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Sample records for miquelon nr nauru

  1. Nauru: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Nauru Population 9,275 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code NR 3-letter ISO code NRU Numeric ISO...

  2. TWP Nauru Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Nauru99 Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsNauru99 Campaign Campaign Links Nauru99 Media Resource ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

  4. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    2010-07-15

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  5. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  6. ARM - TWP Nauru Site-Inactive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  7. Nauru

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  8. ARM - PI Product - Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsNauru Island Effect Detection Data Set ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air

  9. Using ARM TWP Nauru Observations to Evaluate a Simple Thermodynamic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using ARM TWP Nauru Observations to Evaluate a Simple Thermodynamic Model of the Subcloud Layer Under Fair-Weather Cumulus Conditions Albrecht, Bruce University of Miami Kollias,...

  10. nr | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nr | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home / nr

  11. Nauru Island Effect Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    et al. (2001), cloud plumes were seen in 50% of the daytime images, with afternoon frequency increasing to 63%. Figure 1. Location of sites. 1 Fourteenth ARM Science Team...

  12. nr

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  13. nr

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:www.nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  14. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | Neutron Reflectometry (NR) at Lujan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Helps To Understand the Performance of Radiation-Resistant Materials Neutron Reflectometry (NR) at Lujan Center Helps To Understand the Performance of Radiation-Resistant Materials Precipitation of implanted He is a major concern for the performance and survivability of plasma-facing components in future fusion reactors. In the Applied Physics Letters 98, 241913 (2011) *, the use of NR is reported to study the Cu/Nb layered nanocomposites resistive to high He doses. Neutron

  15. Nauru'99: Scaling of Radiosondes by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini University of L' Aquila L' Aquila, Italy B. M. Lesht Argonne National Laboratory Chicago, Illinois Introduction Previous ...

  16. Microsoft Word - DE-NR0000031-075.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR 2 183 CONTINUATION SHEET REFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED PAGE OF BECHTEL MARINE PROPULSION CORPORATION (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) DE-NR0000031/075 a. Clause 4., Changes, is amended by removing the name G. W. Twardowski. Therefore, page 2 of Section H is deleted in its entirety and replaced with the new page 2 attached hereto. b. Clause 26., Responsible Corporate Official, is amended by inserting

  17. The LANL C-NR counting room and fission product yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackman, Kevin Richard

    2015-09-21

    This PowerPoint presentation focused on the following areas: LANL C-NR counting room; Fission product yields; Los Alamos Neutron wheel experiments; Recent experiments ad NCERC; and Post-detonation nuclear forensics

  18. Preliminary Analysis of the Nauru Island Effect Study Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the path of the easterly trade winds. However, during El Nio conditions, the easterly trade winds weaken in the tropical western Pacific. Figure 2 shows the effect of an El...

  19. Activation of nuclear receptor NR5A2 increases Glut4 expression and glucose metabolism in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolado-Carrancio, A.; Riancho, J.A.; Sainz, J.; Rodrguez-Rey, J.C.

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: NR5A2 expression in C2C12 is associated with myotube differentiation. DLPC induces an increase in GLUT4 levels and glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes. In high glucose conditions the activation of NR5A2 inhibits fatty acids oxidation. - Abstract: NR5A2 is a nuclear receptor which regulates the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, pluripotency maintenance and cell differentiation. It has been recently shown that DLPC, a NR5A2 ligand, prevents liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in mouse models of insulin resistance, an effect that has been associated with changes in glucose and fatty acids metabolism in liver. Because skeletal muscle is a major tissue in clearing glucose from blood, we studied the effect of the activation of NR5A2 on muscle metabolism by using cultures of C2C12, a mouse-derived cell line widely used as a model of skeletal muscle. Treatment of C2C12 with DLPC resulted in increased levels of expression of GLUT4 and also of several genes related to glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. These changes were accompanied by an increased glucose uptake. In addition, the activation of NR5A2 produced a reduction in the oxidation of fatty acids, an effect which disappeared in low-glucose conditions. Our results suggest that NR5A2, mostly by enhancing glucose uptake, switches muscle cells into a state of glucose preference. The increased use of glucose by muscle might constitute another mechanism by which NR5A2 improves blood glucose levels and restores insulin sensitivity.

  20. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test FY09 Status: High Concentration Calcium-Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-12-16

    100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test FY09 Status: High Concentration Calcium-Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization INTERIM LETTER REPORT

  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Apatite Investigation at the 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-28

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the 100-NR-2 Apatite Project. The U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment. The scope of this project covers the technical support needed before, during, and after treatment of the targeted subsurface environment using a new high-concentration formulation.

  2. PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-02

    In 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at the 100-N Area would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary. Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing strontium-90 flux to the Columbia River. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  3. E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    75' 00.955 L' E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CR CA.d M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decoaunissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M /4.0-03 kl 77.0% I - The attached elimination reconunendation was prepared in accordance rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The

  4. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  5. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-08-11

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  6. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  7. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  8. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  9. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-10-05

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  10. The Impact of the Annual Cycle on Cloudiness at Manus and Nauru

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a cloud effect of 0 is associated with clear-sky. These data have been smoothed using Gaussian filters with half-widths of 7 and 20 days (Figure 2). Figure 2. Shortwave radiative...

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  13. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  14. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  15. ARM - Education Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nauru Airport. The kiosk at Nauru. Two children at the TWP kiosk dedication at Nauru sport ARM Climate Research Facility headwear. Beginning in 2003, ARM Education and Outreach...

  16. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: High-Concentration Calcium-Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2010-09-01

    Following an evaluation of potential strontium-90 (90Sr) treatment technologies and their applicability under 100-NR-2 hydrogeologic conditions, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Fluor Hanford, Inc. (now CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company [CHPRC]), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at the 100-N Area should include apatite as the primary treatment technology. This agreement was based on results from an evaluation of remedial alternatives that identified the apatite permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology as the approach showing the greatest promise for reducing 90Sr flux to the Columbia River at a reasonable cost. This letter report documents work completed to date on development of a high-concentration amendment formulation and initial field-scale testing of this amendment solution.

  17. Interim Report: 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Low Concentration Calcium Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Xie, YuLong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2008-07-11

    Following an evaluation of potential Sr-90 treatment technologies and their applicability under 100-NR-2 hydrogeologic conditions, U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N Area will include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary (most likely phytoremediation). Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing Sr-90 flux to the river at a reasonable cost. In July 2005, aqueous injection, (i.e., the introduction of apatite-forming chemicals into the subsurface) was endorsed as the interim remedy and selected for field testing. Studies are in progress to assess the efficacy of in situ apatite formation by aqueous solution injection to address both the vadose zone and the shallow aquifer along the 300 ft of shoreline where Sr-90 concentrations are highest. This report describes the field testing of the shallow aquifer treatment.

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence of Island Effects on Nauru Cole, H., and Miller, E., National Center for Atmospheric Research Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Nauru...

  19. clements-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    South Pacific Regional Environmental Progamme Apia, Western Samoa A. Pitcher and J. Cain Nauru Department of Island Development and Industry Nauru Introduction The U.S....

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water (middle) and radar reflectivity (bottom) for 3 hours on 25 Nov. 1998. A straightforward example from Nauru A not so straightforward example from Nauru Surface rainfall...

  1. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-02-07

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  2. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  3. Summary of NR Program Prometheus Efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashcroft, John; Eshelman, Curtis

    2007-01-30

    The Naval Reactors Program led work on the development of a reactor plant system for the Prometheus space reactor program. The work centered on a 200 kWe electric reactor plant with a 15-20 year mission applicable to nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). After a review of all reactor and energy conversion alternatives, a direct gas Brayton reactor plant was selected for further development. The work performed subsequent to this selection included preliminary nuclear reactor and reactor plant design, development of instrumentation and control techniques, modeling reactor plant operational features, development and testing of core and plant material options, and development of an overall project plan. Prior to restructuring of the program, substantial progress had been made on defining reference plant operating conditions, defining reactor mechanical, thermal and nuclear performance, understanding the capabilities and uncertainties provided by material alternatives, and planning non-nuclear and nuclear system testing. The mission requirements for the envisioned NEP missions cannot be accommodated with existing reactor technologies. Therefore concurrent design, development and testing would be needed to deliver a functional reactor system. Fuel and material performance beyond the current state of the art is needed. There is very little national infrastructure available for fast reactor nuclear testing and associated materials development and testing. Surface mission requirements may be different enough to warrant different reactor design approaches and development of a generic multi-purpose reactor requires substantial sacrifice in performance capability for each mission.

  4. Summary of NR Program Prometheus Efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Ashcroft; C Eshelman

    2006-02-08

    The Naval Reactors Program led work on the development of a reactor plant system for the Prometheus space reactor program. The work centered on a 200 kWe electric reactor plant with a 15-20 year mission applicable to nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). After a review of all reactor and energy conversion alternatives, a direct gas Brayton reactor plant was selected for further development. The work performed subsequent to this selection included preliminary nuclear reactor and reactor plant design, development of instrumentation and control techniques, modeling reactor plant operational features, development and testing of core and plant material options, and development of an overall project plan. Prior to restructuring of the program, substantial progress had been made on defining reference plant operating conditions, defining reactor mechanical, thermal and nuclear performance, understanding the capabilities and uncertainties provided by material alternatives, and planning non-nuclear and nuclear system testing. The mission requirements for the envisioned NEP missions cannot be accommodated with existing reactor technologies. Therefore concurrent design, development and testing would be needed to deliver a functional reactor system. Fuel and material performance beyond the current state of the art is needed. There is very little national infrastructure available for fast reactor nuclear testing and associated materials development and testing. Surface mission requirements may be different enough to warrant different reactor design approaches and development of a generic multi-purpose reactor requires substantial sacrifice in performance capability for each mission.

  5. NR Pu SEIS Advisory 07272012_Clean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( 423) 7 51---8400 Valley A uthority: r rgolden@tva.gov DOE A nnounces I ssuance o f D raft S upplemental E nvironmental S tudy o n P lutonium D isposition WASHINGTON, D C - T...

  6. ARM - Visiting the TWP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Visiting the TWP Nauru Island from the air. Nauru Island from the air. The Tropical Western Pacific site consists of three diverse climate research facilities in Papua New Guinea, the Republic of Nauru, and Australia.

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2010 [Data Announcements, Facility News] New Datastream Identifies Nauru Data Influenced by Clouds Bookmark and Share A new data set that identifies periods when Nauru data may be affected by island-influenced clouds has been produced by Chuck Long, site scientist for the ARM Tropical Western Pacific site. The Nauru island effect (NIE) data set currently covers the period from September 2005 to May 2010 and will be updated periodically as new data are obtained. This data set will help

  8. Microsoft Word - DE-NR0000031-075.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Practices 471.2-1C Manual for Classified Matter Protection and Control 473.1-1 Physical Protection Program Manual 473.2-1A Firearms Qualification Courses Manual 473.2-2 ...

  9. NR Hanford OCMED Awd4 June 8 2012.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Consolidated Business Center 250 E. 5 th Street, Suite 500, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Media Contact: June 8, 2012 Cameron Hardy 509-308-4947 Cameron.hardy@rl.gov DOE ...

  10. 2008-07-31 Draft NR Block Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customer Name acquires from an identified or unidentified electricity-producing unit by contract purchase, and for which the amount received by Customer Name does not...

  11. Hanford Site - 100-NR-2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exist? Yes Sole Source Aquifer? No Basis for Exit Strategy: Design based Completion Environmental Indicators (EIs) Groundwater Migration Under Control? No Current Human...

  12. NR-WFR Plan for Comment July 8 2013.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monday, July 8, 2013 Bill Taylor - 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Public Comment Sought for Savannah River Site Workforce Restructuring Plan AIKEN, SC -- The Department of...

  13. NR SRNS Contract Extension Sept 6 2012.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 6, 2012 Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov DOE to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River Site to September 2016 Aiken, SC -- The...

  14. NR WIPP Transportation Award Jan 9 2012f.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center 250 E. 5 th Street, Suite 500, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Media Contact: For Immediate Release Bill Taylor 803-952-8564 January 9, 2012 bill.taylor@srs.gov DOE Selects Two Small Businesses to Truck Transuranic Waste to New Mexico Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded two small-business contracts to CAST Specialty Transportation, Inc. and Visionary Solutions, LLC, to provide trucking services to

  15. DOE and HBCU MOU FINAL NR.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AIKEN, SC 29802 NEWS MEDIA CONTACTS: IMMEDIATE RELEASE Hope Derrick, (803) 799-1100 Thursday, September 3, 2009 hope.derrick@mail.house.gov Julie Petersen, (803) 952-7690 julie.petersen@srs.gov DOE AND HBCUs PARTNER TO ADVANCE EDUCATIONAL AND FUTURE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR MINORITY STUDENTS IN SOUTH CAROLINA AND NORTHEAST GEORGIA Columbia, SC - Today the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and nine Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) of

  16. NR Pu SEIS Advisory 07152010 _final_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Municipal Center, North Augusta, SC, from 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. - August 24, 2010 - Best Western Stevens Inn, Carlsbad, NM, from 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Savannah River...

  17. Microsoft Word - 090723NR200WGW.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    move from the center of the Hanford Site to the river." The new treatment system will pump contaminated water from the ground and remove several chemical and radioactive...

  18. DOE-NR CAB New Members.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Citizens Advisory Board. The Savannah River Site (SRS) Citizens Advisory Board (CAB) is a community board that provides advice and recommendations, from a community...

  19. NR-CAB Meeting March 25-26 2013.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management cleanup programs. For addition information on the SRS Citizens Advisory Board visit: http:www.srs.govgeneraloutreachsrs-cabsrs-cab.html -DOE- SR-13-01...

  20. Microsoft Word - NR WIPP CONTRACT EXTENSION MAY 3 2010.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Extends Management and Operations Contract at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad, NM. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) today announced a two-year extension of the Washington TRU Solutions LLC management and operations (M&O) contract. As the WIPP M&O contractor, Washington TRU Solutions is responsible for managing the National Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program, which includes retrieval, characterization, transportation, and disposal activities at

  1. Microsoft Word - NR WIPP CONTRACT EXTENSION MAY 3 2010.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Extends Management and Operations Contract at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad, NM. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) today announced a...

  2. c5nr01856k 9878..9885 ++

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale View Article Online View Journal | View Issue 8 3 a i s 8 § £ 1 CrossMark click for updates Cite this: Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 9878 A new reversal mode in exchange coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic disks: distorted viscous vortexf Dustin A. Gilbert,3 Li Ye,a Aida Varea,b Sebastia Agramunt-Puig,c Nuria del Valle,c Carles Navau,c Jose Francisco Lopez-Barbera,c,d Kristen S. Buchanan,e Axel Hoffmann,f Alvar Sanchez,c Jordi Sort,c,g Kai Liu*a and Josep Nogues*c,d,g Received 23rd March

  3. Microsoft Word - DE-NR0000031-001.rtf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SDLlCITATIDNIMDDIFICATIDN OF CONTRACT 1:.CONTRACTID CODE IPAGE OF PAGES DE-N ROOOOO31 1 I 27 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISmONJPURCHASE REQ. NO. I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 001 Same as Block l6C NlA 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) Code I U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office P.O. Box 109 West Mifflin, PA 15122-0109 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. street, county, State end ZIP Code) J1... 9A. AMENDMENT OF

  4. Microsoft Word - DE-NR0000031-FY11.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    .~._-_._.-_._.._----------------------- AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATlON/MOOlFICATlON OF CONTRACT II. CONTRACT 10 CODE IPAGE~S 1 I 192 2. AMENDMENTIMODlFICATIONNO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISInONlPtJRCHASE REQ. NO. r PROJECT NO. (If~") 032 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 01111 7. ADMINISTEREDBY (lfotllerlMnltem 6) CODE T01111 NRLFO - PGH NRLFO - PGH US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NAVAL REACTORS LABORATORY FIELD OFFICE - PGH NAVAL REACTORS LABORATORY FIELD OFF POBOX 109 POBOX 109

  5. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the surrounding ocean. Nauru (orographic extent of 61 m) produces a daytime heat dome, below the prevailing easterlies, which acts as a catalyst in plume generation. These...

  6. ARM - Blog Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 1, 2013 [Blog, Field Notes] A Personal Note to Nauru Bookmark and Share Message from the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site Scientist, Chuck Long: Circa 1998, Chuck Long shares his mood after helping ARM colleagues install the observation site on Nauru Island. Circa 1998, Chuck Long shares his mood after helping ARM colleagues install the observation site on Nauru Island. I first arrived on Nauru in late 1998 to help install the ARM site. Yes, I had a shovel in hand, digging the trenches

  7. TWP Island Cloud Trail Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a key to understanding boundary layer cloud formation in the tropics. Except during El Nio periods, Nauru represents a divergent region of the ocean upwind from the...

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data at five ARM sites: Barrow, Alaska; Lamont, Oklahoma; Darwin, Australia; Manus, Papa New Guinea; and Nauru Island. In addition to bringing ARM the MMCR, Ken is also...

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A description of the four ARM sites (BillingsBRS, E13, Manus and Nauru) currently included in the Baseline Surface Radiation...

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Guinea and Republic of Nauru, the TWP Office has developed stable power and reliable communications systems to continuously operate an extensive suite of in-situ instruments,...

  11. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accepted the transfer of remaining ARM infrastructure and equipment; the official handover to the Nauru Department of Commerce, Industry and Environment occurred the following...

  12. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    remote balloon launcher. Like the Manus site, the Nauru research station reports Health and Status data each hour and delivers higher resolution data monthly to the ARM...

  13. ARM - TWP Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection...

  14. ARM - TWP Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  15. ARM - Information for Guest Scientists

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  16. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004). For Manus and Nauru, an 8-month running composite fit is used for the clear-sky total downwelling shortwave (SW), with fit coefficients for the clear-sky ratio of...

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Radiative...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    residuals from total heat and moisture budgets, or satellite observations. The long time series of observations taken at the ARM sites on Nauru and Manus provides a more direct...

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Radiometers During Aerosols99, the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), and Nauru99* Miller, M.A. A Survey of the Current State of the DOE ARM Millimeter Cloud Radars, the ...

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    students crowd around the new ARM educational kiosk to learn more about climate change. Surround by the Pacific Ocean, the Republic of Nauru is one of three sites that make...

  20. SCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    Forcing data, suitable for use with single column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs), have been derived from NWP analyses for the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites of Manus Island and Nauru.

  1. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Energy Budget Measurements from Nauru99 C. W. Fairall, J. E. Hare, A. A. Grachev, and A. B. White National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown conducted a series of measurements in transit to and in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site on Nauru in June-July 1999 as part

  2. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observations of High-Level Cirrus Clouds by the NOAA Depolarization Lidar During Nauru99 J. M. Intrieri and S. Sandberg National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Abstract During the Nauru99 field campaign, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) depolarization and backscatter lidar (DABUL) obtained cloud data from aboard the research vessel Ron Brown. This lidar system, which obtains information on cloud

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbulent Surface Flux Measurements from Nauru99 C. W. Fairall, J. E. Hare, and A. A. Grachev National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Research Vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown conducted a series of measurements in transit to and in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site on Nauru in June-July 1999 as part of a joint

  4. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru Submitter: Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Matthews, S., J. M. Hacker, J. Cole, J. Hare, C. N. Long, and R. M. Reynolds, (2007): Modification of the atmospheric boundary layer by a small island: observations from Nauru, MWR, Vol. 135, No. 3, pages 891–905. Figure 1.

  5. ARM - Traditional Knowledge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomTraditional Knowledge Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Traditional Knowledge An elder from Nauru is interviewed for the TWP kiosks. An elder from Nauru is interviewed for the TWP kiosks. Traditional knowledge can be defined as a cumulative body of knowledge and

  6. ARM - Kiosks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomKiosks Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Kiosks A kiosk was installed at the Nauru airport in November 2006. A kiosk was installed at the Nauru airport in November 2006. The North Slope of Alaska kiosk was installed in October 2003. The North Slope of Alaska kiosk was

  7. ARM - Campaign Instrument - island-guest-instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsisland-guest-instruments Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Nauru Island guest instruments (ISLAND-GUEST-INSTRUMENTS) Instrument Categories Radiometric, Surface Meteorology Campaigns Nauru99 Campaign [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 1999.06.16 - 1999.07.15 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf)

  8. N.R. 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; HEAT...

  9. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Fall 2010 Tracer Infiltration Test (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Greenwood, William J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Horner, Jacob A.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2011-04-14

    The primary objectives of the tracer infiltration test were to 1) determine whether field-scale hydraulic properties for the compacted roadbed materials and underlying Hanford fm. sediments comprising the zone of water table fluctuation beneath the site are consistent with estimates based laboratory-scale measurements on core samples and 2) characterize wetting front advancement and distribution of soil moisture achieved for the selected application rate. These primary objectives were met. The test successfully demonstrated that 1) the remaining 2 to 3 ft of compacted roadbed material below the infiltration gallery does not limit infiltration rates to levels that would be expected to eliminate near surface application as a viable amendment delivery approach and 2) the combined aqueous and geophysical monitoring approaches employed at this site, with some operational adjustments based on lessons learned, provides an effective means of assessing wetting front advancement and the distribution of soil moisture achieved for a given solution application. Reasonably good agreement between predicted and observed tracer and moisture front advancement rates was observed. During the first tracer infiltration test, which used a solution application rate of 0.7 cm/hr, tracer arrivals were observed at the water table (10 to 12 ft below the bottom of the infiltration gallery) after approximately 5 days, for an advancement rate of approximately 2 ft/day. This advancement rate is generally consistent with pre-test modeling results that predicted tracer arrival at the water table after approximately 5 days (see Figure 8, bottom left panel). This agreement indicates that hydraulic property values specified in the model for the compacted roadbed materials and underlying Hanford formation sediments, which were based on laboratory-scale measurements, are reasonable estimates of actual field-scale conditions. Additional work is needed to develop a working relationship between resistivity change and the associated change in moisture content so that 4D images of moisture content change can be generated. Results from this field test will be available for any future Ca-citrate-PO4 amendment infiltration tests, which would be designed to evaluate the efficacy of using near surface application of amendments to form apatite mineral phases in the upper portion of the zone of water table fluctuation.

  10. SRS Biomass Startup NR-03 12 12 - DOE FINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 full- time jobs onsite and support the local logging community. "Developing clean, renewable sources is an important part of President Obama's all-of-the-above approach to...

  11. http://www.bls.gov/news.release/osh.nr0.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    industry injury and illness cases reported nationally in 2009 were of a more serious nature that involved days away from work, job transfer, or restriction--commonly referred to...

  12. http://www.bls.gov/news.release/osh.nr0.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... compared to 2008--led by a decline among the 'Skin diseases' category which accounted for nearly 47 percent of the decline in illness cases among private industry establishments. ...

  13. NR-SRS TRU Waste Shipments Milestone June 4 2013.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Savannah River Site met two new milestone records towards analyzing, preparing, packaging and shipping radioactive transuranic (TRU) waste bound for a disposal site in New...

  14. Microsoft Word - NR DRAFT RFP WIPP M&O APR 1 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 1, 2011 william.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals Seeking Contractor to Manage, Operate Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Cincinnati -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Draft Request for Proposal (RFP) seeking a management and operations contractor to maintain the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) and manage the DOE National Transuranic Waste (TRU) Program in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The estimated value of the anticipated contract is from $130 to $160 million

  15. Microsoft Word - NR WIPP TECH ASSISTANCE RFQ MAY 3 2010.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Seeks Technical Assistance Contractor at New Mexico Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Cincinnati -- The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) today for a technical assistance contract to the Carlsbad Field Office and the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. This acquisition is under a General Services Administration (GSA) Federal Supply Schedule. The Department intends to award a single task order with a three-year performance period with options that can

  16. Microsoft Word - NR WIPP TRANSPORT RFP MARCH 30 2011f2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 30, 2011 william.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov DOE Seeks Trucking Services for Transuranic Waste Shipments Cincinnati -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today will issue a Request for Proposals for the continuation of carrier services to transport transuranic waste (TRU) between DOE sites and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The transportation of TRU waste is accomplished by contracted trucking carriers that ship the waste via public highways on custom designed

  17. Darwin : The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, William E.; Jones, L. A.; Baldwin, T.; Nitschke, K.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998, a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. The Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites are operated through collaborative agreements with the PNG National Weather Service, The Nauru Department of Industry and Economic Development (IED), and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Special Services Unit (SSU) respectively. All ARM TWP activities in the region are coordinated with the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) based in Apia, Samoa. The Darwin ARM site and its role in the ARM TWP Program are discussed.

  18. E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CT Perrine Field, FL Bloomington, IN Layfayette, IN Note 1 South Bend, IN Note 2 Cambridge, MA Medford, MA Baltimore, MD . 1 NAME (Continued) University of Michigan St. Louis...

  19. mitrescu-c revised

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 LIRAD Analysis of Equatorial Cirrus at the TWP (Manus Island and Nauru) CART Sites C. Mitrescu, R. T. Austin, C.M.R. Platt, and G. L. Stephens Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction The purpose of this work is to obtain high-cloud emittance and optical depth over the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) (Manus Island and Nauru) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites on a routine basis using the lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) method. Current operation of the micropulse lidar

  20. Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesTropical Western Pacific TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Tropical Western Pacific-Inactive Manus, Papua New Guinea: 2° 3' 39.64" S, 147° 25' 31.43" E Nauru Island: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Darwin, Australia: 12° 25' 28.56" S,

  1. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiometers and Radiosondes During Nauru99 E. R. Westwater and Y. Han Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado B. B. Stankov National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington B. M. Lesht Argonne National Laboratory Argonne,

  2. ARM - Datastreams - avhrrhovmuller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsavhrrhovmuller Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AVHRRHOVMULLER AVHRR: Hovmuller diagrams for Manus and Nauru Active Dates 1996.11.01 - 2002.07.01

  3. ARM - VAP Product - lbtm3minnisnau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    minnisnau Documentation lbtm-minnis : XDC documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : LBTM3MINNISNAU Layered Bispectral Threshold Method (LBTM) cloud products derived from GMS-5,Nauru

  4. ARM XDC Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    satellite GOES13 Area Covered The areas covered are: SGP 32N-42N, 91W-105W TWP Darwin: 5S-17S, 125E-136E Manus: 1.5S-2.5S, 147E-148E Nauru: 0-1S, 166.5E-167.5E Entire TWP Domain:...

  5. ARM XDC Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    goesminnis-acfX1.c1: 3x3 0.3 deg grid cells around Central Facility TWP Darwin: 5S-17S, 125E-136E Manus: 1.5S-2.5S, 147E-148E Nauru: 0-1S, 166.5E-167.5E Entire TWP Domain:...

  6. Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Nauru Island Effect Study (NIES) IOP Science Plan June 2001 Chuck Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ARM TWP Site Scientist, NIES IOP Lead Scientist Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research C. Long., DOE/SC-ARM-0505 Contents 1. Background ............................................................................................................................... 1 2. Scientific

  7. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr14gacnau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gacnau Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AVHRR14GACNAU Global Area Coverage 4-km resolution files for Nauru

  8. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr14lacnau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lacnau Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AVHRR14LACNAU AVHRR (NOAA 14), 1-km res., local area coverage of Nauru

  9. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr15gacnau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gacnau Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AVHRR15GACNAU Global Area Coverage 4-km resolution files for Nauru

  10. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr16gacnau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gacnau Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AVHRR16GACNAU Global Area Coverage 4-km resolution files for Nauru

  11. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr16lacnau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lacnau Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AVHRR16LACNAU AVHRR (NOAA 16), 1-km res., local area coverage of Nauru

  12. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr17lacnau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lacnau Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AVHRR17LACNAU AVHRR (NOAA 17), 1-km res., local area coverage of Nauru from Kwajalein, provided by Aeromet Active Dates 2002.09.15

  13. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  14. Research and development on ocean thermal energy conversion in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uehara, H.

    1982-08-01

    The study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) in Japan has been conducted under the leadership of a team of the ''Sunshine Project'', a national new energy development project promoted by the Ministry of International Trade and Industries (MITI) since 1974. At present, two experimental OTEC power plants -Nauru's OTEC plant and Imari's OTEC plant are operating. In this paper, the review of research and development activity of these two OTEC plants in Japan is made.

  15. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examination of Island Effects on Near-Surface Bulk Meteorology and Air-Sea Fluxes from the Nauru99 Field Program C. W. Fairall and M. J. Post National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado J. E. Hare, A. B. White, and A. A. Grachev Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The

  16. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary Layer Cloud Climatology at the ARM TWP Nauru Site P. Kollias Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science/ Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado B.A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Boundary layer (BL) clouds are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 2 km of the Earth's atmosphere. Data on fair-weather cumuli have also received relatively little recent

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2005 [Facility News] Instruments Added and Upgraded at Tropical Western Pacific Sites Bookmark and Share Challenges presented by the remoteness and environmental conditions at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Tropical Western Pacific locale are offset by the unique climatological data collected by the measurement instruments located at its sites, including Nauru Island shown above. Located about 8,000 miles from the United States along the equator near northern Australia, the Tropical

  18. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Darwin Site-InactiveInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility, Darwin, Australia Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through the ARM Aerial Facility. MFRSR Multifilter

  19. post-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ETL Instrumentation on R/V Ronald H. Brown for the Nauru99 Campaign M. J. Post, C. W. Fairall, D. A. Hazen, R. M. Hardesty, W. L. Eberhard, and B. E. Martner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado V. G. Wulfmeyer National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction The 1996 Combined Sensor Program

  20. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Western Pacific The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility established its second research facility, the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) field measurement site, in 1996. This site consists of three research facilities: Manus (established in 1996), Nauru (1998), and Darwin (2002). The data collected at these sites help scientists better understand the role of the tropics in modulating or controlling significant aspects of the global climate and improve models

  1. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InactiveInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Tropical Western Pacific Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through the ARM Aerial Facility. MFRSR Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer

  2. ARM - TWP Darwin Site - Aussie Trivia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InactiveTWP Darwin Site-InactiveTWP Darwin Site - Aussie Trivia TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Darwin Site - Aussie Trivia Did you know... The first beer brewed in Australia was in 1796 by John Boston, thus starting Australia's lifelong love for the amber nectar!

  3. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsnauflx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsncepgfsnauflx Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : NCEPGFSNAUFLX NCEP GFS: surface variables at Nauru Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2010.07.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Radiometric, Surface Properties Originating Instrument National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System (NCEPGFS)

  4. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsnaupprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsncepgfsnaupprof Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : NCEPGFSNAUPPROF NCEP GFS: vertical profiles of met quantities at standard pressures, at Nauru Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2010.07.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties Originating Instrument National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System

  5. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsnausfc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsncepgfsnausfc Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : NCEPGFSNAUSFC NCEP GFS: flux variables at Nauru Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2010.07.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Surface Properties Originating Instrument National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System (NCEPGFS) Measurements The

  6. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsnausprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsncepgfsnausprof Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : NCEPGFSNAUSPROF NCEP GFS: vertical profiles of met quantities at sigma layers, at Nauru Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2010.07.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties Originating Instrument National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System

  7. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsnauzprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsncepgfsnauzprof Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : NCEPGFSNAUZPROF NCEP GFS: vertical profiles of met quantities at standard heights, at Nauru Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2010.07.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties Originating Instrument National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System

  8. ARM - Lesson Plans: Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Western Pacific Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Tropical Western Pacific These lesson plans were developed using the two volumes of Climate Change and Sea Level from the curriculum development project for the Tropical Western Pacific schools in Nauru,

  9. ARM - Datastreams - avhrr12lacnau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lacnau Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AVHRR12LACNAU AVHRR (NOAA 12),1-km res., local area coverage of Nauru from Kwajalein, provided by Aeromet Active Dates 2002.04.16 - 2002.09.10

  10. Impact of cloud microphysics on squall line organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Observations to Validate and Improve Cloud Micrfophysical Schemes Wojciech Grabowski (PI) Hugh Morrison, Sally McFarlane (Co-PIs) Hanna Pawlowska (Co-I) CMWG Breakout, ARM STM 2008 Two major efforts of project * Warm clouds. We will use microphysical retrievals from Nauru and SGP (including CLASIC), together with aircraft observations (RICO) to assess model simulations of shallow cumulus. * Focus is on treatment of turbulent- microphysical interactions and impact on optical properties. *

  11. In-service packet with pics.pmd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Into The Classroom ARM Education Program North Slope of Alaska 2002 What is ARM? What is ARM Education? The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (here, "radiation" means sunlight and radiant heat) is the largest global climate change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The ARM Program has data collecting sites in three very different places in the world: the Tropical Western Pacific (Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Nauru), in the Southern

  12. Microsoft Word - Gage-KS.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intercomparisons of Cloud Observations from the AL S-band Profiler and the ETL K-band Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar on the R/V Ronald H. Brown during Nauru99 K. S. Gage and D. A. Carter National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Johnston and C. R. Williams Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado M. Ryan Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado D. Hazen and B. W. Orr National

  13. MS_08_15.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Changes to the Merged Sounding VAP David Troyan and Mike Jensen, BNL Jim Mather and Sally McFarlane, PNNL Eli Mlawer and Jennifer Delamere, AER, Inc. Mark Miller, Rutger University Dave Turner, University of Wisconsin Jay Mace, University of Utah Merged Sounding Data Availability SGP: NSA: TWP Manus: TWP Nauru: TWP Darwin: 2000 - 2005 2004 - 2007 2006 2004 - 2006 2002 - 2006 Two versions of Merged Sounding exist. The original version is continuing to be run for all permanent sites; the

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is one of the four fixed sites. It consists of three climate research facilities; the Manus facility on Los Negros Island in Manus, Papua New Guinea (established in 1996); the Nauru facility on Nauru Island, Republic of Nauru (1998); and the Darwin facility in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (2002). The operations are supported by government agencies in each host country. Covering the area roughly between 10 degrees N and 10 degrees S of the equator and from 130 degrees E to 167 degrees E, the TWP locale includes a region that plays a large role in the interannual variability observed in the global climate system. More than 250,000 TWP data sets from 1996 to the present reside in the ARM Archive. Begin at the TWP information page for links or access data directly from the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is next to the Pacific "warm pool" - off the coast of Papua New Guinea, just north of Australia. The "warm pool" is important because it gives off heat and moisture to the atmosphere above it, forming deep convective cloud systems. These cloud systems control the amount of solar energy that reaches the earth's surface and the amount of the earth's heat energy that can escape into space. The TWP site has locations in Manus, Nauru, and

  16. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TWP Storm Types TWP Storm Types Fig. 1. ARM TWP sites experience different convective clouds within the TWP: (1) ITCZ, (2) SPCZ, (3) Island convection, and (4) Coastal convection. ARM sites: D = Darwin, M = Manus, N = Nauru). Plot color scheme: yellow is cold, blue is warm. 1 2 3 4 M M N N D D 6 December, 2005, 5:30 GMT 6 December, 2005, 5:30 GMT 1. OVERVIEW 1. OVERVIEW A. Previous Work A. Previous Work Tracked clouds with geostationary satellite data to determine the context of the cloud state

  18. ARM - VAP Product - rhbarscl1cloth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsarsclrhbarscl1cloth Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : RHBARSCL1CLOTH ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms, Ron Brown ship, Nauru Active Dates 1999.06.15 - 1999.07.15 Originating VAP Process Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations : ARSCL Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Dataset of the Evaluation of Large-Scale Models Using ARM Data at Manus and Nauru Jakob, C. and May, P.T., BMRC Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The use of ARM data for model evaluation is a first necessary step in achieving one of the programs foremost goals, the improvement of parameterizations of clouds and radiation in GCMs. However, most of the data in the ARM archive is representative for time and space scales that are incompatible with the large

  20. ARM - VAP Product - armbeatm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsarmbearmbeatm Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095313 DOI: 10.5439/1039931 Central Facility, Lamont, OK (SGP C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039932 Central Facility, Barrow AK (NSA C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039933 Central Facility, Manus I., PNG (TWP C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039934 Central Facility, Nauru Island (TWP C2) DOI: 10.5439/1039935 Central Facility, Darwin, Australia (TWP C3) [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We

  1. ARM - VAP Product - armbecldrad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsarmbearmbecldrad Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095314 DOI: 10.5439/1039926 Central Facility, Lamont, OK (SGP C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039927 Central Facility, Barrow AK (NSA C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039928 Central Facility, Manus I., PNG (TWP C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039929 Central Facility, Nauru Island (TWP C2) DOI: 10.5439/1039930 Central Facility, Darwin, Australia (TWP C3) [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We

  2. ARM - PI Product - SCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsSCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : SCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses Forcing data, suitable for use with single column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs), have been derived from NWP analyses for the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites of Manus Island and Nauru. Data Details

  3. ARM - Campaign Instrument - lbtm-minnis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentslbtm-minnis Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Minnis Cloud Products Using LBTM Algorithm (LBTM-MINNIS) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties, Satellite Observations Campaigns ARESE II IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2000.02.01 - 2000.04.05 Nauru99 Campaign [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 1999.06.16 - 1999.07.15 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are

  4. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_2008.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEASUREMENTS OF VERTICAL VELOCITY IN BOUNDARY LAYER CLOUDS P. Kollias 1 , B. A. Albrecht 2 and V. Ghate 2 1.McGill University, Montreal Canada 2.University of Miami, Miami Florida Fig. 1 Monthly-averaged hydrometeor (cloud+precipitation) fraction using MMCR-only observations at the Nauru (C2) ARM Tropical Western Pacific site Progress has been made in our ability to observe the vertical velocity in clouds using the ARM MMCR's (Kollias et al., 2007; Kollias and Albrecht, 2000; Kollias et al.,

  6. EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE FOR THE 100-NR-1 OPERABLE UNIT TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL INTERIM ACTION RECORD OF DECISION AND 100-NR-1/100-NR-2 OPERABLE UNIT INTERIM ACTION RECORD OF DECISION January 2003 SITE NAME AND LOCATION U.S. Department of Energy 100 Areas 100-NR-1 and 100-NR-2 Operable Units, Hanford Site Benton County, Washington INTRODUCTION TO THE SITE AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  7. Collaborative Research: ARM observations for the development and evaluation of models and parameterizations of cloudy boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Bruce,

    2013-07-12

    This is a collaborative project with Dr. Ping Zhu at Florida International University. It was designed to address key issues regarding the treatment of boundary layer cloud processes in climate models with UM’s research focusing on the analyses of ARM cloud radar observations from MMCR and WACR and FIU’s research focusing on numerical simulations of boundary layer clouds. This project capitalized on recent advancements in the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) processing and the development of the WACR (at the SGP) to provide high temporal and spatial resolution Doppler cloud radar measurements for characterizing in-cloud turbulence, large-eddy circulations, and high resolution cloud structures of direct relevance to high resolution numerical modeling studies. The principal focus of the observational component of this collaborative study during this funding period was on stratocumulus clouds over the SGP site and fair-weather cumuli over the Nauru site. The statistical descriptions of the vertical velocity structures in continental stratocumulus clouds and in the Nauru shallow cumuli that are part of this study represents the most comprehensive observations of the vertical velocities in boundary layer clouds to date and were done in collaboration with Drs. Virendra Ghate and Pavlos Kollias.

  8. Carbon Connections | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connections Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Connections Place: Norfolk, England, United Kingdom Zip: NR4 7TJ Sector: Carbon Product: Carbon Connections links partner...

  9. Dabbrook Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dabbrook Services Place: Great Yarmouth, United Kingdom Zip: NR31 6PT Sector: Services Product: Provides design and engineering...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mariapoienar@yahoo.com ; National Institute for Research and Development in Electrochemistry and Condensed Matter, Plautius Andronescu Str Nr 1, 300224 Timisoara ; Hardy,...

  11. University of Regina researchers complete milestone in major international

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics project at JLab (University of Regina) | Jefferson Lab uregina.ca/external/communications/releases/current/nr-03232012.html Submitted: Friday, March 23

  12. Cimon, Engstrom, Mattson, Pollet, Vanni, Suyama Page 1 of 3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 RAP Committee: Draft Advice re: 100-N Draft A, v.2 Cimon, Engstrom, Mattson, Pollet, Vanni, Suyama Page 1 of 3 Draft Advice re: Proposed Plan for Remediation of the 100-NR-1 and 100-NR-2 Operable Units (DOE/RL-2012-68, Draft A) Background The 100-N area is the last of the 100 Area, River Corridor, RI/FS and Proposed Plans for submittal. The 100-N area consists of two Decision Units, NR-1, which is the source unit, and NR-2, the groundwater unit. There are 234 facilities, of which 76% have

  13. Econic Renewable Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Econic Renewable Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Econic Renewable Energy Solutions Place: Norfolk, United Kingdom Zip: NR 105PQ Sector: Renewable Energy Product:...

  14. Microsoft Word - S09799_EnhancedMR.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Domestic Well Data This page intentionally left blank DETECTION LIMIT PARAMETER LOCATION CODE UN- CERTAINTY ZONE COMPL FLOW REL. REPORT DATE: 3/7/2013 2:01 pm CLASSIC GROUNDWATER QUALITY DATA BY PARAMETER WITH ZONE (USEE201) FOR SITE RVT01, Riverton Processing Site UNITS QUALIFIERS: LAB DATA QA RESULT SAMPLE: DATE ID LOCATION TYPE NR N mg/L 0405 N001 06/13/2012 - - # 113 WL Alkalinity, Total (As CaCO3) NR N mg/L 0405 N001 12/03/2012 - - # 38 WL NR N mg/L 0422 N001 06/12/2012 - - # 168 WL NR N

  15. Careers & the disABLED Career Expo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: Ronald Reagan Bldg, Washington, DCAttendees:  Terri Sosa (Science)POC:  Donna FriendWebsite: http://bit.ly/1tlHhNr

  16. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of fluids within the Baca...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by conductive reheating during downward movement. Chemical modeling using the EQ3NR computer code indicates chemical stability with the mineral assemblage quartz, albite, K-mica,...

  17. Prometheus Reactor I&C Software Development Methodology, for Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hamilton

    2005-07-30

    The purpose of this letter is to submit the Reactor Instrumentation and Control (I&C) software life cycle, development methodology, and programming language selections and rationale for project Prometheus to NR for approval. This letter also provides the draft Reactor I&C Software Development Process Manual and Reactor Module Software Development Plan to NR for information.

  18. Nitrogen-doped and simultaneously reduced graphene oxide with superior dispersion as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Cheol-Ho; Yun, Jin-Mun; Lee, Sungho; Jo, Seong Mu; Yoo, Sung Jong; Cho, Eun Ae; Khil, Myung-Seob; Joh, Han-Ik

    2014-11-15

    Nitrogen doped graphene oxide (Nr-GO) with properties suitable for electrocatalysts is easily synthesized using phenylhydrazine as a reductant at relatively low temperature. The reducing agent removes various oxygen functional groups bonded to graphene oxide and simultaneously dope the nitrogen atoms bonded with phenyl group all over the basal planes and edge sites of the graphene. The Nr-GO exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reaction compared to the commercial carbon black and graphene oxide due to the electronic modification of the graphene structure. In addition, Nr-GO shows excellent dispersibility in various solvent due to the dopant molecules.

  19. TUNL Ph.D. Degrees Theses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14C. Duke University, 1983, Supervisor: N.R. Roberson. Download PDF (1.23 MB) Steven E. King, Radiative Capture of Protons and Deuterons into 3He. Duke University, 1983,...

  20. Long-Term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    non-refractory submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1) including organic aerosol (OA), sulfate (SO 4 2- ), nitrate (NO 3 - ), ammonium (NH 4 + ), and chloride (Cl-). In this study,...

  1. Microsoft Word - 2012 Research Day Winners.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C-NR Marcus Weigand, MPA-CMMS Blake Sturtevant, MPA-11 Satish Karra, EES-16 Graham King, LANSCE-LC Eric Daub, EES-17T-CNLS Louise Evans, NEN-1 Benjamin Ueland, MPA-CMMS Yan...

  2. Pellet Zone Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pellet Zone Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pellet Zone Ltd Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: NR19 1AE Sector: Biomass Product: UK based biomass pellet trading firm....

  3. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    James H. Clarke 1 , Allen G. Croff 1 , Lyndsey Fern Fyffe 1 , Michael Gochfeld 3 , Michael ... River Corridor 100-BC, 100-KR, 100-HR-3 (D&H) primarily chromium 100-NR (strontium-90) ...

  4. CX-005033: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oil Cleanup in 100-NR-2CX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 01/19/2011Location(s): Hanford, WashingtonOffice(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office

  5. Wind Power Renewables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Power Renewables Place: Norfolk, United Kingdom Zip: NR29 5BG Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind project developer Coordinates: 36.846825, -76.285069 Show Map Loading...

  6. Scira Offshore Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: NR32 1DE Sector: Wind energy Product: Developer of the Sheringham Shoals offshore wind farm. References: Scira Offshore Energy1 This article is a stub. You can...

  7. Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste to return of research reactor fuel of U.S. origin. In addition, Snl supports the nrC in the development of technical bases to support various rule-making activities...

  8. NREL Photoelectrode Research Advances Hydrogen Production Efforts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    catalysts. Technical Contacts: Jing Gu, Jing.Gu@nrel.gov; John Turner, John.Turner@nrel.gov Reference: Gu, J.; Y. Yan; J.L. Young; K. Steirer; N.R. Neale; J.A. Turner....

  9. Microsoft Word - Participants_Web.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Day 2015 i Postdoc Participants Adamska, Lyudmyla T-1 Poster 003 Ahmed, Towfiq T-4 Poster 004 Barker, Beau C-NR Poster 005 Beedle, Christopher MPA-CMMS Poster 006 Bennett, ...

  10. CX-001627: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    627: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001627: Categorical Exclusion Determination Test Reactor Cask Implementation CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 04/12/2010 Location(s): Idaho Office(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy This proposed action is a process and facility modification. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) uses the Naval Reactors (NR) Casks to transport test trains between the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) Expended Core Facility and the ATR. The NR Casks, however, are approaching

  11. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 SECTION A. Project Title: Test Reactor Cask Implementation. SECTION B. Project Description: This proposed action is a process and facility modification. Background / Purpose & Need The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) uses the Naval Reactors (NR) Casks to transport test trains between the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) Expended Core Facility and the ATR. The Naval Reactor (NR) Casks, however, are approaching the end of their design life. In 1997, Bettis initiated a contract for construction of

  12. Boundary Layer Cloudiness Parameterizations Using ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Albrecht

    2004-09-15

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: (1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, (2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the processes responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and (3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: (1) develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, (2) evaluate the capability and limitations of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low- signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak no n-precipitating clouds, (3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and (4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  13. Final Technical Report ARM DOE Grant #DE-FG02-03ER63520 Parameterizations of Shortwave Radiactive Properties of Broken Clouds from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Bruce, A.

    2006-06-19

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: 1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, 2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the pocesses responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and 3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: 1)develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, 2) evaluate the capability and limitation of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low-signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak non-precipitating clouds, 3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and 4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  14. Mineral industries of Australia, Canada, and Oceania (including a discussion of Antarctica's mineral resources). Mineral perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbell, C.L.; Lyday, T.Q.; Newman, H.H.

    1985-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines report gives the mineral industry highlights of two of the world's major mineral producing countries, Australia and Canada, and seven Pacific island nations or territories--Fiji, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Nauru, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. The mineral resources of Antarctica are also discussed. Because of the size of the Australian and Canadian mineral industries, summary reviews are presented for each of the States, Provinces, or Territories. The most current information available from all nations is given on major minerals or mineral-commodity production, share of world production, and reserves. Reported also are significant mining companies, locations and capacities of their main facilities, and their share of domestic production. Other information is provided on mineral-related trade with the United States, government mineral policy, energy production-consumption and trade, the mining industry labor force, and prospects for the mineral industry. Maps show the locations of selected mineral deposits, oilfields and gasfields, mines, and processing facilities including iron and steel plants, nonferrous smelters and refineries, and cement plants, as well as infrastructure pertinent to the mineral industry.

  15. Quantifying Diurnal Cloud Radiative Effects by Cloud Type in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Long, Charles N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-06-01

    Cloud radiative effects are examined using long-term datasets collected at the three Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities in the tropical western Pacific. We quantify the surface radiation budget, cloud populations, and cloud radiative effects by partitioning the data by cloud type, time of day, and as a function of large scale modes of variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase and wet/dry seasons at Darwin. The novel facet of our analysis is that we break aggregate cloud radiative effects down by cloud type across the diurnal cycle. The Nauru cloud populations and subsequently the surface radiation budget are strongly impacted by ENSO variability whereas the cloud populations over Manus only shift slightly in response to changes in ENSO phase. The Darwin site exhibits large seasonal monsoon related variations. We show that while deeper convective clouds have a strong conditional influence on the radiation reaching the surface, their limited frequency reduces their aggregate radiative impact. The largest source of shortwave cloud radiative effects at all three sites comes from low clouds. We use the observations to demonstrate that potential model biases in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and mean cloud frequency would lead to larger errors in the surface energy budget compared to biases in the timing of the diurnal cycle of cloud frequency. Our results provide solid benchmarks to evaluate model simulations of cloud radiative effects in the tropics.

  16. Enhanced photoresponse of conformal TiO{sub 2}/Ag nanorod array-based Schottky photodiodes fabricated via successive glancing angle and atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi; Cansizoglu, Hilal; Cansizoglu, Mehmet Fatih; Karabacak, Tansel; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors demonstrate a proof of concept nanostructured photodiode fabrication method via successive glancing angle deposition (GLAD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The fabricated metal-semiconductor nanorod (NR) arrays offer enhanced photoresponse compared to conventional planar thin-film counterparts. Silver (Ag) metallic NR arrays were deposited on Ag-film/Si templates by utilizing GLAD. Subsequently, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) was deposited conformally on Ag NRs via ALD. Scanning electron microscopy studies confirmed the successful formation of vertically aligned Ag NRs deposited via GLAD and conformal deposition of TiO{sub 2} on Ag NRs via ALD. Following the growth of TiO{sub 2} on Ag NRs, aluminum metallic top contacts were formed to complete the fabrication of NR-based Schottky photodiodes. Nanostructured devices exhibited a photo response enhancement factor of 1.49??10{sup 2} under a reverse bias of 3 V.

  17. SREL Reprint #3036

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Extreme arsenic resistance by the acidophilic archaeon ‘Ferroplasma acidarmanus’ Fer1 Craig Baker-Austin1,6, Mark Dopson1,2, Margaret Wexler1, R. Gary Sawers3, Ann Stemmler4, Barry P. Rosen4, and Philip L. Bond1,5,7 1School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK 2Molecular Biology, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden 3Department of Molecular Biology, John Innes Centre, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Wayne state

  18. Issue framework for potential 100-N advice (lead Issue Manager: Engstrom

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    framework for potential 100-N advice (lead Issue Manager: Engstrom) Background information The 100-N area is the last of the 100 Area, River Corridor, RI/FS and Proposed Plans for submittal. The 100-N area consists of two Decision Units, NR-1, which is the source unit, and NR-2, the groundwater unit. There are 234 facilities, of which 76% have been demolished, and there are 175 waste sites and four RCRA TSD sites. Of these waste sites, 18 have been cleaned up and 78 have been scheduled for start

  19. Polymers incorporating covalently attached organoimido polyoxometalates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maatta, Eric A.; Moore, Aaron R.

    2004-03-16

    New polyoxometalate compounds and polymers comprising recurring monomers of those compounds are provided. The compounds are formed by replacing at least one oxide of the starting polyoxometalate with an organoimido (NR) group bonded to the polyoxometalate via a triple bond to the nitrogen atom. The R of the (NR) group comprises a reactive functional group which renders the compound readily polymerizable, alone or with other monomers (e.g., divinylbenzene), to form the inventive polymers. Additionally, a countercation (e.g., bis(tetra-n-butylammonium)) can be mixed with the polyoxometalate compounds in order to neutralize the negative charge thereof as well as to make those compounds more soluble in organic solvents.

  20. Presentation Title

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4/20/2015 2:07 PM Budget Atomization April 2015 National Nuclear Security Administration 2 4/20/2015 2:07 PM Overview of NNSA Budget Structure As of May 2014: * 4 Treasury Symbols o Weapons Activities (WA), Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), Naval Reactors (NR), and Federal Salaries and Expenses (FSE) o Federal personnel accounts in FSE, WA, and NR have sub-accounts within 4 symbols o Congressional approval required to move funds between * 166 Congressional Controls o 123 (74%) < $50M o

  1. Papers Published April 1, 1998 - March 31, 1999

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... R.G. Korteling, W.G. Lynch, K.B. Morley, E.C. Pollacco, E. Ramakrishnan, L.P. Remsberg, M.B. Tsang, C. Volant, S.J. Yennello, H. Xi and N.R. Yoder (ISIS Collaboration) Nucl Phys. ...

  2. The improvement in functional characteristics of eco-friendly composites made of natural rubber and cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araki, Kunihiro; Kaneko, Shonosuke; Matsumoto, Koki; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Arao, Yoshihiko; Nagatani, Asahiro

    2015-05-22

    We investigated the efficient use of cellulose to resolve the problem of the depletion of fossil resources. In this study, as the biomass material, the green composite based on natural rubber (NR) and the flake-shaped cellulose particles (FSCP) was produced. In order to further improvement of functional characteristics, epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) was also used instead of NR. The FSCP were produced by mechanical milling in a planetary ball mill with a grinding aid as a cellulose aggregation inhibitor. Moreover, talc and mica particles were used to compare with FSCP. NR and ENR was mixed with vulcanizing agents and then each filler was added to NR compound in an internal mixer. The vulcanizing agents are as follows: stearic acid, zinc oxide, sulfur, and vulcanization accelerator. The functionalities of the composites were evaluated by a vibration-damping experiment and a gas permeability experiment. As a result, we found that FSCP filler has effects similar to (or more than) inorganic filler in vibration-damping and O{sub 2} barrier properties. And then, vibration- damping and O{sub 2} barrier properties of the composite including FSCP was increased with use of ENR. In particular, we found that ENR-50 composite containing 50 phr FSCP has three times as high vibration-damping property as ENR-50 without FSCP.

  3. Microsoft Word - chapter FeCMn_v3.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 31 48 77 66 BM FZ BM FZ FZ FZ 20 A516 GTA Air 6.9 MPa H 2 6.9 MPa H 2 nr 435 435 462 ... FZ fusion zone; GMA gas metal arc; GTA gas tungsten arc; SA submerged arc; SMA ...

  4. Blunt Trauma Performance of Fabric Systems Utilizing Natural Rubber Coated High Strength Fabrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, M. R.; Ahmad, W. Y. W.; Samsuri, A.; Salleh, J.; Abidin, M. H.

    2010-03-11

    The blunt trauma performance of fabric systems against 9 mm bullets is reported. Three shots were fired at each fabric system with impact velocity of 367+-9 m/s and the depth of indentation on the modeling clay backing was measured. The results showed that 18-layer and 21-layer all-neat fabric systems failed the blunt trauma test. However, fabric systems with natural rubber (NR) latex coated fabric layers gave lower blunt trauma of between 25-32 mm indentation depths. Deformations on the neat fabrics upon impact were identified as broken yarns, yarn stretching and yarn pull-out. Deflections of the neat fabrics were more localised. For the NR latex coated fabric layers, no significant deformation can be observed except for peeled-off regions of the NR latex film at the back surface of the last layer. From the study, it can be said that the NR latex coated fabric layers were effective in reducing the blunt trauma of fabric systems.

  5. Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephens, Frances Helen (Santa Fe, NM); Baker, Ralph Thomas (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-01-12

    A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. The method generates hydrogen and produces a solid polymeric [R.sup.1R.sup.2B--NR.sup.3R.sup.4].sub.n product. The method of dehydrogenating amine-boranes may be used to generate H.sub.2 for portable power sources.

  6. SU-D-18C-01: A Novel 4D-MRI Technology Based On K-Space Retrospective Sorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Current 4D-MRI techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of an entirely new framework of 4D-MRI based on k-space retrospective sorting. Methods: An important challenge of the proposed technique is to determine the number of repeated scans(NR) required to obtain sufficient k-space data for 4D-MRI. To do that, simulations using 29 cancer patients' respiratory profiles were performed to derive the relationship between data acquisition completeness(Cp) and NR, also relationship between NR(Cp=95%) and the following factors: total slice(NS), respiratory phase bin length(Lb), frame rate(fr), resolution(R) and image acquisition starting-phase(P0). To evaluate our technique, a computer simulation study on a 4D digital human phantom (XCAT) were conducted with regular breathing (fr=0.5Hz; R=256256). A 2D echo planer imaging(EPI) MRI sequence were assumed to acquire raw k-space data, with respiratory signal and acquisition time for each k-space data line recorded simultaneously. K-space data was re-sorted based on respiratory phases. To evaluate 4D-MRI image quality, tumor trajectories were measured and compared with the input signal. Mean relative amplitude difference(D) and cross-correlation coefficient(CC) are calculated. Finally, phase-sharing sliding window technique was applied to investigate the feasibility of generating ultra-fast 4D-MRI. Result: Cp increased with NR(Cp=100*[1-exp(-0.19*NR)], when NS=30, Lb=100%/6). NR(Cp=95%) was inversely-proportional to Lb (r=0.97), but independent of other factors. 4D-MRI on XCAT demonstrated highly accurate motion information (D=0.67%, CC=0.996) with much less artifacts than those on image-based sorting 4D-MRI. Ultra-fast 4D-MRI with an apparent temporal resolution of 10 frames/second was reconstructed using the phase-sharing sliding window technique. Conclusions: A novel 4D-MRI technology based on k-space sorting has been successfully developed and evaluated on the digital phantom. Framework established can be applied to a variety of MR sequences, showing great promises to develop the optimal 4D-MRI technique for many radiation therapy applications. NIH (1R21CA165384-01A1)

  7. Microsoft Word - Action Plan Appendix B as of 02-25-2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Listing of Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Groups/Units (sheet 1 of 19) B-1 Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Planned Action Group Number Group/Units Operable Unit (if applicable) Closure* Operating Permit D-1-1 100-D Ponds (120-D-1) 100-DR-1 X T-1-1 105-DR (122-DR-1) Sodium Fire Facility X D-1-2 1301-N/1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities 116-N-1 Crib 116-N-3 Crib 100-NR-1 X T-1-2 1324-N/1324-NA Liquid Waste Facilities 120-N-1 Pond 120-N-2 Neutralization Unit 100-NR-1 X T-1-3** 1706-KE

  8. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations ofmore » the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.« less

  9. Long-term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol Chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome D.; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Timothy R.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. Over the period of 19 months (Nov. 20, 2010 – June 2012) highly time resolved (~30 min.) NR-PM1 data was recorded. Using this dataset the value-added product (VAP) of deriving organic aerosol components (OACOMP) is introduced. With this VAP, multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix can be performed on long term data to return organic aerosol (OA) factors that are associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. Three factors were obtained from this VAP including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when nitrate increased due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations showed little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increased and were mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were computed by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. From this model there is evidence to support that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  10. EIS-0350-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EIS evaluates the completion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project, which consists of constructing the nuclear facility portion (CMRR-NF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The CMRR Project provides the analytical chemistry and materials characterization capabilities currently or previously performed in the existing Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. Because of recent detailed site geotechnical investigations, certain aspects of the CMRR-NR project have changed resulting in change to the environmental impacts.

  11. 1. INSERT ABOVE, CLASSIFICATION LEVEL, UNCLASSIFIED, OR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (03-98) (Exception to SF 14, Approved by NARS, June 1978) 1. INSERT ABOVE, CLASSIFICATION LEVEL, UNCLASSIFIED, OR OFFICIAL USE ONLY 4. PRECEDENCE DESIGNATION ("X" appropriate box): 6. FROM 9. TO COMMUNICATION CENTER ROUTING U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TELECOMMUNICATION MESSAGE (See reverse side for Instructions) 5. TYPE OF MESSAGE FOR COMMUNICATION CENTER USE MESSAGE IDENTIFICATION NR: DTG: Z YES 2. MESSAGE CONTAINS WEAPON DATA? ("X" appropriate box. Message Center will not

  12. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. PDF icon NNSA_NR_NEPA-APS-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the West Valley Demonstration Project 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Nevada Field Office 2012

  13. Want Optical Enhancement? Try nanocups | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Want Optical Enhancement? Try nanocups Research by Rana Biswas and Akshit Peer was the focus of an article by Stewart Wills of Optics and Photonics News. The researchers have demonstrated a technique for achieving extraordinary optical transmission, with modeled electric-field enhancements as high as a hundredfold, using a continuous film of gold on a corrugated, "nanocupped" substrate (Nanoscale, doi:10.1039/c5nr07903a). The technique, according to the team, requires only

  14. Distinguished Student Awards Paul Asare Agyapong, NEN-3, UGS, Technical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distinguished Student Awards Paul Asare Agyapong, NEN-3, UGS, Technical Ty Brooks, C-IIAC, UGS, Technical Amy Jordan, EES-16, GRA, Technical Heather Hughes, IRM-CAS, GRA, Administrative Alison Tamasi, C-NR, GRA, Technical Andrea Vargas, ITPMO, GRA, Administrative Naomi Wasserman, EES-14, UGS, Technical Distinguished Mentor Awards Joysree Aubrey, IAT-DO Alina Deshpande, DSA-3 Andrew Nelson, MST-7 Robert Robey, XCP-2 Information Technology Cody Jackson, "Evaluating Cyber Security Policies

  15. Reversible Electrocatalytic Production and Oxidation of Hydrogen at Low Overpotentials by a Functional Hydrogenase Mimic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stuart E.; Yang, Jenny Y.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, Morris

    2012-03-26

    A new bis(diphosphine) nickel(II) complex, [Ni(PPh2NR2)2](BF4)2, 1, (R = CH2CH2OCH3) is described. A {Delta}G{sup o} of 0.84 kcal/mol{sup -1} for hydrogen addition for this complex was calculated from the experimentally determined equilibrium constant. This complex displays reversible electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen production and oxidation at low overpotentials, a characteristic most commonly associated with hydrogenase enzymes.

  16. 03-08-2010 NNSA-B-10-0097

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8-2010 NNSA-B-10-0097 Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to perform neutron reflectivity and fluorescence microscopy studies of the structure and activity of the negative factor (Nef) protein from Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) bound to lipid membranes. Some of the proposed work with the recombinant proteins - the neutron reflection (NR) - would be performed at national neutron-scattering user facilities across the country; initial work would be performed at the

  17. Assessment Report: OAS-V-15-01 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Assessment Report: OAS-V-15-01 November 25, 2014 Assessment of Audit Coverage of Cost Allowability for Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation During October 1, 2012, Through September 30, 2013, Under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-NR0000031 Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation (BMPC) was established solely to operate the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy-Department of Energy program responsible for the research, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of

  18. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs.

  19. Fort Yukon Wood Energy Program: Wood Boiler Deployment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wood Energy Program: Wood Boiler Deployment Department of Energy Tribal Program Review Golden, Colorado May 7 2015 Presented by: Frannie Hughes Gwitchyaa Zhee Corporation CEO Work compiled by Kelda Britton, CATG NR Director Please contact me for a full list of citations. kelda@catg.org CATG is a consortium of 10 Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes located throughout the Yukon Flats. Arctic Village, Beaver, Birch Creek, Canyon Village, Chalkyitsik, Circle, Fort Yukon, Rampart, Stevens Village

  20. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations of the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  1. DRAFT AUDIT REPORT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment Report Assessment of Audit Coverage of Cost Allowability for Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation During October 1, 2012, Through September 30, 2013, Under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-NR0000031 OAS-V-15-01 November 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 25, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, NAVAL REACTORS LABORATORY FIELD OFFICE FROM: Jack Rouch, Director Central Audits

  2. Model Investigation of Temperature and Concentration Dependent Luminescence of Erbium-doped Tellurite Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoshal, S. K.; Sahar, M. R.; Rohani, M. S.; Tewari, H. S.

    2011-11-22

    Improving the up-conversion efficiency is the key issue in tellurite glasses. The quantum efficiency, radiative transition rate and lifetimes of excited states are greatly influenced by the optical properties of the host material, ligand field, multiphonon relaxation processes, impurities, temperature and concentration of erbium ions. We develop a comprehensive 4-level model to examine the radiative and nonradiative (NR) decay processes for the green ({sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}) and red ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}) emission over a temperature range of (10-340 K) and concentration range of (0.1-4.5 mol.%). Concentration dependent enhancement and thermal quenching of efficiency for up-conversion is investigated using the derived rate equations. These features are attributed to the NR energy transfer processes, trapped impurity effects, and thermal assisted hopping. The unusual nature of temperature and concentration dependent quenching effects for green and red emission is queries for further investigations. It is further suggested that to achieve higher infrared to visible up-converted efficiency in tellurite glasses the NR channels for energy and charge transfer by phonon and impurity mediated process has to be minimized. Our results on pump power dependent emission intensity, quantum efficiency, luminescence intensity, radiative lifetimes, and transition probabilities are in conformity with other experimental findings.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-10-08

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. HFE represents the AMF statistics for the Shouxian, China, deployment in 2008. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. For the fourth quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users is down substantially (about 30%) from last quarter. Most of this decrease resulted from a reduction in the ACRF Infrastructure users (e.g., site visits, research accounts, on-site device accounts, etc.) associated with the AMF China deployment. While users had easy access to the previous AMF deployment in Germany that resulted in all-time high user statistics, physical and remote access to on-site accounts are extremely limited for the AMF deployment in China. Furthermore, AMF data have not yet been released from China to the Data Management Facility for processing, which affects Archive user statistics. However, Archive users are only down about 10% from last quarter. Another reason for the apparent reduction in Archive users is that data from the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), a major field campaign conducted on the North Slope of Alaska, are not yet available to users. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008. There were no incidents this reporting period.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP locale has historically had a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning this quarter, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The central facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 16 surface new characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place within the next 12 months. The AMF continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, that started May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities within the next 12 months. Users can participate in field experiments at the sites and mobile facility, or they can participate remotely. Therefore, a variety of mechanisms are provided to users to access site information. Users who have immediate (real-time) needs for data access can request a research account on the local site data systems. This access is particularly useful to users for quick decisions in executing time-dependent activities associated with field campaigns at the fixed sites and mobile facility locations. The eight computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the AMF; and the DMF at PNNL. However, users are warned that the data provided at the time of collection have not been fully screened for quality and therefore are not considered to be official ACRF data. Hence, these accounts are considered to be part of the facility activities associated with field campaign activities, and users are tracked. In addition, users who visit sites can connect their computer or instrument to an ACRF site data system network, which requires an on-site device account. Remote (off-site) users can also have remote access to any ACRF instrument or computer system at any ACRF site, which requires an off-site device account. These accounts are also managed and tracked.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-03-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 through December 31, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. For all fixed sites, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2007. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the current deployment in Niamey, Niger, Africa. PYE represents the AMF statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP Central Facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF in Niger. This report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days-broken down by institution type, gender, race, citizenship, visitor role, visit purpose, and facility-for actual visitors and for active user research computer accounts. During this reporting period, the ACRF Archive did not collect data on user characteristics in this way. Work is under way to collect and report these data. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. For the first quarter of FY 2007, the overall number of users is up from the last reporting period. The historical data show that there is an apparent relationship between the total number of users and the 'size' of field campaigns, called Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs): larger IOPs draw more of the site facility resources, which are reflected by the number of site visits and site visit days, research accounts, and device accounts. These types of users typically collect and analyze data in near-real time for a site-specific IOP that is in progress. However, the Archive accounts represent persistent (year-to-year) ACRF data users that often mine from the entire collection of ACRF data, which mostly includes routine data from the fixed and mobile sites, as well as cumulative IOP data sets. Archive data users continue to show a steady growth, which is independent of the size of IOPs. For this quarter, the number of Archive data user accounts was 961, the highest since record-keeping began. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Although the AMF is not officially collecting data this quarter, personnel are regularly involved with teardown, packing, hipping, unpacking, setup, and maintenance activities, so they are included in the safety statistics. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period October 1 - December 31, 2006. There were no recordable or lost workdays or incidents for the first quarter of FY 2007.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-05-22

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF is being deployed to China and is not in operation this quarter. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. The average as well as the individual site values exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2007. For the second quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was nearly as high as the last reporting period, in which a new record high for number of users was established. This quarter, a new record high was established for the number of user days, particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany, as well as major field campaigns at the NSA and SGP sites. This quarter, 37% of the Archive users are ARM science-funded principal investigators and 23% of all other facility users are either ARM science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008. There were no incidents this reporting period.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-01-24

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007, for the fixed sites and the mobile site. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and this was the final operational quarter. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, a series of severe weather events (i.e., widespread ice storms) disrupted utility services, which affected the SGP performance measures. Some instruments were covered in ice and power and data communication lines were down for more than 10 days in some areas of Oklahoma and Kansas, which resulted in lost data at the SGP site. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. The AMF completed its mission at the end of this quarter in Haselback, Germany (FKB designation). NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF, currently in Germany. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Due to the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams, and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. For the first quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was up significantly from the last reporting period. For the fourth consecutive reporting period, a record high number of Archive users was recorded. In addition, the number of visitors and visitor days set a new record this reporting period particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany. It is interesting to note this quarter that 22% (a slight decrease from last quarter) of the Archive users are ARM Science funded principal investigators and 35% (the same as last quarter) of all other facility users are either ARM Science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007. There were no incidents this reporting period.

  8. A novel approach to determine post mortem interval using neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Cekanova, Maria; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Nichols, Trent L; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Donnell, Robert; Finocchiaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, neutron radiography (NR) is used non-destructively to measure changes in hydrogen (H) content in decaying tissues as a mean to estimate post-mortem invertal (PMI). After death, tissue undergoes sequential changes consisting of organic and inorganic phase variations, as well as a gradual reduction of tissue water content. H is the primary contributor to NR contrast in biological specimens because (1) it is the most abundant element in biological tissues and (2) its nucleus scatter thermal and cold neutrons more strongly than any other atomic nucleus. These contrast differences can be advantageous in a forensic context to determine small changes in hydrogen concentrations. Dog cadavers were used as a model for human cadavers. Canine tissues and cadavers were exposed to controlled (laboratory settings) and uncontrolled (University of Tennessee Anthropology Research Facility) environmental conditions during putefraction, respectively. Neutron radiographs were supplemented with photographs and histology data to assess the decomposition stage of cadavers. Results demonstrated that the increase in neutron transmission likely corresponded to a decrease in hydrogen content in the tissue, which was correlated with the time of decay of the tissue. Tissues depleted in hydrogen are brighter in the neutron transmission radiographs of skeletal muscles, lung, and bone, under controlled conditions. Over a period of 10 days, changes in neutron transmission through lung and muscle were found to be higher than bone by 8.3%, 7.0 %, and 2.0 %, respectively. Estimation of the PMI was calculated from a natural logarithmic fitting of the NR data. Under controlled conditions, estimation of the PMI was 70% and 63.9 % accurate for bone and lung tissues, while being 1.4% accurate for muscle tissue. All results underestimated the true PMI. In conclusion, neutron radiography can be used for detection of hydrogen changes in decaying tissues to estimate PMI.

  9. Fibrous composites comprising carbon nanotubes and silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-10-11

    Fibrous composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes; and a silica-containing moiety having one of the structures: (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NR.sub.1R.sub.2) or (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NCO; where n is from 1 to 6, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each independently H, CH.sub.3, or C.sub.2H.sub.5.

  10. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-26

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  11. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-18

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  12. EQ3/6 A Software Package for Geochemical Modeling

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-13

    EQ3/6 is a software package for modeling geochemical interactions between aqueous solution, solids, and gases, following principles of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. It is useful for interpreting aqueiou solution chemical compositions and for calculating the consequences of reaction of such solutions with minerals, other solids, and gases. It is designed to run in a command line environment. EQPT is a thermodynamic data file preprocessor. EQ3NR is a speciation-solubility code. EQ6 is a reaction pathmore » code.« less

  13. PAGE OF PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bONTRACT AWARD ! PAGE OF PAGES 1 1. CONTACT NUMBER 2. EFfECT1VE DATE 3. SOUCiTATION NUMBER DE-EMOO01819 I 01/1312012 DE*SOL*OOO2446 *. ISSUED BY ClDE ,,0:.:3:.:0"'0"-1 _ _ _ _ _ - l *. AOUIN!STEREDBY /11_"'. EMCBC - ~~ U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Oepartment of Energy Carlsbad Field Office EM Consolidated Business Cent r 4021 National Parks Highway 250 E. 5th Street, Suite 500 P.O. Box 3090 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Carlsbad, NM 88221 7. NAMEANDAODRESS OF CdOE 8. PAYMeNrV4L BE MADE

  14. Microsoft Word - BLZhuikov_09_02_2014.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Production o f m edical r adioisotopes i n R ussia a nd P rospective Isotope p rogram i n I nstitute o f N uclear R esearch. Dr. B oris L . Z huikov Laboratory o f R adioisotope C omplex, I NR, M oscow, R ussia Institute f or N uclear R esearch o f R ussian A cademy o f S cience ABSTRACT: Reactor and accelerator centers in Russia produce medical isotopes and develop prospective technologies. In the near future, we anticipate increased isotope production for use in nuclear medicine in Russia. T

  15. Participants: Judith Holm, DOE-AL Markus Popa, RW-44 Betty Nolan, DOE-HQ-CI Dave Crose, IN-MWCSG

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conference Call Notes and Action Items April 30, 1998 3:30-4:30 p.m. EDT Participants: Judith Holm, DOE-AL Markus Popa, RW-44 Betty Nolan, DOE-HQ-CI Dave Crose, IN-MWCSG Ray English, DOE-NR Greg Sahd, DOE-CAO-WIPP Fred Butterfield, DOE-HQ-EM-22 Audrey Adamson, UETC- TEC/WG Program Support Ken Niles, OR-WIEB Seth Kirshenberg, ECA Judith Bradbury, PNL Elizabeth Helvey, JK Associates Chris Wentz, NM-WGA Summary: The TEC/WG Communications Topic Group's first conference call addressed the membership,

  16. United States Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93478 Las Vegas NV 89193-3478 EPA 600/4-91/030 DOE/DP00539-063 Research and Development Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 EPA/600/4-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 4 990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thorn& and Nuclear

  17. Quality Assurance Plan, N springs expedited response action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, G.J.

    1994-07-01

    This document is the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) to be followed during the definitive design, construction, and operational phases for activities associated with the N Springs Expedited Response Action (ERA) for the 100-NR-2 Operable Unit (OU). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) will comply with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance (DOE 1989), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), EPA/530-SW-86-031, Technical Guidance Document: Construction Quality Assurance for Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facilities (EPA 1986).

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - SC-0023(SamPosterArmStm09).e.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algorithm for Deriving Particle Size Distributions for Thin Clouds From Sun and Aureole Measurements Using a Diffraction Approximation J.G. DeVore 1 , A.T. Stair 1 , S.A. Rappaport 1,2 1 Science and Engineering Applications Corporation Burlington, MA 01803 2 Department of Physics, MIT Cambridge, MA 02139 1. Diffraction Approximation Contact: J. DeVore devore@ScEAC.com 781-791-3209 March 08 - SC-0023 2. Key Theoretical Result The differential density of spherical scatterers, n(r) (#/area/µ µ µ

  19. Ecological

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - Consequences of Nuclear Testing Amcl~itka isln,zd has a Iristory of disturbnnce by nroder~r matt, i,rclr~ding US. military operatio~ts on the isla~rd drrring Il'orld ll'nr % n~rterlnthrg the a~tder.qou~rd nuclear tests Nilrow nrrd Cannikin, for which preparation begntr in 1966. nlarry of the. terrestrial distarbnrrces resttlti,tg from ,taclear testing were superimposed o n scars remai~tirrg from the nrilitnry occt~pntiotz. Constrriction, road hirprouement, and the hlilrow an(/ Cnrrnikbt

  20. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I~' CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I~' CONTRACT ID CODE IPAGE OF PAGES DE-NR0000031 . 1 I 1 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 003 Same as Block 16G . N~ 6. ISSUED BV CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BV (If other than Item 6) Code I U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office P.O. Box 109 West Mifflin, PA 15122-0109 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. street, county, State and ZIP Code) (*...) 9.A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Bechtel Marine

  1. ,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O'

  2. WJLP-~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WJLP-~ . '- 'TX FKcrr \~+$g&&- Lx.3 M NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Juae 24, 1953 Contract Na. AT(X)-l)-1156 ML 18 e 2 - 0 -. ; *.-la r;o7 Project lOumber 41-2 Estimated Manpower Required (Man Months) A. Technical 1 Starting Date 4nr-11 1 B. Non-Technical" 7QL Estimated Completion Ikte July 31, q;, Estimated Total Cost &.&&I - 00 . (A) g; Serlarfea and Uagea Analytfcal (It) Indfrect Costs . I . (D) MatePfsPs and Open-sting Supplies $&QQ. (F) Overhead (0) Contingency

  3. '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I- i. : ' . .a \ ' .. .,a. : - . . . . ' -. a ' . ,i ..' - 3/q, f k/A e _ ' ,!,Y.' .' .. yy,.. ' ; ,' 8 8 A GLINO~C~~~ nada of df&ntlirr& oparations at Metsl'Hydrides, Ino*, 0 2. J. Zlc33ur, ~J>llcntlonq Bract ,' , . . . .\ Dh B, 5, \Yo' rs, ?i?,T),, 33diod Eirectcr L " ', ' ' &y' ,' ,' l .l,CT;IT' TY nr?zxT - ~%SIx? J.22~. 8 !X J.IY. I.& ( -.. . /&x,f.- 11 3Y . - _, \. ., ' . ._' .: . -' ;yT;, ' \. 5 ., . ..: :' .<, ..;.- ".~' .,' ,..",..-. i.., ,;..

  4. I I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Header Sheet .Doc ID # 7 e) AW-h a""- - 'IN r 1,9- / q 1-1- 31 0 )c // C) SC CCN: FUSRAP COMMUNICATIONS DISTRIBUTION FSRD= COMM. TYPELL-1-1 FORMER SITES RESTORATION DIVISION (EW-93) SAIC SENSITIVE DATE PROCESSED BY PDCC APR 0 3 1997 COMM REF ADMIN RCD SUBJECT .1 lrhnu rn t FROM To r P, COMM DATE ADDR CODE I I CLOSES CNN Wes I - RESPONSE TRACKING INFORMATION AC TION DESCRIPTION: 01: Ioi: OWEOTO- OWED BY: (ORG) I (ORG) TARGETDAT9.A IcLosiNr cco..coaoip. DATE CLOSING REF- 02: 1 02'. OWED

  5. TO : W. B. Harris

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    /:' Ofice n/r emordfld%m o UNITED STATE?/ GOVERNMENT TO : W. B. Harris # DATE,: Kay 25, 19jl FROM : T. B. Kle ' 4 SUBJECT: RZSJLTS OF AERCSOL SAMPLING AT U.S. B'JRKALI OF ?4EES XRING VISIT OF XARCH 1, 1951 ' I BRUCZTON, PA. 3~XBOL: HSH:PBK:hnh . Purpose of Visit 1. To obtain aerosol samples during the performanc' ent types of explosibility tests. of several differ- 2; To advise as to the safe handling of material, Results 1. Following are tine results of the average concen before, during and

  6. Microsoft Word - FY12 Fee Des.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NR0000031 copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtue of this amendment you desire to change an offer already submitted, such change may be

  7. Microsoft Word - M002-SF30.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I:.CONTRACT ID CODE IPAGE OF PAGES DE-NR0000031 1 I 27 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (II app/icable) 002 Same as Block 16C N/A 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) Code I U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office P.O. Box 109 West Mifflin, PA 15122-0109 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. slreet, county, State and ZIP Code) ..J.:l 9.A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Bechtel Marine

  8. Use of bark-derived pyrolysis oils ass a phenol substitute in structural panel adhesives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louisiana Pacific Corp

    2004-03-01

    The main objective of this program was to pilot the world's first commercial-scale production of an acceptable phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin containing natural resin (NR) ingredients, for use as an adhesive in Oriented-Strand Board (OSB) and plywood panel products. Natural Resin products, specifically MNRP are not lignin ''fillers''. They are chemically active, natural phenolics that effectively displace significant amounts of phenol in PF resins, and which are extracted from bark-derived and wood-derived bio-oils. Other objectives included the enhancement of the economics of NR (MNRP) production by optimizing the production of certain Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP{trademark}) byproducts, particularly char and activated carbon. The options were to activate the char for use in waste-water and/or stack gas purification. The preliminary results indicate that RTP{trademark} carbon may ultimately serve as a feedstock for activated carbon synthesis, as a fuel to be used within the wood product mill, or a fuel for an electrical power generating facility. Incorporation of the char as an industrial heat source for use in mill operations was L-P's initial intention for the carbon, and was also of interest to Weyerhaeuser as they stepped into in the project.

  9. Method Of Signal Amplification In Multi-Chromophore Luminescence Sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levitsky, Igor A. (Fall River, MA); Krivoshlykov, Sergei G. (Shrewsbury, MA)

    2004-02-03

    A fluorescence-based method for highly sensitive and selective detection of analyte molecules is proposed. The method employs the energy transfer between two or more fluorescent chromophores in a carefully selected polymer matrix. In one preferred embodiment, signal amplification has been achieved in the fluorescent sensing of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) using two dyes, 3-aminofluoranthene (AM) and Nile Red (NR), in a hydrogen bond acidic polymer matrix. The selected polymer matrix quenches the fluorescence of both dyes and shifts dye emission and absorption spectra relative to more inert matrices. Upon DMMP sorption, the AM fluorescence shifts to the red at the same time the NR absorption shifts to the blue, resulting in better band overlap and increased energy transfer between chromophores. In another preferred embodiment, the sensitive material is incorporated into an optical fiber system enabling efficient excitation of the dye and collecting the fluorescent signal form the sensitive material on the remote end of the system. The proposed method can be applied to multichromophore luminescence sensor systems incorporating N-chromophores leading to N-fold signal amplification and improved selectivity. The method can be used in all applications where highly sensitive detection of basic gases, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), Sarin, Soman and other chemical warfare agents having basic properties, is required, including environmental monitoring, chemical industry and medicine.

  10. Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production by [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+: Removing the Distinction Between Endo- and Exo- Protonation Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Houston JS; Wiese, Stefan; Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris; Helm, Monte L.

    2015-04-03

    A new Ni(II) complex, [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ (7PPh2NH = 3,6-triphenyl-1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane) has been synthesized, and its electrochemical properties are reported. The 7PPh2NH ligand features an NH, ensuring properly positioned protonated amine groups (NH+) for electrocatalysis, regardless of whether protonation occurs exo- or endo- to the metal center. The compound is an electrocatalyst for H2 production in the presence of organic acids (pKa range 1013 in CH3CN) with turnover frequencies ranging from 160770 s-1 at overpotentials between 320470 mV, as measured at the half peak potential of the catalytic wave. In stark contrast to [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ and other [Ni(7PPh2NR')]2+ complexes, catalytic turnover frequencies for H2 production by [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ do not show catalytic rate enhancement upon the addition of H2O. This finding supports the assertion that [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ eliminates the distinction between the endo- and exo-protonation isomers. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Geochemical Modeling Of Aqueous Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-09-07

    EQ3/6 is a software package for geochemical modeling of aqueous systems. This description pertains to version 7.2b. It addresses aqueous speciation, thermodynamic equilibrium, disequilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The major components of the package are EQ3NR, a speciation-solubility code, and EQ6 a reaction path code. EQ3NR is useful for analyzing groundwater chemistry data, calculating solubility limits, and determining whether certain reactions are in states of equilibrium or disequilibrium. It also initializes EQ6 calculations. EQ6 models themore » consequences of reacting an aqueous solution with a specified set of reactants (e.g., minerals or waste forms). It can also model fluid mixing and the effects of changes in temperature. Each of five supporting data files contain both standard state and activity coefficient-related data. Three support the use of the Davies or B-dot equations for the activity coefficients; the other two support the use of Pitzer''s equations. The temperature range of the thermodynamic data on the data files varies from 25 degrees C only to 0-300 degrees C.« less

  12. Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

    2011-07-01

    We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

  13. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT OF STORMWATER AND WASTEWATER AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT (SPRU) DISPOSITION PROJECT, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abitz, R.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2011-06-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating the water management procedures at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU). The facility has three issues related to water management that require technical assistance: (1) due to a excessive rainfall event in October, 2010, contaminated water collected in basements of G2 and H2 buildings. As a result of this event, the contractor has had to collect and dispose of water offsite; (2) The failure of a sump pump at a KAPL outfall resulted in a Notice of Violation issued by the New York State Department of Environment and Conservation (NYSDEC) and subsequent Consent Order. On-site water now requires treatment and off-site disposition; and (3) stormwater infiltration has resulted in Strontium-90 levels discharged to the storm drains that exceed NR standards. The contractor has indicated that water management at SPRU requires major staff resources (at least 50 persons). The purpose of this review is to determine if the contractor's technical approach warrants the large number of staff resources and to ensure that the technical approach is compliant and in accordance with federal, state and NR requirements.

  14. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

    1984-01-01

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid medium of the formula NR.sub.3 and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  15. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-05-06

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid meidum of the formula NR/sub 3/ and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  16. Ab initio investigation of electronic and vibrational contributions to linear and nonlinear dielectric properties of ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casassa, S.; Baima, J.; Mahmoud, A.; Kirtman, B.

    2014-06-14

    Electronic and vibrational contributions to the static and dynamic (hyper)polarizability tensors of ice XI and model structures of ordinary hexagonal ice have been theoretically investigated. Calculations were carried out by the finite field nuclear relaxation method for periodic systems (FF-NR) recently implemented in the CRYSTAL code, using the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham approach (CPKS) for evaluating the required electronic properties. The effect of structure on the static electronic polarizabilities (dielectric constants) and second-hyperpolarizabilities is minimal. On the other hand, the vibrational contributions to the polarizabilities were found to be significant. A reliable evaluation of these (ionic) contributions allows one to discriminate amongst ice phases characterized by different degrees of proton-order, primarily through differences caused by librational motions. Transverse static and dynamic vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities were found by extrapolating calculations for slabs of increasing size, in order to eliminate substantial surface contributions.

  17. FY 2008 Annual Performance Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hyd rog en Tan k Res earc h, LLN L PH EN IX Ex pe rim en t, BN L Fu el Ce ll Re sea rch , AN L Ca rb on Se qu es tra tio n Re se ar ch , PN NL Hi gh Ex pl os iv es Ap pl ic at io ns Fa ci lit y, LL NL Com put er Sim ulat ion The ater , LAN L Al ga e Re se ar ch , NR EL Ad va nc ed Bio fue ls Re se arc h, LB NL T ra in in g Nuc lear Mat eria ls Sto rag e, SRS C o a l G a s if ic a ti o n R e s e a rc h , P N N L Cli ma te Mo de lin g, OR NL AnnuAl PerformAnce rePort fY 2008 Table of Contents

  18. Hazard analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facilty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    This hazard analysis (HA) has been prepared for the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility (Facility), in compliance with the requirements of Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) controlled manual WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis Manual, and to the direction of WHC-IP-0690, Safety Analysis and Regulation Desk Instructions, (WHC 1992). An HA identifies potentially hazardous conditions in a facility and the associated potential accident scenarios. Unlike the Facility hazard classification documented in WHC-SD-NR-HC-004, Hazard Classification for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, (Huang 1993), which is based on unmitigated consequences, credit is taken in an HA for administrative controls or engineered safety features planned or in place. The HA is the foundation for the accident analysis. The significant event scenarios identified by this HA will be further evaluated in a subsequent accident analysis.

  19. Coupling reactions of phenylacetylene with water, hydrogen sulfide and primary amines mediated by a Ru(II) phenylvinylidene complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianchini, C.; Peruzzini, M.; Zanobini, F. [Istituto per lo Studio della Stereochimica ed Energetica dei Composti di Coordinazione, Florence (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Ru(II) fragment [(PNP)RuCl{sub 2}] assists the reaction of phenylacetylene with water, hydrogen sulfide and primary amines to give carbonyl, {eta}{sup 1}-benzylthioaldehyde, and isonitrile complexes, respectively [PNP = CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2}){sub 2}]. In all of these processes, the reaction is initiated by the 1-alkyne to vinylidene tautomerization at the Ru(II) center, followed by attack of the H{sub 2}Z molecule (Z = O, S, NR) on the vinylidene ligand. The mechanisms which account for these transformations have been completely elucidated and several of the intermediates in these reactions have been isolated and fully characterized. The scope of these reactions in view of their potential applications in organic syntheses involving thioaldehydes and optically pure isonitriles will be briefly presented.

  20. Resolution of Surveillance Report No. PAD-BDW-95-004 for suspect bolts installed in the 105 KW roof addition structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frier, W.A.

    1995-04-14

    A DOE RL surveillance determined that a test report (WHC-SD-NR-TRP-020) was less than adequate. As a result, WHC removed nine of the previous in-situ tested A325 suspect bolts and contracted with Koon-Hall Testing Corporation to perform hardness and tensile testing and chemical composition analysis of the removed bolts. WHC also contracted with ADVENT Engineering, Inc., to perform an evaluation of the Koon-Hall test results and to respond to the concerns identified in the DOE RL surveillance. The Koon-Hall Laboratory test results and the assessments strongly support the conclusion that the suspect bolts are indeed the equivalent of A325 high-strength, Type-1 bolts and have been properly heat-treated.

  1. NRC antitrust licensing actions, 1978--1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, S.J.; Simpson, J.J.

    1997-09-01

    NUREG-0447, Antitrust Review of Nuclear Power Plants, was published in May 1978 and includes a compilation and discussion of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proceedings and activity involving the NRC`s competitive review program through February 1978, NUREG-0447 is an update of an earlier discussion of the NRC`s antitrust review of nuclear power plants, NR-AIG-001, The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Antitrust Review of Nuclear Power Plants: The Conditioning of Licenses, which reviewed the Commission`s antitrust review function from its inception in December 1970 through April 1976. This report summarizes the support provided to NRC staff in updating the compilation of the NRC`s antitrust licensing review activities for commercial nuclear power plants that have occurred since February 1978. 4 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  3. A.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  4. Y

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    _. - - 0' Y j MO . I-3 % V. B&m, MvUlen at Rmt Bf~terWa %lBh.%r#on I, B. Dauling, M- ?d muh& Mvirr;iaa 08lt M&a OpuFdlwn c&m YxZfXBUW~l~7Wzllltsl AT&T. XoUIs anrwlllif +t3&v: /s j.y;, ) &%! 19 11 .' 4 8R -0 rYlof / -s&l9s6 ~8~~8~nr~~~arvbiobU#tsrtni$~rlo&~tgbaa o#t-a~f~babmak*.=*m ~dfuww8uranq1zp, 1956, givtng UI UtiJmta of the total qwrnti* of -7 )iWzu#b rriiinrk fn8bra#aatbhr,S&krrirdrport. ~wrtgrorr~~tof#oraturl~liror~~ bobel&6dJ,I$lq

  5. Su'zject:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Su'zject: IraS3~ct: nr - - -- Of -.irc:?ou St: s at Ca;C Lidye. To: Tine irea Zn;ineer, : (Attention: 'adissn S=_uare -flea, l:ex- York, I-Ia>or P'nillip I'errittj 1. "-I,' 1 The warehouses being used at Cak Sidge for the storage Gf' i'orei'6, ore, tailices and slag were inspected 9 Aug. 1944 by representatives of t:?cig :/* "c Zledical Section acd Captain K. E. Zimmerman. 2. in warehouse 5:2, at present, two days per month. In this no ona is working more than ore or warehouse are

  6. NUCLEAR REGULATOR%'-C~fiMls6N REGION I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    jNrTED ST&ye ^ = I\ ) r P, NUCLEAR REGULATOR%'-C~fiMls6N REGION I 63I PIIRK AVENUE Wcs:in;kcse Elecric Coroorrzion ATTiN: 2. F:. jhaw I=-- Zivision Piant Manaaer wm.1.1 I SJeszi nszcuse PY LZC w 5:oscifeic, blew Jersey c7003 Sgkjerz: Inspection $002286/S:-01 T+is refe-s ta the s?ecf2.! s2' :ety -yi <nsoecrion conducted by Ms. M. Camobell of WI *S cSf4ce on Jenczry 29, 296; a: p2-f:; 27: co ccti vi ti es aurhorfzed by NRC Li cekse No 3ckr: tne dlsrussions of our findings he'ld by Mr. M.

  7. RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 , RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V : w ~?g+QZ FM USAEC NYK @5 TO USAEC LEMUMT Ill.. AEC WWC ; I _. _' FOR A TAMwsflO h@G NR tt0 PD Tti18~18~~10 APPROVE pf TWJNTY GRAM8 ENRICHED 1 '. , URANlUM TO 8YLyANI~q FOR W8E. IWTREPARIWG~F~VE U&AN,!UU SLUGS 7/.8 lF4j34 ' .' : ' . ~ , . LQ~JG m S/8 1%~ ~IAhiiilER pa THE-DIE WI& CW!. APOROX 300 DOLLARS Am " , SIX ~uN-~Y# WILL BE REQI!!REl! FW WJG FA~ICf' TlW PD ?eJJRCt+A= @ fmR woull] BE m OUT to 8YLVANIA AND WNT TO, V L PAf?SEGIAN Cy

  8. Draft New England Clean Power Link Project Environmental Impact Statement Appendix A-L

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) that the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1-September 30, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This fourth quarter comprises a total of 2208 possible hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has historically had a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning in the second quarter of FY2010, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original instrumentation and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Central Facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 12 new surface characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The transition to the smaller footprint is ongoing through this quarter. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place by the end of calendar year 2011. AMF1 continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, that began on May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities by the end of 2011. The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado, in support of the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The first field deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility will be used to validate ARM-developed algorithms that convert the remote sensing measurements to cloud properties for liquid and mixed phase clouds. Although AMF2 is being set up this quarter, the official start date of the field campaign is not until November 1, 2010. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of scientific user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010.

  10. Recyclable catalysts methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dioumaev, Vladimir K.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2006-02-28

    Organometallic complexes are provided, which include a catalyst containing a transition metal, a ligand and a component having the formula GAr.sup.F. Ar.sup.F is an aromatic ring system selected from phenyl, naphthalenyl, anthracenyl, fluorenyl, or indenyl. The aromatic ring system has at least a substituent selected from fluorine, hydrogen, hydrocarbyl or fluorinated hydrocarbyl, G is substituted or unsubstituted (CH.sub.2).sub.n or (CF.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n is from 1 to 30, wherein further one or more CH.sub.2 or CF.sub.2 groups are optionally replaced by NR, PR, SiR.sub.2, BR, O or S, or R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, GAr.sup.F being covalently bonded to either said transition metal or said ligand of said catalyst, thereby rendering said cationic organometallic complex liquid. The catalyst of the organometallic complex can be [CpM(CO).sub.2(NHC)L.sub.k].sup.+A.sup.-, wherein M is an atom of molybdenum or tungsten, Cp is substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl radical represented by the formula [C.sub.5Q.sup.1Q.sup.2Q.sup.3Q.sup.4Q.sup.5], wherein Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, GAr.sup.F C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, substituted hydrocarbyl radical, substituted hydrocarbyl radical substituted by GAr.sup.F, halogen radical, halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, --OR, --C(O)R', --CO.sub.2R', --SiR'.sub.3 and --NR'R'', wherein R' and R'' are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, halogen radical, and halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, wherein said Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 radicals are optionally linked to each other to form a stable bridging group, NHC is any N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, L is either any neutral electron donor ligand, wherein k is a number from 0 to 1 or L is an anionic ligand wherein k is 2, and A.sup.- is an anion. Processes using the organometallic complexes as catalysts in catalytic reactions, such as for example, the hydrosilylation of aldehydes, ketones and esters are also provided.

  11. Prenatal PCBs disrupt early neuroendocrine development of the rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Cunningham, Stephanie L. [Center for Molecular and Cellular Toxicology, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gore, Andrea C., E-mail: andrea.gore@mail.utexas.edu [Center for Molecular and Cellular Toxicology, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Institute for Neuroscience, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Neonatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can interfere with hormone-sensitive developmental processes, including brain sexual differentiation. We hypothesized that disruption of these processes by gestational PCB exposure would be detectable as early as the day after birth (postnatal day (P) 1) through alterations in hypothalamic gene and protein expression. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected twice, once each on gestational days 16 and 18, with one of the following: DMSO vehicle; the industrial PCB mixture Aroclor 1221 (A1221); a reconstituted mixture of the three most prevalent congeners found in humans, PCB138, PCB153, and PCB180; or estradiol benzoate (EB). On P1, litter composition, anogenital distance (AGD), and body weight were assessed. Pups were euthanized for immunohistochemistry of estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) or TUNEL labeling of apoptotic cells or quantitative PCR of 48 selected genes in the preoptic area (POA). We found that treatment with EB or A1221 had a sex-specific effect on developmental apoptosis in the neonatal anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), a sexually dimorphic hypothalamic region involved in the regulation of reproductive neuroendocrine function. In this region, exposed females had increased numbers of apoptotic nuclei, whereas there was no effect of treatment in males. For ER{alpha}, EB treatment increased immunoreactive cell numbers and density in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of both males and females, while A1221 and the PCB mixture had no effect. PCR analysis of gene expression in the POA identified nine genes that were significantly altered by prenatal EDC exposure, in a manner that varied by sex and treatment. These genes included brain-derived neurotrophic factor, GABA{sub B} receptors-1 and -2, IGF-1, kisspeptin receptor, NMDA receptor subunits NR2b and NR2c, prodynorphin, and TGF{alpha}. Collectively, these results suggest that the disrupted sexual differentiation of the POA by prenatal EDC exposures is already evident as early as the day after birth, effects that may change the trajectory of postnatal development and compromise adult reproductive function.

  12. Electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons under both external strain and electric field, studied by first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Ting; Dong, Jinming; Zhou, Jian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-08-14

    The electronic and magnetic properties of armchair edge MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons (MoS{sub 2}-ANRs) underboth the external strain and transverse electric field (E{sub t}) have been systematically investigated by using the first-principles calculations. It is found that: (1) If no electric field is applied, an interesting structural phase transition would appear under a large tensile strain, leading to a new phase MoS{sub 2}-A'NR, and inducing a big jump peak of the band gap in the transition region. But, the band gap response to compressive strains is much different from that to tensile strain, showing no the structural phase transition. (2) Under the small tensile strains (<10%), the combined E{sub t} and tensile strain give rise to a positive superposition (resonant) effect on the band gap reduction at low E{sub t} (<3 V/nm), and oppositely a negative superposition (antiresonant) one at high E{sub t} (>4 V/nm). On the other hand, the external compressive strains have always presented the resonant effect on the band gap reduction, induced by the electric field. (3) After the structural phase transition, an external large tensile strain could greatly reduce the critical field E{sub tc} causing the band gap closure, and make the system become a ferromagnetic (FM) metal at a relative low E{sub t} (e.g., <4 V/nm), which is very helpful for its promising applications in nano-mechanical spintronics devices. (4) At high E{sub t} (>10 V/nm), the magnetic moments of both the MoS{sub 2}-ANR and MoS{sub 2}-A'NR in their FM states could be enhanced greatly by a tensile strain. Our numerical results of effectively tuning physical properties of MoS{sub 2}-ANRs by combined external strain and electric field may open their new potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  13. Imaging dirac-mass disorder from magnetic dopant-atoms in the ferromagnetic topological insulator Crx(Bi?.?Sb?.?)??xTe?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Inhee; Kim, Chung Koo; Lee, Jinho; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Zhong, Ruidan D.; Schneeloch, John A.; Liu, Tiansheng S.; Valla, Tonica; Tranquada, John M.; Gu, Genda; et al

    2015-01-20

    To achieve and use the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TIs), it is necessary to open a Dirac-mass gap in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely applied approach. However, it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in themoreferromagnetic TI Cr?.??(Bi?.?Sb?.?)?.??Te?. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap ?(r) reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate is directly related to fluctuations in n(r), the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of ?(r) not inconsistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship ?(r)?n(r) is confirmed throughout and exhibits an electrondopant interaction energy J* = 145 meVnm. These observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.less

  14. Cyclopentadienyl-containing low-valent early transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2007-01-09

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising {Cp*MRR'.sub.n}.sup.+{A}.sup.- wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR''.sub.3, NR''.sub.2, OR'', SR'', GeR''.sub.3, SnR''.sub.3, and C.dbd.C-containing groups (R''=C.sub.1 C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  15. Cyclopentadienyl-containing low-valent early transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2003-12-30

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR".sub.3, NR".sub.2, OR", SR", GeR".sub.3, SnR".sub.3, and C.dbd.C containing groups (R".dbd.C.sub.1 -C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  16. Catalysts For Hydrogenation And Hydrosilylation Methods Of Making And Using The Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dioumaev, Vladimir K.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2004-05-18

    A compound is provided including an organometallic complex represented by the formula I: wherein M is an atom of molybdenum or tangsten, Cp is substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl radical represented by the formula [C.sub.5 Q.sup.1 Q.sup.2 Q.sup.3 Q.sup.4 Q.sup.5 ], wherein Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, substituted hydrocarbyl radical, halogen radical, halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, --OR, --C(O)R', --CO.sub.2 R', --SiR'.sub.3 and --NR'R", wherein R' and R" are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, halogen radical, and halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, wherein said Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 radicals are optionally linked to each other to form a stable bridging group, NHC is any N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, L is either any neutral electron donor ligand, wherein k is a number from 0 to 1 or L is an anionic ligand wherein k is 2, and A.sup.- is an anion. Processes using the organometallic complex as catalyst for hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones are provided. Processes using the organometallic complex as catalyst for the hydrosilylation of aldehydes, ketones and esters are also provided.

  17. Cyclopentadienyl-containing low-valent early transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2006-10-10

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising {Cp*MRR'.sub.n}.sup.+{A}.sup.- wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR''.sub.3, NR''.sub.2, OR'', SR'', GeR''.sub.3, SnR''.sub.3, and C.dbd.C-containing groups (R''=C.sub.1 C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  18. Cyclopentadienyl-containing low-valent early transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2003-04-08

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising {Cp*MRR'.sub.n }.sup.+ {A}.sup.- wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR".sub.3, NR".sub.2, OR", SR", GeR".sub.3, and SnR".sub.3 containing groups (R"=C.sub.1 -C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  19. Cyclopentadienyl-Containing Low-Valent Early Transition Metal Olefin Polymerization Catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J.; Luo, Lubin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2004-06-08

    A catalyst system useful to polymerize and co-polymerize polar and non-polar olefin monomers is formed by in situ reduction with a reducing agent of a catalyst precursor comprising {Cp*MRR'.sub.n }.sup.+ {A}.sup.- wherein Cp* is a cyclopentadienyl or substituted cyclopentadienyl moiety; M is an early transition metal; R is a C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl; R' are independently selected from hydride, C.sub.1 -C.sub.20 hydrocarbyl, SiR".sub.3, NR".sub.2, OR", SR", GeR".sub.3, SnR".sub.3, and C.dbd.C-containing groups (R"=C.sub.1 -C.sub.10 hydrocarbyl); n is an integer selected to balance the oxidation state of M; and A is a suitable non-coordinating anionic cocatalyst or precursor. This catalyst system may form stereoregular olefin polymers including syndiotactic polymers of styrene and methylmethacrylate and isotactic copolymers of polar and nonpolar olefin monomers such as methylmethacrylate and styrene.

  20. Synthesis of labeled oxalic acid derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2004-06-22

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, specifically ##STR1## where each C* is selected from the group consisting of a carbon-12, i.e., .sup.12 C, or a carbon-13, i.e., .sup.13 C and at least one C* is .sup.13 C, R.sup.1 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl and aryl, and X is selected from the group of --NR.sup.2 R.sup.3 where R.sup.2 and R.sup.3 are each independently selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl, --SR.sup.4 where R.sup.4 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl, and --OR.sup.5 where R.sup.5 is selected from the group of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, alkoxy and aryl with the proviso that when R.sup.1 is methyl then R.sup.5 is other than methyl, when R.sup.1 is ethyl then R.sup.5 is other than ethyl, and when R.sup.1 is benzyl then R.sup.5 is other than benzyl.

  1. Thermally-induced transition of lamellae orientation in block-copolymer films on ‘neutral’ nanoparticle-coated substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yager, Kevin G.; Forrey, Christopher; Singh, Gurpreet; Satija, Sushil K.; Page, Kirt A.; Patton, Derek L.; Jones, Ronald L.; Karin, Alamgir; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-06-01

    Block-copolymer orientation in thin films is controlled by the complex balance between interfacial free energies, including the inter-block segregation strength, the surface tensions of the blocks, and the relative substrate interactions. While block-copolymer lamellae orient horizontally when there is any preferential affinity of one block for the substrate, we recently described how nanoparticle-roughened substrates can be used to modify substrate interactions. We demonstrate how such ‘neutral’ substrates can be combined with control of annealing temperature to generate vertical lamellae orientations throughout a sample, at all thicknesses. We observe an orientational transition from vertical to horizontal lamellae upon heating, as confirmed using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM), neutron reflectometry (NR) and rotational small-angle neutron scattering (RSANS). Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we identify substrate-localized distortions to the lamellar morphology as the physical basis of the novel behavior. In particular, under strong segregation conditions, bending of horizontal lamellae induce a large energetic cost. At higher temperatures, the energetic cost of conformal deformations of lamellae over the rough substrate is reduced, returning lamellae to the typical horizontal orientation. Thus, we find that both surface interactions and temperature play a crucial role in dictating block-copolymer lamellae orientation. As a result, our combined experimental and simulation findings suggest that controlling substrate roughness should provide a useful and robust platform for controlling block-copolymer orientation in applications of these materials.

  2. Functional and structural diversity in GH62 α-L-arabinofuranosidases from the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaur, Amrit Pal; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Xu, Xiaohui; Lowden, Michael J.; Leyva, Juan Francisco; Stogios, Peter J.; Cui, Hong; Leo, Rosa Di; Powlowski, Justin; Tsang, Adrian; et al

    2015-05-01

    The genome of the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum (strain CBS 625.91) harbours a wide range of genes involved in carbohydrate degradation, including three genes, abf62A, abf62B and abf62C, predicted to encode glycoside hydrolase family 62 (GH62) enzymes. Transcriptome analysis showed that only abf62A and abf62C are actively expressed during growth on diverse substrates including straws from barley, alfalfa, triticale and canola. The abf62A and abf62C genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the resulting recombinant proteins were characterized. Calcium-free crystal structures of Abf62C in apo and xylotriose bound forms were determined to 1.23 and 1.48 Å resolution respectively. Site-directed mutagenesismore » confirmed Asp55, Asp171 and Glu230 as catalytic triad residues, and revealed the critical role of non-catalytic residues Asp194, Trp229 and Tyr338 in positioning the scissile α-L-arabinofuranoside bond at the catalytic site. Further, the +2R substrate-binding site residues Tyr168 and Asn339, as well as the +2NR residue Tyr226, are involved in accommodating long-chain xylan polymers. Overall, our structural and functional analysis highlights characteristic differences between Abf62A and Abf62C, which represent divergent subgroups in the GH62 family.« less

  3. Rigid-rotor, field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conti, F. Giammanco, F.; Plasma Diagnostics and Technologies Ltd., Via Giuntini 63, 56023 Navacchio ; Wessel, F. J.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Bolte, N.; Morehouse, M.; Qerushi, A.; Rahman, H. U.; Roche, T.; Slepchenkov, M.

    2014-02-15

    The radial profiles, n(r), B{sub z}(r), and E{sub r}(r), for a Flux-Coil (“inductively driven”), Field-Reversed Configuration (FC-FRC) are measured and compared to the predictions of the Rigid-Rotor Model (RRM), which is an analytic, one-dimensional, time-independent, equilibrium description for the FRC. Injectors mounted on both ends of the confinement vessel provide a pre-fill plasma. Coaxial coils mounted outside the vacuum boundaries of the annular-confinement vessel accelerate the plasma and produce the FRC. The density profile is measured by laser interferometry, the magnetic-field profile using an in-situ probe array, and the electric-field profile using an in-situ, floating-probe array. Free parameters for each profile are measured, which also allow other intrinsic-plasma parameters to be determined, using computer-fit algorithms: null radius, radial thickness, plasma temperature, rotation frequencies, the latter of which are independently verified by spectroscopy. All radial profiles agree with the RRM predictions, for the experimental configuration, parameter regime, and specified-time interval studied here.

  4. EARLY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN A STRATIFIED MEDIUM WITH A POWER-LAW DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, Xue-Feng, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-10-20

    A long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) has been widely thought to arise from the collapse of a massive star, and it has been suggested that its ambient medium is a homogenous interstellar medium (ISM) or a stellar wind. There are two shocks when an ultra-relativistic fireball that has been ejected during the prompt gamma-ray emission phase sweeps up the circumburst medium: a reverse shock that propagates into the fireball, and a forward shock that propagates into the ambient medium. In this paper, we investigate the temporal evolution of the dynamics and emission of these two shocks in an environment with a general density distribution of n?R {sup k} (where R is the radius) by considering thick-shell and thin-shell cases. A GRB afterglow with one smooth onset peak at early times is understood to result from such external shocks. Thus, we can determine the medium density distribution by fitting the onset peak appearing in the light curve of an early optical afterglow. We apply our model to 19 GRBs and find that their k values are in the range of 0.4-1.4, with a typical value of k ? 1, implying that this environment is neither a homogenous ISM with k = 0 nor a typical stellar wind with k = 2. This shows that the progenitors of these GRBs might have undergone a new mass-loss evolution.

  5. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted formore » by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.« less

  6. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Li-Hong; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Ma, Qin; Shi, Ye-Hui; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Li, Shu-Fen; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Tong, Zhong-Sheng; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression.

  7. Color stable manganese-doped phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Deshpande, Anirundha Rajendra; Grigorov, Ljudmil Slavchev

    2014-04-29

    A lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light includes a semiconductor light source; and a phosphor material radiationally coupled to the light source. The phosphor material includes a color-stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphor prepared by a process including providing a phosphor of formula I; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]:Mn.sup.+4 I and contacting the phosphor in particulate form with a saturated solution of a composition of formula II in aqueous hydrofluoric acid; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]; II wherein A is Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, NR.sub.4 or a combination thereof; M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y, La, Nb, Ta, Bi, Gd, or a combination thereof; R is H, lower alkyl, or a combination thereof; x is the absolute value of the charge of the [MF.sub.y] ion; and y is 5, 6 or 7. In particular embodiments, M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, or a combination thereof.

  8. Color stable manganese-doped phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Deshpande, Anirudha Rajendra; Grigorov, Ljudmil Slavchev

    2012-08-28

    A process for preparing color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphors includes providing a phosphor of formula I; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]:Mn.sup.+4 I and contacting the phosphor in particulate form with a saturated solution of a composition of formula II in aqueous hydrofluoric acid; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]; II wherein A is Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, NR.sub.4 or a combination thereof; M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y, La, Nb, Ta, Bi, Gd, or a combination thereof; R is H, lower alkyl, or a combination thereof; x is the absolute value of the charge of the [MF.sub.y] ion; and y is 5, 6 or 7. In particular embodiments, M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, or a combination thereof. A lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light includes a semiconductor light source; and a phosphor composition radiationally coupled to the light source, and which includes a color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphor.

  9. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy polymer thermoset bond in a humid environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted for by the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.

  10. Electronic and magnetic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons with Stone–Wales defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Haixia; Fang, Dangqi; Gong, Baihua; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Erhu; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-02-14

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Stone–Wales (SW) defects were investigated using first-principles calculations. We found that two types of SW defects (named SW-Ι and SW-ΙΙ) exist in ZSiNRs. The SW defect was found to be the most stable at the edge of the ZSiNR, independently of the defect orientation, even more stable than it is in an infinite silicene sheet. In addition, the ZSiNRs can transition from semiconductor to metal or half-metal by modifying the SW defect location and concentration. For the same defect concentration, the band structures influenced by the SW-Ι defect are more distinct than those influenced by the SW-ΙΙ when the SW defect is at the edge. The present study suggests the possibility of tuning the electronic properties of ZSiNRs using the SW defects and might motivate their potential application in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  11. Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

    2010-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

  12. Thermally-induced transition of lamellae orientation in block-copolymer films on ‘neutral’ nanoparticle-coated substrates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yager, Kevin G.; Forrey, Christopher; Singh, Gurpreet; Satija, Sushil K.; Page, Kirt A.; Patton, Derek L.; Jones, Ronald L.; Karin, Alamgir; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-06-01

    Block-copolymer orientation in thin films is controlled by the complex balance between interfacial free energies, including the inter-block segregation strength, the surface tensions of the blocks, and the relative substrate interactions. While block-copolymer lamellae orient horizontally when there is any preferential affinity of one block for the substrate, we recently described how nanoparticle-roughened substrates can be used to modify substrate interactions. We demonstrate how such ‘neutral’ substrates can be combined with control of annealing temperature to generate vertical lamellae orientations throughout a sample, at all thicknesses. We observe an orientational transition from vertical to horizontal lamellae upon heating, as confirmedmore » using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM), neutron reflectometry (NR) and rotational small-angle neutron scattering (RSANS). Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we identify substrate-localized distortions to the lamellar morphology as the physical basis of the novel behavior. In particular, under strong segregation conditions, bending of horizontal lamellae induce a large energetic cost. At higher temperatures, the energetic cost of conformal deformations of lamellae over the rough substrate is reduced, returning lamellae to the typical horizontal orientation. Thus, we find that both surface interactions and temperature play a crucial role in dictating block-copolymer lamellae orientation. As a result, our combined experimental and simulation findings suggest that controlling substrate roughness should provide a useful and robust platform for controlling block-copolymer orientation in applications of these materials.« less

  13. Mechanisms of degradation in adhesive joint strength: Glassy thermoset polymer bond in a humid environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Austin, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-06

    The degradation in the strength of napkin-ring (NR) joints bonded with an epoxy thermoset is evaluated in a humid environment. While adherend composition (stainless steel and aluminum) and surface preparation (polished, grit blasted, primed, coupling agent coated) do not affect virgin (time=0) joint strength, they can significantly affect the role of moisture on the strength of the joint. Adherend surface abrasion and corrosion processes are found to be key factors in determining the reliability of joint strength in humid environments. In cases where surface specific joint strength degradation processes are not active, decreases in joint strength can be accounted formoreby the glass transition temperature, Tg, depression of the adhesive associated with water sorption. Under these conditions, joint strength can be rejuvenated to virgin strength by drying. In addition, the decrease in joint strength associated with water sorption can be predicted by the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model by shifting the adhesive reference temperature, Tref, by the same amount as the Tg depression. When surface specific degradation mechanisms are active, they can reduce joint strength below that associated with adhesive Tg depression, and joint strength is not recoverable by drying. Furthermore, a critical relative humidity (or, potentially, critical water sorption concentration), below which the surface specific degradation does not occur, appears to exist for the polished stainless steel joints.less

  14. Simplified treatment of exact resonance elastic scattering model in deterministic slowing down equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, M.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T.

    2012-07-01

    Simplified treatment of resonance elastic scattering model considering thermal motion of heavy nuclides and the energy dependence of the resonance cross section was implemented into NJOY [1]. In order to solve deterministic slowing down equation considering the effect of up-scattering without iterative calculations, scattering kernel for heavy nuclides is pre-calculated by the formula derived by Ouisloumen and Sanchez [2], and neutron spectrum in up-scattering term is expressed by NR approximation. To check the verification of the simplified treatment, the treatment is applied to U-238 for the energy range from 4 eV to 200 eV. Calculated multi-group capture cross section of U-238 is greater than that of conventional method and the increase of the capture cross sections is remarkable as the temperature becomes high. Therefore Doppler coefficient calculated in UO{sub 2} fuel pin is calculated more negative value than that on conventional method. The impact on Doppler coefficient is equivalent to the results of exact treatment of resonance elastic scattering reported in previous studies [2-7]. The agreement supports the validation of the simplified treatment and therefore this treatment is applied for other heavy nuclide to evaluate the Doppler coefficient in MOX fuel. The result shows that the impact of considering thermal agitation in resonance scattering in Doppler coefficient comes mainly from U-238 and that of other heavy nuclides such as Pu-239, 240 etc. is not comparable in MOX fuel. (authors)

  15. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  16. Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Munne

    2006-07-19

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

  17. Combined Spectroscopic and Electrochemical Detection of a NiIHN Bonding Interaction with Relevance to Electrocatalytic H2 Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kochem, Amelie; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Wiedner, Eric S.; van Gastel, Maurice

    2015-07-13

    The [Ni(PR2NR2)2]2+ family of complexes are exceptionally active catalysts for proton reduction to H2. In this manuscript, we explore the first protonation step of the proposed catalytic cycle by using a catalytically inactive NiI complex possessing a sterically demanding variation of the ligand. Due to the paramagnetic nature of the NiI oxidation state, the protonated NiI intermediate has been characterized through a combination of cyclic voltammetry, ENDOR, and HYSCORE spectroscopy. Both the electrochemical and spectroscopic studies indicate that the NiI complex is protonated at a pendant amine that is endo to Ni, which suggests the presence of an intramolecular NiIHN bonding interaction. Using density functional theory, the proton was found to hydrogen bond to three doubly-occupied, localized molecular orbitals: the 3dxz, 3dz2, and 3dyz orbitals of nickel. These studies provide the first direct experimental evidence for this critical catalytic intermediate, and implications for catalytic H2 production are discussed. Research was supported by the Max Planck Society (EPR, ENDOR, and HYSCORE spectroscopy, computational studies), and as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (electrochemistry, NMR spectroscopy). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  18. METAL ABUNDANCES, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND OTHER PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE RR LYRAE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Sesar, Branimir; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans E-mail: jmn@isr.bc.ca E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu E-mail: derekas@konkoly.hu E-mail: chadid@marseille.fr

    2013-08-20

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude {delta} Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 {+-} 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 {+-} 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-{phi}{sub 31}{sup s}-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on {approx}970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg)

  19. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.

  20. Characterization of Ambient Aerosols in Mexico City during the MCMA-2003 Campaign with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry. Results from the CENICA Supersite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcedo, D.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Dzepina, K.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Zhang, Q.; Huffman, A. J.; DeCarlo, Peter; Jayne, J. T.; Mortimer, P.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kolb, C. E.; Johnson, Kirsten S.; Zuberi, Bilal M.; Marr, L.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.; Cardenas, B.; Bernabe, R.; Marquez, C.; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, YuLong; Brune, W. H.; Lesher, R.; Shirley, T.; Jiminez, J. L.

    2006-03-24

    An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed at the CENICA Supersite, while another was deployed in the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML) during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003) from March 29-May 4, 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. This is the first of a series of papers reporting the AMS results from this campaign. The AMS provides real time information on mass concentration and composition of the non-refractory species in particulate matter less than 1 ?m (NR PM1) with high time and size resolution. For the first time, we report field results from a beam width probe, which was used to study the shape and mixing state of the particles and to quantify potential losses of irregular particles due to beam broadening inside the AMS. Data from this probe show that no significant amount of irregular particles was lost due to excessive beam broadening. A comparison of the CENICA and AML AMSs measurements is presented, being the first published intercomparison between two quadrupole AMSs. The speciation, and mass concentrations reported by the two AMSs compared well. In order to account for the refractory material in the aerosol, we also present measurements of Black Carbon (BC) using an aethalometer and an estimate of the aerosol soil component obtained from PIXE analysis of filters. Comparisons of (AMS + BC + soil) mass concentration with other collocated particle instruments (a LASAIR Optical Particle Counter, a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) and a DustTrack Aerosol Monitor) are also presented. The comparisons show that the (AMS + BC + soil) mass concentration during MCMC-2003 is a good approximation to the total PM??? mass concentration.

  1. Imaging Dirac-mass disorder from magnetic dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic topological insulator Crx(Bi0.1Sb0.9)2-xTe3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Inhee; Kim, Chung Koo; Lee, Jinho; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Zhong, Ruidan D.; Schneeloch, John A.; Liu, Tiansheng S.; Valla, Tonica; Tranquada, John M.; Gu, Genda D.; et al

    2015-01-20

    To achieve and use the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TIs), it is necessary to open a “Dirac-mass gap” in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely applied approach. However, it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in themore » ferromagnetic TI Cr₀.₀₈(Bi₀.₁Sb₀.₉)₁.₉₂Te₃. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap Δ(r) reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate is directly related to fluctuations in n(r), the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of Δ(r) not inconsistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship Δ(r)∝n(r) is confirmed throughout and exhibits an electron–dopant interaction energy J* = 145 meV·nm². In addition, these observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.« less

  2. Functional and structural diversity in GH62 ?-L-arabinofuranosidases from the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Amrit Pal; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Xu, Xiaohui; Lowden, Michael J.; Leyva, Juan Francisco; Stogios, Peter J.; Cui, Hong; Leo, Rosa Di; Powlowski, Justin; Tsang, Adrian; Savchenko, Alexei

    2015-05-01

    The genome of the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum (strain CBS 625.91) harbours a wide range of genes involved in carbohydrate degradation, including three genes, abf62A, abf62B and abf62C, predicted to encode glycoside hydrolase family 62 (GH62) enzymes. Transcriptome analysis showed that only abf62A and abf62C are actively expressed during growth on diverse substrates including straws from barley, alfalfa, triticale and canola. The abf62A and abf62C genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the resulting recombinant proteins were characterized. Calcium-free crystal structures of Abf62C in apo and xylotriose bound forms were determined to 1.23 and 1.48 resolution respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Asp55, Asp171 and Glu230 as catalytic triad residues, and revealed the critical role of non-catalytic residues Asp194, Trp229 and Tyr338 in positioning the scissile ?-L-arabinofuranoside bond at the catalytic site. Further, the +2R substrate-binding site residues Tyr168 and Asn339, as well as the +2NR residue Tyr226, are involved in accommodating long-chain xylan polymers. Overall, our structural and functional analysis highlights characteristic differences between Abf62A and Abf62C, which represent divergent subgroups in the GH62 family.

  3. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutronmore » reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.« less

  4. Stratified magnetically driven accretion-disk winds and their relations to jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-01-10

    We explore the poloidal structure of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds in relation to their potential association with the X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) and the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), in a single unifying approach. We present the density n(r, ?), ionization parameter ?(r, ?), and velocity structure v(r, ?) of such ionized winds for typical values of their fluid-to-magnetic flux ratio, F, and specific angular momentum, H, for which wind solutions become super-Alfvnic. We explore the geometrical shape of winds for different values of these parameters and delineate the values that produce the widest and narrowest opening angles of these winds, quantities necessary in the determination of the statistics of AGN obscuration. We find that winds with smaller H show a poloidal geometry of narrower opening angles with their Alfvn surface at lower inclination angles and therefore they produce the highest line of sight (LoS) velocities for observers at higher latitudes with the respect to the disk plane. We further note a physical and spatial correlation between the X-ray WAs and UFOs that form along the same LoS to the observer but at different radii, r, and distinct values of n, ?, and v consistent with the latest spectroscopic data of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. We also show that, at least in the case of 3C 111, the winds' pressure is sufficient to contain the relativistic plasma responsible for its radio emission. Stratified MHD disk winds could therefore serve as a unique means to understand and unify the diverse AGN outflows.

  5. Improving in vitro Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture model for assessing male reproductive toxicity: Lessons learned from comparisons of cytotoxicity versus genomic responses to phthalates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Xiaozhong; Hong, Sung Woo; Moreira, Estefania G.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2009-09-15

    Gonocytes exist in the neonatal testis and represent a transient population of male germ-line stem cells. It has been shown that stem cell self-renewal and progeny production is probably controlled by the neighboring differentiated cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo known as niches. Recently, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture (SGC) model with ECM overlay, which creates an in vivo-like niche and supports germ-line stem cell functioning within a 3D environment. In this study, we applied morphological and cytotoxicity evaluations, as well as microarray-based gene expression to examine the effects of different phthalate esters (PE) on this model. Known in vivo male developmentally toxic PEs (DTPE) and developmentally non-toxic PEs (DNTPE) were evaluated. We observed that DTPE induced significantly greater dose-dependent morphological changes, a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cytotoxicity compared to those treated with DNTPE. Moreover, the gene expression was more greatly altered by DTPE than by DNTPE and non-supervised cluster analysis allowed the discrimination of DTPE from the DNTPE. Our systems-based GO-Quant analysis showed significant alterations in the gene pathways involved in cell cycle, phosphate transport and apoptosis regulation with DTPE but not with DNTPE treatment. Disruptions of steroidogenesis related-gene expression such as Star, Cyp19a1, Hsd17b8, and Nr4a3 were observed in the DTPE group, but not in the DNTPE group. In summary, our observation on cell viability, cytotoxicity, and microarray-based gene expression analysis induced by PEs demonstrate that our in vitro 3D-SGC system mimicked in vivo responses for PEs and suggests that the 3D-SGC system might be useful in identifying developmental reproductive toxicants.

  6. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN MOLECULAR CLOUD CORE DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) IN CORONA AUSTRALIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Harju, J.; Juvela, M.; Sipilae, O.; Hotzel, S.

    2013-01-20

    Chemical reactions in starless molecular clouds are heavily dependent on interactions between gas phase material and solid phase dust and ices. We have observed the abundance and distribution of molecular gases in the cold, starless core DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) in Corona Australis using data from the Swedish ESO Submillimeter Telescope. We present column density maps determined from measurements of C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1, 1-0) and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0) emission features. Herschel data of the same region allow a direct comparison to the dust component of the cloud core and provide evidence for gas phase depletion of CO at the highest extinctions. The dust color temperature in the core calculated from Herschel maps ranges from roughly 10.7 to 14.0 K. This range agrees with the previous determinations from Infrared Space Observatory and Planck observations. The column density profile of the core can be fitted with a Plummer-like density distribution approaching n(r) {approx} r {sup -2} at large distances. The core structure deviates clearly from a critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere. Instead, the core appears to be gravitationally bound and to lack thermal and turbulent support against the pressure of the surrounding low-density material: it may therefore be in the process of slow contraction. We test two chemical models and find that a steady-state depletion model agrees with the observed C{sup 18}O column density profile and the observed N(C{sup 18}O) versus A{sub V} relationship.

  7. Modeling hot gas flow in the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus of NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2014-02-20

    Based on the dynamical black hole (BH) mass estimates, NGC 3115 hosts the closest billion solar mass BH. Deep studies of the center revealed a very underluminous active galactic nucleus (AGN) immersed in an old massive nuclear star cluster. Recent 1 Ms Chandra X-ray visionary project observations of the NGC 3115 nucleus resolved hot tenuous gas, which fuels the AGN. In this paper we connect the processes in the nuclear star cluster with the feeding of the supermassive BH. We model the hot gas flow sustained by the injection of matter and energy from the stars and supernova explosions. We incorporate electron heat conduction as the small-scale feedback mechanism, the gravitational pull of the stellar mass, cooling, and Coulomb collisions. Fitting simulated X-ray emission to the spatially and spectrally resolved observed data, we find the best-fitting solutions with ?{sup 2}/dof = 1.00 for dof = 236 both with and without conduction. The radial modeling favors a low BH mass <1.3 10{sup 9} M {sub ?}. The best-fitting supernova rate and the best-fitting mass injection rate are consistent with their expected values. The stagnation point is at r {sub st} ? 1'', so that most of the gas, including the gas at a Bondi radius r{sub B} = 2''-4'', outflows from the region. We put an upper limit on the accretion rate at 2 10{sup 3} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}. We find a shallow density profile n?r {sup ?} with ? ? 1 over a large dynamic range. This density profile is determined in the feeding region 0.''5-10'' as an interplay of four processes and effects: (1) the radius-dependent mass injection, (2) the effect of the galactic gravitational potential, (3) the accretion flow onset at r ? 1'', and (4) the outflow at r ? 1''. The gas temperature is close to the virial temperature T{sub v} at any radius.

  8. Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2012-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

  9. Biodegradation of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X.; Haws, R.; Wright, B.; Reese, D.; Moeller, G.; Peterson, C.

    1995-12-31

    Biodiesel fuel test substances Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Neat Rape Oil (NR), Say Methyl Ester (SME), Soy Ethyl Ester (SEE), Neat Soy Oil (NS), and proportionate combinations of RME/diesel and REE/diesel were studied to test the biodegradability of the test substances in an aerobic aquatic environment using the EPA 560/6-82-003 Shake Flask Test Method. A concurrent analysis of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel was also performed for comparison with a conventional fuel. The highest rates of percent CO{sub 2} evolution were seen in the esterified fuels, although no significant difference was noted between them. Ranges of percent CO{sub 2} evolution for esterified fuels were from 77% to 91%. The neat rape and neat soy oils exhibited 70% to 78% CO{sub 2} evolution. These rates were all significantly higher than those of the Phillips D-2 reference fuel which evolved from 7% to 26% of the organic carbon to CO{sub 2}. The test substances were examined for BOD{sub 5} and COD values as a relative measure of biodegradability. Water Accommodated Fraction (WAF) was experimentally derived and BOD{sub 5} and COD analyses were carried out with a diluted concentration at or below the WAF. The results of analysis at WAF were then converted to pure substance values. The pure substance BOD{sub 5} and COD values for test substances were then compared to a control substance, Phillips D-2 Reference fuel. No significant difference was noted for COD values between test substances and the control fuel. (p > 0.20). The D-2 control substance was significantly lower than all test substances for BCD, values at p << 0.01. RME was also significantly lower than REE (p < 0.05) and MS (p < 0.01) for BOD{sub 5} value.

  10. P3HT-b-PS Copolymers as P3HT/PCBM Interfacial Compatibilizers for High Efficiency Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Kai; Yu, Xiang; Hong, Kunlun; Keum, Jong Kahk; Browning, Jim; Ivanov, Ilia N; Chen, Jihua; Alonzo Calderon, Jose E; Sumpter, Bobby G; Payzant, E Andrew; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B

    2011-01-01

    To control the donor-acceptor phase separation for more efficient organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells, poly(3-hexylthiophene)-block-polystyrene (P3HT-b-PS) diblock copolymer was added to serve as a compatibilizer in a P3HT/ [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester fullerene derivative (PCBM) blend. An addition of 5 wt% of P3HT-b-PS copolymer in the P3HT/PCBM blend improved the power-conversion efficiency from 3.3% to 4.1% due to an enhancement of both the short-circuit current density and fill factor compared to that of a pristine P3HT/PCBM solar cell. Grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS), absorption spectroscopy and carrier mobility studies reveal that the crystallinity and orientation of P3HT were improved, thereby enhancing hole transport in the P3HT polymer, and leading to a better balance between the electron and hole mobilities in the P3HT/PCBM active layer. Neutron reflectometry (NR) experiments demonstrate that a distinct scattering length density profile shows the highest PCBM concentration in the middle layer region and a more compact and homogeneous layer, presumably due to an increase in miscibility of P3HT and PCBM driven by the copolymer compatibilizer, while adding 5 wt% of P3HT-b-PS copolymer in the P3HT/PCBM blend. Quantum density functional theory calculations show that the P3HT-b-PS additive tends to promote microphase segregation, with the PCBM attracted to the PS block, and the P3HT stacking onto the P3HT block, which presumably leads to improvements in long-range crystallinity , consistent with the GIXS findings. Overall, the results for P3HT-b-PS copolymer in a P3HT/PCBM blend demonstrate that tailored block copolymers can act as an effective compatibilizer in blended systems to further improve solar cell performance

  11. Amino acid modified Ni catalyst exhibits reversible H2 oxidation/production over a broad pH range at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Arnab; DuBois, Daniel L.; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-11-18

    Hydrogenases interconvert H2 and protons at high rates and with high energy efficiencies, providing inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. Studies designed to determine how the protein scaffold can influence a catalytically active site has led to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives, [Ni(PCy2NAmino acid2)2]2+ (CyAA), of [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ complexes. It is shown that these CyAA derivatives can catalyze fully reversible H2 production/oxidation, a feature reminiscent of enzymes. The reversibility is achieved in acidic aqueous solutions, 0.25% H2/Ar, and elevated temperatures (tested up to 348 K) for the glycine (CyGly), arginine (CyArg), and arginine methyl ester (CyArgOMe) derivatives. As expected for a reversible process, the activity is dependent upon H2 and proton concentration. CyArg is significantly faster in both directions than the other two derivatives (~300 s-1 H2 production and 20 s-1 H2 oxidation; pH=1, 348 K). The significantly slower rates for CyArgOMe (35 s-1 production and 7 s-1 oxidation) compared to CyArg suggests an important role for the COOH group during catalysis. That CyArg is faster than CyGly (3 s-1 production and 4 s-1 oxidation under the same conditions) suggests that the additional structural features imparted by the guanidinium groups facilitate fast and reversible H2 addition/release. These observations demonstrate that appended, outer coordination sphere amino acids work in synergy with the active site and can play an equally important role for synthetic molecular electrocatalysts as the protein scaffold does for redox active enzymes. This work was funded by the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the US DOE, BES (AD, WJS), and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, BES (DLD, JASR). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US DOE.

  12. An in vitro investigation of endocrine disrupting effects of the mycotoxin alternariol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frizzell, Caroline; Ndossi, Doreen; Kalayou, Shewit; Eriksen, Gunnar S.; Verhaegen, Steven; Srlie, Morten; Elliott, Christopher T.; Ropstad, Erik; Connolly, Lisa

    2013-08-15

    Alternariol (AOH) is a mycotoxin commonly produced by Alternaria alternata on a wide range of foods. Few studies to date have been performed to evaluate the effects of AOH on endocrine activity. The present study makes use of in vitro mammalian cellular based assays and gene expression to investigate the ability of AOH to act as an endocrine disruptor by various modes of action. Reporter gene assays (RGAs), incorporating natural steroid hormone receptors for oestrogens, androgens, progestagens and glucocorticoids were used to identify endocrine disruption at the level of nuclear receptor transcriptional activity, and the H295R steroidogenesis assay was used to assess endocrine disruption at the level of gene expression and steroid hormone production. AOH exhibited a weak oestrogenic response when tested in the oestrogen responsive RGA and binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of AOH. H295R cells when exposed to 0.11000 ng/ml AOH, did not cause a significant change in testosterone and cortisol hormones but exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 ?M) AOH resulted in a significant increase in estradiol and progesterone production. In the gene expression study following exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 ?M) AOH, only one gene NR0B1 was down-regulated, whereas expression of mRNA for CYP1A1, MC2R, HSD3B2, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B2 and CYP19 was up-regulated. Expression of the other genes investigated did not change significantly. In conclusion AOH is a weak oestrogenic mycotoxin that also has the ability to interfere with the steroidogenesis pathway. - Highlights: Alternariol was investigated for endocrine disrupting activity. Reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay have been used. An oestrogenic effect of alternariol was observed. This can lead to an increase in expression of the progesterone receptor. Alternariol is capable of modulating hormone production and gene expression.

  13. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Kewitz, T.; Sperka, J.

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.

  14. Evaluation of nitrogen-rich macrocyclic ligands for the chelation of therapeutic bismuth radioisotopes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wilson, Justin J.; Ferrier, Maryline; Radchenko, Valery; Maassen, Joel R.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Batista, Enrique R.; Martin, Richard L.; Nortier, Francois M.; Fassbender, Michael E.; John, Kevin D.; et al

    2015-05-01

    The use of α-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy is a promising treatment strategy for small micro-metastatic disease. The radioisotope ²¹³Bi is a nuclide that has found substantial use for targeted α-therapy (TAT). The relatively unexplored aqueous chemistry of Bi³⁺, however, hinders the development of bifunctional chelating agents that can successfully deliver these Bi radioisotopes to the tumor cells. Here, a novel series of nitrogen-rich macrocyclic ligands is explored for their potential use as Bi-selective chelating agents. The ligands, 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Lpy), 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(3-pyridazylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Lpyd), 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(4-pyrimidylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Lpyr), and 1,4,7,10-tetrakis(2-pyrazinylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (Lpz), were prepared by a previously reported method and investigated here for their abilitiesmore » to bind Bi radioisotopes. The commercially available and commonly used ligands 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and N-[(R)-2-amino-3-(p-isothiocyanato-phenyl)propyl]-trans-(S,S)- cyclohexane-1,2-diamine-N,N,N',N",N"-pentaacetic acid (CHX-A''-DTPA) were also explored for comparative purposes. Radio-thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was used to measure the binding kinetics and stabilities of the complexes formed. The long-lived isotope, ²⁰⁷Bi (t1/2 = 32 years), was used for these studies. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were also employed to probe the ligand interactions with Bi³⁺ and the generator parent ion Ac³⁺.In contrast to DOTA and CHX-A''-DTPA, these nitrogen-rich macrocycles selectively chelate Bi³⁺ in the presence of the parent isotope Ac³⁺. Among the four tested, Lpy was found to exhibit optimal Bi³⁺-binding kinetics and complex stability. Lpy complexes Bi³⁺ more rapidly than DOTA, yet the resulting complexes are of similar stability. DFT calculations corroborate the experimentally observed selectivity of these ligands for Bi³⁺ over Ac³⁺. Taken together, these data implicate Lpy as a valuable chelating agent for the delivery of ²¹³Bi. Its selectivity for Bi³⁺ and rapid and stable labeling properties warrant further investigation and biological studies.« less

  15. Synthesis of main group, rare-earth, and d{sup 0} metal complexes containing beta-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Ka King

    2013-05-02

    A series of organometallic compounds containing the tris(dimethylsilyl)methyl ligand are described. The potassium carbanions KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} and KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA are synthesized by deprotonation of the hydrocarbon HC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} with potassium benzyl. KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA crystallizes as a dimer with two types of three-center-two-electron KH- Si interactions. Homoleptic Ln(III) tris(silylalkyl) complexes containing ?-SiH groups M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) are synthesized from salt elimination of the corresponding lanthanide halide and 3 equiv. of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The related reactions with Sc yield bis(silylalkyl) ate-complexes containing either LiCl or KCl. The divalent calcium and ytterbium compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) are prepared from MI{sub 2} and 2 equiv of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} react with 1 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to give 1,3- disilacyclobutane {Me2Si-C(SiHMe2)2}2 and MC(SiHMe2)3HB(C6F5)3L, and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}, respectively. The corresponding reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu) give the ?-SiH abstraction product [{(Me{sub 2}HSi){sub 3}C}{sub 2}LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}SiMe{sub 2}][HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}] (Ln = Y, Lu), but the silene remains associated with the Y or Lu center. The abstraction reactions of M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2 }or TMEDA) and Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) and 2 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} give the expected dicationic M{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and dicationic mono(silylalkyl) LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2} (Ln = Y, Lu, La), respectively. Salt metathesis reactions of Cp{sub 2}(NR{sub 2})ZrX (X = Cl, I, OTf; R = t-Bu, SiHMe{sub 2}) and lithium hydrosilazide ultimately afford hydride products Cp{sub 2}(NR{sub 2})ZrH that suggest unusual ?-hydrogen elimination processes. A likely intermediate in one of these reactions, Cp{sub 2}Zr[N(SiHMe{sub 2})t-Bu][N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}], is isolated under controlled synthetic conditions. Addition of alkali metal salts to this zirconium hydrosilazide compound produces the corresponding zirconium hydride. However as conditions are varied, a number of other pathways are also accessible, including C-H/Si-H dehydrocoupling, ?-abstraction of a CH, and ?-abstraction of a SiH. Our observations suggest that the conversion of (hydrosilazido)zirconocene to zirconium hydride does not follow the classical four-center ?- elimination mechanism. Elimination and abstraction reactions dominate the chemistry of ligands containing ?- hydrogen. In contrast, Cp{sub 2}Zr{N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}}H and Cp{sub 2}Zr{N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}}Me undergo selective ?-CH bond activation to yield the azasilazirconacycle Cp{sub 2Zr}{?{sup 2}-N(SiHMe{sub 2})SiHMeCH{sub 2}}, even though there are reactive ?-hydrogen available for abstraction. The ?-SiH groups in metallacycle provide access to new pathways for sixteen-electron zirconium alkyl compounds, in which Cp{sub 2}Zr{?{sup 2}-N(SiHMe{sub 2})SiHMeCH{sub 2}} undergoes a rare ?-bond metathesis reaction with ethylene. The resulting vinyl intermediate undergoes ?-hydrogen abstraction to reform ethylene and a silanimine zirconium species that reacts with ethylene to give a metallacyclopentane as the isolated product. The pendent ?-SiH in metallocycle also reacts with paraformaldehyde through an uncatalyzed hydrosilylation to form an exocyclic methoxysilyl moiety, while the zirconium-carbon bond in metallocycle is surprisingly inert toward formaldehyde. Still, the Zr-C moiety in metallocycle is available for chemistry, and it interacts with the carbon monoxide and strong electrophile B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to provide Cp{sub 2}Zr[?{sup 2}- OC(=CH{sub 2})SiMeHN(SiHMe

  16. Group 4 Metalloporphyrin diolato Complexes and Catalytic Application of Metalloporphyrins and Related Transition Metal Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guodong Du

    2004-12-19

    In this work, the first examples of group 4 metalloporphyrin 1,2-diolato complexes were synthesized through a number of strategies. In general, treatment of imido metalloporphyrin complexes, (TTP)M=NR, (M = Ti, Zr, Hf), with vicinal diols led to the formation of a series of diolato complexes. Alternatively, the chelating pinacolate complexes could be prepared by metathesis of (TTP)MCl{sub 2} (M = Ti, Hf) with disodium pinacolate. These complexes were found to undergo C-C cleavage reactions to produce organic carbonyl compounds. For titanium porphyrins, treatment of a titanium(II) alkyne adduct, (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh), with aromatic aldehydes or aryl ketones resulted in reductive coupling of the carbonyl groups to produce the corresponding diolato complexes. Aliphatic aldehydes or ketones were not reactive towards (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh). However, these carbonyl compounds could be incorporated into a diolato complex on reaction with a reactive precursor, (TTP)Ti[O(Ph){sub 2}C(Ph){sub 2}O] to provide unsymmetrical diolato complexes via cross coupling reactions. In addition, an enediolato complex (TTP)Ti(OCPhCPhO) was obtained from the reaction of (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh) with benzoin. Titanium porphyrin diolato complexes were found to be intermediates in the (TTP)Ti=O-catalyzed cleavage reactions of vicinal diols, in which atmospheric oxygen was the oxidant. Furthermore, (TTP)Ti=O was capable of catalyzing the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and {alpha}-hydroxy ketones to benzaldehyde and {alpha}-diketones, respectively. Other high valent metalloporphyrin complexes also can catalyze the oxidative diol cleavage and the benzyl alcohol oxidation reactions with dioxygen. A comparison of Ti(IV) and Sn(IV) porphyrin chemistry was undertaken. While chelated diolato complexes were invariably obtained for titanium porphyrins on treatment with 1,2-diols, the reaction of vicinal diols with tin porphyrins gave a number of products, including mono-, bis-alkoxo, and chelating diolato complexes, depending on the identity of diols and the stoichiometry employed. It was also found that tin porphyrin complexes promoted the oxidative cleavage of vicinal diols and the oxidation of {alpha}-ketols to {alpha}-diketones with dioxygen. In extending the chemistry of metalloporphyrins and analogous complexes, a series of chiral tetraaza macrocyclic ligands and metal complexes were designed and synthesized. Examination of iron(II) complexes showed that they were efficient catalysts for the cyclopropanation of styrene by diazo reagents. Good yields and high diastereoselectivity were obtained with modest enantioselectivity. A rationalization of the stereoselectivity was presented on the basis of structural factors in a carbene intermediate.

  17. Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a particular batch scheme). The volume of test space in IPTs is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. In addition to the IPTs, the Cylindrical MATRIX concept features test spaces at the centers of fuel assemblies where very high fast flux can be achieved. This magnitude of fast flux is similar to that achieved in the ATR A-positions, however, the available volume having these conditions is greater in the MATRIX design than in the ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the Cylindrical MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this statement must be qualified by acknowledging that this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design matures. Also, some of the requirements were not strictly met, but are believed to be achievable once features to be added later are designed.

  18. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

    2012-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

  19. End Calorimeter Warm Tube Heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primdahl, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-06

    The Tevatron accelerator beam tube must pass through the End Calorimeter cryostats of the D-Zero Collider Detector. Furthermore, the End Calorimeter cryostats must be allowed to roll back forty inches without interruption of the vacuum system; hence, the Tev tube must slide through the End Calorimeter cryostat as it is rolled back. The Tev pass through the End Calorimeter can actually be thought of as a cluster of concentric tubes: Tev tube, warm (vacuum vessel) tube, IS layers of superinsulation, cold tube (argon vessel), and Inner Hadronic center support tube. M. Foley generated an ANSYS model to study the heat load. to the cryostat. during collider physics studies; that is, without operation of the heater. A sketch of the model is included in the appendix. The vacuum space and superinsulation was modeled as a thermal solid, with conductivity derived from tests performed at Fermilab. An additional estimate was done. by this author, using data supplied by NR-2. a superinsulation manufacturer. The ANSYS result and hand calculation are in close agreement. The ANSYS model was modified. by this author. to incorporate the effect of the heater. Whereas the earlier model studied steady state operation only. the revised model considers the heater-off steady state mode as the initial condition. then performs a transient analysis with a final load step for time tending towards infinity. Results show the thermal gradient as a function of time and applied voltage. It should be noted that M. Foley's model was generated for one half the warm tube. implying the tube to be symmetric. In reality. the downstream connection (relative to the collision point) attachment to the vacuum shell is via several convolutions of a 0.020-inch wall bellows; hence. a nearly adiabatic boundary condition. Accordingly. the results reported in the table reflect extrapolation of the curves to the downstream end of the tube. Using results from the ANSYS analysis, that is, tube temperature and corresponding heat flux, temperature of the nichrome wire can be estimated. The possibility of frost is of genuine concern, as evidenced by the 250 K minimum temperature for the warm tube while heaters are not operating. Noting that steady state operation at 1 Amp (40 volts) allows the nichrome wire to stay below the critical temperature for Kapton, a conservative plan is to allow several days of heater operation, at 1 Amp (40 volts), before roll-back. Warm-up can be accelerated by operating the heaters in excess of 1 Amp, as evidenced by the test where a maximum of 3.2 Amp was supplied. Operating the heaters in excess of 1 Amp must be done with care since a rapid rise in temperature will likely occur once any ice present has been melted.