WITH GENERAL ELECTRIC. W(l)-08-009; CH- 1453 S-109 ,544 "SYNTHESIS OF POL Y(BUTYLENE-CO-ISOSORBIDE TEREPHTHALA TE) AND ITS PROPERTIES" The Petitioner, SABIC Innovative Plastics IP B.V. ("SABIC"), has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights in the subject invention entitled "SYNTHESIS OF POL Y(BUTYLENE-CO-ISOSORBIDE TEREPHTHALA TE) AND ITS PROPERTIES." The invention relates to copolymers made from biological materials. The invention was made under the above identified subcontract with General Electric Plastics (GE). GE was subsequently purchased by SABIC

296

Stationary temperature profiles and heat flux distribution in a plastic-encapsulated circuit package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal characteristics that are important to structural integrity are analyzed herein for a TTL, plastic-encapsulated package. By assuming that total module heat during operation is engendered at idealized junctions between lead wires and the chip surface, ...

J. A. Paivanas

1972-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

NETL: News Release - NETL-Funded R&D Yields Non-Disruptive Plastic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date: February 20, 2007 NETL-Funded R&D Yields Non-Disruptive Plastic Natural Gas Pipeline Repair Tool New Tool Offers Economic, Safety, and Environmental Benefits in Repairing...

298

In vivo visualization of CaMKII activity in ocular dominance plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alterations in sensory experience can persistently modify the responses of cortical neurons. Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity, a process in which alternation of visual input induces a shift in cortical responsiveness, is ...

Kwok, Show Ming

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Sliding contact at plastically graded surfaces and applications to surface design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tailored gradation in elastic-plastic properties is known to offer avenues for suppressing surface damage during normal indentation and sliding contact. These graded materials have potential applications in diverse areas ...

Prasad, Anamika, 1979-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Improving Energy Efficiency at U.S. Plastics Manufacturing Plants: Summary Report and Case Studies  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Programs BestPractices report based on a comprehensive plant assessment project with ITP's Industrial Assessment Center, The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., and several of its member companies.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Plasticity in W6%Re Revealed by In Situ Laue Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address plasticity in WRe alloys, in-situ Laue micro-compression tests were performed on W-6%Re (w/w) oriented with the compression axis in [238] and...

302

A probe for in situ, remote, detection of defects in buried plastic natural gas pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several techniques are available to determine the integrity of in situ metal pipeline but very little is available in the literature to determine the integrity of plastic pipelines. Since the decade of the 1970s much of the newly installed gas distribution and transmission lines in the United States are fabricated from polyethylene or other plastic. A probe has been developed to determine the in situ integrity of plastic natural gas pipelines that can be installed on a traversing mechanism (pig) to detect abnormalities in the walls of the plastic natural gas pipeline from the interior. This probe has its own internal power source and can be deployed into existing natural gas supply lines. Utilizing the capacitance parameter, the probe inspects the pipe for flaws and records the data internally which can be retrieved later for analysis.

Mathur, M.P.; Spenik, J.L.; Condon, C.M.; Monazam, E.R.; Fincham, W.L.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

303

FRP model (Version 1.0) for estimating styrene emissions from fiber-reinforced plastics fabrication processes (on diskette). Model-simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This software estimates styrene emissions from the manufacture of fiber-reinforced plastics/composite (FRP/C) products. In using the model, the user first chooses the appropriate process: gel coating, resin sprayup, hand layup, etc. Choosing a process will cause the baseline input values for that process to be displayed. Then the new values that apply to the user`s plant are entered. After all the parameters appropriate to the fabrication process have been added, the values for Overall modification factor and Calculated emission (percent AS) will be displayed. Results can be printed or saved.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thin film transistors on plastic substrates with reflective coatings for radiation protection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabrication of silicon thin film transistors (TFT) on low-temperature plastic substrates using a reflective coating so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The TFT can be used in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics such as video cameras, personal digital assistants, and cell phones.

Wolfe, Jesse D. (Fairfield, CA); Theiss, Steven D. (Woodbury, MN); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA); Wickbold, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA)

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

306

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

307

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

308

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual FO - Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual FO - 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual FO - Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

309

Experimental testing and analytical analysis of a plastic panel heat exchanger for greenhouse heating  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a plastic panel-type heat exchanger, suitable for greenhouse heating using low-grade (25 to 60/sup 0/C water) power plant reject heat, was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical analysis showed that a plastic panel heat exchanger would have an overall heat transfer coefficient, U/sub 0/, of about 18 w/m/sup 2/-/sup 0/C compared to about 12 w/m/sup 2/-/sup 0/C for a fin-tube heat exchanger, under typical greenhouse conditions. Furthermore the plastic heat exchanger would require less fan power due to reduced air pressure losses. The experimental data revealed a similar functional relationship for U/sub 0/ and air flow when compared with the theoretical calculations, however the experimental values of U/sub 0/ were consistently larger by 20 to 30%. It was concluded that a properly designed plastic heat exchanger can compete with metal fin tube type exchangers on a performance basis, but the plastic heat exchangers are 3 to 4 times larger by volume. However, because of the lower cost of plastic, a substantial cost reduction is expected. It appears that further study, examining heat exchanger lifetime, performance and costs, is warranted.

Olszewski, M.; Thomas, J.F.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Plastic Straining of Iridium Alloy DOP-26 During Cup Sizing Operations  

SciTech Connect

DOP-26 iridium alloy cups are used for fuel cladding for radioisotope power systems. The cups are deep drawn and recrystallized prior to final fabrication operations. This study characterizes the plastic deformation of cups during a sizing operation following the recrystallization heat treatment. The purpose of the sizing operation is to achieve the specified roundness, diameter, and radius dimensions of the cup. The operation introduces various levels of plastic strain in the cup. Plastic strain can be a cause of inhomogeneous or abnormal grain growth during subsequent exposure to elevated temperature during the service life of the fueled clad. This is particularly true in the case of cups which have irregularities in the cup walls from the deep drawing operations. Diameter and roundness measurements were made on two cups both before and after sizing. Plastic strain levels were calculated using the ABAQUSTM finite element software. The calculated plastic strain levels in both cups were below 0.025, a value shown to be below the critical strain for abnormal grain growth during a simulated service exposure. The calculated maximum plastic strain was found to increase with increased applied sizing load and was not sensitive to the input value for the clearance between the cup and the sizing die. The calculated geometry of the sized cups was in good agreement with the measurements on the finished cups.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL; Ulrich, George B [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Design and analysis of a recycled plastic noise barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report documents a study of the feasibility of using soundwalls constructed of recycled plastics in place of conventional building materials. Important considerations in selecting materials used in this study include: environmental impact, acoustics, aesthetics, performance, safety, and cost. Various recycled materials were solicited from commercial manufacturers and subjected to a number of laboratory and field tests. These tests include three-point bending tests, impact hammer excitations, exposure to different types of weather, and experimentation with a variety of connections. Based on those results, several of the most promising materials were selected for construction of a full-scale installation of a test section of a soundwall at the Riverside Campus of Texas A&M University. This field section was monitored for a period of one year for response to environmental factors such as wind and exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Analysis of the field structure includes system identification of dynamic characteristics, finite element simulation, and acoustic performance. Acoustic results show that noise insertion loss of the prototype soundwall is exceptional. As for structural integrity, the prototype soundwall performed adequately over the course of the project with only a few members showing detrimental effects from the harsh thermal environment. System identification and experimental analysis of test data were successfully implemented and indicate that the soundwall is moderately wind sensitive. A finite element model of the soundwall was developed to simulate both static and dynamic response to loads. Using methods of modal superposition and random response, deflection was predicted for the top of the wall due to application of a strong wind event.

Esche, Steven Todd

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have modified a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) hydrothermal pretreatment pilot plant for batch operation and blowdown of the treated batch to low pressure. We have also assembled a slurry shearing pilot plant for particle size reduction. Waste paper and a mixture of waste paper/polyethylene plastic have been run in the pilot plant with a treatment temperature of 275{degrees}C. The pilot-plant products have been used for laboratory studies at LLNL. The hydrothermal/shearing pilot plants have produced acceptable slurries for gasification tests from a waste paper feedstock. Work is currently underway with combined paper/plastic feedstocks. When the assembly of the Research Gasification Unit at Texaco (feed capacity approximately 3/4-ton/day) is complete (4th quarter of FY96), gasification test runs will commence. Laboratory work on slurry samples during FY96 has provided correlations between slurry viscosity and hydrothermal treatment temperature, degree of shearing, and the presence of surfactants and admixed plastics. To date, pumpable slurries obtained from an MSW surrogate mixture of treated paper and plastic have shown heating values in the range 13-15 MJ/kg. Our process modeling has quantified the relationship between slurry heating value and hydrogen yield. LLNL has also performed a preliminary cost analysis of the process with the slurry heating value and the MSW tipping fee as parameters. This analysis has shown that the overall process with a 15 MJ/kg slurry gasifier feed can compete with coal-derived hydrogen with the assumption that the tipping fee is of the order $50/ton.

Wallman, P.H.; Richardson, J.H.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Packaging materials biodegradation. January 1973-February 1990 (A Bibliography from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1973-February 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the biodegradation of packaging materials. Plastic films, cellophane, and biodegradable plastic bottles are emphasized. European, state, and local laws and regulations prohibiting the use of plastics that are not degradable are discussed. A starch-based plastic additive that promotes plastic biodegradation is briefly examined. (This updated bibliography contains 176 citations, 26 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Packaging materials biodegradation. January 1973-October 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1973-October 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the biodegradation of packaging materials. Plastic films, cellophane, and biodegradable plastic bottles are emphasized. European, state, and local laws and regulations prohibiting the use of plastics that are not degradable are discussed. A starch-based plastic additive that promotes plastic biodegradation is briefly examined. (This updated bibliography contains 150 citations, 28 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Packaging-materials biodegradation. January 1973-April 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1973-April 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the biodegradation of packaging materials. Plastic films, cellophane, and biodegradable plastic bottles are emphasized. European, state, and local laws and regulations prohibiting the use of plastics that are not degradable are discussed. A starch-based plastic additive that promotes plastic biodegradation is briefly studied. (This updated bibliography contains 117 citations, 34 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Topic: Productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... General Information: 301-975-5020 mfg@nist ... competitive in the global market, companies need to ... become more efficient in energy, production and ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

317

Silicon Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... An Investigation into the Electrochemical Production of Si by the FFC Cambridge Process: Emre Ergl1; ?shak Karakaya2; Metehan Erdo?an2;...

318

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

319

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

320

Plastic Limit Analysis of Offshore Foundation and Anchor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents the applications of plastic limit analysis to offshore foundations and anchors, including the drag embedment anchors (DEAs) for mobile offshore drilling units (MODUs) and spudcan foundations for jack-up platforms. In deep waters, drag embedment anchors are an attractive option for mooring of semisubmersible platforms due to low installation cost and high holding capacity; on the other hand, jack-up platforms are more stable than semisubmersible platforms but only can be placed in shallow waters. The analyses of anchor capacities are developed for an idealized anchor comprising a rectangular fluke, a cylindrical shank, and a metal chain connected to the shank at the padeye. The anchor trajectory prediction during drag embedment is also developed by considering anchor behavior in conjunction with the mechanics of the anchor line. The results of simulations show that anchors approach at equilibrium condition rapidly during the embedment and both the normalized holding capacity and the anchor line uplift angle remain constants in this stage. Besides the geometry of the fluke, the properties of the shank and soil are also crucial factors in the anchor-soil interaction behavior. Partial failure of mooring systems for floating structures will subject drag anchors to loads having an appreciable component outside of the intended plane of loading. Partial failure of mooring systems during hurricanes in recent years have generated an interest in understanding drag anchor performance under these conditions. The analysis presents the simulations of three dimensional trajectories of an anchor system subjected to an out-of-plane load component. For the conditions simulated in the example analyses, the anchor experienced a modest amount of continued embedment following partial failure of the mooring system; however, the ultimate embedment and capacity of the anchor is much less than what would have developed if the anchor had continued in its original trajectory within the plane of intended loading. The analyses of the spudcan foundation of jack-up units include preloading, bearing capacity, and the displacement assessment. When the contribution of the soil moment resistance is considered, a three-stage assessment procedure is recommended: superposing environmental forces on the plot of yield surface, determining the value of yield function corresponding to the external forces, and computing the factor of safety of the spudcan. The results of the assessment may be ambiguous while the different yield functions are employed to analyze the spudcan in soft clay.

Chi, Chao-Ming

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

322

EI Summary of All Manufacturing SIC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) The manufacturing sector includes establishments engaged in the mechanical or chemical transformation of materials or substances into new products. These operations are generally conducted in facilities described as plants, factories, or mills, while characteristically using power-driven machines and material-handling equipment. Manufacturing also includes such activities as the assembly of components of manufactured products and the blending of materials, such as lubricating oil, plastics, resins, or liquors.

323

Comparison of Lithium Gadolinium Borate Crystal Shards in Scintillating and Nonscintillating Plastic Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method for detecting neutrons using scintillating lithium gadolinium borate crystal shards in a plastic matrix while maintaining high gamma rejection. We have procured two cylindrical detectors, 5"\\times5", containing 1% crystal by mass. Crystal shards have a typical dimension of 1 mm. One detector was made with scintillating plastic, and one with nonscintillating plastic. Pulse shape analysis was used to reject gamma ray backgrounds. The scintillating detector was measured to have an intrinsic fast fission neutron efficiency of 0.4% and a gamma sensitivity of less than 2.3 \\times 10-9, while the nonscintillating detector had a neutron efficiency of 0.7% and gamma sensitivity of (4.75\\pm3.94)\\times10-9. We determine that increasing the neutron detection efficiency by a factor of 2 will make the detector competitive with moderated 3He tubes, and we discuss several simple and straightforward methods for obtaining or surpassing such an improvement. We end with a discussion of possible applications, both for the scintillating-plastic and nonscintillating-plastic detectors.

Kareem Kazkaz; Nathaniel S. Bowden; Marisa Pedretti

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

Flowing with the Tide:Epiphytic Host-Specificity and Phenotypic Plasticity of the Brown Alga Padina boryana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLASTICITY OF THE BROWN ALGA PADINA BORYANA SIERRA M. FLYNN94720 USA Abstract. Epiphytic algae form complex communitiesmacroalgae hosts. The brown alga Padina boryana acts as a

Flynn, Sierra Michelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geek-Up[10.15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from 15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from Bacteria and Wireless Water Heaters Geek-Up[10.15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from Bacteria and Wireless Water Heaters October 15, 2010 - 5:56pm Addthis Nanoparticles grown under the irradiation of high-energy X-rays | Source: Argonne National Lab and Carnegie Institution of Washington Nanoparticles grown under the irradiation of high-energy X-rays | Source: Argonne National Lab and Carnegie Institution of Washington Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Watching nanoparticles in real time can help improve the performance of their application as solar cells, chemical and biological sensors and diagnostic imaging. Scientists are using bacteria with free wastewater to develop

326

Elastic-plastic analysis of the toroidal field coil inner leg of the compact ignition tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Elastic-plastic analyses were made for the inner leg of the Compact Ignition Tokamak toroidal field (TF) coil, which is made of copper-Inconel composite material. From the result of the elastic-plastic analysis, the effective Young's moduli of the inner leg were determined by the analytical equations. These Young's moduli are useful for the three-dimensional, elastic, overall TF coil analysis. Comparison among the results of the baseline design (R = 1.324 m), the bucked pressless design, the 1.527-m major radius design, and the 1.6-m major radius design was also made, based on the elastic-plastic TF coil inner leg analyses.

Horie, T.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Large area ceramic thin films on plastics: A versatile route via solution processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new general route for large area, submicron thick ceramic thin films (crystalline metal oxide thin films) on plastic substrates is presented, where the crystallization of films is guaranteed by a firing process. Gel films are deposited on silicon substrates with a release layer and fired to be ceramic films, followed by transferring onto plastic substrates using adhesives. The ceramic films thus fabricated on plastics exhibit a certain degree of flexibility, implying the possibility of the technique to be applied to high-throughput roll-to-roll processes. Using this technique, we successfully realized transparent anatase thin films that provide high optical reflectance and transparent indium tin oxide thin films that exhibit electrical conductivity on polycarbonate and acrylic resin substrates, respectively. Crystallographically oriented zinc oxide films and patterned zinc oxide films are also demonstrated to be realized on acrylic resin substrates.

Kozuka, H.; Yamano, A.; Uchiyama, H.; Takahashi, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, 564-8680 (Japan); Fukui, T.; Yoki, M.; Akase, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, 564-8680 (Japan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Coupled elastic-plastic thermomechanically assisted diffusion: Theory development, numerical implementation, and application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully coupled thermomechanical diffusion theory describing the thermal and mechanically assisted mass transport of dilute mobile constituents in an elastic solid is extended to include the effects of elastic-plastic deformation. Using the principles of modern continuum mechanics and classical plasticity theory, balance laws and constitutive equations are derived for a continuum composed of an immobile, but deformable, parent material and a dilute mobile constituent. The resulting equations are cast into a finite element formulation for incorporation into a finite element code. This code serves as a tool for modeling thermomechanically assisted phenomena in elastic-plastic solids. A number of simplified problems for which analytical solutions can be derived are used to benchmark the theory and finite element code. Potential uses of the numerical implementation of the theory are demonstrated using two problems. Specifically, tritium diffusion in a titanium alloy and hydrogen diffusion in a multiphase stainless steel are examined.

Weinacht, D.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Geek-Up[10.15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geek-Up[10.15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from Geek-Up[10.15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from Bacteria and Wireless Water Heaters Geek-Up[10.15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from Bacteria and Wireless Water Heaters October 15, 2010 - 5:56pm Addthis Nanoparticles grown under the irradiation of high-energy X-rays | Source: Argonne National Lab and Carnegie Institution of Washington Nanoparticles grown under the irradiation of high-energy X-rays | Source: Argonne National Lab and Carnegie Institution of Washington Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Watching nanoparticles in real time can help improve the performance of their application as solar cells, chemical and biological sensors and diagnostic imaging.

330

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

331

Method for measuring residual stresses in materials by plastically deforming the material and interference pattern comparison  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring residual stress in a material comprising the steps of establishing a speckle pattern on the surface with a first laser then heating a portion of that pattern with an infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress dung heating and enables calculation of the stress.

Pechersky, Martin J. (241 Chardonnat La., Aiken, SC 29803)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Length-scale dependent aging and plasticity of a colloidal polycrystal under cyclic shear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate plasticity in a colloidal polycrystal by using confocal microscopy and time-resolved light scattering, following the evolution of the network of grain boundaries as the sample is submitted to a large number of shear deformation cycles. The dynamics associated with plasticity are found to be ballistic and to slow down until a steady state is reached after a large number of shear cycles. Surprisingly, the cross-over time between the initial aging regime and the steady state decreases with increasing probed length scale, hinting at a hierarchical organization of the grain boundary dynamics.

Elisa Tamborini; Luca Cipelletti; Laurence Ramos

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

Simulation Study on the Characteristics of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastics in Electromagnetic Tomography Nondestructive Evaluation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) using the finite element method in electromagnetic tomography nondestructive evaluation systems are presented in this paper. Ansoft Maxwell 3D models describing the interaction of the sensors with ... Keywords: Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP), finite element, electromagnetic tomography (EMT), nondestructive evaluation (NDE), sensitivity matrix

Ze Liu; Yu Xu; Xiaofei Zhang; Yali Pei; Yiping Cheng; Wuliang Yin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Moraine Molded Plastics, Inc.: Industrial Energy Assessment Finds Opportunities to Save $24,000 in Annual Operating Costs  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at the Moraine Molded Plastics by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

List of Manufacturing Groups Displayed in the 1998 Manufacturing Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21 manufacturing subsectors (3-digit NAICS codes); 21 manufacturing subsectors (3-digit NAICS codes); 311 Food 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 313 Textile Mills 314 Textile Product Mills 315 Apparel 316 Leather and Allied Products 321 Wood Products 322 Paper 323 Printing and Related Support 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 325 Chemicals 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 331 Primary Metals 332 Fabricated Metal Products 333 Machinery 334 Computer and Electronic Products 335 Electrical Equip., Appliances, and Components 336 Transportation Equipment 337 Furniture and Related Products 339 Miscellaneous 6 industry groups (4-digit NAICS codes); 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 3219 Other Wood Products 3272 Glass and Glass Products 3312 Steel Products from Purchased Steel 3313 Alumina and Aluminum

336

X-ray Diffraction Studies of Forward and Reverse Plastic Flow in Nanoscale Layers during Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biaxial stress-strain response of layers within Cu/Ni nanolaminates is determined from in-plane x-ray diffraction spectra during heating/cooling. Thinner (11 nm) Cu and Ni layers with coherent, cube-on-cube interfaces reach ~1.8 GPa (Cu) and ~2.9 GPa (Ni) without yielding. Thicker (21 nm) layers with semi-coherent interfaces exhibit unusual plastic phenomena, including extraordinary plastic work hardening rates, and forward vs. reverse plastic flow with small (~10%) changes in stress, and evidence that threshold plastic stress in Ni layers is altered by preceding plastic flow in Cu layers. Line energy, pinning strength, net interfacial dislocation density and hardness are provided.

Gram, Michael D [Ohio State University, Columbus; Carpenter, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Anderson, Peter M [Ohio State University, Columbus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Presentation to the Plastics Developers Association North America Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in in Dow Chemical 26 May 2010, Beijing Ningke Peng About Dow A diversified chemical company, harnessing the power of science and technology to improve living daily  founded in Midland, Michigan in 1897  annual sales of $58 billion  52,000 employees  3,900+ in China and growing daily  supplies more than 5,000 products  serve customers in 160 countries  a company committed to sustainability  24 sites and offices in China Dow's Energy Use Dow is among the largest Industrial Energy Consumers  Annual Energy Consumption Globally ≈ 600 Trillion Btu's (22 million tons of coal equivalent)  The Cost of Energy in 2009 Approached US $2.5 Billion Globally (~17 billion RMB)

338

PRODUCTION OF SHEET FROM PARTICULATE MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for forming coherent sheet material from particulate material such as granular or powdered metal, granular or powdered oxide, slurries, pastes, and plastic mixes which cohere under pressure. The primary object is to avoid the use of expensive and/ or short lived pressing tools, that is, dies and specially profiled rolls, and so to reduce the cost of the product and to prcvide in a simple manner for the making of the product in a variety of shapes or sizes. The sheet material is formed when the particulate material is laterally confined in a boundary material deformable in all lateral directions under axial pressure and then axially compressing the layer of particulate material together with the boundary material.

Blainey, A.

1959-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Pyrolytic conversion of plastic and rubber waste to hydrocarbons with basic salt catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a process for improving the pyrolytic conversion of waste selected from rubber and plastic to low molecular weight olefinic materials by employing basis salt catalysts in the waste mixture. The salts comprise alkali or alkaline earth compounds, particularly sodium carbonate, in an amount of greater than about 1 weight percent based on the waste feed.

Wingfield, Jr., Robert C. (Southfield, MI); Braslaw, Jacob (Southfield, MI); Gealer, Roy L. (West Bloomfield, MI)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Large Plastic Deformation in High-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries Caused by Charge and Discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Plastic Deformation in High-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries Caused by Charge and Discharge, Massachusetts 02138 Evidence has accumulated recently that a high-capacity elec- trode of a lithium-ion battery in the particle is high, possibly leading to fracture and cavitation. I. Introduction LITHIUM-ION batteries

Suo, Zhigang

342

The Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials with Coatings (IN-07-070)  

Argonne has developed an autogenic pyrolysis process to convert plastic waste into high-value carbon nanotubes (50?100 nm outside diameter) and perfectly round carbon spheres (2-12 ?m outside diameter). The tubes can be used as anode material in ...

343

Role of Sustained Excitability of the Leg Motor Cortex After Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Associative Plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Role of Sustained Excitability of the Leg Motor Cortex After Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the leg motor cortex after transcranial magnetic stimulation in asso- ciative plasticity. J Neurophysiol magnetic stimulation (TMS) produces specific changes to the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in lower leg

Gorassini, Monica

344

Experimental investigation of plastic finned-tube heat exchangers, with emphasis on material thermal conductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, two modified types of polypropylene (PP) with high thermal conductivity up to 2.3 W/m K and 16.5 W/m K are used to manufacture the finned-tube heat exchangers, which are prospected to be used in liquid desiccant air conditioning, heat recovery, water source heat pump, sea water desalination, etc. A third plastic heat exchanger is also manufactured with ordinary PP for validation and comparison. Experiments are carried out to determine the thermal performance of the plastic heat exchangers. It is found that the plastic finned-tube heat exchanger with thermal conductivity of 16.5 W/m K can achieve overall heat transfer coefficient of 34 W/m{sup 2} K. The experimental results are compared with calculation and they agree well with each other. Finally, the effect of material thermal conductivity on heat exchanger thermal performance is studied in detail. The results show that there is a threshold value of material thermal conductivity. Below this value improving thermal conductivity can considerably improve the heat exchanger performance while over this value improving thermal conductivity contributes very little to performance enhancement. For the finned-tube heat exchanger designed in this paper, when the plastic thermal conductivity can reach over 15 W/m K, it can achieve more than 95% of the titanium heat exchanger performance and 84% of the aluminum or copper heat exchanger performance with the same dimension. (author)

Chen, Lin; Li, Zhen; Guo, Zeng-Yuan [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that previously contained chemicals (hazardous or non-hazardous) are collected by CWS for recycling. Bottles should be dry and empty without chemical residue. Rinse and collect rinsate in chemical

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

346

Development of plastic heat exchangers for ocean thermal energy conversion. Final report, August 1976--December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials and processes have been selected and design information obtained for plastic ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) heat exchangers as the result of a program comprising five types of laboratory experiments. Tests to evaluate the chemical resistance of seven commercially available thermoplastics to sea water and several possible working fluids were conducted with emphasis placed on compatibility with ammonia. Environmental rupture tests involving exposure of stressed specimens to sea water or liquid ammonia indicated that the high density polyethylene (HDPE) is the best suited candidate and produced an extrapolated 100,000 hour failure stress of 1060 psi for HDPE. Long term durability tests of extruded HDPE plate-tube panel confirmed that plastic heat transfer surface is mechanically reliable in an OTEC environment. Thermal conductivity measurements of acetylene black filled HDPE indicated that conductivity may be increased by 50% with a 35% by weight filler loading. The permeability coefficient measured for liquid ammonia through HDPE was higher than previous estimates. Test showed that the rate can be significantly reduced by sulfonation of HDPE. A review of biofouling mechanisms revealed that the permeable nature of the plastic heat exchanger surface may be used to control primary biofouling form formation by allowing incorporation of non-toxic organic repellents into the plastic. A preliminary design and fabrication development program suggests that construction of an ammonia condenser test unit is feasible using currently available materials and manufacturing techniques.

Hart, G.K.; Lee, C.O.; Latour, S.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Carbon Fiber Production from a Kraft Hardwood Lignin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin is a renewable resource material that is being evaluated for the low cost production of carbon fiber for automotive and other applications. Solvent extraction of a commercial hardwood lignin product yielded a purified lignin free of the contaminants typical of lignins derived from the Kraft chemical pulping of wood. The purified lignin was highly melt-spinnable into fibers, from which carbon fiber was subsequently produced. The lignin has been evaluated in terms of its rheological properties, fiber melt spinning ability, and potential for manufacture of low cost carbon fiber without the need for plasticizing agents or chemical modifications.

Baker, Darren A [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

349

Product Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1 Wrought alloy products and tempers...or cold-finished Rivets Forgings and forging stock Foil Fin stock Drawn Extruded Rod Bar Wire 1050 . . . . . . . . . H112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1060 O, H12, H14, H16, H18 O, H12, H14, H112 O, H12, H14, H18, H113 O, H112 . . . .

350

The ElasticViscousPlastic Sea Ice Dynamics Model in General Orthogonal Curvilinear Coordinates on a SphereIncorporation of Metric Terms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new discretization for the elasticviscousplastic (EVP) sea ice dynamics model incorporates metric terms to account for grid curvature effects in curvilinear coordinate systems. A fundamental property of the viscousplastic ice rheology that ...

Elizabeth C. Hunke; John K. Dukowicz

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Information Administration.. Office of Energy MarketsEnergy Information Administration. Office of Energy MarketsEnergy Information Administration. Office of Energy Markets

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

H2A Delivery: Miscellaneous Cost and H2 Losses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Reviewed primarily to ensure that proper annual maintenance and repair costs for compressor - New value allowed longer compressor lifetime Forecourt Item New Old Notes...

353

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

354

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Available; W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas New Field Discoveries...

355

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1996). 4. National appliance energy consumption is thethe sum of the national appliance energy consumption for all

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

EvoNILM: evolutionary appliance detection for miscellaneous household appliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the energy awareness of consumers, it is necessary to provide them with information about their energy demand, not just on the household level. Non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM) gives the consumer the opportunity to disaggregate their consumed ... Keywords: evolutionary algorithm, load disaggregation, non-intrusive load monitoring

Dominik Egarter; Wilfried Elmenreich

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Miscellaneous Paper A-97-3 us Army Corps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Aquatic weeds - Control -- Handbooks, manuals, etc. 3. Plant regulators - Research - Texas. I. Getsinger design of Ponds 43, 44, and 45; (b) reconstruction of levees and pond bottoms; (c) underground piping

US Army Corps of Engineers

358

Miscellaneous Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 58 134 121 75 2007-2011 Adjustments 23 0 49 2009-2011 Revision Increases 4 17 19 2009-2011 Revision Decreases 22 77 27 2009-2011 Sales 0 11 89 2009-2011 Acquisitions 0 0 0...

359

,"Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shale Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

360

Detailed Energy Data Collection for Miscellaneous and Electronic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and varied usage patterns. Few studies have collected field data on the long-term energy use of MELs, due to the difficulty and expense of traditional power meters. Recent...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

138 239 270 349 350 379 1977-2011 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation 139 241 272 349 363 393 1979-2011 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 120 226 263 271...

362

Miscellaneous Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 35 42 2009-2011 Adjustments -1 13 2 2009-2011 Revision Increases 5 3 3 2009-2011 Revision Decreases 2 1 2 2009-2011 Sales 0 9 0 2009-2011 Acquisitions 0 5 0 2009-2011 Extensions...

363

Miscellaneous Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3+ or Netscape Navigator 3+ Make sure that JavaScript is enabled in your browser Shale Gas (Billion Cubic Feet) Area: U.S. Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California...

364

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency of fans for fuel-fired furnaces, and replacing halogen torchieres with more efficient CFL

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for clotheswasher and dishwasher motors, color televisions,Recorder Ceiling Fan Dishwasher Motor Clotheswasher Motor

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

U. S. Navy shipboard-generated plastic-waste pilot-recycling program. Research and development report, Apr 90-Jan 91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From April 1990 through January 1991, the feasibility of recycling Navy shipboard-generated plastic wastes was explored. Normally, plastic wastes are source separated aboard Navy ships and retained for shoreside disposal in accordance with new fleet requirements implementing MARPOL Annex V that prohibits the discharge of plastics at sea. Over 23,000 pounds of shipboard plastic wastes from USS Lexington (AVT 16) and ships from the Norfolk Naval Base were recycled into park benches, picnic tables and carstops that have been distributed back to the Navy bases for use. Navy shipboard plastics must undergo sorting prior to recycling because Navy plastic waste contains large quantities of composite plastic items (e.g., plastic/paper) that are not easily recyclable. Recycling food-contaminated plastics is not practical due to sanitation problems encountered during handling. However, certain items have good resale value if separated by resin type and color (e.g., sonobuoy casings, hard plastic containers, packaging films). Education, feedback, and command support for shipboard recycling programs are required to ensure maximum participation and to minimize contamination with non-plastic items. Specially marked plastics only containers increase convenience and effectiveness of the recycling program.

Middleton, L.B.; Huntley, J.Y.; Burgiel, J.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Production Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Figure 1 shows the sequence of shapes in the production of a hollow handle for a table knife formed and coined in a 410 kg (900 lb) pneumatic drop hammer. The work metal was 0.81 mm (0.032 in.) thick copper alloy C75700 (nickel silver, 65??12) annealed to a hardness of 35 to 45 HRB; blank size was 25 by...

368

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement tracer tests. Topical report, December 20, 1995--December 20, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ERC is developing the detailed design of the commercial entry MW-class power plant. The product requirements and specifications have been derived. The planned baseline power plant is rated at 2.85 MW on natural gas and has a heat rate of 6.22 {times} 10{sup 6} J/kWh (5900 Btu/kWh; 58% LHV). Additional optional features will be available to include non-standard site conditions and other fuels. In parallel, the baseline product design has progressed to the final design phase. The preliminary product design, which also included parametric optimization, major component vendor interaction, and cost estimation, has been completed during the past year. The power plant approach consists of several factory-constructed truck-transportable modules. A computer-generated power plant layout is shown in a figure. The proposed power plant is expected to have a gross output of 3.03 MW, providing net 2.85 MW AC. The parasitic power loss is approximately 6%, of which, inverter, step-up transformer, BOP motors, and miscellaneous loads consume 2%, 1%, 2%, and 1%, respectively.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2011 Hiroshi Sakuragi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Large amounts of fossil fuels are consumed every day in spite of increasing environmental problems. To preserve the environment and construct a sustainable society, the use of biofuels derived from different kinds of biomass is being practiced worldwide. Although bioethanol has been largely produced, it commonly requires food crops such as corn and sugar cane as substrates. To develop a sustainable energy supply, cellulosic biomass should be used for bioethanol production instead of grain biomass. For this purpose, cell surface engineering technology is a very promising method. In biobutanol and biodiesel production, engineered host fermentation has attracted much attention; however, this method has many limitations such as low productivity and low solvent tolerance of microorganisms. Despite these problems, biofuels such as bioethanol, biobutanol, and biodiesel are potential energy sources that can help establish a sustainable society. 1.

Hiroshi Sakuragi; Kouichi Kuroda; Mitsuyoshi Ueda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief primer on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat, and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. References for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper.

Singh, S.P.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. Because the subject is vast and the space is limited, references for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper. 24 references.

Singh, S.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Sugar Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar Production Sugar Production Name: Lauren Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: This is the experiment I did: our class took 6 sugars, placed them in test tubes and put three drops of yeast in each test tube. we then placed them in the incubator for one day and the next day looked at our results. the purpose was to find out with sugar would produce the most carbon dioxide. two of the sugars that we tested were LACTOSE and STARCH. my question is, why are lactose and starch the only sugars who didn't produce any, or very very little, carbon dioxide? and how is this process related to glycolysis? Replies: Bacteria and yeast are very efficient with their enzyme systems. They don't make enzymes they can't use. Yeast don't have the enzymes necessary to metabolize lactose. Starch is a complex sugar and yeast needs certain enzymes to break starch down into sugar. Every chemical reaction needs its own enzyme.

373

PLASTIC BEHAVIOR OF POLYCRYSTALLINE TANTALUM IN THE 5 x 10^7/s REGIME  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this experiment is to investigate the plastic response of Tantalum to dynamic loading at high strain rates. The samples used were derived from high purity rolled plate, polished down to thicknesses in the range 25-100 {micro}m. Dynamic loading was applied by direct laser ablation of the sample, with pulses up to 10 ns long, at the Jupiter Laser Facility. The elastic-plastic wave structure was measured using two line VISAR systems of different sensitivity, and strain rates were inferred from the rise time of the waves. The elastic wave amplitudes indicated flow stresses between 2 and 3 GPa, depending on the sample thickness. Samples were recovered for post-shot metallographic analysis.

Hammel, B D; Swift, D C; El-Dasher, B S; Kumar, M; Collins, G W; Florando, J

2011-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

Elastic and plastic strains and the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of elastic (stress) and plastic (cold work) strains on the stress corrosion cracking of a transformable austenitic stainless steel was studied in several aqueous chloride environments. Initial polarization behavior was active for all deformation conditions as well as for the annealed state. Visual observation, potential-time, and current-time curves indicated the development of a pseudo-passive (flawed) film leading to localized corrosion, occluded cells and SCC. SCC did not initiate during active corrosion regardless of the state of strain unless severe low temperature deformation produced a high percentage of martensite. Both elastic and plastic deformation increased the sensitivity to SCC when examined on the basis of percent yield strength. The corrosion potential, the critical cracking potential, and the potential at which the current changes from anodic to cathodic were essentially unaffected by deformation. It is apparent that the basic electrochemical parameters are independent of the bulk properties of the alloy and totally controlled by surface phenomena.

Vaccaro, F.P.; Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Stability of A-150 plastic ionization chamber response over a ~30 year period  

SciTech Connect

At the NIU Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab, the clinical tissue-equivalent ionization chamber response is measured every treatment day using a cesium source that was configured to match readings obtained at the National Bureau of Standards. Daily measurements are performed in air using the air-to-tissue dose conversion factors given in AAPM Report no. 7. The measured exposure calibration factors have been tabulated and graphed as a function of time from 1978 to present. For A-150 plastic ionization chambers, these factors exhibit a sinusoidal variation with a period of approximately one year and amplitude of {+-} 1%. This variation, attributable to the hygroscopic nature of A-150 plastic, is correlated with the relative humidity of the facility, and is greater than the humidity corrections for gas described in the literature. Our data suggest that chamber calibration should be performed at least weekly to accommodate these variations.

Kroc, Thomas K.; Lennox, Arlene J.; /Fermilab

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Degradation of degradable starch-polyethylene plastics in a compost environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradable plastics have differing degradation rates. Three types of degradation of polyethylene in the starch-polyethylene polymers can occur: chemical degradation, photodegradation, and biological degradation. This study examines all three types of degradation in 11 commercially produced degradable starch-polyethylene bags. Different rates for chemical and photo-degradation were found within a 20 day or an 8-week period. Results indicated that both the 70[degree]C oven and HT-HH film treatments were appropriate methods to evaluate oxidative degradation. In a compost environment, oxygen tension on the surface of the film appears to be the rate-limiting component for both chemical and biological degradation. Levels of starch in all bags was similar, so the prooxidant additive was critical in promoting the oxidative degradation of polyethylene. The Fe-Mn additive displayed the best catalytic activity. This study overall confirms degradation of starch-polyethylene plastics in a natural environment. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Johnson, K.E.; Pometto, A.L. III; Nikolov, Z.L. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Clinical prototype of a plastic water-equivalent scintillating fiber dosimeter array for QA applications  

SciTech Connect

A clinical prototype of a scintillating fiber dosimeter array for quality assurance applications is presented. The array consists of a linear array of 29 plastic scintillation detectors embedded in a water-equivalent plastic sheet coupled to optical fibers used to guide optical photons to a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The CCD is packaged in a light-tight, radiation-shielded housing designed for convenient transport. A custom designed connector is used to ensure reproducible mechanical positioning of the optical fibers relative to the CCD. Profile and depth dose characterization measurements are presented and show that the prototype provides excellent dose measurement reproducibility ({+-}0.8%) in-field and good accuracy ({+-}1.6% maximum deviation) relative to the dose measured with an IC10 ionization chamber.

Lacroix, Frederic; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Guillot, Mathieu; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Design and development of a laminated glass-plastic Fresnel lens for point focus photovoltaic systems  

SciTech Connect

The design and development of a laminated glass-plastic Fresnel lens for point focus photovoltaic systems use is described. The objective of this development was to examine the feasibility of producing lenses with a cost effectiveness superior to that of lenses made by casting of acrylic. The procedure used in executing this development, the method used in cost effectiveness evaluation, results obtained and recommendations for further work are presented.

Matalon, L. A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production a by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 430 468 552 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 98 120 131 313 Textile Mills 57 50 44 314 Textile Product Mills 31 34 36 315 Apparel Manufacturing 66 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 7 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 87 94 110 322 Paper Manufacturing 159 160 177 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 104 109 107 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 134 215 523 325 Chemical Manufacturing 415 470 657 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 158 183 212 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 85 97 134

380

Effect of Accumulative Roll Bonding on Plastic Flow Properties of Commercially Pure Zirconium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulative roll bonding (ARB) has been considered as one of the promising techniques for fabrication of ultra-fine grained (UFG) metallic materials. The ARB process consists of several cycles of cutting, stacking, and rolling of metal sheets, so very high strains can be induced in the material resulting in significant grain refinement and in the formation of UFG microstructures. The ARB technique has been applied to a wide range of metallic materials such as Al and Al alloys, Mg, Fe and steels, Zr, Cu, as well as composite materials. UFG metallic materials processed via ARB show increased strength. Despite a significant body of experimental research into the deformation behaviour of the ARB-processed materials, the fundamentals of their plastic deformation are not fully understood yet. This work focuses on the effect of grain refinement via ARB-processing on the mechanical behavior and on the strain-rate sensitivity of commercially pure Zr (99.8% purity). The mechanical properties of the as-received coarse-grained (CG) and UFG (as-ARB processed) samples were studied at room temperature at two different strain rates. Mechanical strain rate jump tests were performed during tensile deformation to estimate the instantaneous strain-rate sensitivity. The evolution of surface relief during plastic deformation of pure Zr in both CG and UFG conditions was studied. The features of plastic deformation of pure Zr in both CG and UFG conditions are discussed.

Sabirov, I.; Molina-Aldareguia, J. M.; Perez-Prado, M. T. [Instituto Madrileno de Estudios Avanzados de Materiales-IMDEA Materials Institute, Madrid (Spain); Jiang, L.; Kassner, M. E. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, CA (United States)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Plastic packaging and burn-in effects on ionizing dose response in CMOS microcircuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are reported from an investigation of the effects of packaging and burn-in on the post-irradiation performance of National Semiconductor 54AC02 Quad 2-input NOR gates. The test population was drawn from a single wafer fabricated in the National process qualified under Mil-Prf-38535 to an ionizing radiation hardness of 100 krads(Si). The test sample was divided between plastic and ceramic packages. Additionally, half of the plastic samples and half of the two ceramic samples received a 168 hour/125 C burn-in. Two irradiation schemes were used. The first followed Mil-Std-883 Method 1019.4 (dose rate = 50 rads(Si)/s). The second used a low dose rate (0.1 rads(Si)/s). AC, DC, transfer function and functional behavior were monitored throughout the tests. Significant differences among the package types and burn-in variations were noted with the plastic, burned-in components demonstrating enhanced degradation. They show the worst post-irradiation parameter values as well as very broad post-irradiation parameter distributions. Degradation is highly dependent upon dose rate and anneal conditions. Two different radiation induced leakage paths have been identified, and their characteristics have been correlated to variations in high dose rate and low dose rate circuit performance. Caution is recommended for system developers to ensure that radiation hardness characterization is performed for the same package/burn-in configuration to be used in the system.

Clark, S.D.; Bings, J.P. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, IN (United States). Crane Div.; Maher, M.C.; Williams, M.K.; Alexander, D.R.; Pease, R.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Method for the separation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is provided for separating acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) plastics from each other. The ABS and HIPS plastics are shredded to provide a selected particle size. The shredded particles of the ABS and HIPS plastics are applied to a solution having a solution density in a predefined range between 1.055 gm/cm.sup.3 and 1.07 gm/cm.sup.3, a predefined surface tension in a range between 22 dynes/cm to 40 dynes/cm and a pH in the range of 1.77 and 2.05. In accordance with a feature of the invention, the novel method is provided for separating ABS and HIPS, two solid thermoplastics which have similar densities by selectively modifying the effective density of the HIPS using a binary solution with the appropriate properties, such as pH, density and surface tension, such as a solution of acetic acid and water or a quaternary solution having the appropriate density, surface tension, and pH.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Arman, Bayram (Amherst, NY); Karvelas, Dimitrios E. (Downers Grove, IL); Pomykala, Jr., Joseph A. (Crest Hill, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Light scattering apparatus and method for determining radiation exposure to plastic detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system and method of analyzing cumulative radiation exposure registered as pits on track etch foils of radiation dosimeters. The light scattering apparatus and method of the present invention increases the speed of analysis while it also provides the ability to analyze exposure levels beyond that which may be properly measured with conventional techniques. Dosimeters often contain small plastic sheets that register accumulated damage when exposed to a radiation source. When the plastic sheet from the dosimeter is chemically etched, a track etch foil is produced wherein pits or holes are created in the plastic. The number of these pits, or holes, per unit of area (pit density) correspond to the amount of cumulative radiation exposure which is being optically measured by the apparatus. To measure the cumulative radiation exposure of a track etch foil a high intensity collimated beam is passed through foil such that the pits and holes within the track etch foil cause a portion of the impinging light beam to become scattered upon exit. The scattered light is focused with a lens, while the primary collimated light beam (unscattered light) is blocked. The scattered light is focused by the lens onto an optical detector capable of registering the optical power of the scattered light which corresponds to the cumulative radiation to which the track etch foil has been exposed.

Hermes, Robert E. (White Rock, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

385

REMOTE CONTROL EQUIPMENT FOR PLUTONIUM METAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Design and construction of remote control equipment for plutonium metal production are described. Criteria for the design of the equipment included the following: rubber gloves were to be completely eliminated; all mechanisms were to be built as integral units to facilitate replacement through use of the plastic- bag technique; no accessory equipment such as switches, valves, piping, or cylinders were to be inside the contaminated enclosure unless required to handle the plutonium; and all units were to be tested in mockups before final design. The chemical process, general layout, and operating function are outlined. Descriptions are given of all mechanical units, electrical systems, hydroxide slurry systems, ventilation systems, and chemical tanks and manifolds. (W.L.H.)

Hazen, W.C.

1951-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the author. ) Stone Tool Production, Hikade, UEE 2010Short Citation: Hikade 2010, Stone Tool Production. UEE.Thomas, 2010, Stone Tool Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

388

The O{sub 2}-enriched air gasification of coal, plastics and wood in a fluidized bed reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of the O{sub 2} in the gasification stream of a BFB gasifier has been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Main advantage of the O{sub 2}-enriched air is the increasing of the bed temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No remarkable effects on tar reduction. Decreasing of recognized PAHs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification reactions completed inside the dense bed and splashing zone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polycondensation reactions occur mainly in the freeboard region. - Abstract: The effect of oxygen-enriched air during fluidized bed co-gasification of a mixture of coal, plastics and wood has been investigated. The main components of the obtained syngas were measured by means of on-line analyzers and a gas chromatograph while those of the condensate phase were off-line analysed by means of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The characterization of condensate phase as well as that of the water used as scrubbing medium completed the performed diagnostics. The experimental results were further elaborated in order to provide material and substances flow analyses inside the plant boundaries. These analyses allowed to obtain the main substance distribution between solid, gaseous and condensate phases and to estimate the conversion efficiency of carbon and hydrogen but also to easily visualise the waste streams produced by the process. The process performance was then evaluated on the basis of parameters related to the conversion efficiency of fuels into valuable products (i.e. by considering tar and particulate as process losses) as well as those related to the energy recovery.

Mastellone, Maria Laura, E-mail: mlaura.mastellone@unina2.it [Department of Environmental Sciences-Second University of Naples, Via Vivaldi, 43 81100 Caserta (Italy); Zaccariello, Lucio; Santoro, Donato; Arena, Umberto [Department of Environmental Sciences-Second University of Naples, Via Vivaldi, 43 81100 Caserta (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production a by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

c c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4c. Capacity Adjusted Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 432 459 487 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 116 110 115 313 Textile Mills 55 52 42 314 Textile Product Mills 32 34 32 315 Apparel Manufacturing 67 53 31 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 11 8 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 88 95 98 322 Paper Manufacturing 172 163 160 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 107 106 99 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 221 241 254 325 Chemical Manufacturing 437 468 510 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 162 181 175

390

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3b. Value of Production a by Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2006 > Table 3b and 2006 > Table 3b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3b. Value of Production 1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 429 456 539 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 103 104 125 313 Textile Mills 57 45 39 314 Textile Product Mills 31 31 33 315 Apparel Manufacturing 65 43 30 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 10 6 6 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 91 88 112 322 Paper Manufacturing 155 152 171 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 100 95 100 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 136 218 551 325 Chemical Manufacturing 419 452 662 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 164 172 212

391

Thickness effects on the plastic collapse of perforated plates with triangular penetration patterns  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the effects of plate thickness on the accuracy of limit load solutions obtained using an elastic-perfectly plastic [EPP] equivalent solid [EQS] procedure for flat perforated plates with a triangular array of penetrations. The EQS approach for limit loads is based on an EQS collapse surface that is valid for generalized plane strain. This assumption is applicable for very thick plates but is known to be less reasonable for very thin plates where plane stress may be a better assumption. The limits of applicability of the generalized plane strain assumption are investigated by obtaining limit load solutions for perforated plates of various thicknesses that are subjected to in-plane and bending loads. Plastic limit load solutions obtained using three-dimensional EPP finite element analysis [FEA] of models which include each penetration explicitly are compared with solutions obtained using the EQS approximation. The penetration pattern chosen for this study has a ligament efficiency (ligament width-to-pitch ratio, h/P) of 0.32. For plates thicker than the pitch, the limit load calculated using the EQS method for both in-plane and bending loads is shown to be very accurate (within 4%) of the limit load calculated for the explicit model. On the other hand, for thin plates (t/P< 2), the EQS limit load is 5% greater than the explicit limit load for bending and 8% greater than the explicit limit load for in-plane loads. For thinner plates, the collapse surface is tied to the local geometry deformation and, hence, an equivalent solid plate representation of plastic collapse is a function of deformation mode and thickness.

Gordon, J.L.; Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Petroleum - Exploration & Production - EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. ... Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf.

393

Position paper Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant storage of uranium in plastics  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the end of the Cold War, the United States nuclear weapon stockpile is being reduced from approximately 20,000 warheads to fewer than 10,000 by the end of the century. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is the Department of Energy (DOE) site charged with the responsibility of providing safe, secure storage for the uranium recovered from these weapons. In addition to weapons material, Y-12 has traditionally processed and stored uranium from nonweapon programs and presumably will continue to do so. The purpose of this document is to evaluate the suitability of plastics for use in the containment of uranium.

Duerksen, W.K.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced plasticity, phase transformations, and detonation  

SciTech Connect

Modern computers enable routine multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations of shock propagation in solids using realistic interatomic potentials, and offer a direct insight into the atomistic processes underlying plasticity, phase transformations, and the detonation of energetic materials. Past, present, and prospects for future simulations will be discussed in the context of prototypical systems for each of these three classes of problems. Initial samples ranging from perfect single crystals, to those with specific isolated defects, to full-fledged polycrystalline materials will be considered.

Germann, T. C. (Timothy C.)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The form of a constitutive equation of plastic deformation compatible with stress relaxation data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hart's approach to constitutive equations of plasticity and experimental results relevant to his formalism are reanalyzed, with special emphasis on the consequences of the scaling relation observed in the relaxation curves of a large number of materials. Complete constitutive equations containing a single structure variable are proposed which describe the experimentally determined relaxation and tensile test curves. An interpretation of the structure variable is given in terms of the density of obstacles to dislocations. The equations are generalized to include recovery and applied to dislocation creep.

Fortes, M.A.; Rosa, M.E.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Measured Savings of DC to AC Drive Retrofit in Plastic Extrusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the potential electrical energy efficiency improvements for utilizing alternating current (AC) motors controlled by variable frequency drives (VFD) in place of direct current (DC) motors to drive plastic extrusion machines. A brief background on the extrusion process is presented along with typical extrusion machine electrical drive performance requirements. Motor performance characteristics and control strategies are described for both AC and DC machines. A case study is presented, where detailed electrical measurements were performed on two similar extrusion machines driven by a DC motor and an AC motor respectively. Electrical energy, demand, and cost savings are analyzed

Sfeir, R. A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Application Of Elastic Perfectly Plastic Cyclic Analysis To Assessment Of Creep Strain  

SciTech Connect

A cyclic elastic-perfectly plastic analysis method is proposed which provides a conservative estimate to cyclic creep strain accumulation within the ratchet boundary. The method is to check for ratcheting based on an elastic-perfectly material with a temperature-dependent pseudo yield stress defined by temperature, time and stress to give 1% creep strain. It does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. This simplified method could be used as a rapid screening calculation, with full time-dependent creep analysis used if necessary.

Carter, Peter [Stress Engineering Services Inc.; Jetter, Robert I [Consultant; Sham, Sam [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

High Rate Plasticity under Pressure using a Windowed Pressure-Shear Impact Experiment  

SciTech Connect

An experimental technique has been developed to study the strength of materials under conditions of moderate pressures and high shear strain rates. The technique is similar to the traditional pressure-shear plate-impact experiments except that window interferometry is used to measure both the normal and transverse particle velocities at a sample-window interface. Experimental and simulation results on vanadium samples backed with a sapphire window show the utility of the technique to measure the flow strength under dynamic loading conditions. The results show that the strength of the vanadium is 600 MPa at a pressure of 4.5 GPa and a plastic strain of 1.7%.

Florando, J N; Jiao, T; Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Ferranti, L; Becker, R C; Minich, R W; Bazan, G

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

Coal Combustion and Organic By-Products Blends as Soil Substitutes/Amendments for Horticulture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data from greenhouse and field experiments evaluating the utilization of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) as (i) components of potting mixes to grow ornamentals in a greenhouse, (ii) components of topsoil to grow sod in a greenhouse on plastic, and (iii) components of topsoil to produce sod in the field. The experimental mixes included bottom and fly-ash mixed with biosolids. Two greenhouse experiments involving Evolvus and Pansy test plants and a greenhouse experiment to grow sod ...

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

PROPERTIES AND NANOSTRUCTURES OF NANO-MATERIALS PROCESSED BY SEVERE PLASTIC DEFORMATION (SPD).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic materials usually exhibit higher strength but lower ductility after being plastically deformed by conventional techniques such as rolling, drawing and extrusion. In contrast, nanostructured metals and alloys processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) have demonstrated both high strength and high ductility. This extraordinary mechanical behavior is attributed to the unique nanostructures generated by SPD processing. The combination of ultrafine grain size and high-density dislocations appears to enable deformation by new mechanisms not active in coarse-grained metals and alloys. These results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the microstructures of metals and alloys by SPD to obtain superior mechanical properties. Nanostructured metals and alloys processed by SPD techniques have unique nanostructures not observed in nanomaterials synthesized by other techniques such as the consolidation of nanopowders. The SPD-generated nanostructures have many features related to deformation, including high dislocation densities, and high- and low-angle grain boundaries in equilibrium or nonequilibrium states. Future studies are needed to investigate the deformation mechanisms that relate the unique nanostructures with the superior mechanical properties exhibited by SPD-processed metals and alloys.

Zhu, Y. T. (Yuntian Theodore)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper  

SciTech Connect

Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

Dupont, Virginie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

402

Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

Solonick, W. [Electric Boat Corp., Groton, CT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

W.R. Solonick

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Determination of unconverted HDPE in coal/plastics co-liquefaction stream samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In several coal/plastics liquefaction runs performed by Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI), a substantial amount of incompletely converted high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was present in ash-free recycle resid streams when either the ROSE-SR unit was used in Run POC-2, or the pressure filter unit was used in Runs CMSL-8 and CMSL-9. This indicates that the HDPE is less reactive than coal at the liquefaction conditions used. In these ash-free streams, there is no solid organic or inorganic material arising from the coal, and the incompletely converted HDPE can be recovered by extraction and filtration with tetrahydrofuran (THF) at room temperature. The HDPE (or HDPE-like material, which could also consist of heavy waxes) is THF insoluble. However, in ashy streams, there are both inorganic ({open_quotes}ash{close_quotes}) and organic (unconverted coal) components present from liquefaction of the coal, that interfere with an easy and clean separation of the HDPE from the coal/plastics liquefaction stream sample. Therefore, CONSOL developed an analytical procedure for HDPE in the ashy stream samples based on extraction of HDPE from the sample using hot (150{degrees}C) decalin (decahydronaphthalene), in which the HDPE is soluble. The decalin extraction is both preceded and succeeded by extractions and washes with THF at room temperature, to remove the coal-derived components from the sample.

Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Micropillar compression technique applied to micron-scale mudstone elasto-plastic deformation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mudstone mechanical testing is often limited by poor core recovery and sample size, preservation and preparation issues, which can lead to sampling bias, damage, and time-dependent effects. A micropillar compression technique, originally developed by Uchic et al. 2004, here is applied to elasto-plastic deformation of small volumes of mudstone, in the range of cubic microns. This study examines behavior of the Gothic shale, the basal unit of the Ismay zone of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and potential shale gas play in southeastern Utah, USA. Precision manufacture of micropillars 5 microns in diameter and 10 microns in length are prepared using an ion-milling method. Characterization of samples is carried out using: dual focused ion - scanning electron beam imaging of nano-scaled pores and distribution of matrix clay and quartz, as well as pore-filling organics; laser scanning confocal (LSCM) 3D imaging of natural fractures; and gas permeability, among other techniques. Compression testing of micropillars under load control is performed using two different nanoindenter techniques. Deformation of 0.5 cm in diameter by 1 cm in length cores is carried out and visualized by a microscope loading stage and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Axisymmetric multistage compression testing and multi-stress path testing is carried out using 2.54 cm plugs. Discussion of results addresses size of representative elementary volumes applicable to continuum-scale mudstone deformation, anisotropy, and size-scale plasticity effects. Other issues include fabrication-induced damage, alignment, and influence of substrate.

Michael, Joseph Richard; Chidsey, Thomas (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cap plasticity models and compactive and dilatant pre-failure deformation  

SciTech Connect

At low mean stresses, porous geomaterials fail by shear localization, and at higher mean stresses, they undergo strain-hardening behavior. Cap plasticity models attempt to model this behavior using a pressure-dependent shear yield and/or shear limit-state envelope with a hardening or hardening/softening elliptical end cap to define pore collapse. While these traditional models describe compactive yield and ultimate shear failure, difficulties arise when the behavior involves a transition from compactive to dilatant deformation that occurs before the shear failure or limit-state shear stress is reached. In this work, a continuous surface cap plasticity model is used to predict compactive and dilatant pre-failure deformation. During loading the stress point can pass freely through the critical state point separating compactive from dilatant deformation. The predicted volumetric strain goes from compactive to dilatant without the use of a non-associated flow rule. The new model is stable in that Drucker's stability postulates are satisfied. The study has applications to several geosystems of current engineering interest (oil and gas reservoirs, nuclear waste repositories, buried targets, and depleted reservoirs for possible use for subsurface sequestration of greenhouse gases).

FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

Material and process screening as applied to a reinforced plastic parabolic trough concentrator module  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing parabolic trough solar collectors are basically sheet metal designs utilizing aluminum or steel as the major structural materials. The relatively high labor content associated with these sheet metal designs has generated an interest in investigating the cost effectiveness of using reinforced plastics as a major structural material for trough solar collectors. This interest is bolstered by a growing desire on the part of industry to identify new material-process combinations which save weight, use less energy, and require less capital equipment and assembly costs. The use of reinforced plastics as the basic material for a line-focus parabolic trough concentrator module is studied. This module constitutes a basic building block with which longer trough rows can be built. The basic part analysis is described including the quantification of key material and part-function relationships. In addition candidate materials and processes are reviewed and, the costs associated with the most attractive combinations defined. Finally, the major conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

Hodge, R. (ed.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Effects of Hanford tank simulant waste on plastic packaging to components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. Consistent with the methodology outlined in this paper, we have performed the second phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant Hanford Tank mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the comprehensive testing of five plastic liner materials in the aqueous mixed waste simulant. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately}1, 3, 6, and 40 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 7, 14, 28, 180 day exposures to the waste simulant at 18, 50, and 60{degree}C. From the limited data analyses performed to date in this study, we have identified the fluorocarbon Kel-F{trademark} as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to 40 kGy gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste at 60{degree}C. The most stricking observation from this study was the poor performance of Teflon under these conditions.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Performance characteristics of the Atlas 60 kV, 60 kJ plastic capacitors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides the performance data of Atlas plastic capacitors as supplied by Maxwell Technologies and Aerovox Corporation. The fiberglass cases at 13 inches high by 29 inches wide and 28 inches in depth with a 2 inch by 18 inch bushing on each end. Two styles of the 33.5uF capacitors have been evaluated for Atlas use, a conventional paper-foil and a self-healing metalized-paper and plastic dielectric design. A test program to capacitor failure, is being used to evaluate capacitor lifetime at full voltage (60 kV) and a nominal 15% reversal. With the Atlas parameters, peak currents of {approximately} 340 kA are realized. In anticipation of faults, capacitors are capable, specified, and tested for 700 kA performance. Accurate methods are also utilized to determine capacitor inductance, less than 20 nH. The results of the various capacitor testing programs will be presented in addition to future directives for their R and D efforts.

Reass, W.; Bennet, G.; Bowman, D.; Lopez, E.; Monroe, M.; Parsons, W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Supercooled-liquid and plastic-crystalline state in succinonitrile-glutaronitrile mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a thorough characterization of the glassy phases of mixtures of succinonitrile and glutaronitrile via dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. This system is revealed to be one of the rare examples where both glassy states of matter, a structurally disordered supercooled liquid and an orientationally disordered plastic crystal, can be prepared in the same material. Both disordered states can be easily supercooled, finally arriving at a structural-glass or a glassy-crystal state. Detailed investigations using broadband dielectric spectroscopy enable a comparison of the glassy dynamics in both phases. Just as previously demonstrated for supercooled-liquid and plastic-crystalline ethanol, our experiments reveal very similar relaxational behavior and glass temperatures of both disordered states. Thus the prominent role of orientational degrees of freedom in the glass transition, suggested on the basis of the findings for ethanol, is fully corroborated by the present work. Moreover, the fragilities of both phases are determined and compared for different mixtures. The findings can be well understood within an energy-landscape based explanation of fragility.

M. Gtz; Th. Bauer; P. Lunkenheimer; A. Loidl

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

Numerical study on transient heat transfer under soil with plastic mulch in agriculture applications using a nonlinear finite element model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper is developed a simple mathematical model of transient heat transfer under soil with plastic mulch in order to determine with numerical studies the influence of different plastic mulches on the soil temperature and the evolutions of temperatures at different depths with time. The governing differential equations are solved by a Galerkin Finite Element Model, taking into account the nonlinearities due to radiative heat exchange between the soil surface, the plastic mulch and the atmosphere. The model was validated experimentally giving good approximation of the model to the measured data. Simulations were run with the validated model in order to determine the optimal combination of mulch optical properties to maximize the soil temperature with a Taguchi's analysis, proving that the material most used nowadays in Colombia is not the optimal and giving quantitative results of the properties the optimal mulch must possess.

De Castro, Carlos Armando

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

414

Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for separation of cesium and strontium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for extraction of cesium and strontium. The use of polymeric materials containing plasticizers which are solvents for hydrophobic anions such as derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide or tetraphenylborate which are capable of extracting cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions in contact with the polymeric materials, is described. The polymeric material may also include a synergistic agent for a given ion like polyethylene glycol or a crown ether, for removal of radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium from solutions of diverse composition and, in particular, for solutions containing large excess of sodium nitrate.

Abney, Kent D. (30 San Juan St., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Kinkead, Scott A. (70 Canada Cir., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Mason, Caroline F. V. (148 Piedra Loop, Los Alamos, NM 87544); Rais, Jiri (Fr. Krizka 11, 17000 Praha 7, CZ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer coated sheet metal components find diverse applications in many industries. The manufacturing of the components generally involves forming of sheet metal into the desired shape and coating of the formed part with organic coating. An alternative manufacturing route is to coat the sheet metal first before forming. The change in the manufacturing sequence can potentially improve cost and reduce environmental impact. This approach, however, requires the coating to survive the deformation process. Thus, the effect of plastic deformation on coating adhesion is of primary interest to many engineers and researchers. This research aims at developing a methodology to predict the adhesion of coating after metal forming processes. A pull-off apparatus that measures the coating pull-off stress was used to indicate the coating adhesion strength. Several types of specimen were designed to obtain uniaxial tension, biaxial tension, and tension-compression deformation modes on pre-coated sheet by using a uniaxial tensile tester. Experimental results from two selected polymer coated sheet metals show that coating adhesion was affected by plastic deformation. An analytical model based on a virtual interface crack concept was developed to indicate the adhesion potential of the coating-substrate interface. From interfacial fracture mechanics, the initial adhesion potential is defined as the energy release rate characterized by the virtual interface crack and the initial pull-off stress. The analytical model was used to predict coating adhesion loss after deformation in uniaxial tension mode. The analytical model predictions agreed well with experimental results. Finite element analysis tool was applied to simulate more complex deformation modes in stamping of coated sheet meals. The stress field near the interface crack tip was used to calculate the energy release rate and predict the adhesion loss under different deformation modes. The predictions obtained from numerical method are also in good agreements with the experimental results in biaxial tension and tension-compression modes. The research has led to a better understanding of the effects of plastic deformation on coating adhesion. The developed adhesion test methods can be used to generate useful information on coating durability for diverse practical use. It is also expected that the results of the research will facilitate the development of better polymer coated sheet metal to be used in sheet metal forming processes.

Huang, Yu-Hsuan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Mg Production(Australia).pdf 49.21 KB MgProduction_Australia.mht 81.47 KB Mg Production(Brazil Israel Congo Malaysia).pdf 50.48 KB

417

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

418

Production Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Project Accounts Production Project Accounts Overview Most NERSC login accounts are associated with specific individuals and must not be shared. Sometimes it is...

419

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

420

Century Model Product Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Century Model Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of a new model product. The model product "CENTURY: Modeling Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change, Version 4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report Data for: 2005 Release Date: May 15, 2006 Next Release: May 15, 2007

422

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

423

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

424

Industrial Energy-Efficiency Improvement Program. Annual report to the Congress and the President 1979  

SciTech Connect

The industrial energy efficiency improvement program to accelerate market penetration of new and emerging industrial technologies and practices which will improve energy efficiency; encourage substitution of more plentiful domestic fuels; and enhance recovery of energy and materials from industrial waste streams is described. The role of research, development, and demonstration; technology implementation; the reporting program; and progress are covered. Specific reports from the chemicals and allied products; primary metals; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass, paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metals; transportation equipment; machinery (except electrical); textile mill products; rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products are discussed. Additional data from voluntary submissions, a summary on progress in the utilization of recovered materials, and an analysis of industrial fuel mix are briefly presented. (MCW)

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Study of two tantalum Taylor impact specimens using experiments and stochastic polycrystal plasticity simulation  

SciTech Connect

We compare the experimentally obtained response of two cylindrical tantalum Taylor impact specimens. The first specimen is manufactured using a powder metallurgy (P/M) process with a random initial texture and relatively equiaxed crystals. The second is sectioned from a roundcorner square rolled (RCSR) rod with an asymmetric texture and elongated crystals. The deformed P/M specimen has an axisymmetric footprint while the deformed RCSR projectile has an eccentric footprint with distinct corners. Also, the two specimens experienced similar crystallographic texture evolution, though the RCSR specimen experienced greater plastic deformation. Our simulation predictions mimic the texture and deformation data measured from the P/M specimen. However, our RCSR specimen simulations over-predict the texture development and do not accurately predict the deformation, though the deformation prediction is improved when the texture is not allowed to evolve. We attribute this discrepancy to the elongated crystal morphology in the RCSR specimen which is not represented in our mean-field model.

Tonks, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Effect of Asymmetric Rolling on Plastic Anisotropy of Low Carbon Steels during Simple Shear Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple shear tests are performed on low carbon steel pre-deformed in conventional, asymmetric and orthogonal-asymmetric rolling. The simple-shear tests were carried out at 0 deg. , 45 deg. and 135 deg. with respect to the previous rolling direction. For a reduction ratio of 15%, a transient stagnation in the hardening rate is observed at reloading for all changes in strain path. The shear stress level, the hardening rate and extent of the plateau appear to be insensitive to the preliminary applied rolling conditions. After a reduction ratio of 50%, plastic instability was detected at reloading for all the changes of strain path and rolling conditions studied. A specific heat treatment was then designed allowing the material to become ductile after rolling while retaining the fine microstructure and therefore the high strength. Promising results were obtained essentially for 45 deg. shear tests.

Gracio, J. J.; Vincze, G.; Panigrahi, B. B. [Centro de Tecnologia Mecanica e Automacao, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Kim, H. J. [Materials Mechanics Laboratory(MML), Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology(GIFT), Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31 Hyoja-Dong, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Barlat, F. [Materials Mechanics Laboratory(MML), Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology(GIFT), Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31 Hyoja-Dong, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Centro de Tecnologia Mecanica e Automacao, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rauch, E. F. [Science Ingenierie des Materiaux and Procede s, GPM2 (CNRS UMR 5266) INPG-UJF, BP 46, 38402 Saint Martin d'Heres Cedex (France); Yoon, J. W. [Alloy Technology and Material Research Division, Alcoa Technical Center, 100 Technical Drive, Alcoa Center, PA 15069-0001 (United States); Centro de Tecnologia Mecanica e Automacao, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

New radiation stable and long-lived plastic scintillator for the SSC  

SciTech Connect

The study of the influence of the concentration of secondary flour, high concentrations of primary dopant, diffusion enhancer, and stabilizer, on radiation hardness is presented. It is concluded that the diffusion enhancing technique is the most powerful method for improving rad hardness. A new polystyrene scintillator which contains 2% pT and 0.02% POPOP and 20% diffusion enhancer and 0.02% stabilizer gave 91% of initial light output immediately after 3MRad in air. Data are presented that show that scintillator prepared form commercial polymer is more radiation hard and has greater light output than scintillator prepared from monomer. It is assumed that this difference is due to different molecular weight distributions. Some protocols for acceleration of aging (yellowing and crazing) are presented. It is shown that one of the main reasons for aging of plastic scintillators is residual monomer.

Senchishin, V.; Koba, V.; Korneeva, O. [Inst. for Single Crystals, Kharkov (Ukraine)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Separation of packaging plastics by froth flotation in a continuous pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to apply froth flotation to separate post-consumer PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) from other packaging plastics with similar density, in a continuously operated pilot plant. A representative sample composed of 85% PET, 2.5% PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) and 11.9% PS (Polystyrene) was subjected to a combination of alkaline treatment and surfactant adsorption followed by froth flotation. A mineral processing pilot plant, owned by a Portuguese mining company, was adapted for this purpose. The experimentation showed that it is possible to produce an almost pure concentrate of PET, containing 83% of the PET in feed, in a single bank of mechanical flotation cells. The concentrate grade attained was 97.2% PET, 1.1% PVC and 1.1% PS. By simulation it was shown that the Portuguese recycling industry specifications can be attained if one cleaning and one scavenger stages are added to the circuit.

Carvalho, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.carvalho@ist.utl.p [CERENA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Durao, Fernando; Ferreira, Celia [CERENA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model  

SciTech Connect

A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

Carter, Peter [Stress Engineering Services Inc.; Sham, Sam [ORNL; Jetter, Robert I [Consultant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Incineration of Residue from Paint Stripping Operations Using Plastic Media Blasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A preliminary investigation has been performed on the environmental consequences of incinerating plastic-media-blasting (PHB) wastes from paint removal operations. PHB is similar to sandblasting although blasting takes place at a much lower pressure. The blasted media can be recovered and recycled several times, but ultimately a residue of paint dust/chips and attrited media dust are left for disposal. This residue is a dry solid that may potentially be classified as a hazardous waste. One possible alternative to depositing the waste residue directly into a hazardous waste landfill is incineration. Incineration would provide desirable volume reduction. However, the fate of heavy metals from the entrained paint waste is not known. Samples of PHB residue were combusted at temperatures between 690C and 815C with approximately 125% of stoichiometric air. The ash remaining after combustion was then analyzed for heavy metal content and tested for leachability using the EPA toxicity characteristics leaching procedures (TCLP).

Helt, J. E.; Mallya, N.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials - Part 2: Commodity plastics  

SciTech Connect

In this series of two papers, various polymeric materials are investigated as to their potential applicability as absorber materials for solar thermal collectors. While Part 1 of this paper series deals with the aging behavior of engineering plastics, including two amorphous polymers (PPE + PS) and (PC) and two semi-crystalline polymers (two types of PA12), the present Part 2 treats the aging behavior of semi-crystalline so-called ''commodity'' plastics (two types of crosslinked polyethylene (PE-X) and two types of polypropylene (PP)). As in Part 1, the focus of the investigation is to study the aging behavior of these materials under maximum operating conditions (80 C in water up to 16,000 h) and stagnation conditions (140 C in air up to 500 h) typical for northern climate. The materials supplied or produced as polymer films were first characterized in the unaged state and then for different states of aging by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and by mechanical tensile tests. DSC was applied primarily to obtain information on physical aging phenomena, whereas SEC analysis was used to characterize chemical degradation of the materials. In addition, physical and chemical aging were both analyzed via the small and large strain mechanical behavior. Comparing the two aging conditions in hot air and hot water, a rather stable mechanical performance profile was found for both PP types over the investigated aging time, which was interpreted in terms of competing physical and chemical aging mechanisms. Analogously such competing mechanisms were also inferred for one of the PE-X materials, while the other exhibited substantial degradation in terms of strain-to-break values for both aging conditions. In principle, both PP and PE-X are promising candidates for black absorber applications in northern climates if proper measures against overheating are taken and when adequately modified. (author)

Kahlen, S. [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W. [Institute for Polymeric Materials and Testing, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, Linz 4040 (Austria)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Pratt, H. Willem, L. - B. Desroches, and S. M. Donovan. U.S. Residential Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products: Results from Amazon Mechanical Turk Surveys., 2013. Desroches, L....

433

List of Manufacturing Groups Displayed in the 1998 Manufacturing...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

336 Transportation Equipment 337 Furniture and Related Products 339 Miscellaneous 6 industry groups (4-digit NAICS codes); 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 3219...

434

Cerebral Cortex doi:10.1093/cercor/bhi116 Temporary Occlusion of Associative Motor Cortical Plasticity by Prior Dynamic Motor Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel Hebbian stimulation paradigm was employed to examine physiological correlates of motor memory formation in humans. Repetitive pairing of median nerve stimulation with transcranial magnetic stimulation over the contralateral motor cortex (paired associative stimulation, PAS) may decrease human motor cortical excitability at interstimulus intervals of 10 ms (PAS10) or increase excitability at 25 ms (PAS25). The properties of this plasticity have previously been shown to resemble associative timing-dependent long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) as established in vitro. Immediately after training a novel dynamic motor task, the capacity of the motor cortex to undergo plasticity in response to PAS25 was abolished. PAS10-induced plasticity remained unchanged. When retested after 6 h, PAS25-induced plasticity recovered to baseline levels. After training, normal PAS25induced plasticity was observed in the contralateral training-naive

Katja Stefan; Matthias Wycislo; Reinhard Gentner; Axel Schramm; Markus Naumann; Karlheinz Reiners; Joseph Classen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cyclic plasticity and shakedown in high-capacity electrodes of lithium-ion batteries Laurence Brassart, Kejie Zhao, Zhigang Suo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclic plasticity and shakedown in high-capacity electrodes of lithium-ion batteries Laurence for lithium-ion batteries. Upon absorbing a large amount of lithium, the electrode swells greatly rights reserved. 1. Introduction Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are energy-storage systems of choice

Suo, Zhigang

436

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. First technical progress report for the fourth quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect

The broad objective of this project is to obtain improved, quantitative understanding of the transient plasticity of bituminous coals under high heating rates and other reaction and pretreatment conditions of scientific and practical interest. To these ends the research plan is to measure the softening and resolidification behavior of two US bituminous coals with a rapid-heating, fast response, high-temperature coal plastometer, previously developed in this laboratory. Specific measurements planned for the project include determinations of apparent viscosity, softening temperature, plastic period, and resolidificationtime for molten coal: (1) as a function of independent variations in coal type, heating rate, final temperature, gaseous atmosphere (inert, 0{sub 2} or H{sub 2}), and shear rate; and (2) in exploratory runs where coal is pretreated (preoxidation, pyridine extraction, metaplast cracking agents), before heating. The intra-coal inventory and molecular weight distribution of pyridine extractables will also be measured using a rapid quenching, electrical screen heater coal pyrolysis reactor. The yield of extractables is representative of the intra-coal inventory of plasticing agent (metaplast) remaining after quenching. Coal plasticity kinetics will then be mathematically modeled from metaplast generation and depletion rates, via a correlation between the viscosity of a suspension and the concentration of deformable medium (here metaplast) in that suspension. Work during this reporting period has been concerned with re-commissioning the rapid heating rate plastometer apparatus.

Darivakis, G.S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A cell-centered Lagrangian finite volume approach for computing elasto-plastic response of solids in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian formulation is presented for solving large deformation problems in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries. Since solid materials can sustain significant shear deformation, evolution equations for stress and strain ... Keywords: Axisymmetric geometries, Cell-centered, Elasto-plastic, Finite volume, Hydrodynamics, Hypo-elastic, Lagrangian, Material strength, Mimetic, Solid mechanics

Shiv Kumar Sambasivan; Mikhail J. Shashkov; Donald E. Burton

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

On calibration of orthotropic elastic-plastic constitutive models for paper foils by biaxial tests and inverse analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper two procedures are developed for the identification of the parameters contained in an orthotropic elastic-plastic-hardening model for free standing foils, particularly of paper and paperboard. The experimental data considered are provided ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Paper foils, Parameter identification

Tomasz Garbowski; Giulio Maier; Giorgio Novati

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Illinois coal production pushes Illinois Basin production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal production in the Illinois Basin during the first half of 2012 (64.4 million short tons) was 13% higher than the same period in 2011. This ...

440

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By-products generated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

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441

Technetium production: a feasibility study for Texas A&M University nuclear science center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The affordability and feasibility of the production of the metastable nuclide of technetium (Tc-99m) by neutron capture activation of molybdenum trioxide (with a subsequent solvent extraction) has been explored for the Texas A&M University, Nuclear Science Center (NSC). The primary impetus for exploring the possibility of producing Tc-99m is the interest expressed by the University's College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM). Currently, the CVM receives partially depleted Tc-99m generators from a local vendor, free-of-charge. However, the future status of this supply is unclear and the need for an alternative source needs to be addressed. Also, the CVM expects sufficient growth so that the donated generators cannot meet their anticipated need. Two experiments performed at the NSC explored the ability to produce Tc99m for the CVM and provided data for estimating production costs. These experiments entailed the irradiation of molybdenum trioxide and the separation of Tc99m from the irradiated targets. In addition, the experiments determined the optimum solvent volumes, the effects of a subsequent extraction, and measured the loss in recovery when an oxidizing agent (hydrogen peroxide) was eliminated from the extraction procedure. These results have not previously been reported. The feasibility of production was determined by comparing a local hospital's cost for Tc-99m, delivered by a local vendor, to the production costs at the NSC. The production cost for Tc-99m is based on a modified NSC irradiation price listing, chemical costs, and miscellaneous costs based upon the Tc-99m activity requirement of 1 1. I GBq per day by the CVM. A cost for initial setup was also determined. This research also revealed additional obtaining Tc-99m. A low activity separation showed a mean recovery of 66.9 ?1. 1 % for Tc-99m over a five-day extraction period. The optimum solvent volume to aqueous volume ratio for a first and second extraction was determined from an additional separation experiment to be 0.6 and 0.2, respectively. The second experiment also demonstrated a 20.9 % reduction in percent-recovery when the oxidizing agent was eliminated.

Hearne, David Douglass

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Spectral method for the correction of the Cerenkov light effect in plastic scintillation detectors: A comparison study of calibration procedures and validation in Cerenkov light-dominated situations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purposes of this work were: (1) To determine if a spectral method can accurately correct the Cerenkov light effect in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) for situations where the Cerenkov light is dominant over the scintillation light and (2) to develop a procedural guideline for accurately determining the calibration factors of PSDs. Methods: The authors demonstrate, by using the equations of the spectral method, that the condition for accurately correcting the effect of Cerenkov light is that the ratio of the two calibration factors must be equal to the ratio of the Cerenkov light measured within the two different spectral regions used for analysis. Based on this proof, the authors propose two new procedures to determine the calibration factors of PSDs, which were designed to respect this condition. A PSD that consists of a cylindrical polystyrene scintillating fiber (1.6 mm{sup 3}) coupled to a plastic optical fiber was calibrated by using these new procedures and the two reference procedures described in the literature. To validate the extracted calibration factors, relative dose profiles and output factors for a 6 MV photon beam from a medical linac were measured with the PSD and an ionization chamber. Emphasis was placed on situations where the Cerenkov light is dominant over the scintillation light and on situations dissimilar to the calibration conditions. Results: The authors found that the accuracy of the spectral method depends on the procedure used to determine the calibration factors of the PSD and on the attenuation properties of the optical fiber used. The results from the relative dose profile measurements showed that the spectral method can correct the Cerenkov light effect with an accuracy level of 1%. The results obtained also indicate that PSDs measure output factors that are lower than those measured with ionization chambers for square field sizes larger than 25x25 cm{sup 2}, in general agreement with previously published Monte Carlo results. Conclusions: The authors conclude that the spectral method can be used to accurately correct the Cerenkov light effect in PSDs. The authors confirmed the importance of maximizing the difference of Cerenkov light production between calibration measurements. The authors also found that the attenuation of the optical fiber, which is assumed to be constant in the original formulation of the spectral method, may cause a variation of the calibration factors in some experimental setups.

Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

MPTP-meditated hippocampal dopamine deprivation modulates synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms including learning deficits are inducible by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Therefore, it is possible that MPTP may disturb hippocampal memory processing by modulation of dopamine (DA)- and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We demonstrate here that intraperitoneal (i.p.) MPTP injection reduces the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) within 7 days. Subsequently, the TH expression level in SN and hippocampus and the amount of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus decrease. DA depletion does not alter basal synaptic transmission and changes pair-pulse facilitation (PPF) of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) only at the 30 ms inter-pulse interval. In addition, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is impaired whereas the duration of long-term depression (LTD) becomes prolonged. Since both LTP and LTD depend critically on activation of NMDA and DA receptors, we also tested the effect of DA depletion on NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. Seven days after MPTP injection, the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSPs are decreased by about 23%. Blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSP does not mimic the MPTP-LTP. Only co-application of D1/D5 and NMDA receptor antagonists during tetanization resembled the time course of fEPSP potentiation as observed 7 days after i.p. MPTP injection. Together, our data demonstrate that MPTP-induced degeneration of DA neurons and the subsequent hippocampal DA depletion alter NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. - Highlights: > I.p. MPTP-injection mediates death of dopaminergic neurons. > I.p. MPTP-injection depletes DA and DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus. > I.p. MPTP-injection does not alter basal synaptic transmission. > Reduction of LTP and enhancement of LTD after i.p. MPTP-injection. > Attenuation of NMDA-receptors mediated fEPSPs after i.p. MPTP-injection.

Zhu Guoqi; Chen Ying; Huang Yuying [Institutes of Brain Science, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Li Qinglin [Key laboratory of XinAn Medicine, Anhui University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230038 (China); Behnisch, Thomas, E-mail: behnish@fudan.edu.cn [Institutes of Brain Science, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Grain refinement and texture development of cast bi90sb10 alloy via severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to study learn about grain refinement mechanisms and texture development in cast n-type Bi90Sb10 alloy caused by severe plastic deformation. The practical objective is to produce a fine grained and textured microstructure in Bi90Sb10 alloy with enhanced thermoelectric performance and mechanical strength. In the study, twelve millimeter diameter cast bars of Bi90Sb10 alloy were encapsulated in square cross section aluminum 6061 alloy containers. The composite bars were equal channel angular (ECAE) extruded through a 90 degree angle die at high homologous temperature. Various extrusion conditions were studied including punch speed (0.1, 0.3 and 0.6 in/min), extrusion temperature (220, 235 and 250oC), number of extrusion passes (1, 2 and 4), route (A, BC and C), and exit channel area reduction ratio (half and quarter area of inlet channel). The affect of an intermediate long term heat treatment (for 100 hours at 250oC under 10-3 torr vacuum) was explored. Processed materials were characterized by optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Texture was analyzed using the {006} reflection plane to identify the orientation of the basal poles in processed materials. The cast grains were irregularly shaped, had a grain size of hundreds-of-microns to millimeters, and showed inhomogeneous chemical composition. Severe plastic deformation refines the cast grains through dynamic recrystallization and causes the development of a bimodal microstructure consisting of fine grains (5-30 micron) and coarse grains (50-300 micron). ECAE processing of homogenizied Bi-Sb alloy causes grain refinement and produces a more uniform microstructure. Texture results show that ECAE route C processing gives a similar or slightly stronger texture than ECAE route A processing. In both cases, the basal-plane poles become aligned with the shear direction. Reduction area exit channel extrusion is more effective for both grain refinement and texture enhancement than simple ECAE processing.

Im, Jae-taek

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

446

Prediction of Gas Leak Tightness of Superplastically Formed Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some applications, in this case an aluminium box in a subatomic particle detector containing highly sensitive detecting devices, it is important that a formed sheet should show no gas leak from one side to the other. In order to prevent a trial-and-error procedure to make this leak tight box, a method is set up to predict if a formed sheet conforms to the maximum leak constraint. The technique of superplastic forming (SPF) is used in order to attain very high plastic strains before failure. Since only a few of these boxes are needed, this makes, this generally slow, process an attractive production method. To predict the gas leak of a superplastically formed aluminium sheet in an accurate way, finite element simulations are used in combination with a user-defined material model. This constitutive model couples the leak rate with the void volume fraction. This void volume fraction is then dependent on both the equivalent plastic strain and the applied hydrostatic pressure during the bulge process (backpressure).

Snippe, Corijn H. C. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef) PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meinders, T. [University of Twente, Faculty of Engineering Technology PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Area of Entry by Area of Entry Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Ethylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Bonded Aircraft Fuel Other Bonded Aircraft Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Bonded, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Other, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 2000 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

448

Engineering Thermotolerant Biocatalysts for Biomass Conversion to Products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic biomass is a promising feedstock for producing renewable chemicals and transportation fuels as petroleum substitutes. Fermentation of the cellulose in biomass in an SSF process requires that the properties of the microbial biocatalyst match the fungal cellulase activity optima for cost-effective production of products. Fermentation of the pentose sugars derived from hemicellulose in biomass is an additional asset of an ideal biocatalyst. The microbial biocatalyst used by the industry, yeast, lacks the ability to ferment pentose sugars. The optimum temperature for growth and fermentation of yeast is about 35C. The optimum temperature for commercially available cellulase enzymes for depolymerization of cellulose in biomass to glucose for fermentation is 50-55 C. Because of the mismatch in the temperature optima for the enzyme and yeast, SSF of cellulose to ethanol (cellulosic ethanol) with yeast is conducted at a temperature that is close to the optimum for yeast. We have shown that by increasing the temperature of SSF to 50-55 C using thermotolerant B. coagulans, the amount of cellulase required for SSF of cellulose to products can be reduced by 3-4 fold compared to yeast-based SSF at 35C with a significant cost savings due to lower enzyme loading. Thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans strains ferment hemicellulose-derived pentose sugars completely to L(+)-lactic acid, the primary product of fermentation. We have developed genetic tools to engineer B. coagulans for fermentation of all the sugars in biomass to ethanol. Using these tools, we have altered the fermentation properties of B. coagulans to produce ethanol as the primary product. The thermotolerant property of B. coagulans has been shown to also lower the cellulase requirement and associated cost in SSF of cellulose to lactic acid compared to lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid is a potential petroleum substitute for bio-based renewable plastics production. This study has led to the development of B. coagulans as a thermotolerant microbial biocatalyst for production of ethanol as a transportation fuel and lactic acid as a starting material for bio-based plastics in a cost-effective manner from renewable biomass.

K. T. Shanmugam, L. O. Ingram and J. A. Maupin-Furlow

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

450

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

451

Industrial Oil Products Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forum for professionals involved in research, development, engineering, marketing, and testing of industrial products and co-products from fats and oils, including fuels, lubricants, coatings, polymers, paints, inks, cosmetics, dielectric fluids, and ad

452

The Product Creation Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Product Creation Process is described in its context. A phased model is shown, as many organisations use such a model as blueprint. The operational organisation of the product creation process is discussed, especially the role of the operational leader.

Gerrit Muller

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Casthouse Productivity and Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... Cast Shop for Aluminum Production: Casthouse Productivity and ... performance indicator called Specific Energy Consumption [SEC] ... Improved Monolithic Materials for Lining Aluminum Holding and Melting Furnaces: Andy...

454

Bio-Based Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often...

455

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

456

Topic: Product Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Product Data. Event. Model-Based Enterprise Summit. TDP Standards Development Summit. Group. Life Cycle Engineering Group. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers

458

Soy Protein Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will provide an overview of the key benefits of soy protein products in an easily understood format. ...

459

Table 3. Product Applications  

of all hazardous metals, low -level radioactive waste, fission products and transuranics Macroencapsulation of contaminated debris, metal and ...

460

MSID Products, Tools, & Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SID Products, Tools, & Services. XML Testbed - collection of XML-Related Tools; Express Engine - STEP (ISO 10303) development ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "miscellaneous plastic products" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

IEEE 1588 Products & Implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Facsimile. 100 Bureau Drive, M/S 8220 Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8220. IEEE 1588 Products & Implementations. This page ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

462

Seamless Steel Tubular Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...). The tank also contained the search units.Fig. 6 Seamless and welded austenitic stainless steel tubular products were

463

Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds  

SciTech Connect

Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.; (UWASH); (UTSMC)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

464

Construction and performance of a plastic scintillating fiber target for a rare kaon decay experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A K/sup +/ stopping target consisting of 2269 plastic fibers, 2 mm diameter and 3.12 m long has been installed in an experiment searching for the rare decay K/sup +/ to ..pi nu../bar nu/ at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The fibers are bundled onto 379 photomultiplier tube and base assemblies with single photoelectron resolution. After routing to the counting room, the signals are amplified and then distributed to TDC's and high-pass filter circuits that provide signals to ADC's and to fan-ins that provide a target energy-sum pulse used in the fast triggering logic. A minimum ionizing particle 3 m from the photomultiplier yields 1 photoelectron/mm path. The target provides transverse spatial resolution of 4 mm (FWHM) for the vertex of the K/sup +/ decay and 2 ns timing resolution (FWHM) on the difference between the K/sup +/ stop and the subsequent decay. Details of the target construction and operating performance are provided. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Frank, J.S.; Strand, R.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Standard practice for examination of fiberglass reinforced plastic fan blades using acoustic emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice provides guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) fan blades of the type used in industrial cooling towers and heat exchangers. 1.2 This practice uses simulated service loading to determine structural integrity. 1.3 This practice will detect sources of acoustic emission in areas of sensor coverage that are stressed during the course of the examination. 1.4 This practice applies to examinations of new and in-service fan blades. 1.5 This practice is limited to fan blades of FRP construction, with length (hub centerline to tip) of less than 3 m [10 ft], and with fiberglass content greater than 15 % by weight. 1.6 AE measurements are used to detect emission sources. Other nondestructive examination (NDE) methods may be used to evaluate the significance of AE sources. Procedures for other NDE methods are beyond the scope of this practice. 1.7 UnitsThe values stated in either SI units or inch-pound units are to be regarded separately as sta...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Chemical compatibility screening results of plastic packaging to mixed waste simulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a chemical compatibility program for evaluating transportation packaging components for transporting mixed waste forms. We have performed the first phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the screening of 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately}3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14 day exposures to the waste simulants of 60 C. The seal materials or rubbers were tested using VTR (vapor transport rate) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criteria of {approximately}1 g/m{sup 2}/hr for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. It was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only VITON passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. It is anticipated that those materials with the lowest VTRs will be evaluated in the comprehensive phase of the program. For specific gravity testing of liner materials the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A capture-gated neutron calorimeter using plastic scintillators and 3He drift tubes  

SciTech Connect

A segmented neutron calorimeter using nine 4-inch x 4-inch x 48-inch plastic scintillators and sixteen 2-inch-diameter 48-inch-long 200-mbar-{sup 3}He drift tubes is described. The correlated scintillator and neutron-capture events provide a means for n/{gamma} discrimination, critical to the neutron calorimetry when the {gamma} background is substantial and the {gamma} signals are comparable in amplitude to the neutron signals. A single-cell prototype was constructed and tested. It can distinguish between a {sup 17}N source and a {sup 252}Cf source when the {gamma} and the thermal neutron background are sufficiently small. The design and construction of the nine-cell segmented detector assembly follow the same principle. By recording the signals from individual scintillators, additional {gamma}-subtraction schemes, such as through the time-of-flight between two scintillators, may also be used. The variations of the light outputs from different parts of a scintillator bar are less than 10%.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bacon, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borozdin, Konstantin N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clark, Deborah J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Jesse A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lisowski, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fessaha G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, Frederick E [REGIS UNIV.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Projecting Low Dimensional Chaos from Spatio-temporal Dynamics in a Model for Plastic Instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the possibility of projecting low dimensional chaos from spatiotemporal dynamics of a model for a kind of plastic instability observed under constant strain rate deformation conditions. We first discuss the relationship between the spatiotemporal patterns of the model reflected in the nature of dislocation bands and the nature of stress serrations. We show that at low applied strain rates, there is a one-to-one correspondence with the randomly nucleated isolated bursts of mobile dislocation density and the stress drops. We then show that the model equations are spatiotemporally chaotic by demonstrating the number of positive Lyapunov exponents and Lyapunov dimension scale with the system size at low and high strain rates. Using a modified algorithm for calculating correlation dimension density, we show that the stress-strain signals at low applied strain rates corresponding to spatially uncorrelated dislocation bands exhibit features of low dimensional chaos. This is made quantitative by demonstrating that the model equations can be approximately reduced to space independent model equations for the average dislocation densities, which is known to be low-dimensionally chaotic. However, the scaling regime for the correlation dimension shrinks with increasing applied strain rate due to increasing propensity for propagation of the dislocation bands.

Ritupan Sarmah; G. Ananthakrishna

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for silicon diodes using a plastic scintillation detector  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the perturbation factor in megavoltage electron beams for three models of silicon diodes (IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded) using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6-, 12-, and 18-MeV clinical electron beams. They also measured depth-dose curves using the IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded diodes. The authors used the depth-dose curves measured with the PSD as a perturbation-free reference to extract the perturbation factors of the diodes. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the diodes increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results show the same trend as published Monte Carlo simulation results for the EFD diode; however, the perturbations measured experimentally were greater. They found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed slightly away from the source reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: The manufacturer recommended EPOM appears to be incorrect at low electron energy (6 MeV). In addition, the perturbation factors for diodes may be greater than predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke est, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1, Canada and Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Quebec, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council (NRC), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Quebec, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Strangeness Production at COSY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper gives an overview of strangeness-production experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. Results on kaon-pair and phi meson production in pp, pd and dd collisions, hyperon-production experiments and Lambda p final-state interaction studies are presented.

Frank Hinterberger; Hartmut Machner; Regina Siudak

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

471

Coal production 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

Two-tracer spectroscopy diagnostics of temperature profile in the conduction layer of a laser-ablated plastic foil  

SciTech Connect

A technique that combines the diagnostics of electron temperature history and the measurements of ablation velocity with two-tracer x-ray spectroscopy has been developed for diagnosing the temperature profiles in the thermal conduction layers of laser-ablated plastic foils. The electron temperature in the plastic ablator was diagnosed using the isoelectronic line ratios of Al Ly{alpha} line to Mg Ly{alpha} line, emitted from a tracer layer of Al/Mg mixture buried under the ablator. The ablation velocity was inferred from the time delay between the onset time of x-ray line emissions from Al and Mg tracer layers buried at two depths in the ablator, respectively. From the measured electron temperatures and ablation velocity, the electron temperature profile in the conduction layer was inferred. The measured temperature profile was compared with the simulated one and reasonable agreement was found.

Zhang Jiyan; Yang Guohong; Hu Xin; Yang Jiamin; Ding Yaonan; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu Yan; Yan Jun; Pei Wenbin [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Literature review of the lifetime of DOE materials: Aging of plastic bonded explosives and the explosives and polymers contained therein  

SciTech Connect

There are concerns about the lifetime of the nation`s stockpile of high explosives (HEs) and their components. The DOE`s Core Surveillance and Enhanced Surveillance programs specifically target degradation of HE, binders, and plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) for determination of component lifetimes and handling procedures. The principal goal of this project is to identify the decomposition mechanisms of HEs, plasticizers, and plastic polymer binders resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation, heat, and humidity. The primary HEs of concern are 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocyclooctane (HMX). Hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is closely related to these two compounds and is also included in the literature review. Both Kel-F 800 and Estane are polymers of interest. A stabilizer, Irganox 1010, and an energetic plasticizer that is a blend of acetaldehyde 2,2-dinitropropyl acetal, are also of interest, but the focus of this report will be on the explosives and polymers. This presents a literature review that provides background on the synthesis, degradation, and techniques to analyze TATB, HMX, RDX, Kel-F 800, Estane, and the PBXs of these compounds. As there are many factors that can influence degradation of materials, the degradation discussion will be divided into sections based on each factor and how it might affect the degradation mechanism. The factors reviewed that influence the degradation of these materials are exposure to heat, UV- and {gamma}-irradiation, and the chemistry of these compounds. The report presents a recently compiled accounting of the available literature. 80 refs., 7 figs.

Burgess, C.E.; Woodyard, J.D. [West Texas A and M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States); Rainwater, K.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lightfoot, J.M. [Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States); Richardson, B.R. [Engineered Carbons, Inc., Borger, TX (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTICITY MODEL USING NON ASSOCIATED FLOW RULE FOR HCP MATERIALS INCLUDING ZIRCONIUM FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

In this report (prepared in collaboration with Prof. Jeong Whan Yoon, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia) a research effort was made to develop a non associated flow rule for zirconium. Since Zr is a hexagonally close packed (hcp) material, it is impossible to describe its plastic response under arbitrary loading conditions with any associated flow rule (e.g. von Mises). As a result of strong tension compression asymmetry of the yield stress and anisotropy, zirconium displays plastic behavior that requires a more sophisticated approach. Consequently, a new general asymmetric yield function has been developed which accommodates mathematically the four directional anisotropies along 0 degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and biaxial, under tension and compression. Stress anisotropy has been completely decoupled from the r value by using non associated flow plasticity, where yield function and plastic potential have been treated separately to take care of stress and r value directionalities, respectively. This theoretical development has been verified using Zr alloys at room temperature as an example as these materials have very strong SD (Strength Differential) effect. The proposed yield function reasonably well models the evolution of yield surfaces for a zirconium clock rolled plate during in plane and through thickness compression. It has been found that this function can predict both tension and compression asymmetry mathematically without any numerical tolerance and shows the significant improvement compared to any reported functions. Finally, in the end of the report, a program of further research is outlined aimed at constructing tensorial relationships for the temperature and fluence dependent creep surfaces for Zr, Zircaloy 2, and Zircaloy 4.

Michael V. Glazoff; Jeong-Whan Yoon

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Characterization of a dissolved oxygen sensor made of plastic optical fiber coated with ruthenium-incorporated solgel  

SciTech Connect

A dissolved oxygen sensor made of plastic optical fiber as the substrate and dichlorotris (1, 10-phenanthroline) ruthenium as a fluorescence indicator is studied. Oxygen quenching characteristics of both intensity and phase were measured; the obtained characteristics showed deviation from the linear relation described by the Stern-Volmer equation. A two-layer model is proposed to explain the deviation, and main parameters can be deduced with the model.

Chu Fenghong; Yang Junjie; Cai Haiwen; Qu Ronghui; Fang Zujie

2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

476

Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with engineering plastics. Quarterly report, 1 April 1992--30 June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All seven oil immersion studies are complete at both temperatures. Nine out of ten refrigerant ambient immersion studies are complete including 60C (140F) for R-123. All 22 plastic test materials have been molded into test bars. All test bars have been quality controlled for physical consistency and integrity. All 22 test chambers are functional. Creep loads have been increased to 25% of ultimate tensile. Refrigerant has solubilities of Emery 2927 with R-22 and 134a are complete.

Cavestri, R.C.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Linking high and low temperature plasticity in bulk metallic glasses: thermal activation, extreme value statistics and kinetic freezing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At temperatures well below their glass transition, the deformation properties of bulk metallic glasses are characterised by a sharp transition from elasticity to plasticity, a reproducible yield stress, and an approximately linear decrease of this stress with increasing temperature. In the present work it shown that when the well known properties of the under-cooled liquid regime, in terms of the underlying potential energy landscape, are assumed to be also valid at low temperature, a simple thermal activation model is able to reproduce the observed onset of macro-scopic yield. At these temperatures, the thermal accessibility of the complex potential energy landscape is drastically reduced, and the statistics of extreme value and the phenomenon of kinetic freezing become important, affecting the spatial heterogeneity of the irreversible structural transitions mediating the elastic-to-plastic transition. As the temperature increases and approaches the glass transition temperature, the theory is able to smoothly transit to the high temperature deformation regime where plasticity is known to be well described by thermally activated viscoplastic models.

P. M. Derlet; R. Maa

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

478

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product - Crude  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Gasoline inventories indicate how tight the gasoline product market is in any one region. When the gasoline market is tight, it affects the portion of gasoline price is the spread between spot product price and crude oil price. Note that in late 1998-and early 1999 spreads were very small when inventories were quite high. Contrast summers of 1998 or 1999 with summer 2000. Last summer's tight markets, resulting low stocks and transition to Phase 2 RFG added price pressure over and above the already high crude price pressure on gasoline -- particularly in the Midwest. As we ended last winter, gasoline inventories were low, and the spread between spot prices and crude oil were higher than typical as a result. Inventories stayed well below average and the spread during the

479

Plastic substrates for active matrix liquid crystal display incapable of withstanding processing temperature of over 200.degree. C and method of fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bright-polarizer-free, active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) are formed on plastic substrates. The primary components of the display are a pixel circuit fabricated on one plastic substrate, an intervening liquid-crystal material, and a counter electrode on a second plastic substrate. The-pixel circuit contains one or more thin-film transistors (TFTs) and either a transparent or reflective pixel electrode manufactured at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid damage to the plastic substrate. Fabrication of the TFTs can be carried out at temperatures less than 100.degree. C. The liquid crystal material is a commercially made nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) film. The counter electrode is comprised of a plastic substrate coated with a transparent conductor, such as indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). By coupling the active matrix with NCAP, a high-information content can be provided in a bright, fully plastic package. Applications include any low cost portable electronics containing flat displays where ruggedization of the display is desired.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA); Havens, John (San Diego, CA); Jones, Phil (Marlborough, GB)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Plastic substrates for active matrix liquid crystal display incapable of withstanding processing temperature of over 200 C and method of fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bright-polarizer-free, active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) are formed on plastic substrates. The primary components of the display are a pixel circuit fabricated on one plastic substrate, an intervening liquid-crystal material, and a counter electrode on a second plastic substrate. The-pixel circuit contains one or more thin-film transistors (TFTs) and either a transparent or reflective pixel electrode manufactured at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid damage to the plastic substrate. Fabrication of the TFTs can be carried out at temperatures less than 100 C. The liquid crystal material is a commercially made nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) film. The counter electrode is comprised of a plastic substrate coated with a transparent conductor, such as indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). By coupling the active matrix with NCAP, a high-information content can be provided in a bright, fully plastic package. Applications include any low cost portable electronics containing flat displays where ruggedization of the display is desired. 12 figs.

Carey, P.G.; Smith, P.M.; Havens, J.H.; Jones, P.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z