Sample records for minimum gap runner

  1. Light-Emitting Tag Testing in Conjunction with Testing of the Minimum Gap Runner Turbine Design at Bonneville Dam Powerhouse 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a pilot study conducted by Tom Carlson of PNNL and Mark Weiland of MEVATEC Corp to test the feasibility of using light-emitting tags to visually track objects passing through the turbine environment of a hydroelectric dam. Light sticks were released at the blade tip, mid-blade, and hub in the MGR turbine and a Kaplan turbine at Bonneville Dam and videotaped passing thru the dam to determine visibility and object trajectories.

  2. Runner upgrading: Learning from Ontario Hydro`s experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kee, D.C.; Markovich, M.S.; Munro, R.I. [Ontario Hydro (Canada)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning, design, and implementation of turbine runner replacement at Ontario Hydro is described in the article. The use of fully homologous modeling for upgrade projects, including both francis and propeller runner types, is outlined. Confirmation of physical model efficiency is obtained through numerical modeling. Inlet connections, setting cavitation-erosion guarantees, and other guarantees included in tender documents are also described in some detail.

  3. Seriality, the Literary and Database in Homestar Runner: Some Old Issues in New Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boluk, Stephanie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been reconfigured in digital media. Using Homestar Runner asthe range of what many digital media scholars might strictlyheavily on serial logics. Digital media and specifically, a

  4. Webinar: America's Next Top Energy Innovator Runner-Up Presents Hydrogen Detection Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar, "America's Next Top Energy Innovator Runner-Up Presents Hydrogen Detection Technologies," originally presented on April 3, 2012.

  5. Gnie mcanique Design of a Small Pelton Runner Used as Energy Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lausanne, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de

    a good hydraulic efficiency. The hydraulic efficiency in Pelton turbines are directly liked system in desalination plants. In order to design a runner with good hydraulic efficiency, the current hydraulic theory and the effect of some form factors in the runner efficiency are studied and applied

  6. Experimental optimization of a free vortex propeller runner for micro hydro application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The turbine technology for low head application in the micro hydro range has been vastly neglected despite niche available in scattered regions of valley flows as well as in wastewater canals and other energy recovery schemes, where the available head does not exceed 2 meters. The goal of this study is to develop hydraulically optimized propeller turbines for the micro hydro range with a particular focus on ease of manufacture. This paper presents a wide range of geometrical optimization steps carried out on a propeller runner, whose blades have been designed using the free vortex theory, and operating with a gross head from 1.5 to 2 m and discharge of approximately 75 l/s. It further illustrates 3 stages of geometrical modifications carried out on the runner with an objective of optimizing the runner performance. These modifications comprised of changes to the tip angles (both at the runner inlet and exit) as well as the hub angles (at the runner inlet) of the runner blades. The paper also presents an interesting theoretical methodology to analyze the effects of each optimization stage. This method looks at the relative changes to shaft power and discharge at constant head and speed and gives wonderful insight as to how the internal parameters like Euler shaft work and runner hydraulic losses are behaving with respect to each optimization stage. It was found that the performance of the runner was very sensitive to changes to exit tip angle. At two levels of modification, the discharge increased in the range of 15-30%, while shaft power increased in the range of 12-45%, thus influencing the efficiency characteristics. The results of the runner inlet tip modification were very interesting in that a very significant rise of turbine efficiency was recorded from 55% to 74% at the best efficiency point, which was caused by a reduced discharge consumption as well as a higher power generation. It was also found that the optimization study on a propeller runner has reasonably validated the estimates of the free vortex theory despite small deviations. The final runner configuration demonstrated a maximum efficiency of 74% ({+-}1.8%), which is very encouraging from the perspectives of micro hydro application. The paper concludes with recommendations of a series of optimization steps to increase the efficiency of the runner. It also recommends the attempt of Computational Fluid Dynamics both as a validation and optimization tool for future research on propeller runners. (author)

  7. Mind The Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel F. Litim

    2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss an optimisation criterion for the exact renormalisation group based on the inverse effective propagator, which displays a gap. We show that a simple extremisation of the gap stabilises the flow, leading to better convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory. This improves the reliability of truncations, most relevant for any high precision computation. These ideas are closely linked to the removal of a spurious scheme dependence and a minimum sensitivity condition. The issue of predictive power and a link to the Polchinski RG are discussed as well. We illustrate our findings by computing critical exponents for the Ising universality class.

  8. libRoadRunner: A High Performance SBML Simulation and Analysis Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endre T. Somogyi; Jean-Marie Bouteiller; James A. Glazier; Matthias König; Kyle Medley; Maciej H. Swat; Herbert M. Sauro

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents libRoadRunner, an extensible, high-performance, cross-platform, open-source software library for the simulation and analysis of models \\ expressed using Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). SBML is the most widely used standard for representing dynamic networks, especially biochemical networks. libRoadRunner supports solution of both large models and multiple replicas of a single model on desktop, mobile and cluster computers. libRoadRunner is a self-contained library, able to run both as a component inside other tools via its C++ and C bindings andnteractively through its Python interface. The Python Application Programming Interface (API) is similar to the APIs of Matlab and SciPy, making it fast and easy to learn, even for new users. libRoadRunner uses a custom Just-In-Time (JIT) compiler built on the widely-used LLVM JIT compiler framework to compile SBML-specified models directly into very fast native machine code for a variety of processors, making it appropriate for solving very large models or multiple replicas of smaller models. libRoadRunner is flexible, supporting the bulk of the SBML specification (except for delay and nonlinear algebraic equations) and several of its extensions. It offers multiple deterministic and stochastic integrators, as well as tools for steady-state, stability analyses and flux balance analysis. We regularly update libRoadRunner binary distributions for Mac OS X, Linux and Windows and license them under Apache License Version 2.0. http://www.libroadrunner.org provides online documentation, full build instructions, binaries and a git source repository.

  9. Prediction Indicators for Voluntary Carbon-Offset Purchases Among Trail Runners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, M. Nils

    Prediction Indicators for Voluntary Carbon-Offset Purchases Among Trail Runners M. Nils Peterson Voluntary carbon offsets (VCOs) represent a rapidly growing tool for addressing climate change, but few voluntary carbon offsets (VCOs) to offset emissions from activities they engage in. Prior to the global

  10. Changes in vigorous physical activity and incident diabetes inmale runners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined the dose-response relationship between changes in reported vigorous exercise (running distance, {Delta}km/wk) and self-reported physician diagnosed diabetes in 25,988 men followed prospectively for (mean {+-} SD) 7.8 {+-} 1.8 years. Logistic regression analyses showed that the log odds for diabetes declined significantly in relation to men's {Delta}km/wk (coefficient {+-} SE: -0.012 {+-} 0.004, P < 0.01), which remained significant when adjusted for BMI (-0.018 {+-} 0.003, P < 0.0001). The decline in the log odds for diabetes was related to the distance run at the end of follow-up when adjusted for baseline distance, with (-0.024 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) or without (-0.027 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) adjustment for BMI. Baseline distance was unrelated to diabetes incidence when adjusted for the distance at the end of follow-up. Compared to men who ran <8 km/wk at the end of follow-up, incidence rates in those who ran {ge} 8 km/wk were 95% lower between 35-44 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 92% lower between 45-54 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 87% lower between 55 and 64 years old (P < 0.0001), and 46% lower between 65-75 yrs old (P = 0.30). For the subset of 6,208 men who maintained the same running distance during follow-up ({+-}5 km/wk), the log odds for diabetes declined with weekly distance run (-0.024 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.02) but not when adjusted for BMI (-0.005 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.65). Conclusion: Vigorous exercise significantly reduces diabetes incidence, due in part to the prevention of age-related weight gain and in part to other exercise effects. Physical activity decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes [1-10]. Moderate and vigorous exercise are purported to produce comparable reductions in diabetes risk if the energy expenditure is the same [3,10]. The optimal physical activity dose remains unclear, however, with some [4-7] but not all studies [1,8,9] showing continued reduction in diabetes for high versus intermediate energy expenditures. The National Runners Health Study [11-19] is unique among population cohorts in its focus on the health impact of higher doses of vigorously intense physical activity (i.e., {ge} 6-fold metabolic rate). The study was specifically designed to evaluate the dose-response relationship between vigorous physical activity and health for intensities and durations that exceed current physical activity recommendations [20-22]. One specific hypothesis is whether changes in vigorous physical activity affect the risk for becoming diabetic. Although women were surveyed and followed-up, only 23 developed diabetes so there is limited statistical power to establish their significance. Our analyses of diabetes and vigorous exercise are therefore restricted to men. This paper relates running distance at baseline and at the end of follow-up to self-reported, physician diagnosed diabetes in vigorously active men who were generally lean and ostensibly at low diabetic risk The benefits of greater doses of more vigorous exercise are relevant to the 27% of U.S. women and 34% of U.S. men meet or exceed the more general exercise recommendations for health benefits [23]. Specific issues to be addressed are: (1) whether maintenance of the same level of vigorous exercise over time reduces the risk of incident diabetes in relation to the exercise dose; (2) whether men who decrease their activity increase their risk for becoming diabetic; and (3) whether end of follow-up running distances are more predictive of diabetes than baseline distances, suggesting a causal, acute effect. Elsewhere we have shown that greater body weight is related to a lack of vigorous exercise [12-14] and increases the risk for diabetes even among generally lean vigorously active men [11]. In runners, leanness may be due to the exercise or due to initially lean men choosing to run further [17]. Therefore we also test whether body weight mediates the effects of vigorous exercise on diabetes, and whether this may be due to self-selection.

  11. Haemers' Minimum Rank.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tims, Geoff

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Haemers' minimum rank was first defined by Willem Haemers in 1979. He created this graph parameter as an upper bound for the Shannon capacity of… (more)

  12. The Minimum Price Contract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Welch, Mark; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimum price contract is one of many tools a marketer may use to better manage price and production risk while trying to achieve financial goals and objectives. This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages involved...

  13. Windy Gap Firming Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Windy Gap Firming Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOEEIS-0370 (cooperating agency) Western's proposed...

  14. College Gender Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronson, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    College Gender Gaps BY MARY ANN BRONSONBY MARY ANN BRONSON FALL 2013 W HY DO WOMEN ATTEND collegerelationship is crucial. Mary Ann Bronson, a Ph.D. candidate

  15. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

  16. Generation gaps in engineering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, David J. (David Jinwoo)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is much enthusiastic debate on the topic of generation gaps in the workplace today; what the generational differences are, how to address the apparent challenges, and if the generations themselves are even real. ...

  17. Fiber optic gap gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA); Larsen, Greg J. (Brentwood, CA); Sanchez, Roberto J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  18. Inception report and Gap analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inception report and Gap analysis Boiler inspection Riga, June 2004 #12;Inception report and gap analysis ­ boiler inspection Table of Content 1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 3 2 BOILER INSTALLATIONS ­ GAP ANALYSIS

  19. Minimum Gas Service Standards (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natural gas companies in Ohio are required to follow the Minimum Gas Service Standards, which are set and enforced by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. These rules are found in chapter 4901...

  20. Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to all dams and structures which impound or divert waters on rivers or their tributaries, with some exceptions. The regulations set standards for minimum flow (listed in the...

  1. Uncertainties in Gapped Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eylee Jung; Kwang S. Kim; DaeKil Park

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by graphene-based quantum computer we examine the time-dependence of the position-momentum and position-velocity uncertainties in the monolayer gapped graphene. The effect of the energy gap to the uncertainties is shown to appear via the Compton-like wavelength $\\lambda_c$. The uncertainties in the graphene are mainly contributed by two phenomena, spreading and zitterbewegung. While the former determines the uncertainties in the long-range of time, the latter gives the highly oscillation to the uncertainties in the short-range of time. The uncertainties in the graphene are compared with the corresponding values for the usual free Hamiltonian $\\hat{H}_{free} = (p_1^2 + p_2^2) / 2 M$. It is shown that the uncertainties can be under control within the quantum mechanical law if one can choose the gap parameter $\\lambda_c$ freely.

  2. GAP TESTS; COMPARISON BETWEEN UN GAP TEST AND CARD GAP TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    98-36 GAP TESTS; COMPARISON BETWEEN UN GAP TEST AND CARD GAP TEST by R. BRANKA and C. MICHOT, FRANCE (tel.: 33 3 44 55 65 19, fax: 33 3 44 55 65 10) ABSTRACT: UN gap test, type 1(a) or 2(a), is the recommended test in the acceptance procedure for transport of explosives in class 1. Up to the revision

  3. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  4. The minimum-uncertainty coherent states for Landau levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, A. [Physics Department, Payame Noor University, P. O. Box 19395-4697 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakhri, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, P. O. Box 51666-16471 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mojaveri, B. [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, P. O. Box 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Glauber minimum-uncertainty coherent states with two variables for Landau levels, based on the representation of Weyl-Heisenberg algebra by two different modes, have been studied about four decades ago. Here, we introduce new two-variable coherent states with minimum uncertainty relationship for Landau levels in three different methods: the infinite unitary representation of su(1, 1) is realized in two different methods, first, by consecutive levels with the same energy gaps and also with the same value for z-angular momentum quantum number, then, by shifting z-angular momentum mode number by two units while the energy level remaining the same. Besides, for su(2), whether by lowest Landau levels or Landau levels with lowest z-angular momentum, just one finite unitary representation is introduced. Having constructed the generalized Klauder-Perelomov coherent states, for any of the three representations, we obtain their Glauber coherency by displacement operator of Weyl-Heisenberg algebra.

  5. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  6. Mind the gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Bhagwat; A. Krassnigg; P. Maris; C. D. Roberts

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  7. On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demaine, Erik D.

    We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

  8. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents additional resources on loan standards and requirements from Elise Avers' presentation on HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements.

  9. Energy Consumption of Minimum Energy Coding in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Energy Consumption of Minimum Energy Coding in CDMA Wireless Sensor Networks Benigno Zurita Ares://www.ee.kth.se/control Abstract. A theoretical framework is proposed for accurate perfor- mance analysis of minimum energy coding energy consumption is analyzed for two coding schemes proposed in the literature: Minimum Energy coding

  10. Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso M´ario Jesus ´Alberto M´arquez Abstract The NP multiple criteria minimum spanning tree as several applications into the network design problems criteria minimum spanning trees. There are several geometric network design and application problems

  11. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  12. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yin, Y.

    1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

  13. Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste and other land uses. The regulations require an...

  14. Knots and Minimum Distance Energy Rosanna Speller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denne, Elizabeth

    Knots and Minimum Distance Energy Rosanna Speller (Dated: May 11, 2008) Professor Elizabeth Denne have least Minimum Distance Energy. I previously showed that the energy is minimized for convex polygons. We hope relating the energy to chords of polygons will be a helpful step towards showing

  15. Minimum rank of graphs that allow loops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikkelson, Rana C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The traditional "minimum rank problem" for simple graphs associates a set of symmetric matrices, the zero-nonzero pattern of whose off-diagonal entries are described by the… (more)

  16. Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allegretto, Sylvia; Dube, Arindrajit; Reich, Michael; Zipperer, Ben

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    adjusted Current Employment Statistics data from BLS. TheBureau of Labor Statistics’ Employment and Earnings Reports.and Statistics 92, 4: 945-64. [27] _________2013. “Minimum Wage Shocks, Employment

  17. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  18. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hysinger, C.L.; Beaman, J.J.; Melgaard, D.K.; Williamson, R.L.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows. 17 figs.

  19. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000...

  20. Emplacement Gantry Gap Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Thornley

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, the project has established important to safety (ITS) performance requirements for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) based on the identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171512], Table A-11). Further, SSCs credited with performing safety functions are classified as ITS. In turn, assurance that these SSCs will perform as required is sought through the use of consensus codes and standards. This gap analysis is based on the design completed for license application only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, alternative designs currently under consideration will be discussed throughout this study. This gap analysis will evaluate each code and standard identified within the ''Emplacement Gantry ITS Standards Identification Study'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173586]) to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied, a gap is highlighted. This study will identify requirements to supplement or augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, this gap analysis will identify nonstandard areas of the design that will be subject to a design development plan. Nonstandard components and nonstandard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, assurance that an SSC will perform as required may not be readily sought though the use of consensus standards. This gap analysis is prepared by the Emplacement and Retrieval (E&R) project team and is intended for the sole use of the Engineering department in work regarding the emplacement gantry. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the E&R project team should be consulted before use of this gap analysis for purposes other than those stated herein or by individuals other than authorized by the Engineering department.

  1. Hard-gapped Holographic Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallab Basu; Jianyang He; Anindya Mukherjee; Hsien-Hang Shieh

    2009-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we discuss the zero temperature limit of a "p-wave" holographic superconductor. The bulk description consists of a non-Abelian SU(2) gauge fields minimally coupled to gravity. We numerically construct the zero temperature solution which is the gravity dual of the superconducting ground state of the "p-wave" holographic superconductors. The solution is a smooth soliton with zero horizon size and shows an emergent conformal symmetry in the IR. We found the expected superconducting behavior. Using the near horizon analysis we show that the system has a "hard gap" for the relevant gauge field fluctuations. At zero temperature the real part of the conductivity is zero for an excitation frequency less than the gap frequency. This is in contrast with what has been observed in similar scalar- gravity-gauge systems (holographic superconductors). We also discuss the low but finite temperature behavior of our solution.

  2. Building Information Modeling - A Minimum Mathematical Configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhandare, Ruchika

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    minimum information required to execute the construction of a project. A plain concrete beam element was used as the case study for this research. The results show that a minimal information schema can be developed for a simple building element. Further...

  3. Learning Minimum Volume Sets Clayton Scott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Clayton

    Learning Minimum Volume Sets Clayton Scott Statistics Department Rice University Houston, TX 77005 herein are primarily of theoretical interest, although they may be implemented e#eciently for certain measure based on S: # P (G) = (1/n) # n i=1 I(X i # G). Here I(·) is the indicator function. Set µ

  4. Minimum Energy Diagrams for Multieffect Distillation Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    and the energy use from this process accounts for an estimated 3% of the world energy consumption.1 With rising on the overall plant energy consumption. The use of heat integration combined with complex config- urations distillation ar- rangements. An easy form of comparison for energy consumption is the minimum vapor flow rate

  5. Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1 David Eppstein 2 Leonidas J. Guibas 3 Monika R. Henzinger 4 Abstract We consider the parametric minimum spanning tree problem- pute the sequence of minimum spanning trees generated as varies. We also consider the kinetic minimum

  6. Calibration curves for some standard Gap Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, A.L.; Sommer, S.C.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative shock sensitivities of explosive compositions are commonly assessed using a family of experiments that can be described by the generic term ''Gap Test.'' Gap tests include a donor charge, a test sample, and a spacer, or gap, between two explosives charges. The donor charge, gap material, and test dimensions are held constant within each different version of the gap test. The thickness of the gap is then varied to find the value at which 50% of the test samples will detonate. The gap tests measure the ease with a high-order detonation can be established in the test explosive, or the ''detonability,'' of the explosive. Test results are best reported in terms of the gap thickness at the 50% point. It is also useful to define the shock pressure transmitted into the test sample at the detonation threshold. This requires calibrating the gap test in terms of shock pressure in the gap as a function of the gap thickness. It also requires a knowledge of the shock Hugoniot of the sample explosive. We used the 2DE reactive hydrodynamic code with Forest Fire burn rates for the donor explosives to calculate calibration curves for several gap tests. The model calculations give pressure and particle velocity on the centerline of the experimental set-up and provide information about the curvature and pulse width of the shock wave. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Air Gap Tunin Yilin Mao, Yashwanth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Air Gap Tunin Yilin Mao, Yashwanth Electrical Engineering Departm The Unive ymao1@olemiss.edu, ypadooru@ Abstract-- An adjustable air gap was proposed the resonant frequency of patch antennas the frequency of coaxially fed p center conductor has to be de-soldered and r time the width of the air gap

  8. Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risø National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

  9. Generation Gaps in Engineering? David J. Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    Generation Gaps in Engineering? by David J. Kim B.S., Computer Science and Engineering;3 Generation Gaps in Engineering? by David J. Kim Submitted to the System Design and Management Program on May in Engineering and Management ABSTRACT There is much enthusiastic debate on the topic of generation gaps

  10. An Extended Dead-End Elimination Algorithm to Determine Gap-Free Lists of Low Energy States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    modelling; global energy minimum; bacteriorhodopsin; protonation state; pH titration; X-DEE; dead of lowest free energy is the most prob- able and thus of primary interest in structural research. ProteinsAn Extended Dead-End Elimination Algorithm to Determine Gap-Free Lists of Low Energy States EDDA

  11. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety Manager FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap...

  12. Narrow gap electronegative capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Narrow gap electronegative (EN) capacitive discharges are widely used in industry and have unique features not found in conventional discharges. In this paper, plasma parameters are determined over a range of decreasing gap length L from values for which an electropositive (EP) edge exists (2-region case) to smaller L-values for which the EN region connects directly to the sheath (1-region case). Parametric studies are performed at applied voltage V{sub rf}=500 V for pressures of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mTorr, and additionally at 50 mTorr for 1000 and 2000 V. Numerical results are given for a parallel plate oxygen discharge using a planar 1D3v (1 spatial dimension, 3 velocity components) particle-in-cell (PIC) code. New interesting phenomena are found for the case in which an EP edge does not exist. This 1-region case has not previously been investigated in detail, either numerically or analytically. In particular, attachment in the sheaths is important, and the central electron density n{sub e0} is depressed below the density n{sub esh} at the sheath edge. The sheath oscillations also extend into the EN core, creating an edge region lying within the sheath and not characterized by the standard diffusion in an EN plasma. An analytical model is developed using minimal inputs from the PIC results, and compared to the PIC results for a base case at V{sub rf}=500 V and 50 mTorr, showing good agreement. Selected comparisons are made at the other voltages and pressures. A self-consistent model is also developed and compared to the PIC results, giving reasonable agreement.

  13. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  14. Chiral gap effect in curved space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonino Flachi; Kenji Fukushima

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a new type of QCD phenomenon induced in curved space. In the QCD vacuum a mass gap of Dirac fermions is attributed to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. If the curvature is positive large, the chiral condensate melts but a chiral invariant mass gap can still remain, which we name the chiral gap effect in curved space. This leads to decoupling of quark deconfinement which implies a view of black holes surrounded by a first-order QCD phase transition.

  15. Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevisan, Luca

    Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time Bernard Chazelle #3; Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum spanning tree- components algorithm picks O(1=#15; 2 ) vertices in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose

  16. Undecidability of the Spectral Gap (short version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubitt, Toby; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral gap -- the difference in energy between the ground state and the first excited state -- is one of the most important properties of a quantum many-body system. Quantum phase transitions occur when the spectral gap vanishes and the system becomes critical. Much of physics is concerned with understanding the phase diagrams of quantum systems, and some of the most challenging and long-standing open problems in theoretical physics concern the spectral gap, such as the Haldane conjecture that the Heisenberg chain is gapped for integer spin, proving existence of a gapped topological spin liquid phase, or the Yang-Mills gap conjecture (one of the Millennium Prize problems). These problems are all particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: Given a quantum many-body Hamiltonian, is the system it describes gapped or gapless? Here we show that this problem is undecidable, in the same sense as the Halting Problem was proven to be undecidable by Turing. A consequence of this is that the spectral gap...

  17. Undecidability of the Spectral Gap (short version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toby Cubitt; David Perez-Garcia; Michael M. Wolf

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral gap -- the difference in energy between the ground state and the first excited state -- is one of the most important properties of a quantum many-body system. Quantum phase transitions occur when the spectral gap vanishes and the system becomes critical. Much of physics is concerned with understanding the phase diagrams of quantum systems, and some of the most challenging and long-standing open problems in theoretical physics concern the spectral gap, such as the Haldane conjecture that the Heisenberg chain is gapped for integer spin, proving existence of a gapped topological spin liquid phase, or the Yang-Mills gap conjecture (one of the Millennium Prize problems). These problems are all particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: Given a quantum many-body Hamiltonian, is the system it describes gapped or gapless? Here we show that this problem is undecidable, in the same sense as the Halting Problem was proven to be undecidable by Turing. A consequence of this is that the spectral gap of certain quantum many-body Hamiltonians is not determined by the axioms of mathematics, much as Goedels incompleteness theorem implies that certain theorems are mathematically unprovable. We extend these results to prove undecidability of other low temperature properties, such as correlation functions. The proof hinges on simple quantum many-body models that exhibit highly unusual physics in the thermodynamic limit.

  18. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Criticality Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  19. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  20. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Environmental Restoration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  1. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Construction Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  2. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Mechanical Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  3. Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

  4. Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive Radio Networks Wei Ren, Xiangyang Xiao, Qing Zhao algorithm with bounded performance guarantee for constructing the minimum-energy multicast tree, which by studying the impact of the traffic load of the primary network on the minimum-energy multicast tree. I

  5. Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems David Fern'andez­Baca 1? , Giora with a parameter. The second is an asymptotically optimal algorithm for the minimum ratio spanning tree problem, as well as other search problems, on dense graphs. 1 Introduction In the parametric minimum spanning tree

  6. Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems David Fern´andez-Baca Giora algorithm for the minimum ratio spanning tree problem, as well as other search prob- lems, on dense graphs. 1 Introduction In the parametric minimum spanning tree problem, one is given an n-node, m

  7. Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees in Euclidean Spaces Pegah Kamousi #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Timothy M.

    Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees in Euclidean Spaces Pegah Kamousi # Computer Science University­1­4503­0682­9/11/06 ...$10.00. Keywords Algorithms, Theory General Terms Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees, Geometric Data and arbitrary but known probability p i . We want to compute the expected length of the minimum spanning tree

  8. On Two-Stage Stochastic Minimum Spanning Kedar Dhamdhere1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi, R.

    On Two-Stage Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees Kedar Dhamdhere1 , R. Ravi2 , and Mohit Singh2 1}@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract. We consider the undirected minimum spanning tree problem in a stochastic optimization setting algorithm. We then consider the Stochastic minimum spanning tree problem in a more general black-box model

  9. Gap Assessment (FY 13 Update)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getman, Dan

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To help guide its future data collection efforts, The DOE GTO funded a data gap analysis in FY2012 to identify high potential hydrothermal areas where critical data are needed. This analysis was updated in FY2013 and the resulting datasets are represented by this metadata. The original process was published in FY 2012 and is available here: https://pangea.stanford.edu/ERE/db/GeoConf/papers/SGW/2013/Esposito.pdf Though there are many types of data that can be used for hydrothermal exploration, five types of exploration data were targeted for this analysis. These data types were selected for their regional reconnaissance potential, and include many of the primary exploration techniques currently used by the geothermal industry. The data types include: 1. well data 2. geologic maps 3. fault maps 4. geochemistry data 5. geophysical data To determine data coverage, metadata for exploration data (including data type, data status, and coverage information) were collected and catalogued from nodes on the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). It is the intention of this analysis that the data be updated from this source in a semi-automated fashion as new datasets are added to the NGDS nodes. In addition to this upload, an online tool was developed to allow all geothermal data providers to access this assessment and to directly add metadata themselves and view the results of the analysis via maps of data coverage in Geothermal Prospector (http://maps.nrel.gov/gt_prospector). A grid of the contiguous U.S. was created with 88,000 10-km by 10-km grid cells, and each cell was populated with the status of data availability corresponding to the five data types. Using these five data coverage maps and the USGS Resource Potential Map, sites were identified for future data collection efforts. These sites signify both that the USGS has indicated high favorability of occurrence of geothermal resources and that data gaps exist. The uploaded data are contained in two data files for each data category. The first file contains the grid and is in the SHP file format (shape file.) Each populated grid cell represents a 10k area within which data is known to exist. The second file is a CSV (comma separated value) file that contains all of the individual layers that intersected with the grid. This CSV can be joined with the map to retrieve a list of datasets that are available at any given site. The attributes in the CSV include: 1. grid_id : The id of the grid cell that the data intersects with 2. title: This represents the name of the WFS service that intersected with this grid cell 3. abstract: This represents the description of the WFS service that intersected with this grid cell 4. gap_type: This represents the category of data availability that these data fall within. As the current processing is pulling data from NGDS, this category universally represents data that are available in the NGDS and are ready for acquisition for analytic purposes. 5. proprietary_type: Whether the data are considered proprietary 6. service_type: The type of service 7. base_url: The service URL

  10. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Maroone, James P. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipping, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  11. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  12. Engine piston having an insulating air gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Mark Wayne (Washington, IL); Hunold,Brent Michael (Apex, NC)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A piston for an internal combustion engine has an upper crown with a top and a bottom surface, and a lower crown with a top and a bottom surface. The upper crown and the lower crown are fixedly attached to each other using welds, with the bottom surface of the upper crown and the top surface of the lower crown forming a mating surface. The piston also has at least one centrally located air gap formed on the mating surface. The air gap is sealed to prevent substantial airflow into or out of the air gap.

  13. Flammability limits of dusts: Minimum inerting concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dastidar, A.G.; Amyotte, P.R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Going, J.; Chatrathi, K. [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)] [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new flammability limit parameter has been defined as the Minimum Inerting Concentration (MIC). This is the concentration of inertant required to prevent a dust explosion regardless of fuel concentration. Previous experimental work at Fike in a 1-m{sup 3} spherical chamber has shown this flammability limit to exist for pulverized coal dust and cornstarch. In the current work, inerting experiments with aluminum, anthraquinone and polyethylene dusts as fuels were performed, using monoammonium phosphate and sodium bicarbonate as inertants. The results show that an MIC exists only for anthraquinone inerted with sodium bicarbonate. The other combustible dust and inertant mixtures did not show a definitive MIC, although they did show a strong dependence between inerting level and suspended fuel concentration. As the fuel concentration increased, the amount of inertant required to prevent an explosion decreased. Even though a definitive MIC was not found for most of the dusts an effective MIC can be estimated from the data. The use of MIC data can aid in the design of explosion suppression schemes.

  14. Are We Closing the School Discipline Gap?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losen, Daniel; Hodson, Cheri; Keith II, Michael A; Morrison, Katrina; Belway, Shakti

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.J. , (Ed). Closing the School Discipline Gap: EquitableBooth, E.A. (2011). Breaking schools’ rules: A statewidestudy of how school discipline relates to students’ success

  15. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  16. Beam dumping system and abort gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uythoven, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the beam dumping systems and the abort gap cleaning are reviewed in the context of the general machine protection system. Details of the commissioning experience and setting up, encountered equipment problems, the experience with and status of the eXternal Post Operational Checks (XPOC) and the importance of operational procedures are presented for the beam dumping system. The brief experience with the abort gap cleaning is also presented.

  17. Minimum concave cost flows in capacitated grid networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the minimum concave cost flow problem over a two-dimensional .... as a building block for the theory of production planning and inventory control.

  18. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Abstract: Transition state searches have been...

  19. Optimization Online - Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Recht

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 28, 2007 ... Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization. Benjamin Recht(brecht ***at*** caltech.edu)

  20. Microbial metatranscriptomics in a permanent marine oxygen minimum zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank J.

    Simultaneous characterization of taxonomic composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) has potential to broaden perspectives on the microbial and biogeochemical dynamics ...

  1. DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA Cybersecurity Program Manager (CSPM...

  2. NWChem: Bridging the Gap Between Experimental and Computational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NWChem: Bridging the Gap Between Experimental and Computational Chemistry NWChem: Bridging the Gap Between Experimental and Computational Chemistry Intel recently interviewed...

  3. antiparticle spectrometer gaps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS) - Hunt for dark matter using low-energy antideuterons CERN Preprints Summary: The GAPS experiment is...

  4. Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for HCCI Engines Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for...

  5. Algorithms to Compute Minimum Cycle Basis in Directed Graphs #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehlhorn, Kurt

    , . . . ,C d whose incidence vectors permit a unique linear combination of the incidence vector of any cycleAlgorithms to Compute Minimum Cycle Basis in Directed Graphs # Telikepalli Kavitha + Kurt Mehlhorn # Abstract We consider the problem of computing a minimum cycle basis in a di­ rected graph G with m arcs

  6. Approximate Minimum-Energy Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    and a set of destination nodes, the problem is to build a minimum-energy multicast tree for the requestApproximate Minimum-Energy Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa Liang, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--A wireless ad hoc network consists of mobile nodes that are equipped with energy

  7. Asymptotically minimum BER linear block precoders for MMSE equalisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Tim

    ) [3]. For a general block transmission scheme, optimal detection requires a joint decisionAsymptotically minimum BER linear block precoders for MMSE equalisation S.S. Chan, T.N. Davidson and K.M. Wong Abstract: An asymptotically minimum bit error rate (BER) linear block precoder

  8. Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Shafi

    Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time #3; Bernard Chazelle y Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum span- ning tree in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose sizes are speci#12;ed by a stochastic process. From

  9. Polynomial Time Algorithms for Minimum Energy Scheduling Philippe Baptiste1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chrobak, Marek

    algorithm for computing the minimum energy schedule when all jobs have unit length. 1 Introduction PowerPolynomial Time Algorithms for Minimum Energy Scheduling Philippe Baptiste1 , Marek Chrobak2 policies is to reduce the amount of energy consumed by computer systems while maintaining satisfactory

  10. A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    CAVT A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty Research Center OBJECTIVE ­ Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric Axial motor ­ Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric motor topologies with high torque and power densities MOTIVATION ­ Axial-gap ("pancake") motors have

  11. Oscillation of Fourier Integrals with a spectral gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-30-71T23:59:59.000Z

    May 30, 2003 ... In engineering literature, functions with a spectral gap are called high- .... High-

  12. Natural Gas Engine Development Gaps (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigler, B.T.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of current natural gas vehicle offerings is presented for both light-duty and medium- and heavy-duty applications. Recent gaps in the marketplace are discussed, along with how they have been or may be addressed. The stakeholder input process for guiding research and development needs via the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) to the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission is reviewed. Current high-level natural gas engine development gap areas are highlighted, including efficiency, emissions, and the certification process.

  13. Homolumo gap from dynamical energy levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andric, I.; Jonke, L.; Jurman, D.; Nielsen, H. B. [Theoretical Physics Division, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen DK 2100 (Denmark)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a dynamical matrix model where the matrix is interpreted as a Hamiltonian representing interaction of a bosonic system with a single fermion. We show how a system of second-quantized fermions influences the ground state of the whole system by producing a gap between the highest eigenvalue of the occupied single-fermion states and the lowest eigenvalue of the unoccupied single-fermion states. We describe the development of the gap in both the strong and weak coupling regimes, while for the intermediate coupling strength we expect formation of homolumo kinks.

  14. FINAL REPORT ON GDE GAP CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.; Summers, W.; Danko, E.

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A project has been undertaken to develop an electrochemical cell and support equipment for evaluation of a gas diffusion electrode-based, narrow-electrolyte-gap anode for SO{sub 2} oxidation in the hydrogen production cycle of the hybrid sulfur (HyS) process. The project supported the HyS development program at the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL). The benefits of using a gas diffusion electrode in conjunction with the narrow anolyte gap are being determined through electrochemical polarization testing under a variety conditions, and by comparison to results produced by SRNL and others using anode technologies that have no anolyte gap. These test results indicate that the NGA cell has low resistance suitable for use in the HyS electrolyzer, exhibits good efficiency at high current densities compared to the direct feed HyS electrolyzer, and indicates robust performance in extended testing over 65 hours. Seepage episodes were mostly caused by port clogging, which can be mitigated in future designs through minor modifications to the hardware. Significant reductions in sulfur crossover have not yet been demonstrated in the NGA configuration compared to in-house direct feed testing, but corroborative sulfur layer analysis is as yet incomplete. Further testing in a single-pass anolyte configuration is recommended for complete evaluation of steady-state electrochemical efficiency and SO{sub 2} crossover in the narrow gap configuration.

  15. Energy Gaps in a Spacetime Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. P. Horwitz; E. Z. Engelberg

    2009-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an analysis of the band structure of a spacetime potential lattice created by a standing electromagnetic wave. We show that there are energy band gaps. We estimate the effect, and propose a measurement that could confirm the existence of such phenomena.

  16. Gapped spin Hamiltonian motivated by quantum teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes a time-independent emulation of quan- tum teleportation. We calculate properties of the Hamiltonian, using exact diagonalization and a mean-field theory, and argue that it has a gap. The system exhibits an illuminating relationship to the well-known AKLT (Affleck, Lieb, Kennedy and Tasaki) model.

  17. Tree-ring reconstruction of maximum and minimum temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimum temperatures, diurnal temperature range, changing tree-ring/climate relationships, b; Vaganov et al. 1999; Bar- ber et al. 2000; Lloyd, Fastie 2002). Similar changes during investigations of tree- ring growth/climate relationships in interior British Columbia (BC

  18. Minimum Purchase Price Regulations (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minimum Purchase Price Regulations establish the price which utilities must pay for power produced by large-scale renewable energy generators – that is those capable of producing more than 100...

  19. Optimization Online - On the complexity of maximizing the minimum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikael Fallgren

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 18, 2010 ... ... minimum total Shannon capacity of any mobile user in the system. ... Category 1: Applications -- OR and Management Sciences (Telecommunications ) ... Address: Department of Mathematics, Royal Institute of Technology, ...

  20. Planning of Minimum-Time Trajectories for Robot Arms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahar, Gideon

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum-time for a robot arm has been a longstanding and unsolved problem of considerable interest. We present a general solution to this problem that involves joint-space tesselation, a dynamic time-scaling ...

  1. Theoretical Minimum Energy Use of a Building HVAC System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanskyi, O.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the theoretical minimum energy use required by the HVAC system in a particular code compliant office building. This limit might be viewed as the "Carnot Efficiency" for HVAC system. It assumes that all ventilation and air...

  2. affecting minimum alveolar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    close to the observed minimum mass. The Hubble mass can also be predicted. It is suggested that assumption 1 above could be tested using a cyclotron to accelerate particles...

  3. TOWARD THE MINIMUM INNER EDGE DISTANCE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zsom, Andras

    We explore the minimum distance from a host star where an exoplanet could potentially be habitable in order not to discard close-in rocky exoplanets for follow-up observations. We find that the inner edge of the Habitable ...

  4. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  5. Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Natural Resources Commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in...

  6. Results of the GAP-4 experiment on molten-fuel drainage through intersubassembly gap geometry. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, B.W.; Vetter, D.; Wesel, R.; Sienicki, J.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key issues in assessment of the meltout phase of a hypothetical core disruptive accident in the LMFBR system involves the timing and paths for dispersal of molten fuel from the disrupted core. A program of experiments is underway at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate molten fuel penetration through these postulated escape paths. The purpose of the GAP-4 test was to examine the penetration distances of molten fuel flowing through the flat, narrow channels representing the intersubassembly gap geometry. In the experiment design, the gap geometry was selected to be two-dimensional on the basis that the gap volume in a reactor design would be interconnected and continuous. The molten fuel used in these tests was a mixture of UO/sub 2/ (81%) and molybdenum (19%) which was generated by an exothermic thermite reaction at a temperature of approx. 3470 K.

  7. Comparison of GAP-3 and GAP-4 experiments with conduction freezing calculations. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments GAP-3 and GAP-4 were performed at ANL to investigate the ability of molten fuel to penetrate downward through the narrow channels separating adjacent subassemblies during an LMFBR hypothetical core disruptive accident. Molten fuel-metal mixtures (81% UO/sub 2/, 19% Mo) at an initial temperature of 3470/sup 0/K generated by a thermite reaction were injected downward into 1 m long rectangular test sections (gap thickness = 0.43 cm, channel width = 20.3 cm) initially at 1170/sup 0/K simulating the nominal Clinch River Breeder Reactor intersubassembly gap. In the GAP-3 test, a prolonged reaction time of approx. 15 s resulted in segregation of the metallic Mo and oxidic UO/sub 2/ constituents within the reaction vessel prior to injection. Consequently, Mo entered the test section first and froze, forming a complete plug at a penetration distance of 0.18 m. In GAP-4, the reaction time was reduced to approx. 3 s and the constituents remained well mixed upon injection with the result that the leading edge penetration distance increased to 0.35 m. Posttest examination of the cut-open test sections has revealed the existence of stable insulating crusts upon the underlying steel walls with melting and ablation of the walls only very localized.

  8. On fixed-gap adiabatic quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computation has revolutionary potential for speeding algorithms and for simulating quantum systems such as molecules. We report here a quantum computer design that performs universal quantum computation within a single non-degenerate ground state protected from decohering noise by an energy gap that we argue is system-size-independent. Closely analogous to a traditional electric circuit, it substantially changes the requirements for quantum computer construction, easing measurement, timing, and heating problems. Using the standard adiabatic condition, we present evidence that this design permits "quantum concurrent processing" distributing a quantum computation among extra qubits to perform a quantum algorithm of N gates in an amount of time that scales with the square root of N. One consequence of our work is a fixed gap version of adiabatic quantum computation, which several arguments hinted could be impossible.

  9. Chemical potential and the gap equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huan Chen; Wei Yuan; Lei Chang; Yu-Xin Liu; Thomas Klahn; Craig D. Roberts

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In general the kernel of QCD's gap equation possesses a domain of analyticity upon which the equation's solution at nonzero chemical potential is simply obtained from the in-vacuum result through analytic continuation. On this domain the single-quark number- and scalar-density distribution functions are mu-independent. This is illustrated via two models for the gap equation's kernel. The models are alike in concentrating support in the infrared. They differ in the form of the vertex but qualitatively the results are largely insensitive to the Ansatz. In vacuum both models realise chiral symmetry in the Nambu-Goldstone mode and in the chiral limit, with increasing chemical potential, exhibit a first-order chiral symmetry restoring transition at mu~M(0), where M(p^2) is the dressed-quark mass function. There is evidence to suggest that any associated deconfinement transition is coincident and also of first-order.

  10. SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C ·Historical Operation ·Western Nuclear Crooks Gap Project ·Mined 1956 ­ 1988 and Open Pit Mining ·Current Mine Permit (381C) ·Updating POO, Reclamation Plan & Bond ·Uranium Recovery

  11. Fabrication of photonic band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constant, Kristen (Ames, IA); Subramania, Ganapathi S. (Ames, IA); Biswas, Rana (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.

  12. To Bridge LEDs' Green Gap, Scientists Think Small

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To Bridge LEDs' Green Gap, Scientists Think Small To Bridge LEDs' Green Gap, Scientists Think Small Nanostructures Half a DNA Strand-Wide Show Promise for Efficient LEDs April 4,...

  13. Vehicle Codes and Standards: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, C.; Buttner, W.; Rivkin, C.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies gaps in vehicle codes and standards and recommends ways to fill the gaps, focusing on six alternative fuels: biodiesel, natural gas, electricity, ethanol, hydrogen, and propane.

  14. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 Prospective challengers to...

  15. Substrate-induced band gap opening in epitaxial graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H.A. Electronic states of graphene nanoribbons studied withS.G. Louie. Energy gaps in graphene nanoribbons. Phys. Rev.band-gap engineering of graphene nanoribbons. Phys. Rev.

  16. Bridging the Efficiency Gap: Commercial Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridging the Efficiency Gap: Commercial Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioners John Shugars, Consultant ofcommercialpackaged air conditioners, explore the reasons behindthis efficiency gap, and assess opportunities). Although sales of rooftop air conditioners have steadily increased over the past decade, the efficiency

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - antagonists minimum safety Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    minimum safety Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: antagonists minimum safety Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Microscopic Kinetics and...

  18. The minimum distance of classical and quantum turbo-codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbara, Mamdouh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theory of quantum stabilizer turbo-encoders with unbounded minimum distance. This theory is presented under a framework common to both classical and quantum turbo-encoding theory. The main conditions to have an unbounded minimum distance are that the inner seed encoder has to be recursive, and either systematic or with a totally recursive truncated decoder. This last condition has been introduced in order to obtain a theory viable in the quantum stabilizer case, since it was known that in this case the inner seed encoder could not be recursive and systematic in the same time.

  19. The minimum distance of classical and quantum turbo-codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamdouh Abbara; Jean-Pierre Tillich

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theory of quantum stabilizer turbo-encoders with unbounded minimum distance. This theory is presented under a framework common to both classical and quantum turbo-encoding theory. The main conditions to have an unbounded minimum distance are that the inner seed encoder has to be recursive, and either systematic or with a totally recursive truncated decoder. This last condition has been introduced in order to obtain a theory viable in the quantum stabilizer case, since it was known that in this case the inner seed encoder could not be recursive and systematic in the same time.

  20. Note On The Maximal Primes Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Carella

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This note presents a result on the maximal prime gap of the form p_(n+1) - p_n 0 is a constant, for any arbitrarily small real number e > 0, and all sufficiently large integer n > n_0. Equivalently, the result shows that any short interval [x, x + y], y => C(log x)^(1+e), contains prime numbers for all sufficiently large real numbers x => x_0 unconditionally. An application demonstrates that a prime p => x > 2 can be determined in deterministic polynomial time O(log(x)^8).

  1. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  2. Complexified cones. Spectral gaps and variational principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubois, Loïc

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider contractions of complexified real cones, as recently introduced by Rugh in [Rugh10]. Dubois [Dub09] gave optimal conditions to determine if a matrix contracts a canonical complex cone. First we generalize his results to the case of complex operators on a Banach space and give precise conditions for the contraction and an improved estimate of the size of the associated spectral gap. We then prove a variational formula for the leading eigenvalue similar to the Collatz-Wielandt formula for a real cone contraction. Morally, both cases boil down to the study of suitable collections of 2 by 2 matrices and their contraction properties on the Riemann sphere.

  3. Olene Gap Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation,Olene Gap Geothermal

  4. Implementing Minimum Cycle Basis algorithms Kurt Mehlhorn and Dimitrios Michail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehlhorn, Kurt

    Implementing Minimum Cycle Basis algorithms Kurt Mehlhorn and Dimitrios Michail Max consider the problem of computing a mini- mum cycle basis of an undirected graph G = (V, E) with n vertices in a significant speedup. Based on our experimental observations, we combine the two fundamen- tally different

  5. Effect of mechanical parameters on dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Effect of mechanical parameters on dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures Jun Shintake energy structures Jun Shintake*a,b , Samuel Rosseta , Dario Floreanob , Herbert R. Sheaa a Microsystems for Space Technologies Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Neuchâtel, Switzerland b

  6. A minimum entropy principle of high order schemes for gas ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropy solutions of the compressible Euler equations satisfy a minimum principle for the specific ... where ? is the density, u is the velocity, m is the momentum, E is the total energy and p is the pressure. ... can enforce this condition without destroying conservation. .... achieved under a standard CFL condition ? (|u| + c) ...

  7. On the Minimum Load Coloring Problem --Extended Abtract--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doerr, Benjamin

    # such that the maximum load, l # := max{r# , b #}, is minimized. In the following we shall skip the term ``maximumOn the Minimum Load Coloring Problem --Extended Abtract-- Nitin Ahuja 1 , Andreas Baltz 2 Abstract. Given a graph G = (V, E) with n vertices, m edges and maximum vertex degree #, the load

  8. Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1 S. Irmak, M.ASCE2 ; A. Irmak3 ; J for predicting daily Rn have been widely used. However, when the paucity of detailed climatological data with National Weather Service climatological datasets that only record Tmax and Tmin on a regular basis. DOI: 10

  9. Optimizing rotational acceleration curves for minimum energy use in electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Optimizing rotational acceleration curves for minimum energy use in electric motors. 12/15/06 Fall the optimal efficiency of a motor for any input values of motor constants, distance, or time. In every of the inspiration to find which rotational acceleration curve for the used motors would be most efficient. We really

  10. Localized Minimum-Energy Broadcasting for Wireless Multihop Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    tree. We then observe that, for very dense networks, it is more energy-efficient to reach more than oneLocalized Minimum-Energy Broadcasting for Wireless Multihop Networks with Directional Antennas, and Carmen M. Yago Abstract--There are a number of proposals to achieve energy-efficient broadcasting

  11. Minimum-Hot-Spot Query Trees for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeinalipour, Demetris

    an energy- efficient query routing tree. (a) Energy harvesting for battery- less nodes for the (b) Voltree to the querying node. Energy-efficient query routing trees are needed in a plethora of systems such as PeopleMinimum-Hot-Spot Query Trees for Wireless Sensor Networks Georgios Chatzimilioudis Dept

  12. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  13. Jamming-Aware Minimum Energy Routing in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goeckel, Dennis L.

    1 Jamming-Aware Minimum Energy Routing in Wireless Networks Azadeh Sheikholeslami, Majid Ghaderi; however, energy-aware routing in the presence of active adversary (jammers) has not been considered. We. There has been some study of energy-aware ad hoc routing protocols in the literature [13], [14], [15], [16

  14. BLIND DECONVOLUTION WITH MINIMUM RENYI'S ENTROPY Deniz Erdogmus1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    BLIND DECONVOLUTION WITH MINIMUM RENYI'S ENTROPY Deniz Erdogmus1 , Jose C. Principe1 , Luis Vielva2-mail: [deniz , principe]@cnel.ufl.edu, luis@dicom.unican.es ABSTRACT Blind techniques attract the attention, from communications to control systems. Blind deconvolution is a problem that has been investigated

  15. The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser Abstract on three example applications: generating human-interpretable excuses for failure, motion planning under their failures. · In human-robot interaction, semantically meaningful explanations would help people diagnose

  16. The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser September 13 strategies. It is demonstrated on three example applications: gener- ating human-interpretable excuses, then they provide no explanation for the failure. For several applications, it would be useful for planners

  17. Interior Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interior Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26 Minor standing is prerequisite architecture studio course is required for architecture majors enrolled in the interior architecture minor (1 is required for Architecture majors): IARC 484 Interior Design Studio (6), IARC 486 Furniture

  18. Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26 Minor standing is prerequisite Notes: Required courses in one's major will not count for the minor with one exception: 1 architecture studio course is required for interior architecture majors enrolled in the architecture minor, and this studio

  19. Optimum Wire Tapering for Minimum Power Dissipation in RLC Interconnects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    tapering is shown to reduce the (a CMOS inverter) with the driver (a CMOS inverter). The power dissipatedOptimum Wire Tapering for Minimum Power Dissipation in RLC Interconnects Magdy A. El-Moursy and Eby G. Friedman Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Rochester Rochester, New

  20. Requirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    » Three other 2000-3000-level PSYC courses (any area) No more than 3 credits of PSYC 3889 or 3999 canRequirements: A minimum of 15 PSYC credits, including: » One Area I course » One Area II course) ___2100 (Principles of Research in Psychology) Area I. Social, Developmental, Clinical, & Industrial

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  2. Quantum confinement in GaP nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurich, B.K.; Smith, D.C.; Healy, M.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have prepared GaP and GaAs nanoclusters from organometallic condensation reactions of E[Si(ChH{sub 3})3]3 (E = P, As) and GaCl{sub 3}. The size of the as synthesized clusters is 10 {Angstrom} to 15 {Angstrom}. Larger clusters of 20 {Angstrom} to 30 {Angstrom} size were obtained by thermal annealing of the as grown material. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirm the high crystalline quality. A lattice contraction of 6.7% could be seen for 10 {Angstrom} sized GaAs clusters. The clusters are nearly spherical in shape. Optical absorption spectra show a distinct line which can be assigned to the fundamental transition of the quantum confined electronic state. The measured blue shift, with respect to the GaP bulk absorption edge is 0.53 eV. As the cluster is smaller than the exciton radius, we can calculate the cluster size from this blue shift and obtain 20.2 {Angstrom}, consistent with the results from X-ray diffraction of 19.5 {Angstrom} for the same sample.

  3. Extended Supersymmetry in Gapped and Superconducting Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oikonomou, V K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of the many quantum field theoretical descriptions of graphene in $2+1$ dimensions, we present another field theoretical feature of graphene, in the presence of defects. Particularly, we shall be interested in gapped graphene in the presence of a domain wall and also for superconducting graphene in the presence of a vortex. As we explicitly demonstrate, the gapped graphene electrons that are localized on the domain wall are associated with four $N=2$ one dimensional supersymmetries, with each pair combining to form an extended $N=4$ supersymmetry with non-trivial topological charges. The case of superconducting graphene is more involved, with the electrons localized on the vortex being associated with $n$ one dimensional supersymmetries, which in turn combine to form an $N=2n$ extended supersymmetry with no-trivial topological charges. As we shall prove, all supersymmetries are unbroken, a feature closely related to the number of the localized fermions and also to the exact form of the associated oper...

  4. Extended Supersymmetry in Gapped and Superconducting Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Oikonomou

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of the many quantum field theoretical descriptions of graphene in $2+1$ dimensions, we present another field theoretical feature of graphene, in the presence of defects. Particularly, we shall be interested in gapped graphene in the presence of a domain wall and also for superconducting graphene in the presence of a vortex. As we explicitly demonstrate, the gapped graphene electrons that are localized on the domain wall are associated with four $N=2$ one dimensional supersymmetries, with each pair combining to form an extended $N=4$ supersymmetry with non-trivial topological charges. The case of superconducting graphene is more involved, with the electrons localized on the vortex being associated with $n$ one dimensional supersymmetries, which in turn combine to form an $N=2n$ extended supersymmetry with no-trivial topological charges. As we shall prove, all supersymmetries are unbroken, a feature closely related to the number of the localized fermions and also to the exact form of the associated operators. In addition, the corresponding Witten index is invariant under compact and odd perturbations.

  5. Arc voltage distribution skewness as an indicator of electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Grose, Stephen M. (Glenwood, WV)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrode gap of a VAR is monitored by determining the skewness of a distribution of gap voltage measurements. A decrease in skewness indicates an increase in gap and may be used to control the gap.

  6. Arc voltage distribution skewness as an indicator of electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrode gap of a VAR is monitored by determining the skewness of a distribution of gap voltage measurements. A decrease in skewness indicates an increase in gap and may be used to control the gap. 4 figs.

  7. Investigation of a minimum energy Earth-Mars trajectory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard Emett

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF A MINIMUM ENERGY EARTH-MARS TRAJECTORY A Thesis by Richard Emmett grown Submitted to the Graduate Co11ege of the Texas ASM University in partia1 fulfi11ment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering INVESTIGATION OF A MINIMIIM ENERGy EARTH MARS TRAJECTORy A Thesis by Richard Emmett Brown Approved as to style and content by; (Co-chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) May I967 TABLE...

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of the Gap Heat Transfer Model in BISON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard (INL); Perez, Danielle (INL)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of the heat transfer model in the gap between the fuel rod and the cladding used in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the gap heat transfer models in BISON, the sensitivity of the modeling parameters and the associated responses is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of various parameters in the analysis of gap heat transfer in nuclear fuel.

  9. The Energy-Dependence of GRB Minimum Variability Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golkhou, V Zach; Littlejohns, Owen M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the minimum variability timescales for 938 GRBs observed by the Fermi/GBM instrument prior to July 11, 2012. The tightest constraints on progenitor radii derived from these timescales are obtained from light curves in the hardest energy channel. In the softer bands -- or from measurements of the same GRBs in the hard X-rays from Swift -- we show that variability timescales tend to be a factor 2--3 longer. Applying a survival analysis to account for detections and upper limits, we find median minimum timescale in the rest frame for long-duration and short-duration GRBs of 45 ms and 10 ms, respectively. Fewer than 10% of GRBs show evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. These shortest timescales require Lorentz factors $\\gtrsim 400$ and imply typical emission radii $R \\approx 1 {\\times} 10^{14}$ cm for long-duration GRBs and $R \\approx 3 {\\times} 10^{13}$ cm for short-duration GRBs. We discuss implications for the GRB fireball model and investigate whether GRB minimum timescales evolve w...

  10. SOLAR ROTATION RATE DURING THE CYCLE 24 MINIMUM IN ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, Sarbani, E-mail: antia@tifr.res.i, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum of solar cycle 24 is significantly different from most other minima in terms of its duration as well as its abnormally low levels of activity. Using available helioseismic data that cover epochs from the minimum of cycle 23 to now, we study the differences in the nature of the solar rotation between the minima of cycles 23 and 24. We find that there are significant differences between the rotation rates during the two minima. There are differences in the zonal-flow pattern too. We find that the band of fast rotating region close to the equator bifurcated around 2005 and recombined by 2008. This behavior is different from that during the cycle 23 minimum. By autocorrelating the zonal-flow pattern with a time shift, we find that in terms of solar dynamics, solar cycle 23 lasted for a period of 11.7 years, consistent with the result of Howe et al. (2009). The autocorrelation coefficient also confirms that the zonal-flow pattern penetrates through the convection zone.

  11. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Between Theory and Experiments at Nanoscale Level Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments at Nanoscale Level Studies on a simple platinum-alumina...

  12. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between Theory and Experiments Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  13. Method for Creating Photonic Band Gap Materials - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a photonic band gap. These microstructures have the potential to change the way optoelectronic devices, such as photodiodes, LEDs, and integrated optical circuit elements, are...

  14. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Fire Protection Engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  15. Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties of these materials go through a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications. These materials can go from indirect band gap semiconductors to...

  16. acoustic band gaps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    type of phononic crystals manufactured Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.10631.2167794 The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic composite Deymier, Pierre 2 Acoustic band gap...

  17. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic...

  18. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Nuclear Explosive Safety Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  19. ERDC/CERLTR-05-38 Determining Research Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

    ERDC/CERLTR-05-38 Determining Research Gaps in Disturbance Data for Fort Bliss and a Conceptual-38 November 2005 Determining Research Gaps in Disturbance Data for Fort Bliss and a Conceptual Model Tamara Bliss #12;ABSTRACT Numerous research and outside monitoring efforts have been completed for Fort Bliss

  20. The impact of minimum age of employment regulation on child labor and schooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmonds, Eric V

    Promoting minimum age of employment regulation has been a centerpiece in child labor policy for the last 15 years. If enforced, minimum age regulation would change the age profile of paid child employment. Using micro-data ...

  1. Minimum pressure envelope cavitation analysis using two-dimensional panel method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Christopher J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis tool for calculating minimum pressure envelopes was developed using XFOIL. This thesis presents MATLAB® executables that interface with a modified version of XFOIL for determining the minimum pressure of a foil ...

  2. Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H.W.; Brindle, R.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy used to produce liquid steel in today's integrated and electric arc furnace (EAF) facilities is significantly higher than the theoretical minimum energy requirements. This study presents the absolute minimum energy required to produce steel from ore and mixtures of scrap and scrap alternatives. Additional cases in which the assumptions are changed to more closely approximate actual operating conditions are also analyzed. The results, summarized in Table E-1, should give insight into the theoretical and practical potentials for reducing steelmaking energy requirements. The energy values have also been converted to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in order to indicate the potential for reduction in emissions of this greenhouse gas (Table E-2). The study showed that increasing scrap melting has the largest impact on energy consumption. However, scrap should be viewed as having ''invested'' energy since at one time it was produced by reducing ore. Increasing scrap melting in the BOF mayor may not decrease energy if the ''invested'' energy in scrap is considered.

  3. Magnetic Flux Transport Simulations of Solar Surface Magnetic Distributions During a Grand Minimum.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackay, Duncan

    , Scotland, KY16 9SS. Abstract. It is well known that magnetic activity on the Sun modulates from one cycle strongly depend on the phase of the cycle in which the grand minimum starts and whether it lasts for an odd or even number of cycles. If the grand minimum starts around cycle minimum then a signi#12;cant amount

  4. Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 3. More Than Three Products and Generalized Petlyuk Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 3. More Than Three Products-component feed into M products has been derived. Interestingly, the minimum-energy solution in a complex solution of minimum energy for distillation of a multicomponent feed into multiple products has not been

  5. A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unger, Ron

    A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy Tamar Kaffe-Abramovich and Ron Unger Background: Proteins seem to have their native structure in a global minimum of free energy is in the global minimum of free energy. The aim of this study is to investigate such evolutionary processes

  6. Anomalous electron density events in the quiet summer ionosphere at solar minimum over Millstone Hill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Anomalous electron density events in the quiet summer ionosphere at solar minimum over Millstone region ionosphere over Millstone Hill with calculations from the IZMIRAN model for solar minimum layer. This phenomenon occurs frequently in the quiet ionosphere at solar minimum during summer

  7. LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

  8. An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Timothy X.

    An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network Sheetalkumar Doshi the necessary features of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms the performance of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol in terms of energy savings with an existing on

  9. An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network Sheetalkumar Doshi of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms for their imple- mentation. We of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol in terms of energy savings with an existing on-demand ad

  10. Radial-Gap Permanent Magnet Motor and Drive Research FY 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.

    2005-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task was to study permanent magnet (PM) radial-gap traction drive systems that could meet the U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR Program's 2010 goals to expose weaknesses or identify strengths. Initially, the approach was to compare attributes such as physical deformations during operation, performance (torque, power, efficiency versus speed), material requirements (strength), material costs, manufacturability, weight, power density, specific power, reliability, and drivability for specific motors. Three motors selected were the commercially available 60-kW radial-gap surface-mounted PM motor manufactured by UQM Technologies, Inc.; a hypothetical PM motor with rotor-supported magnets similar to the Honda MCF-21; and Delphi's automotive electric machine drive motor, whose rotor is a ferromagnetic cylinder, held at one end by a shaft that supports the magnets on its inner surface. Potential problems have appeared related to PM motors, such as (1) high no-load spin losses and high operational power losses, probably from eddy current losses in the rotor; (2) the undemonstrated dual mode inverter control (DMIC) for driving a brushless dc motor (BDCM) (UQM and Delphi motors); (3) uncertainty about the potential for reducing current with DMIC; and (4) uncertainty about the relation between material requirements and maximum rotor speed. Therefore, the approach was changed to study in detail three of the comparison attributes: drivability, performance, and material requirements. Drivability and related problems were examined by demonstrating that DMIC may be used to drive an 18-pole 30-kW PM motor to 6000 rpm, where the maximum electrical frequency is 900 Hz. An available axial-gap test motor with 18 poles was used because its control is identical to that of a radial gap PM motor. Performance was analytically examined, which led to a derivation showing that DMIC controls a PM motor so that the motor uses minimum current to produce any power regardless of speed for relative speeds, n = {omega}/{omega}{sub base} {ge} 2. Performance was also examined with efficiency measurements during the 30-kW PM motor test. Material requirements were examined with finite-element analyses (FEA) to determine the speed and location where yield starts and the corresponding deformations and stresses.

  11. British Academy (e-GAP2) Guide for Applicants The British Academy e-GAP2 applicant guide July 2012 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Academy (e-GAP2) Guide for Applicants The British Academy e-GAP2 applicant guide July 2012 Page 1 2012 INTERNAL USER GUIDE A Guide to the British Academy Electronic Submission System (e-GAP2) A Quick Guide for Applicants applying for funding using the e-GAP2 System The British Academy web page

  12. Pairing Gaps, Pseudogaps, and Phase Diagrams for Cuprate Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Sun; Mike Guidry; Cheng-Li Wu

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a symmetry-constrained variational procedure to construct a generalization of BCS to include Cooper pairs with non-zero momentum and angular momentum. The resulting gap equations are solved at zero and finite temperature, and the doping-dependent solutions are used to construct gap and phase diagrams. We find a pseudogap terminating at a critical doping that may be interpreted in terms of both competing order and preformed pairs. The strong similarity between observation and predicted gap and phase structure suggests that this approach may provide a unified description of the complex structure observed for cuprate superconductors.

  13. Plugging of intersubassembly gaps by downward flowing molten steel. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the assessment of the meltout phase of an LMFBR hypothetical core disruptive accident, a pathway for the escape of molten fuel from the disrupted core is provided by the narrow channels separating adjacent subassemblies. However, the removal of fuel through intersubassembly gaps might be impeded by steel blockage formation, if molten steel is postulated to enter the gap network ahead of disrupted fuel. Reported here are the results of an analysis of the conduction freezing controlled penetration behavior of molten steel flowing downward through the voided (of sodium) gap channels nominally separating adjacent subassemblies below the active core region. The objective is to determine the range of conditions under which the steel is predicted to be deposited as a thin crust on the channel walls leaving an open pathway remaining for subsequent fuel flow instead of forming a complete plug which closes off the gap channel and obstructs fuel removal immediately thereafter.

  14. Perspective The MAHB, the Culture Gap, and Some Really

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    is a product of population size, per capita consumption, and the sorts of technologies and social and economic systems that supply the consumption. A vast ``culture gap'' has developed over the past century or so

  15. Air-gap sacrificial materials by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Long Hua

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P(neopentyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) copolymer, abbreviated as P(npMAco-EGDA), was selected as the potential air-gap sacrificial material among possible combination of twenty monomers and four ...

  16. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  17. Proper Sustainability: GAP Grant Proposal Work Plan Strategy Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this webinar I will discuss the new GAP grant requirements for tribal environmental programs and strategies for crafting a work plan that focuses on capacity building activities.  My goal is to...

  18. Energy gap of Kronig-Penney-type hydrogenated graphene superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joo-Hyoung

    The electronic structure of graphene-graphane superlattices with armchair interfaces is investigated with first-principles density-functional theory. By separately varying the widths, we find that the energy gap Eg is ...

  19. Gap generation and semimetal-insulator phase transition in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Gamayun; E. V. Gorbar; V. P. Gusynin

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The gap generation is studied in suspended clean graphene in the continuum model for quasiparticles with the Coulomb interaction. We solve the gap equation with the dynamical polarization function and show that, comparing to the case of the static polarization function, the critical coupling constant lowers to the value \\alpha_c=0.92, which is close to that obtained in lattice Monte Carlo simulations. It is argued that additional short-range four-fermion interactions should be included in the continuum model to account for the lattice simulation results. We obtain the critical line in the plane of electromagnetic and four-fermion coupling constants and find a second order phase transition separating zero gap and gapped phases with critical exponents close to those found in lattice calculations.

  20. Closing gaps in the human genome using sequencing by synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arachchi, Harindra M.

    The most recent release of the finished human genome contains 260 euchromatic gaps (excluding chromosome Y). Recent work has helped explain a large number of these unresolved regions as 'structural' in nature. Another class ...

  1. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  2. Excitonic gap, phase transition, and quantum Hall effect in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Gusynin; V. A. Miransky; S. G. Sharapov; I. A. Shovkovy

    2006-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that physics underlying the recently observed removal of sublattice and spin degeneracies in graphene in a strong magnetic field describes a phase transition connected with the generation of an excitonic gap. The experimental form of the Hall conductivity is reproduced and the main characteristics of the dynamics are described. Predictions of the behavior of the gap as a function of temperature and a gate voltage are made.

  3. Hydrogeologic Model for the Gable Gap Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Bruce A.; Last, George V.; Thomas, Gregory S.; Thompson, Michael D.; Ludwig, Jami L.; Lanigan, David C.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gable Gap is a structural and topographic depression between Gable Mountain and Gable Butte within the central Hanford Site. It has a long and complex geologic history, which includes tectonic uplift synchronous with erosional downcutting associated with the ancestral Columbia River during both Ringold and Cold Creek periods, and by the later Ice Age (mostly glacial Lake Missoula) floods. The gap was subsequently buried and partially backfilled by mostly coarse-grained, Ice Age flood deposits (Hanford formation). Erosional remnants of both the Ringold Formation and Cold Creek unit locally underlie the high-energy flood deposits. A large window exists in the gap where confined basalt aquifers are in contact with the unconfined suprabasalt aquifer. Several paleochannels, of both Hanford and Ringold Formation age, were eroded into the basalt bedrock across Gable Gap. Groundwater from the Central Plateau presently moves through Gable Gap via one or more of these shallow paleochannels. As groundwater levels continue to decline in the region, groundwater flow may eventually be cut off through Gable Gap.

  4. Investigating the book-tax income gap : factors which affect the gap and details regarding its most significant component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidman, Jeri

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) In total, my thesis suggests that recent changes in the book-tax income gap may be exogenous and transitory, due to changes to the calculation of book income, general business conditions or other factors which ...

  5. Influence of gap spacing on the characteristics of Trichel pulse generated in point-to-plane discharge gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhen, E-mail: leezhen1988@gmail.com; Zhang, Bo, E-mail: shizbcn@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; He, Jinliang, E-mail: hejl@tsinghua.edu.cn; Xu, Yongsheng, E-mail: evebus@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the specific characteristics of the Trichel pulse generated in wide point-to-plane discharge gaps are investigated and compared with those of the currents generated in narrow gaps. A set of empirical formulas are derived to describe the specific characteristics. The influence of the gap spacing both on the current characteristics and on the coefficients of the formulas is studied. Based on the experiment results, an improvement is made to the space charge calculation method proposed by Lama and Gallo [J. Appl. Phys. 45, 103–113 (1974)] and the calculation results are compared to the ones obtained with Lama and Gallo's original method. With the influence of the space charge considered, the modified method obtains more accurate results of the space charge accumulating in the gap and gives a more precise description of the motion of the space charge in the gap. Based on the calculation results, the influence of the space charge on the distribution of the electric field is examined and the influence of the gap spacing on the current characteristics is also studied.

  6. Minimum error discrimination between similarity-transformed quantum states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sufiani, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazhari Khiavi, Y. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the well-known necessary and sufficient conditions for minimum error discrimination (MED), we extract an equivalent form for the MED conditions. In fact, by replacing the inequalities corresponding to the MED conditions with an equivalent but more suitable and convenient identity, the problem of mixed state discrimination with optimal success probability is solved. Moreover, we show that the mentioned optimality conditions can be viewed as a Helstrom family of ensembles under some circumstances. Using the given identity, MED between N similarity transformed equiprobable quantum states is investigated. In the case that the unitary operators are generating a set of irreducible representation, the optimal set of measurements and corresponding maximum success probability of discrimination can be determined precisely. In particular, it is shown that for equiprobable pure states, the optimal measurement strategy is the square-root measurement (SRM), whereas for the mixed states, SRM is not optimal. In the case that the unitary operators are reducible, there is no closed-form formula in the general case, but the procedure can be applied in each case in accordance to that case. Finally, we give the maximum success probability of optimal discrimination for some important examples of mixed quantum states, such as generalized Bloch sphere m-qubit states, spin-j states, particular nonsymmetric qudit states, etc.

  7. Near minimum-time maneuvers of large space structures using parameter optimization and lyapunov feedback control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Michael Timothy

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameterization for Minimum-Time Control . . . . 28 28 29 35 39 V CONTROL PARAMETER APPROXIMATIONS. . Control Parameter Approximations for Near-Minimum Time Rest-to- Rest Maneuvers . . Rules of Thumb for Minimum-Time Rest-to-Rest Maneuvers Using the Bang-Bang... ControL One-Switch Bang-Bang Control Approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . , , . . . . , . . Switch Time Approximations Bang-Bang Controls with an Even Number of Control Switches...

  8. Gap formation and stability in non-isothermal protoplanetary discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Les, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several observations of transition discs show lopsided dust-distributions. A potential explanation is the formation of a large-scale vortex acting as a dust-trap at the edge of a gap opened by a giant planet. Numerical models of gap-edge vortices have thus far employed locally isothermal discs, but the theory of this vortex-forming or `Rossby wave' instability was originally developed for adiabatic discs. We generalise the study of planetary gap stability to non-isothermal discs using customised numerical simulations of disc-planet systems where the planet opens an unstable gap. We include in the energy equation a simple cooling function with cooling timescale $t_c=\\beta\\Omega_k^{-1}$, where $\\Omega_k$ is the Keplerian frequency, and examine the effect of $\\beta$ on the stability of gap edges and vortex lifetimes. We find increasing $\\beta$ lowers the growth rate of non-axisymmetric perturbations, and the dominant azimuthal wavenumber $m$ decreases. We find a quasi-steady state consisting of one large-scale, ...

  9. CV evolution: AM Her binaries and the period gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Webbink; D. T. Wickramasinghe

    2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    AM Her variables -- synchronised magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) -- exhibit a different period distribution from other CVs across the period gap. We show that non-AM Her systems may infiltrate the longer-period end of the period gap if they are metal-deficient, but that the position and width of the gap in orbital period is otherwise insensitive to other binary parameters (excepting the normalisation of the braking rate). In AM Her binaries, magnetic braking is reduced as the wind from the secondary star may be trapped within the magnetosphere of the white dwarf primary. This reduced braking fills the period gap from its short-period end as the dipole magnetic moment of the white dwarf increases. The consistency of these models with the observed distribution of CVs, both AM Her and non-AM Her type, provides compelling evidence supporting magnetic braking as the agent of angular momentum loss among long-period CVs, and its disruption as the explanation of the 2 - 3 hour period gap among nonmagnetic CVs.

  10. Campus Outdoor Lighting Standards The following standards provide for minimum safe lighting standards for outdoor area of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Campus Outdoor Lighting Standards The following standards provide for minimum safe lighting with a minimum of 3 foot candles. This lighting level is for daytime and at night. Public Streets Streets must have a minimum of one foot candles average with a minimum of .6 foot candles. Augmented lighting should

  11. Vortex and gap generation in gauge models of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Oliveira; C. E. Cordeiro; A. Delfino; W. de Paula; T. Frederico

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective quantum field theoretical continuum models for graphene are investigated. The models include a complex scalar field and a vector gauge field. Different gauge theories are considered and their gap patterns for the scalar, vector, and fermion excitations are investigated. Different gauge groups lead to different relations between the gaps, which can be used to experimentally distinguish the gauge theories. In this class of models the fermionic gap is a dynamic quantity. The finite-energy vortex solutions of the gauge models have the flux of the "magnetic field" quantized, making the Bohm-Aharonov effect active even when external electromagnetic fields are absent. The flux comes proportional to the scalar field angular momentum quantum number. The zero modes of the Dirac equation show that the gauge models considered here are compatible with fractionalization.

  12. NGNP Project Regulatory Gap Analysis for Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project Regulatory Gap Analysis (RGA) for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) was conducted to evaluate existing regulatory requirements and guidance against the design characteristics specific to a generic modular HTGR. This final report presents results and identifies regulatory gaps concerning current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements that apply to the modular HTGR design concept. This report contains appendices that highlight important HTGR licensing issues that were found during the RGA study. The information contained in this report will be used to further efforts in reconciling HTGR-related gaps in the NRC licensing structure, which has to date largely focused on light water reactor technology.

  13. Finite-temperature lineshapes in gapped quantum spin chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian H. L. Essler; Robert M. Konik

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the finite-temperature dynamical structure factor (DSF) of gapped quantum spin chains such as the spin one Heisenberg model and the transverse field Ising model in the disordered phase. At zero temperature the DSF in these models is dominated by a delta-function line arising from the coherent propagation of single particle modes. Using methods of integrable quantum field theory we determine the evolution of the lineshape at low temperatures. We show that the line shape is in general asymmetric in energy and becomes Lorentzian only at temperatures far below the gap. We discuss the relevance of our results for the analysis of inelastic neutron scattering experiments on gapped spin chain systems such as CsNiCl_3 and YBaNiO_5.

  14. Lower bounds to the spectral gap of Davies generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temme, Kristan [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct lower bounds to the spectral gap of a family of Lindblad generators known as Davies maps. These maps describe the thermalization of quantum systems weakly coupled to a heat bath. The steady state of these systems is given by the Gibbs distribution with respect to the system Hamiltonian. The bounds can be evaluated explicitly, when the eigenbasis and the spectrum of the Hamiltonian is known. A crucial assumption is that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian is non-degenerate. Furthermore, we provide a counterexample to the conjecture, that the convergence rate is always determined by the gap of the associated Pauli master equation. We conclude that the full dynamics of the Lindblad generator has to be considered. Finally, we present several physical example systems for which the bound to the spectral gap is evaluated.

  15. Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

  16. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Gaps in your Safety Program?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Gaps in your Safety Program?

  17. The gender gap on concept inventories in physics: what is consistent, what is inconsistent, and what factors influence the gap?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madsen, Adrian; Sayre, Eleanor C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the literature on the gender gap on concept inventories in physics. Across studies, men consistently score higher on pre-tests of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE) by about 10%, and in most cases score higher on post-tests as well, also by about 10%. The average difference in normalized gain is about 6%. This difference is much smaller than the average difference in normalized gain between traditional lecture and interactive engagement (25%), but is large enough that it could impact the results of studies comparing the effectiveness of different teaching methods. Based on our analysis of 24 published articles comparing the impact of 34 factors that could potentially influence the gender gap, no single factor is sufficient to explain the gap. Several high-profile studies that have claimed to account for or reduce the gender gap have failed to be replicated, suggesting that isolated claims of explanations of the gender gap should be interpreted with ca...

  18. Sub-10-nanometre metallic gaps for use in molecular electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Kellye Suzanne

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    gaps as small as sub-10 nm. Image from (8). Gaps can also be created by trapping gold nanoparticles between large-separation electrodes using an AC field, and then breaking the bridge by applying a large DC 5 1.2 Review of Related Work voltage (16... .3 Simmons Tunnelling Model grown QDs because their local environment is more stable. This susceptibility to electric fields will be apparent in our measurements, as discussed in 7.6. No matter the nature of the excitation, QDs may emit photons when...

  19. Rapidity gap survival in the black-disk regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize how the approach to the black-disk regime (BDR) of strong interactions at TeV energies influences rapidity gap survival in exclusive hard diffraction pp -> p + H + p (H = dijet, Qbar Q, Higgs). Employing a recently developed partonic description of such processes, we discuss (a) the suppression of diffraction at small impact parameters by soft spectator interactions in the BDR; (b) further suppression by inelastic interactions of hard spectator partons in the BDR; (c) correlations between hard and soft interactions. Hard spectator interactions substantially reduce the rapidity gap survival probability at LHC energies compared to previously reported estimates.

  20. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mason, R.J.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode is disclosed. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources. 12 figs.

  1. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mason, Rodney J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources.

  2. The role of the energy gap in protein folding dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estelle Pitard; Henri Orland

    1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of folding of proteins is studied by means of a phenomenological master equation. The energy distribution is taken as a truncated exponential for the misfolded states plus a native state sitting below the continuum. The influence of the gap on the folding dynamics is studied, for various models of the transition probabilities between the different states of the protein. We show that for certain models, the relaxation to the native state is accelerated by increasing the gap, whereas for others it is slowed down .

  3. START-GAP3/DLC3 is a GAP for RhoA and Cdc42 and is localized in focal adhesions regulating cell morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawai, Katsuhisa; Kiyota, Minoru; Seike, Junichi; Deki, Yuko [Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, Harima Science Garden City, Hyogo-ken 678-1297 (Japan); Yagisawa, Hitoshi [Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, Harima Science Garden City, Hyogo-ken 678-1297 (Japan)], E-mail: yagisawa@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp

    2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the human genome there are three genes encoding RhoGAPs that contain the START (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-related lipid transfer)-domain. START-GAP3/DLC3 is a tumor suppressor gene similar to two other human START-GAPs known as DLC1 or DLC2. Although expression of START-GAP3/DLC3 inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells, its molecular function is not well understood. In this study we carried out biochemical characterization of START-GAP3/DLC3, and explored the effects of its expression on cell morphology and intracellular localization. We found that START-GAP3/DLC3 serves as a stimulator of PLC{delta}1 and as a GAP for both RhoA and Cdc42 in vitro. Moreover, we found that the GAP activity is responsible for morphological changes. The intracellular localization of endogenous START-GAP3/DLC3 was explored by immunocytochemistry and was revealed in focal adhesions. These results indicate that START-GAP3/DLC3 has characteristics similar to other START-GAPs and the START-GAP family seems to share common characteristics.

  4. Lost sunspot cycle in the beginning of Dalton minimum: New evidence and consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    in the beginning of the Dalton minimum during 1790s [Usoskin et al., 2001]. Earlier, this cycle has been combinedLost sunspot cycle in the beginning of Dalton minimum: New evidence and consequences I. G. Usoskin November 2002; published 24 December 2002. [1] We have recently suggested that one solar cycle was lost

  5. Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures O. A. Araromi*a , I. Gavrilovichb , J. Shintakea , S. Rosseta , H. R. Sheaa a Microsystems For Space Technologies Laboratory, �cole Polytechnique Fédérale de

  6. An Exponential Improvement on the MST Heuristic for Minimum Energy Broadcasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caragiannis, Ioannis

    in energy saving. A naturally arising issue in ad hoc wireless networks is that of supporting communicationAn Exponential Improvement on the MST Heuristic for Minimum Energy Broadcasting in Ad Hoc Wireless Abstract. In this paper we present a new approximation algorithm for the Minimum Energy Broadcast Routing

  7. On the Cost and Quality Tradeoff in Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees in Wireless Ad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Y. Charlie

    On the Cost and Quality Tradeoff in Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees in Wireless Ad Hoc], each having a different complexity and produc- ing a broadcast tree with a different energy cost. Thus to the quality of the trees constructed. II. BUILDING BLOCKS The three ingredients that constitute any minimum-energy

  8. Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 1. Vmin Diagram for a Two-Product Column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 1. Vmin Diagram for a Two-Product Column how the minimum energy consumption is related to the feed-component distribution for all possible operating points in a two-product distillation column with a multicomponent feed. The classical Underwood

  9. Guidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    this process we present the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR ExperimentsGuidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments Jim F Vandesompele,6 Carl T. Wittwer,12 and Stephen A. Bustin13 There is growing interest in digital PCR (dPCR) be

  10. The Minimum Distance of Turbo-Like Codes Louay Bazzi, Mohammad Mahdian, Daniel A. Spielman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spielman, Daniel A.

    1 The Minimum Distance of Turbo-Like Codes Louay Bazzi, Mohammad Mahdian, Daniel A. Spielman Abstract--Worst-case upper bounds are derived on the minimum distance of parallel concatenated Turbo codes that parallel-concatenated Turbo codes and repeat-convolute codes with sub-linear memory are asymptotically bad

  11. Bloat control and generalization pressure using the minimum description length principle for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacardit, Jaume

    Bloat control and generalization pressure using the minimum description length principle to achieve these objectives based on the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle. This principle solutions that are bigger than necessary, contradicting the Occam's razor principle [7] which says that "the

  12. Bloat control and generalization pressure using the minimum description length principle for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacardit, Jaume

    Bloat control and generalization pressure using the minimum description length principle propose a method to achieve these objectives based on the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle. This principle is a metric which combines in a smart way the accuracy and the complexity of a theory (rule set

  13. Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees In Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    algorithm, power awareness, ad hoc networks, energy consumption optimization, broad- cast and multicastConstructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees In Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa Liang Department related to power consump- tion in this kind of network. One is the minimum-energy broadcast tree problem

  14. Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vialatte, François

    1 Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information Backpropagation L;210 Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information Backpropagation L.-Q. Zhang, A- composition approach, for multichannel blind de- convolution of non-minimumphase systems. In 20] we has

  15. On the random 2-stage minimum spanning tree Abraham D. Flaxman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivelevich, Michael

    On the random 2-stage minimum spanning tree Abraham D. Flaxman Department of Mathematical Sciences random variables, uniformly distributed between 0 and 1, then the expected cost of the minimum spanning tree is asymptotically equal to #16;(3) = P 1 i=1 i 3 . Here we consider the following stochastic two

  16. FINDING THE GLOBAL MINIMUM FOR BINARY IMAGE RESTORATION Tony F. Chan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esedoglu, Selim

    - est. In this paper we define the restored image as the global min- imizer of the total-variation (TVFINDING THE GLOBAL MINIMUM FOR BINARY IMAGE RESTORATION Tony F. Chan , Selim Esedo¯glu and Mila and there are no general methods to calculate the global minimum, while local minimziers are very often of limited inter

  17. Modeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , Berkeley, California. Abstract. The recent solar minimum, marking the end of solar cycle 23, has beenModeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum: Model Mikic and Janet G. Luhmann Predictive Science, San Diego, California. Harvard-Smithsonian Center

  18. Graphical Visualisation of Minimum Energy Requirements for Multi-Effect Distillation Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    1 Graphical Visualisation of Minimum Energy Requirements for Multi-Effect Distillation Arrangements of this paper is to present a simple graphical method for obtaining the energy usage and to compare the energy of Chemical Engineering, 7491 Trondheim, Norway Abstract The minimum energy requirements of six different heat

  19. The CSU Graduation Initiative Closing the Achievement Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Graduation Initiative is part of the nationwide Access to Success project of the National Association to Graduation 7 #12;Tracking and Reporting Consistent evaluation of project results is a critical componentThe CSU Graduation Initiative Closing the Achievement Gap Executive Vice Chancellor Jeri Echeverria

  20. "Charter and Code" Gap Analysis ANALYSIS FOR NORWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    "Charter and Code" ­ Gap Analysis ANALYSIS FOR NORWAY The European Charter for Researchers: Acceptable. The principle of research freedom is well-established in Norway. The committee refers for Research Ethics in Norway. #12;In recent years, issues of research ethics have received increasing

  1. Topology of Local Health Officials' Advice Networks: Mind the Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    , evidence-based programs, and service delivery, and health care reform are innovations Author AffiliationsTopology of Local Health Officials' Advice Networks: Mind the Gaps Jacqueline Merrill, RN, MPH: To determine how a health officials' advice network might contribute to a high-performing public health systems

  2. Abstract Local Reasoning for Concurrent Libraries: Mind the Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Philippa

    considerable work on combining lo- cal reasoning with abstraction. There are two main approaches. One approach, truly abstract reasoning of a tree module (such as DOM) works with predicates based on connecting treeMFPS 2014 Abstract Local Reasoning for Concurrent Libraries: Mind the Gap Philippa Gardner, Azalea

  3. BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN BUILDING SCIENCE AND DESIGN STUDIOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the building industry and, to be effective, they need to be integrated into architectural design from, there is a lack of courses that allow for integrated building design through consideration of multiple performanceBRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN BUILDING SCIENCE AND DESIGN STUDIOS KONSTANTINOS PAPAMICHAEL AND VINEETA

  4. Thermal resistance gaps for solid breeder blankets using packed beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbis, Z.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main design features of a new concept for solid breeder blanket thermal resistance gaps are described and analysis is shown for the blanket thermal characteristics. The effective thermal conductivity of a helium-beryllium packed bed configuration is studied, including the effect of a purge stream. Possible applications of this concept to ITER blanket designs are stressed.

  5. Template strand scrunching during DNA gap repair synthesis by human polymerase [lamda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Larrea, Andres A.; Havener, Jody M.; Perera, Lalith; Krahn, Joseph M.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Ramsden, Dale A.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; (NIH); (UNC)

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Family X polymerases such as DNA polymerase {lambda}(Pol {lambda}) are well suited for filling short gaps during DNA repair because they simultaneously bind both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of short gaps. DNA binding and gap filling are well characterized for 1-nucleotide (nt) gaps, but the location of yet-to-be-copied template nucleotides in longer gaps is unknown. Here we present crystal structures revealing that, when bound to a 2-nt gap, Pol {lambda} scrunches the template strand and binds the additional uncopied template base in an extrahelical position within a binding pocket that comprises three conserved amino acids. Replacing these amino acids with alanine results in less processive gap filling and less efficient NHEJ when 2-nt gaps are involved. Thus, akin to scrunching by RNA polymerase during transcription initiation, scrunching occurs during gap filling DNA synthesis associated with DNA repair.

  6. Smoothness of the Gap Function in the BCS-Bogoliubov Theory of Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuji Watanabe

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We deal with the gap equation in the BCS-Bogoliubov theory of superconductivity, where the gap function is a function of the temperature $T$ only. We show that the squared gap function is of class $C^2$ on the closed interval $[\\,0,\\,T_c\\,]$. Here, $T_c$ stands for the transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the gap function is monotonically decreasing on $[0,\\,T_c]$ and obtain the behavior of the gap function at $T=T_c$. We mathematically point out some more properties of the gap function.

  7. Air-Gap Convection in a Switched Reluctance Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanazzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Switched reluctance machines (SRMs) have recently become popular in the automotive market as they are a good alternative to the permanent magnet machines commonly employed for an electric powertrain. Lumped parameter thermal networks are usually used for thermal analysis of motors due to their low computational cost and relatively accurate results. A critical aspect to be modelled is the rotor-stator air-gap heat transfer, and this is particularly challenging in an SRM due to the salient pole geometry. This work presents firstly a review of the literature including the most relevant correlations for this geometry, and secondly, numerical CFD simulations of air-gap heat transfer for a typical configuration. A new correlation has been derived: $\\mathbf{Nu=0.181\\ Ta_m^{0.207}}$

  8. The imaginary part of the gap function in color superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Feng; Defu Hou; Jiarong Li; Hai-cang Ren

    2006-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We clarify general properties of the energy gap regarding its functional dependence on the energy-momentum dictated by the invariance under a space inversion or a time reversal. Then we derive perturbatively the equation of the imaginary part of the gap function for dense QCD in weak coupling and generalize our results from 2SC case to CFL case. We confirm that the imaginary part is down by $g$ relative to the real part in weak coupling. The numerical results show that, up to the leading order, the imaginary part is no larger than one MeV at extremely large densities and can be as large as several MeV the densities are of physical interest.

  9. Spark gap switch system with condensable dielectric gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thayer, III, William J. (Kent, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spark gap switch system is disclosed which is capable of operating at a high pulse rate comprising an insulated switch housing having a purging gas entrance port and a gas exit port, a pair of spaced apart electrodes each having one end thereof within the housing and defining a spark gap therebetween, an easily condensable and preferably low molecular weight insulating gas flowing through the switch housing from the housing, a heat exchanger/condenser for condensing the insulating gas after it exits from the housing, a pump for recirculating the condensed insulating gas as a liquid back to the housing, and a heater exchanger/evaporator to vaporize at least a portion of the condensed insulating gas back into a vapor prior to flowing the insulating gas back into the housing.

  10. Valley pair qubits in double quantum dots of gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Y. Wu; N. -Y. Lue; L. Chang

    2011-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rise of graphene opens a new door to qubit implementation, as discussed in the recent proposal of valley pair qubits in double quantum dots of gapped graphene (Wu et al., arXiv: 1104.0443 [cond-mat.mes-hall]). The work here presents the comprehensive theory underlying the proposal. It discusses the interaction of electrons with external magnetic and electric fields in such structures. Specifically, it examines a strong, unique mechanism, i.e., the analogue of the 1st-order relativistic effect in gapped graphene. This mechanism is state mixing free and allows, together with the electrically tunable exchange coupling, a fast, all-electric manipulation of qubits via electric gates, in the time scale of ns. The work also looks into the issue of fault tolerance in a typical case, yielding at 10oK a long qubit coherence time (~O(ms)).

  11. Damping of lower hybrid waves in large spectral gap configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Artaud, J.-F.; Nilsson, E.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Mazon, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive experimental data support reliable power deposition and current drive by lower-hybrid (LH) waves in conditions where a large spectral gap exists between the nominal parallel index of refraction prescribed by the antenna characteristics and phasing, and that required for significant Landau damping to take place. We argue that only a significant modification of the initial spectrum at the plasma edge could explain experimental observations. Based on this assumption, a new prescription for reliable simulations of LH current drive using ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck modelling is proposed. A remarkable agreement between experimental observations in the Tore Supra tokamak and simulations is obtained for relevant parametric scans, including electron density and LH waveguide phasing. In an effort to investigate the possible role of fluctuations, it is shown that the spectral gap can be bridged dynamically in the presence of a fluctuating LH spectrum.

  12. Entanglement vs. gap for one-dimensional spin systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aharonov, Dorit [HEBREW UNIV; Gottesman, Daniel [PERIMETER INSTITUTE

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relationship between entanglement and spectral gap for local Hamiltonians in one dimension. The area law for a one-dimensional system states that for the ground state, the entanglement of any interval is upper-bounded by a constant independent of the size of the interval. However, the possible dependence of the upper bound on the spectral gap {Delta} is not known, as the best known general upper bound is asymptotically much larger than the largest possible entropy of any model system previously constructed for small {Delta}. To help resolve this asymptotic behavior, we construct a family of one-dimensional local systems for which some intervals have entanglement entropy which is polynomial in 1/{Delta}, whereas previously studied systems had the entropy of all intervals bounded by a constant times log(1/{Delta}).

  13. Bridge Health Insurance Options ief gap in health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    limitations to bear in mind: n denied health care coverage, you almost certainly won't qualify y at the end-800-304-0372 www.anthem.com and click on visitor and click on state. United Health Care at 1-888-545-5205 or visitBridge Health Insurance Options ief gap in health of coverage became seriously hurt or ill. That

  14. J 4.8 MODELING THE TALLAHASSEE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ANOMALY Kelly G. Godsey*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuelberg, Henry

    1 J 4.8 MODELING THE TALLAHASSEE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE ANOMALY Kelly G. Godsey* 1,2 , Henry E author address: Kelly G. Godsey, NWS, Morristown, TN 37814; email: Kelly.Godsey@noaa.gov #12;2 Fig. 1

  15. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hallam, Steven

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  16. Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recht, Benjamin

    The affine rank minimization problem consists of finding a matrix of minimum rank that satisfies a given system of linear equality constraints. Such problems have appeared in the literature of a diverse set of fields ...

  17. A Cycle Augmentation Algorithm for Minimum Cost Multicommodity Flows on a Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, Bruce

    A Cycle Augmentation Algorithm for Minimum Cost Multicommodity Flows on a Ring Bruce Shepherd bshep of Ford and Fulkerson [5]. We mention that a similar state of affairs held for generalized

  18. MINIMUM REJECTION SCHEDULING IN ALL-PHOTONIC NETWORKS Nahid Saberi and Mark J. Coates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MINIMUM REJECTION SCHEDULING IN ALL-PHOTONIC NETWORKS Nahid Saberi and Mark J. Coates Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering McGill University Montreal, QC, Canada E-mail: nahid.saberi

  19. Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Maleq

    1 Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc Networks of a class of simple and local algorithms called Nearest Neighbor Tree (NNT) algorithms for energy-efficient

  20. IDAPA 37.03.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction and Use of Injection Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  1. Online Supplement to "Bounding Distributions for the Weight of a Minimum Spanning Tree in Stochastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shier, Douglas R.

    Online Supplement to "Bounding Distributions for the Weight of a Minimum Spanning Tree in Stochastic Networks" Kevin R. Hutson · Douglas R. Shier Department of Mathematics & Computer Science, Denison

  2. Statistical Analysis and Time Series Models for Minimum/Maximum Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    temperatures, thereby reducing the adverse effect of global warming in the Antarctic Peninsula. Keywords that the observed increase in the minimum temperatures is a consequence of human activity rather than natural causes

  3. Of horseshoes and heliotropes: Dynamics of dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedman a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    Of horseshoes and heliotropes: Dynamics of dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedman a, , J.A. Burns a located within the Cassini Division's Laplace Gap demonstrates ``heliotropic'' behavior: its geometric

  4. Variation of treefall gap characteristics in an East Texas bottomland hardwood forest: effects of microtopography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almquist, Benjamin Eric

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treefall gaps, formed as a result of small-scale disturbances, allow seedling recruitment and growth in late-successional forests. Many factors contribute to gap regime heterogeneity within and among forest stands, including wind and fire patterns...

  5. Hydraulically controlled magnetic bougienage for correction of long-gap esophageal atresia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noh, Minkyun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About one in 4000 babies in the United States is born with their esophageal disconnected and separated by a gap, which is called esophageal atresia. Esophageal atresia with a relatively short gap can be directly corrected ...

  6. Optical absorption and band gap reduction in (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optical absorption and band gap reduction in (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 solid solutions: A first-principles study. Optical absorption and band gap reduction in (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 solid solutions: A...

  7. Fact #837: September 8, Gap between Net Imports and Total Imports...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7: September 8, Gap between Net Imports and Total Imports of Petroleum is Widening Fact 837: September 8, Gap between Net Imports and Total Imports of Petroleum is Widening Net...

  8. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived. 5 figs.

  9. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Grose, Stephen M. (Glenwood, WV)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived.

  10. Double active shielded magnetic field gradient design with minimum inductance method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Physics DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Approved as to style and content by: F. R. Huson (Chair of Committee) Steve Wry (Member) Edward...

  11. A Dynamic Localized Minimum-Energy Agent Tree-Based Data Dissemination Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, JoAnne

    A Dynamic Localized Minimum-Energy Agent Tree-Based Data Dissemination Scheme for Wireless Sensor this prob- lem by proposing a minimum-energy tree-based data dissemination scheme, Dynamic Localized Minimum-Energy Agent Tree-Based Scheme (DLATS). We exploit the fact that sensor nodes are stationary and location

  12. 1906 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 53, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2005 Minimum-Energy Multicast in Mobile Ad Hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

    in polynomial time, in sharp con- trast with the NP-hardness of constructing the minimum-energy multicast tree with a single tree is presented. The minimum energy-per-bit for multicasting with routing is found by an integer in the Steiner tree literature, can now be interpreted as the optimization for minimum energy multicasting

  13. TECHNICAL REPORT TR-09-04, UC DAVIS, SEPTEMBER 2009. 1 Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    TECHNICAL REPORT TR-09-04, UC DAVIS, SEPTEMBER 2009. 1 Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive guarantee for constructing the minimum-energy multicast tree, which transforms the multicast problem load of the primary network on the minimum-energy multicast tree. I. INTRODUCTION Multicast can provide

  14. Strain energy minimum and vibrational properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes Suchitra Konduri, Sanjoy Mukherjee, and Sankar Nair*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Strain energy minimum and vibrational properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes study the origin of the strain energy minimum in a single-walled aluminosilicate nanotube via a har- persity in the nanotube diameter is explained in terms of a minimum in the strain energy due

  15. Major in Aerospace Engineering Master of Engineering (with creative component) A minimum of 27 credits of acceptable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Major in Aerospace Engineering Master of Engineering (with creative component) ­ A minimum of 27 Engineering along with a minimum of 3 credits of Aer E 599 (creative component) must be taken. The POS Mechanics Master of Engineering (with creative component) ­ A minimum of 24 credits of acceptable course

  16. Erratum to ``How should gaps be treated in parsimony? A comparison of approaches using simulation"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    Erratum Erratum to ``How should gaps be treated in parsimony? A comparison of approaches using)]. The three comparisons for treating gaps as unknown, fifth state character, and Simple Indel Coding are shownTrueTree TAA Fig. 3. Moving average lines of treating gaps as unknown, fifth state, and Simple Indel Coding

  17. OIKOS 101: 499504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    OIKOS 101: 499­504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed size models. ­ Oikos 101: 499­504. ESS for the occupancy of `safe sites' or vegetation gaps. If mortality rates are high and/or frequency-independent, ESS

  18. The Quasi-Distributed Gap Technique for Planar Inductors-Design Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Quasi-Distributed Gap Technique for Planar Inductors-Design Guidelines Jiankun Hu C. R The Quasi-Distributed Gap Technique for Planar Inductors: Design Guidelines Jiankun Hu Charles R. Sullivan of low-permeability magnetic material to form a uniformly distributed gap can facilitate the design

  19. Penetration of plasma into the wafer-focus ring gap in capacitively coupled plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Penetration of plasma into the wafer-focus ring gap in capacitively coupled plasmas Natalia Y of capacitively coupled plasma reactors with a wafer-focus ring gap. The penetration of plasma generated species i.e., ions and radicals into the wafer-focus ring gap is discussed. We found that the penetration of plasma

  20. An Abelian Ward identity and the vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao-jie Xu; Qun Wang

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive an Abelian-like Ward identity in color superconducting phase and calculate vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap. Making use of the Ward identity, we show that subleading order contributions to the gap from vertices are absent for gapped excitations.

  1. THE DEVIL’S STAIRCASE DIMENSIONS AND MEASURE-THEORETICAL ENTROPY OF MAPS WITH HORIZONTAL GAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung-chao Ban; Song-sun Lin

    Abstract. This work elucidates the measure-theoretical entropy and dimensions of a unimodal map with a horizontal gap. The measure-theoretical entropy and dimensions of the Ft (which is defined later)are shown to form a devil’s staircase structure with respect to the gap size t. Pesin’s formula for gap maps is also considered. 1.

  2. Direct control of air gap flux in permanent magnet machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for field weakening in PM machines uses field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72) to produce flux in one or more stators (34, 49, 63, 64), including a flux which counters flux normally produced in air gaps between the stator(s) (34, 49, 63, 64) and the rotor (20, 21, 41, 61) which carries the PM poles. Several modes of operation are introduced depending on the magnitude and polarity of current in the field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72). The invention is particularly useful for, but not limited to, the electric vehicle drives and PM generators.

  3. Low-pressure spark gap triggered by an ion diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, D.S.

    1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Spark gap apparatus for use as an electric switch operating at high voltage, high current and high repetition rate. Mounted inside a housing are an anode, cathode and ion plate. An ionizable fluid is pumped through the chamber of the housing. A pulse of current to the ion plate causes ions to be emitted by the ion plate, which ions move into and ionize the fluid. Electric current supplied to the anode discharges through the ionized fluid and flows to the cathode. Current stops flowing when the current source has been drained. The ionized fluid recombines into its initial dielectric ionizable state. The switch is now open and ready for another cycle.

  4. Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

  5. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Industrial Hygiene | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department of Energy56Executive212-2012 June;'FAQ:Energy FAQS Gap

  6. Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 -3EutecticMinding the Gap Makes for More

  7. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide ThinIon CoolingSubstrateSubstrate-Induced Band-Gap

  8. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide ThinIonSubstrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in

  9. On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis number larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.

  10. Bridge the Gap 2014 --Guidance for Participants Requiring Level Access This level-access route is meant to accommodate Bridge the Gap participants using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travis, Adrian

    or there is an alternative route in to the College theough the Golden Gate. There will be a steward on hand to assist. 12Bridge the Gap 2014 -- Guidance for Participants Requiring Level Access This level-access route is meant to accommodate Bridge the Gap participants using wheelchairs, mobility scooters and pushchairs

  11. Hanford Waste Physical and Rheological Properties: Data and Gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurath, Dean E.; Wells, Beric E.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Tingey, Joel M.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The retrieval, transport, treatment and disposal operations associated with Hanford Tank Wastes involve the handling of a wide range of slurries. Knowledge of the physical and rheological properties of the waste is a key component to the success of the design and implementation of the waste processing facilities. Previous efforts to compile and analyze the physical and rheological properties were updated with new results including information on solids composition and density, particle size distributions, slurry rheology, and particle settling behavior. The primary source of additional data is from a recent series of tests sponsored by the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. These tests involved an extensive suite of characterization and bench-scale process testing of 8 waste groups representing approximately 75% of the high-level waste mass expected to be processed through the WTP. Additional information on the morphology of the waste solids was also included. Based on the updated results, a gap analysis to identify gaps in characterization data, analytical methods and data interpretation was completed.

  12. Hanford Waste Physical and Rheological Properties: Data and Gaps - 12078

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurath, D.E.; Wells, B.E.; Huckaby, J.L.; Mahoney, L.A.; Daniel, R.C.; Burns, C.A.; Tingey, J.M.; Cooley, S.K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The retrieval, transport, treatment and disposal operations associated with Hanford Tank Wastes involve the handling of a wide range of slurries. Knowledge of the physical and rheological properties of the waste is a key component to the success of the design and implementation of the waste processing facilities. Previous efforts to compile and analyze the physical and rheological properties were updated with new results including information on solids composition and density, particle size distributions, slurry rheology, and particle settling behavior. The primary source of additional data is from a recent series of tests sponsored by the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). These tests involved an extensive suite of characterization and bench-scale process testing of 8 waste groups representing approximately 75% of the high-level waste mass expected to be processed through the WTP. Additional information on the morphology of the waste solids was also included. Based on the updated results, a gap analysis to identify gaps in characterization data, analytical methods and data interpretation was completed. (authors)

  13. On the origin of the low temperatures resistivity minimum in Cr thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osquiguil, E.; Tosi, L.; Kaul, E. E.; Balseiro, C. A. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient, ? and R{sub H}, in Cr films of different thicknesses grown on MgO (100) substrates, as a function of temperature T and applied magnetic field H. The results show a low temperature minimum in ?(T), which is thickness dependent. From 40?K to 2?K, the Hall coefficient is a monotonous increasing function as T is reduced with no particular signature at the temperature T{sub min} where the minimum develops. We explain the resistivity minimum assuming an imperfect nesting of the Fermi surface leading to small electron and hole pockets. We introduce a phenomenological model which supports this simple physical picture.

  14. New current control concept -- Minimum time current control in the three-phase PWM converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.W. [LG Industrial Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sul, S.K. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). School of Electrical Engineering

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a new current controller that guarantees the fastest transient response is proposed. The basic concept is to find the optimal control voltage for tracking the reference current with minimum time under the voltage limit constraint. Though this minimum time control concept is also applicable to all the machine drive systems, this paper focuses on the current regulation in the three-phase pulse width modulation (PWM) converter. In the simulation and experimental results, it is observed that the proposed controller has much less transient time than the conventional synchronous PI regulator and the performance of the dc link voltage control is also greatly improved with the proposed current controller.

  15. Method of Controlling Corona Effects and Breakdown Voltage of Small Air Gaps Stressed by Impulse Voltages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athanasios Maglaras; Trifon Kousiouris; Frangiskos Topalis; Dimitrios Katsaros; Leandros A. Maglaras; Konstantina Giannakopoulou

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the influence of a resistor on the dielectric behavior of an air gap. The resistor is connected in series with the air gap and the latter is stressed by impulse voltage. Air gap arrangements of different geometry with either the rod or the plate grounded are stressed with impulse voltages of both positive and negative polarity. The resistor is connected in series with the air gap in the return circuit connecting the gap with the impulse generator. The method followed involves the investigation of the graphs of the charging time concerning the air gaps capacitances, in connection to the value of the resistor, the geometry of the gap, the effect of grounding and the polarity effect. It is determined that the charging time of the air gap increases, as the value of the resistor increases. It is also determined that the peak voltage value of the fully charged air gap decreases as the value of the resistor increases. The results of the mathematical and simulation analysis are compared with the results of the oscillograms taken from experimental work. In addition and consequently to the above results it is concluded from the experimental work that the in series connection of the resistor in the circuit has significant influence on corona pulses (partial discharges) occurring in the gap and on the breakdown voltage of the gap. A new method of controlling the corona effects and consequently the breakdown voltage of small air gaps stressed by impulse voltage of short duration in connection to the ground effect and the polarity effect has arisen. Furthermore through mathematical analysis of the charging graphs obtained from simulation and experimental oscillograms there was a calculation of the values of the capacitance of the air gaps in relation to their geometry and the results were compared to the values calculated with mathematical analysis.

  16. Mind the Gap: Supersymmetry Breaking in Scaling, Microstate Geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orestis Vasilakis; Nicholas P. Warner

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a multi-species supertube solution to construct an example of a scaling microstate geometry for non-BPS black rings in five dimensions. We obtain the asymptotic charges of the microstate geometry and show how the solution is related to the corresponding non-BPS black ring. The supersymmetry is broken in a very controlled manner using holonomy and this enables a close comparison with a scaling, BPS microstate geometry. Requiring that there are no closed time-like curves near the supertubes places additional restrictions on the moduli space of physical, non-BPS solutions when compared to their BPS analogs. For large holonomy the scaling non-BPS solution always has closed time-like curves while for smaller holonomy there is a "gap" in the non-BPS moduli space relative to the BPS counterpart.

  17. Voltage-matched, monolithic, multi-band-gap devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a sting of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  18. Annular gap solitons in Kerr media with circular gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheuer, Jacob [School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Malomed, Boris [School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce standing-light patterns trapped in a Bragg grating written along the radial direction in a self-focusing (SF) or self-defocusing (SDF) optical medium. Unlike previously studied axisymmetric settings that deal with the axial propagation, we consider the propagation of light in the radial directions (outward and inward), which may give rise to annular gap solitons (AGSs), supported by the circular grating. An estimate for the threshold of the modulational instability of the AGS against azimuthal perturbations in the SF medium is obtained analytically, and verified by direct simulations. In the SDF model, stable annular and dipole solitons are found in a numerical form, while multipole patterns and vortex rings are unstable. Similar solitons are possible in the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  19. Voltage-Matched, Monolithic, Multi-Band-Gap Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M. W.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a string of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  20. Gap symmetries from the neighbor coupling in square-lattice superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Liming

    2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The gap symmetries of superconductivity are studied in this work. It is found that the gap symmetries are simply determined by the 4-fold rotational symmetries of the coupling potential on neighbor sites. A local on-site coupling potential results in the on-site pairing with the conventional s-wave symmetry, but a coupling potential between the nearest neighbors or the next-nearest neighbors results in the pairing on neighbor sites with the $s^-$, $d_{x^2-y^2}$, $d_{xy}$, or $s_{x^2y^2}$ gap symmetries. It is proved that both isotropic and anisotropic gap functions are allowed by the 4-fold rotational symmetries of the coupling potential. Finally a numerical computation is performed to demonstrate the gap symmetries. This neighbor coupling provides a unified picture for the gap functions of the conventional and the high Tc superconductivity.

  1. Bachelor of Science with Major in Geology (Minimum of 120 credits required)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Bachelor of Science with Major in Geology (Minimum of 120 credits required) The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree is designed for students planning professional careers in geology, hydrogeology work in geology, geosciences and environmental science. Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students

  2. Bachelor of Arts with Major in Geology: Earth and Space Science (Minimum of 120 credits required)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Bachelor of Arts with Major in Geology: Earth and Space Science (Minimum of 120 credits required) The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Geology (Earth Science) is designed for students planning professional 2053 & 2048L 5 College Algebra MAC 1105 3 Introductory Statistics STA 2023 3 Total 19 Geology (Earth

  3. HIGH-LEVEL MULTI-STEP INVERTER OPTIMIZATION, USING A MINIMUM NUMBER OF POWER TRANSISTORS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    HIGH-LEVEL MULTI-STEP INVERTER OPTIMIZATION, USING A MINIMUM NUMBER OF POWER TRANSISTORS. Juan 56-41-246-999 e-mail lmoran@renoir.die.udec.cl ABSTRACT Multilevel inverters with a large number-5]. Multi-level inverters can operate not only with PWM techniques but also with amplitude modulation (AM

  4. Exploiting Schedule Slacks for RateOptimal PowerMinimum Software Pipelining #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Guang R.

    ­engineered compiler on Wattch power simulator, we observe that our approach can reduce dynamic energy consumptionExploiting Schedule Slacks for Rate­Optimal Power­Minimum Software Pipelining # Hongbo Yang + R systems de­ mand new compiler techniques geared toward both high performance and low power. Software

  5. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO[sub 2]F[sub 2] and H[sub 2]O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF[sub 6] and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % [sup 235]U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  6. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF{sub 6} and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  7. Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial Chang Woo Kang to derive sizing rules for buffered chains, which optimize the overall energy-delay product. Categories result in a poor solution in terms of the energy-delay product. The focus of this work is on multi

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 8, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2009 985 Minimum Energy Coding in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    , which minimizes the total energy consumption by controlling the radio power, is developed. Numerical Networks (WSNs). Energy consumption and reliability are analyzed for two coding schemes: Minimum Energy ME with respect to energy consumption and bit error rate. It is concluded that MME is more energy

  9. Speech enhancement using a minimum mean-square error short-time spectral modulation magnitude estimator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speech enhancement using a minimum mean-square error short-time spectral modulation magnitude In this paper we investigate the enhancement of speech by applying MMSE short-time spectral magnitude estimation on the quality of enhanced speech, and find that this method works better with speech uncertainty. Finally we

  10. Comparison of VLF Wave Activity in the Solar Wind During Solar Maximum and Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    second fast latitude scan (near the solar maximum) with the wave observations during the first fast Experiments (URAP) of Ulysses during its first orbit, which occurred when the solar activity was approachingComparison of VLF Wave Activity in the Solar Wind During Solar Maximum and Minimum: Ulysses

  11. Achieving MinimumCost Multicast: A Decentralized Approach Based on Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Médard, Muriel

    , a monetary or energy cost must be paid for each link usage) and the other that applies for strictly convex­to­point links, and consider the problem of minimum­energy multicast in wireless networks as well as the case generally means finding the shortest tree connecting a set of points in a directed graph; in other words

  12. MinimumEnergy Mobile Wireless Networks Revisited Li Li Joseph Y. Halpern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Li Erran

    at maximum power. Transmitting at maximum power requires a great deal of energy. To minimize energy usage, we for a graph to have this minimum­energy property. We use this characterization to construct a protocol called, SMECN has lower link main­ tenance costs than MECN and can achieve a significant saving in energy usage

  13. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 026115 (2012) Optimizing controllability of complex networks by minimum structural perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Ying-Cheng

    , Beijing 100875, China 2 School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University the practical usage of our approach, its implementation elucidates, interestingly, the intricate relationship dynamics, which is based on the classical control and graph theories [9­11]. The basic goal of the minimum

  14. String method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    York University, New York, New York 10012 Giovanni Ciccottid INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica in the free energy. Provided that the number of collective variables is large enough, the new techniqueString method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces Luca

  15. The Potato Radius: a Lower Minimum Size for Dwarf Planets Charles H. Lineweaver & Marc Norman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    The Potato Radius: a Lower Minimum Size for Dwarf Planets Charles H. Lineweaver & Marc Norman a rounded potato shape to a sphere. We derive this potato-to-sphere transition radius -- or "potato radius" -- from first principles. Using the empirical potato radii of asteroids and icy moons, we derive

  16. eVADER: A Perceptual Approach to Finding Minimum Warning Sound Requirements for Quiet Cars.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , such as hybrid and electric vehicles, to pedestrians has become an important issue for public policy [1], car a localization paradigm to test the detectability of hybrid and internal combustion cars by measuring listenereVADER: A Perceptual Approach to Finding Minimum Warning Sound Requirements for Quiet Cars. Ryan

  17. A minimum-reaction-flux solution to master-equation models of protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    A minimum-reaction-flux solution to master-equation models of protein folding Huan-Xiang Zhoua; published online 20 May 2008 Master equations are widely used for modeling protein folding. Here- ceptual and quantitative models for protein folding.1­15 In such models, the conformational space

  18. Autopilot for a Nonlinear Non-Minimum Phase Tail-Controlled Missile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Autopilot for a Nonlinear Non-Minimum Phase Tail-Controlled Missile Anshu Narang controlled missiles: 1. Exploiting the full physical capabilities of the missile system Fulfilling demanding aerodynamics is expensive and inaccurate Only certain states can be measured #12;3 Acceleration Control

  19. A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen Computer are a popular method for acquiring three-dimensional geometry due to their accuracy and robustness. Maximizing a two camera range scanner design, specifically chosen to minimize calibration complexity and cost

  20. Requirements for the MINOR in Environmental Science Five courses required. Total credits = minimum of 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Requirements for the MINOR in Environmental Science Five courses required. Total credits = minimum to Environmental Science OR NRC 100 Environment and Society OR GEO-SCI 100 Global Environmental Change Select two (2) of following four courses ENVIRSCI 213 Introduction to Environmental Policy ENVIRSCI 214

  1. Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodny, Avinoam

    Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints Yoni in a fast circuit by the same factor does not yield an energy-efficient design, and we characterize efficient. A design implementation is considered to be energy efficient when it has the highest performance

  2. The Blob Code is Competitive with EdgeSets in Genetic Algorithms for the Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julstrom, Bryant A.

    with those of, a GA that encodes spanning trees as edge-sets on Euclidean instances of the minimum rout- ing Spanning Tree Problem Bryant A. Julstrom Department of Computer Science St. Cloud State University St. Cloud, MN, 56301 USA julstrom@stcloudstate.edu ABSTRACT Among the many codings of spanning trees

  3. The minimum circuity frontier and the journey to work David Levinson a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    The minimum circuity frontier and the journey to work David Levinson a, , Ahmed El-Geneidy b,1 economic theory, this suggests locators wish to locate on the frontier with the largest residential lot to be uniform, we cannot assume that all possible home­work pairs are on the frontier. This finding, developed

  4. LOWER BOUNDS ON THE GLOBAL MINIMUM OF A M. GHASEMI, J.B. LASSERRE, M. MARSHALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Murray

    LOWER BOUNDS ON THE GLOBAL MINIMUM OF A POLYNOMIAL M. GHASEMI, J.B. LASSERRE, M. MARSHALL Abstract. We extend the method of Ghasemi and Marshall [SIAM. J. Opt. 22(2) (2012), pp 460-473], to obtain compare this bound with the (global) lower bound fgp ob- tained by Ghasemi and Marshall, and also

  5. Power Controlled Minimum Frame Length Scheduling in TDMA Wireless Networks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arabshahi, Payman

    Power Controlled Minimum Frame Length Scheduling in TDMA Wireless Networks with Sectored Antennas controlled min- imum frame length scheduling for TDMA wireless networks. Given a set of one-hop transmission scheduling and power control was first addressed by Tamer and Ephremides in [1, 2]. Given a set of one

  6. The stackelberg minimum spanning tree game on planar and bounded-treewidth graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinal, Jean

    The Stackelberg Minimum Spanning Tree Game is a two-level combinatorial pricing problem introduced at WADS’07. The game is played on a graph, whose edges are colored either red or blue, and where the red edges have a given ...

  7. BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION F12 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION ­ F12 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum Advisor: Luis Hernandez-Garcia, Ph.D. (hernan@umich.edu) Biomedical Imaging: BIOMEDE 5161 Medical Imaging Systems (3) (I)2 General: BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I

  8. BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION F11 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    BME BIOMEDICAL IMAGING CONCENTRATION ­ F11 MS: 30 total credit hours minimum Advisor: Luis Hernandez-Garcia, Ph.D. (hernan@umich.edu) Biomedical Imaging: BIOMEDE 5161 Medical Imaging Systems (3) (I)2 General: BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I

  9. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  10. Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules is to protect public health and the environment by establishing minimum standards for the proper location, design, construction and maintenance of onsite wastewater...

  11. A Survey of Gaps, Obstacles, and Technical Challenges for Hypersonic Applications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, Timothy Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? The object of this study is to canvas the literature for the purpose of identifying and compiling a list of Gaps, Obstacles, and Technological… (more)

  12. A database for the study of marine mammal behavior: Gap analysis, data standardization, and future directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, S A; Costa, Daniel P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gap Analysis, Data Standardization, and Future Directionsdata, and 3) lack of standardization in data re- porting. Awas the lack of standardization and/or presentation of

  13. Stationary Fuel Cell Application Codes and Standards: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, C. W.; Rivkin, C. H.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of codes and standards related to stationary fuel cell applications and identifies gaps and resolutions associated with relative codes and standards.

  14. When is a Gap Function Good for Error Bounds? 1 Introduction and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    the gap function and its Fukushima type regularization for GVI and WGVI. ... function for GVI and also regularize it along the lines of Fukushima [10] and show

  15. CIVIL-MILITARY GAP AND MILITARY EFFECTIVENESS: THE IMPACT OF IDEOLOGY AND MILITARY EXPERIENCE GAP ON DEFENSE SPENDING IN THE UNITED STATES, 1952-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Byeonggu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of civil-military gap have argued that the difference in values, perspectives, and opinions between civilians and the military matters because it determines military effectiveness, but empirical analyses ...

  16. The Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following courses, with a minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    *Management 4640 - Cross-Cultural Work Study Four courses at the 3000/4000 level from any faculty A minimumThe Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length) and Statistics 1770. Admission to Management programs is competitive and is based on academic achievement prior

  17. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ihab Fathy El-Kady

    2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal research that involves the interplay of metallic-PBG rejection and photonic band edge absorption. They propose that an absolute metallic-PBG may be used to suppress the infrared part of the blackbody emission and, emit its energy only through a sharp absorption band. Potential applications of this new PBG mechanism include highly efficient incandescent lamps and enhanced thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. The suggested lamp would be able to recycle the energy that would otherwise go into the unwanted heat associated with usual lamps, into light emitted in the visible spectrum. It is estimated this would increase the efficiency over conventional lamps by about 40%.

  18. Correlation Energy and Entanglement Gap in Continuous Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Martina; G. Ruggeri; G. Soliani

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Our goal is to clarify the relation between entanglement and correlation energy in a bipartite system with infinite dimensional Hilbert space. To this aim we consider the completely solvable Moshinsky's model of two linearly coupled harmonic oscillators. Also for small values of the couplings the entanglement of the ground state is nonlinearly related to the correlation energy, involving logarithmic or algebraic corrections. Then, looking for witness observables of the entanglement, we show how to give a physical interpretation of the correlation energy. In particular, we have proven that there exists a set of separable states, continuously connected with the Hartree-Fock state, which may have a larger overlap with the exact ground state, but also a larger energy expectation value. In this sense, the correlation energy provides an entanglement gap, i.e. an energy scale, under which measurements performed on the 1-particle harmonic sub-system can discriminate the ground state from any other separated state of the system. However, in order to verify the generality of the procedure, we have compared the energy distribution cumulants for the 1-particle harmonic sub-system of the Moshinsky's model with the case of a coupling with a damping Ohmic bath at 0 temperature.

  19. Device Sizing for Minimum Energy Operation in Subthreshold Circuits Benton H. Calhoun, Alice Wang, and Anantha Chandrakasan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Benton H.

    for Minimum Energy Sizing influences the energy consumption of a circuit in two primary ways. First, sizing have low energy as the primary concern instead of performance. Minimum energy operation for low directly affects energy consumption by changing switched capacitance and leakage current. Sec- ondly

  20. Design Considerations for an On-Demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Timothy X.

    1 Design Considerations for an On-Demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc- demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms for their implementation. We highlight of an 'energy aware' link cache for storing this information. We also compare the performance of an on-demand

  1. Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica and dedicated workplace charging infrastructure in the fleet for minimum life cycle cost or GHG emissions over vehicle and battery costs are the major drivers for PHEVs and BEVs to enter and dominate the cost

  2. Bridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between Business Process Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Bridging the Gap Between Business Process Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and Service of the major reasons for this deficiency is the gap that exists between business process models on the one hand a flexible approach for aligning business process models with workflow specifications. In order to maintain

  3. Beam dynamics of a double-gap acceleration cell for ion implantation with multiple atomic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadlinger, E.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Rusnak, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Saadatmand, K. [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Operation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of our work on ion implantation, we derived equations for the beam dynamics of a two-gap-resonator cavity for accelerating and bunching various ion species of varying energies with the cavity designed for one particular ion species of a given energy (the design-reference particle). A two gap structure is useful at low resonant frequencies where lumped circuit elements (inductors) can be used and the structure kept small. A single gap structure has the advantage that each gap can be independently phased to produce the desired beam dynamics behavior for various ion species and ion energies. However at low frequencies, single gap resonant structures can be large. We find that the two-gap structure, where the phase difference between gaps, for the design reference particle, is fixed at {pi} radians can give acceptable performance provided that the individual two gap cells in the entire accelerator are optimized for the ion species having the largest mass to charge ratio and having the maximum required output energy. Our equations show how to adjust the cavity phases and electric fields to obtain equivalent first-order accelerator performance for various ion species and energies. These equations allow for the effective evaluation of various accelerator concepts and can facilitate the tuning of a linac when changing energies and ion species. Extensive simulations have confirmed the efficacy of our equations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Energy Band-Gap Engineering of Graphene Nanoribbons Melinda Y. Han,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    , New York, New York 10027, USA 2 Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027Energy Band-Gap Engineering of Graphene Nanoribbons Melinda Y. Han,1 Barbaros O¨ zyilmaz,2 Yuanbo an energy gap near the charge neutrality point. Individual graphene layers are contacted with metal

  5. Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Sajeev

    Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells Stephen Foster1,* and Sajeev John1,2 1 demonstrate numerically a 2-D nanostructured design for light trapping in a low band-gap polymer solar cell, "Light harvesting improvement of organic solar cells with self- enhanced active layer designs," Opt

  6. Analyzing the Performance of a Multiobjective GA-P Algorithm for Learning Fuzzy Queries in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Analyzing the Performance of a Multiobjective GA-P Algorithm for Learning Fuzzy Queries in a Machine Learning Environment Oscar Cord´on1 , Enrique Herrera-Viedma1 , Mar´ia Luque1 , F´elix de Moya2- tionary algorithms (EAs) [1], such as genetic algorithm-programming (GA-P) [11] or simulated annealing

  7. MODELING PLANT COMPETITION WITH THE GAPS OBJECT-ORIENTED DYNAMIC SIMULATION MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, D G "David"

    MODELING PLANT COMPETITION WITH THE GAPS OBJECT-ORIENTED DYNAMIC SIMULATION MODEL David G. Rossiter of Agronomy, Inc. #12;MODELING PLANT COMPETITION WITH THE GAPS OBJECT-ORIENTED DYNAMIC SIMULATION MODEL Abstract Modeling inter-species competition is a natural application for dynamic simulation models

  8. Global Minimum Determination of the Born-Oppenheimer Surface within Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goedecker, Stefan; Hellmann, Waldemar; Lenosky, Thomas [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Physics Department, Ohio State University, 1040 Physics Research Building, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States)

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel method, which we refer to as the dual minima hopping method, that allows us to find the global minimum of the potential energy surface (PES) within density functional theory for systems where a fast but less accurate calculation of the PES is possible. This method can rapidly find the ground state configuration of clusters and other complex systems with present day computer power by performing a systematic search. We apply the new method to silicon clusters. Even though these systems have already been extensively studied by other methods, we find new global minimum candidates for Si{sub 16} and Si{sub 19}, as well as new low-lying isomers for Si{sub 16}, Si{sub 17}, and Si{sub 18}.

  9. On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strobel, K; Strobel, Klaus; Weigel, Manfred K.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

  10. On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Strobel; Manfred K. Weigel

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

  11. Communication: Minimum in the thermal conductivity of supercooled water: A computer simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresme, F., E-mail: f.bresme@imperial.ac.uk [Chemical Physics Section, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom and Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Biddle, J. W.; Sengers, J. V.; Anisimov, M. A. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a computer simulation study of the thermodynamic properties and the thermal conductivity of supercooled water as a function of pressure and temperature using the TIP4P-2005 water model. The thermodynamic properties can be represented by a two-structure equation of state consistent with the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the supercooled region. Our simulations confirm the presence of a minimum in the thermal conductivity, not only at atmospheric pressure, as previously found for the TIP5P water model, but also at elevated pressures. This anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity of supercooled water appears to be related to the maximum of the isothermal compressibility or the minimum of the speed of sound. However, the magnitudes of the simulated thermal conductivities are sensitive to the water model adopted and appear to be significantly larger than the experimental thermal conductivities of real water at low temperatures.

  12. A minimum hypothesis explanation for an IMF with a lognormal body and power law tail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu; C. E. Jones

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a minimum hypothesis model for an IMF that resembles a lognormal distribution at low masses but has a distinct power-law tail. Even if the central limit theorem ensures a lognormal distribution of condensation masses at birth, a power-law tail in the distribution arises due to accretion from the ambient cloud, coupled with a non-uniform (exponential) distribution of accretion times.

  13. Feedback control design for smooth, near-minimum time rotational maneuvers of flexible spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byers, Robert Michael

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' Rest ? to-Rest Maneuver LQR Control: 15' Rest ? to-Rest Maneuver Initial Displacement Angle vs. Maneuver Time Minimum Time and LQR Control Control Profiles and Frequency Spectra Smoothing Functions Smooth Feedback Control with Parabolic Switching... is approximated by the hyperbolic tangent (tanh) function. The parabolic switching line associated with the rigid body control is replaced by one which, also using the hyperbolic tangent function, exploits the symmetry of the rigid body state trajectory about...

  14. THINNING OF THE SUN'S MAGNETIC LAYER: THE PECULIAR SOLAR MINIMUM COULD HAVE BEEN PREDICTED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar magnetic activity cycle causes changes in the Sun on timescales that are equivalent to human lifetimes. The minimum solar activity that preceded the current solar cycle (cycle 24) was deeper and quieter than any other recent minimum. Using data from the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON), we show that the structure of the solar sub-surface layers during the descending phase of the preceding cycle (cycle 23) was very different from that during cycle 22. This leads us to believe that a detailed examination of the data would have led to the prediction that the cycle 24 minimum would be out of the ordinary. The behavior of the oscillation frequencies allows us to infer that changes in the Sun that affected the oscillation frequencies in cycle 23 were localized mainly to layers above about 0.996 R{sub Sun }, depths shallower than about 3000 km. In cycle 22, on the other hand, the changes must have also occurred in the deeper-lying layers.

  15. Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more insights into the flare process than the free energy above the potential field state.

  16. Thermal-hydraulic and structural considerations on the gap variation between fuel bundle and hexcan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.K.; Lee, M.J.; Ku, J.Y.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the safety concerns in reactor operation is the temperature of the fuel elements, which are contained in a hexagonal duct, referred to as the hexcan. There are gaps between the fuel bundle and the hexcan, and the gaps somewhat affect thermal-hydraulic behavior of the fuel element. This paper investigates the impact of gap variations on the thermal-hydraulic responses of the fuel element as well as the possibility of fuel bundle and hexcan interaction. The gap variation between hex duct and fuel bundle is caused by differential thermal expansion, creep strain, and irradiation-induced swelling of fuel-cladding and hex duct, and it is a function of fuel burnup. The effects of gap variations on the thermal-hydraulic responses of typical driver subassemblies in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) are investigated. A structural analysis was performed to predict the in-reactor deformation behavior of fuel bundle and hex duct, and followed by a thermal-hydraulic analysis to determine the flow and temperature response due to gap changes. The effects of geometry variation on the thermal-hydraulic response are discussed. The study indicates that the effect of gap variation should not be ignored for subassembly designs.

  17. Thermal-hydraulic and structural considerations on the gap variation between fuel bundle and hexcan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.K.; Lee, M.J.; Ku, J.Y.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the safety concerns in reactor operation is the temperature of the fuel elements, which are contained in a hexagonal duct, referred to as the hexcan. There are gaps between the fuel bundle and the hexcan, and the gaps somewhat affect thermal-hydraulic behavior of the fuel element. This paper investigates the impact of gap variations on the thermal-hydraulic responses of the fuel element as well as the possibility of fuel bundle and hexcan interaction. The gap variation between hex duct and fuel bundle is caused by differential thermal expansion, creep strain, and irradiation-induced swelling of fuel-cladding and hex duct, and it is a function of fuel burnup. The effects of gap variations on the thermal-hydraulic responses of typical driver subassemblies in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) are investigated. A structural analysis was performed to predict the in-reactor deformation behavior of fuel bundle and hex duct, and followed by a thermal-hydraulic analysis to determine the flow and temperature response due to gap changes. The effects of geometry variation on the thermal-hydraulic response are discussed. The study indicates that the effect of gap variation should not be ignored for subassembly designs.

  18. Efficient Computation of Info-Gap Robustness for Finite Element Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, Christopher J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent research effort at LANL proposed info-gap decision theory as a framework by which to measure the predictive maturity of numerical models. Info-gap theory explores the trade-offs between accuracy, that is, the extent to which predictions reproduce the physical measurements, and robustness, that is, the extent to which predictions are insensitive to modeling assumptions. Both accuracy and robustness are necessary to demonstrate predictive maturity. However, conducting an info-gap analysis can present a formidable challenge, from the standpoint of the required computational resources. This is because a robustness function requires the resolution of multiple optimization problems. This report offers an alternative, adjoint methodology to assess the info-gap robustness of Ax = b-like numerical models solved for a solution x. Two situations that can arise in structural analysis and design are briefly described and contextualized within the info-gap decision theory framework. The treatments of the info-gap problems, using the adjoint methodology are outlined in detail, and the latter problem is solved for four separate finite element models. As compared to statistical sampling, the proposed methodology offers highly accurate approximations of info-gap robustness functions for the finite element models considered in the report, at a small fraction of the computational cost. It is noted that this report considers only linear systems; a natural follow-on study would extend the methodologies described herein to include nonlinear systems.

  19. Design, conditioning, and performance of a high voltage, high brightness dc photoelectron gun with variable gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxson, Jared; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Dobbins, John; Liu, Xianghong; Smolenski, Karl [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high voltage photoemission gun has been constructed at Cornell University which features a segmented insulator and a movable anode, allowing the cathode-anode gap to be adjusted. In this work, we describe the gun's overall mechanical and high voltage design, the surface preparation of components, as well as the clean construction methods. We present high voltage conditioning data using a 50 mm cathode-anode gap, in which the conditioning voltage exceeds 500 kV, as well as at smaller gaps. Finally, we present simulated emittance results obtained from a genetic optimization scheme using voltage values based on the conditioning data. These results indicate that for charges up to 100 pC, a 30 mm gap at 400 kV has equal or smaller 100% emittance than a 50 mm gap at 450 kV, and also a smaller core emittance, when placed as the source for the Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector with bunch length constrained to be <3 ps rms. For 100 pC up to 0.5 nC charges, the 50 mm gap has larger core emittance than the 30 mm gap, but conversely smaller 100% emittance.

  20. Thin plate gap bridging study for Nd:YAG pulsed laser lap welds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Robert Allen; Fuerschbach, Phillip William; Bernal, John E.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an on going study of gap bridging for thin plate Nd:YAG laser lap welds, empirical data, high speed imaging, and computer modeling were utilized to better understand surface physics attributed to the formation and solidification of a weld pool. Experimental data indicates better gap bridging can be achieved through optimized laser parameters such as pulse length, duration, and energy. Long pulse durations at low energies generating low peak powers were found to create the highest percent of gap bridging ability. At constant peak power, gap-bridging ability was further improved by using a smaller spot diameter resulting in higher irradiances. Hence, welding in focus is preferable for bridging gaps. Gas shielding was also found to greatly impact gap-bridging ability. Gapped lap welds that could not be bridged with UHP Argon gas shielding, were easily bridged when left unshielded and exposed to only air. Incident weld angle and joint offset were also investigated for their ability to improve gap bridging. Optical filters and brightlight surface illumination enabled high-speed imaging to capture the fluid dynamics of a forming and solidifying weld pool. The effects of various laser parameters and the weld pool's interaction with the laser beam could also be observed utilizing the high-speed imaging. The work described is used to develop and validate a computer model with improved weld pool physics. Finite element models have been used to derive insight into the physics of gap bridging. The dynamics of the fluid motion within the weld pool in conjunction with the free surface physics have been the primary focus of the modeling efforts. Surface tension has been found to be a more significant factor in determining final weld pool shape than expected.

  1. Defect assistant band alignment transition from staggered to broken gap in mixed As/Sb tunnel field effect transistor heterostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    .3As heterointerface. As a result, the band alignment was converted from staggered gap to broken gap-to-source voltage, VGS. As the SS of a MOSFET is governed by the transport mechanism of thermionic-emission over

  2. Electrochemical Waves on Patterned Surfaces: Propagation through Narrow Gaps and Konstantin Agladze, Stephanie Thouvenel-Romans, and Oliver Steinbock*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Electrochemical Waves on Patterned Surfaces: Propagation through Narrow Gaps and Channels propagation through narrow gaps and long channels. In channels, the wave velocity decreases with decreasing dynamically similar phenomena such as propagating fronts, target patterns, and rotating spiral waves. Pattern

  3. On the entropy devil's staircase in a family of gap-tent maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Zyczkowski; Erik M. Bollt

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze dynamical properties of a "gap-tent map" - a family of 1D maps with a symmetric gap, which mimics the presence of noise in physical realizations of chaotic systems. We demonstrate that the dependence of the topological entropy on the size of the gap has a structure of the devil's staircase. By integrating over a fractal measure, we obtain analytical, piece-wise differentiable approximations of this dependence. Applying concepts of the kneading theory we find the position and the values of the entropy for all leading entropy plateaus. Similar properties hold also for the dependence of the fractal dimension of the invariant set and the escape rate.

  4. Theorem on the existence of a nonzero energy gap in adiabatic quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da-Jian Zhang; Xiao-Dong Yu; D. M. Tong

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Adiabatic quantum computation, based on the adiabatic theorem, is a promising alternative to conventional quantum computation. The validity of an adiabatic algorithm depends on the existence of a nonzero energy gap between the ground and excited states. However, it is difficult to ascertain the exact value of the energy gap. In this paper, we put forward a theorem on the existence of nonzero energy gap for the Hamiltonians used in adiabatic quantum computation. It can help to effectively identify a large class of the Hamiltonians without energy-level crossing between the ground and excited states.

  5. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

  6. GAP-independent termination of photoreceptor light response by excess gamma subunit of the cGMP-phosphodiesterase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of photoreceptor signal termination. Invest Oph- thalmol VisMolecular GAP-Independent Termination of Photoreceptor Light

  7. The microscopic pairing gap in a slab of nuclear matter for the Argonne v18 NN-potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Pankratov; M. Baldo; U. Lombardo; E. E. Saperstein; M. V. Zverev; ;

    2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ab initio gap equation for ^1S_0 pairing in a nuclear slab is solved for the Argonne v18 NN-potential. The gap function is compared in detail with the one found previously for the separable form of the Paris potential. The difference between the two gaps turned out to be about 10%. Dependence of the gap on the chemical potential mu is analyzed.

  8. Fact #837: September 8, 2014 Gap between Net Imports and Total Imports of Petroleum is Widening – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #837: Gap between Net Imports and Total Imports of Petroleum is Widening

  9. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H. [Department of Physics and the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF GRADED BAND GAP CdHgTe SOLAR CELLS A. BOUAZZI (*), Y. MARFAING and J. MIMILA-ARROYO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    145 OPTIMIZATION OF GRADED BAND GAP CdHgTe SOLAR CELLS A. BOUAZZI (*), Y. MARFAING and J. MIMILA and an n-type CdHgTe alloy of uniform band gap as the base region. The optimization of solar energy conversion is conducted with respect to two constitutive para- meters : the gradient of the band gap

  11. Correlation in fermion or boson systems as the minimum of entropy relative to all free states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex D. Gottlieb; Norbert J. Mauser

    2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of many-fermion systems, "correlation" refers to the inadequacy of an independent-particle model. Using "free" states as archetypes of our independent-particle model, we have proposed a measure of correlation that we called "nonfreeness" [Int. J. Quant. Inf. 5, 815 (2007)]. The nonfreeness of a many-fermion state was defined to be its entropy relative to the unique free state with the same 1-matrix. In this article, we prove that the nonfreeness of a state is the minimum of its entropy relative to all free states. We also extend the definition of nonfreeness to many-boson states and discuss a couple of examples.

  12. The secondary minimum in YY Her: Evidence for a tidally distorted giant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mikolajewska; E. A. Kolotilov; S. Yu. Shugarov; B. F. Yudin

    2002-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and analyze quiescent UBVRI light curves of the classical symbiotic binary YY Her. We show that the secondary minimum, which is clearly visible only in the quiescent VRI light curves, is due to ellipsoidal variability of the red giant component. Our simple light curve analysis, by fitting of the Fourier cosine series, resulted in a self-consistent phenomenological model of YY Her, in which the periodic changes can be described by a combination of the ellipsoidal changes and a sinusoidal changes of the nebular continuum and line emission.

  13. A Mandated Minimum Competency Testing Program and Its Impact on Learning Disabled Students: Curricular Validity and Comparative Performances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyen, Edward L.; Alley, Gordon R.; Scannell, Dale P.; Harnden, G. Mack; Miller, Kelly F.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, LD specialists, regular class teachers, and parents of LD students judged that the objectives of the Kansas Minimum Competency Specifications prescribed for nonhandicapped students were applicable to LD ...

  14. Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Marcia Donna

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale completions of the type which have been widely utilized since 2004. There is insufficient production history from real wells to determine an appropriate minimum terminal decline rate. In the absence of suitable analogs for the determination...

  15. Diversity and Spatial Distribution of Hydrazine Oxidoreductase (hzo) Gene in the Oxygen Minimum Zone Off Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Liangliang

    Anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) as an important nitrogen loss pathway has been reported in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), but the community composition and spatial distribution of anammox bacteria in the eastern ...

  16. Direct gap photoluminescence of n-type tensile-strained Ge-on-Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaochen

    Room temperature direct gap photoluminescence (PL) was observed from n-type tensile-strained epitaxial Ge-on-Si. The PL intensity increases with n-type doping due to a higher electron population in the direct ? valley as ...

  17. Large inherent optical gain from the direct gap transition of Ge thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoxin

    The recent demonstration of Ge-on-Si diode lasers renews the interest in the unique carrier dynamics of Ge involving both direct (?) and indirect (L) valleys. Here, we report a large inherent direct gap optical gain ...

  18. Codes and Standards Gap Analysis Helps DOE Define Research Priorities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing gaps in codes and standards for alternative vehicle fuels, including hydrogen. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  19. Aerodynamic drag reduction apparatus for gap-divided bluff bodies such as tractor-trailers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Salari, Kambiz (Livermore, CA)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a bluff-bodied vehicle such as a tractor-trailer in a flowstream, the bluff-bodied vehicle of a type having a leading portion, a trailing portion connected to the leading portion, and a gap between the leading and trailing portions defining a recirculation zone. The apparatus is preferably a baffle assembly, such as a vertical panel, adapted to span a width of the gap between the leading and trailing portions so as to impede cross-flow through the gap, with the span of the baffle assembly automatically adjusting for variations in the gap width when the leading and trailing portions pivot relative to each other.

  20. Band gap and electronic structure of MgSiN{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quirk, J. B., E-mail: james.quirk09@imperial.ac.uk; Råsander, M.; McGilvery, C. M.; Moram, M. A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Palgrave, R. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, Gordon Street WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Density functional theory calculations and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that the electronic structure of ordered orthorhombic MgSiN{sub 2} is similar to that of wurtzite AlN. A band gap of 5.7?eV was calculated for both MgSiN{sub 2} (indirect) and AlN (direct) using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof approximation. Correction with respect to the experimental room-temperature band gap of AlN indicates that the true band gap of MgSiN{sub 2} is 6.2?eV. MgSiN{sub 2} has an additional direct gap of 6.3?eV at the ? point.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - atlas thin gap Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Result of Global Commissioning of the ATALS Endcap Muon Trigger System in ATLAS Cavern Summary: on the ATLAS commissioning run from the view point of the Thin Gap Chamber...

  2. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report details technical and cost gap analyses of molten carbonate fuel cell and phosphoric acid fuel cell stationary fuel cell power plants and identifies pathways for reducing costs.

  3. A novel white-light scanning interferometer for absolute nano-scale gap thickness measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhiguang

    This paper presents a special configuration of white-light scanning interferometer, in which the measured gap is not located in any interference arm of the interferometer, but acts as an amplitude-and-phase modulator of ...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - auditory gap detection Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sample search results for: auditory gap detection Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Exp Brain Res (2005) 162: 172180 DOI 10.1007s00221-004-2128-2 Summary: what you hear: auditory...

  5. Photonic band gap of a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yuancheng [Ames Laboratory; Wei, Zeyong [Tongji University; Li, Hongqiang [Tongji University; Chen, Hong [Tongji University; Soukoulis, Costas M [Ames Laboratory

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we present a mechanism for tailoring the photonic band structure of a quarter-wave stack without changing its physical periods by embedding conductive sheets. Graphene is utilized and studied as a realistic, two-dimensional conductive sheet. In a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack, the synergic actions of Bragg scattering and graphene conductance contributions open photonic gaps at the center of the reduced Brillouin zone that are nonexistent in conventional quarter-wave stacks. Such photonic gaps show giant, loss-independent density of optical states at the fixed lower-gap edges, of even-multiple characteristic frequency of the quarter-wave stack. The conductive sheet-induced photonic gaps provide a platform for the enhancement of light-matter interactions.

  6. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs—Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, D. H.; Conway, T. J.; Vanderhorst, Jr, T. J.; Januszewski, III, J.; Leo, R.; Perman, K.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a summarization of the report, Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs, the final report for phase 2 of the SPSP (DOE workforce study) project.

  7. Procedures for Filling Short Gaps in Energy Use and Weather Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Claridge, D. E.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Filling short gaps (a few hours) in hourly energy use and weather data can be useful for (i) retrofit savings analysis and calculation, and for (ii) diagnostic purposes. The paper evaluates four methods for rehabilitating short periods of missing...

  8. Tunable frequency band-gap and pulse propagation in a strongly nonlinear diatomic chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. B. Herbold; J. Kim; V. F. Nesterenko; S. Wang; C. Daraio

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional nonlinear phononic crystals have been assembled from periodic diatomic chains of stainless steel cylinders alternated with Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) spheres. We report the presence of acoustic band gaps in the dispersion relation of the linearized systems and study the transformation of single and multiple pulses in linear, nonlinear and strongly nonlinear regimes with numerical calculations and experiments. The limiting frequencies of the band gap are within the audible frequency range (20-20,000 Hz) and can be tuned by varying the particle's material properties, mass and initial compression. Pulses rapidly transform within very short distances from the impacted end due to the influence of the band gap in the linear and in nonlinear elastic chains. The effects of an in situ band gap created by a mean dynamic compression are observed in the strongly nonlinear wave regime.

  9. Calculation of wakefields in a 17 GHz beam-driven photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Min

    We present the theoretical analysis and computer simulation of the wakefields in a 17 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) structure for accelerator applications. Using the commercial code CST Particle Studio, the fundamental ...

  10. Extended variational approach to the SU(2) mass gap on the lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akeyo, J.O. (Physics Department, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844, Nairobi, Kenya (Kenya)); Jones, H.F.; Parker, C.S. (Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear [delta] expansion is applied to a calculation of the SU(2) mass gap on the lattice. Our results compare favorably with the strong-coupling expansion and are in good agreement with recent Monte Carlo estimates.

  11. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - air gaps size Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ; Biology and Medicine 4 Abstract--This paper presents a model of large air gap transformer composed of two E cores. Approach is based on the Summary: are sufficient to allow...

  13. Thermophotovoltaic conversion using selective infrared line emitters and large band gap photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandhorst, Jr., Henry W. (Auburn, AL); Chen, Zheng (Auburn, AL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient thermophotovoltaic conversion can be performed using photovoltaic devices with a band gap in the 0.75-1.4 electron volt range, and selective infrared emitters chosen from among the rare earth oxides which are thermally stimulated to emit infrared radiation whose energy very largely corresponds to the aforementioned band gap. It is possible to use thermovoltaic devices operating at relatively high temperatures, up to about 300.degree. C., without seriously impairing the efficiency of energy conversion.

  14. Apparatus and method for closed-loop control of reactor power in minimum time

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Jr., John A. (72 Paul Revere Rd., Needham Heights, MA 02194)

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed-loop control law for altering the power level of nuclear reactors in a safe manner and without overshoot and in minimum time. Apparatus is provided for moving a fast-acting control element such as a control rod or a control drum for altering the nuclear reactor power level. A computer computes at short time intervals either the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e '.rho.-.SIGMA..beta..sub.i (.lambda..sub.i -.lambda..sub.e ')+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e '.omega.] or the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e .rho.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e)(.beta.-.rho.)+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e .omega.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e).omega.] These functions each specify the rate of change of reactivity that is necessary to achieve a specified rate of change of reactor power. The direction and speed of motion of the control element is altered so as to provide the rate of reactivity change calculated using either or both of these functions thereby resulting in the attainment of a new power level without overshoot and in minimum time. These functions are computed at intervals of approximately 0.01-1.0 seconds depending on the specific application.

  15. Pecularities of cosmic ray modulation in the solar minimum 23/24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study changes of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for the ending period of the solar cycle 23 and the beginning of the solar cycle 24 using neutron monitors experimental data. We show that an increase of the GCR intensity in 2009 is generally related with decrease of the solar wind velocity U, the strength B of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and the drift in negative (Aneg) polarity epoch. We present that temporal changes of rigidity dependence of the GCR intensity variation before reaching maximum level in 2009 and after it, do not noticeably differ from each other. The rigidity spectrum of the GCR intensity variations calculated based on neutron monitors data (for rigidities greaten than 10 GV) is hard in the minimum and near minimum epoch. We do not recognize any non-ordinary changes in the physical mechanism of modulation of the GCR intensity in the rigidity range of GCR particles to which neutron monitors respond. We compose 2-D non stationary model of transport equation to describe v...

  16. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Standards and Rebate Incentive Programs for Domestic Refrigerators in the Pacific Northwest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Howard S.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refrigerator-freezers (R/Fs) and freezers (FRs) account for 16% of the electricity consumed in the residential sector of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) forecast region (Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Western Montana). After space and water heating, R/Fs are the largest residential electrical end-use. There is great potential for reducing electricity consumption in a cost-effective manner through the purchase and use of more energy-efficient R/Fs and FRs. For example, if every household in the BPA region had the best R/F model now mass-produced, the electricity savings would be about 5 billion kWh/yr, approximately the power supplied annually by 1000 MW of nuclear or coal-fired generating capacity. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and BPA recognize the savings potential from efficient R/Fs and FRs as well as the barriers to their use. In the 1983 regional power plan, the Council directed BPA to develop and implement incentive and promotion programs for efficient appliances. The NPPC also called for the evaluation of minimum efficiency standards for appliances sold in the region. In response to this directive, the Office of Conservation in BPA funded an evaluation of both rebate incentive programs and minimum efficiency standards for R/Fs and FRs. The results are presented in this report.

  17. TBC-Domain GAPs for Rab GTPases Accelerate GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Finger Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan,X.; Eathiraj, S.; Lambright, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rab GTPases regulate membrane trafficking by cycling between inactive (GDP-bound) and active (GTP-bound) conformations. The duration of the active state is limited by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which accelerate the slow intrinsic rate of GTP hydrolysis. Proteins containing TBC (Tre-2, Bub2 and Cdc16) domains are broadly conserved in eukaryotic organisms and function as GAPs for Rab GTPases as well as GTPases that control cytokinesis. An exposed arginine residue is a critical determinant of GAP activity in vitro and in vivo. It has been expected that the catalytic mechanism of TBC domains would parallel that of Ras and Rho family GAPs. Here we report crystallographic, mutational and functional analyses of complexes between Rab GTPases and the TBC domain of Gyp1p. In the crystal structure of a TBC-domain-Rab-GTPase-aluminium fluoride complex, which approximates the transition-state intermediate for GTP hydrolysis, the TBC domain supplies two catalytic residues in trans, an arginine finger analogous to Ras/Rho family GAPs and a glutamine finger that substitutes for the glutamine in the DxxGQ motif of the GTPase. The glutamine from the Rab GTPase does not stabilize the transition state as expected but instead interacts with the TBC domain. Strong conservation of both catalytic fingers indicates that most TBC-domain GAPs may accelerate GTP hydrolysis by a similar dual-finger mechanism.

  18. On the gap-opening criterion of migrating planets in protoplanetary disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Matej; Mayer, Lucio; Meyer, Michael R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to quantitatively explore the torque balance criterion for gap-opening (as formulated by Crida et al. 2006) in a variety of disks when considering a migrating planet. We find that even when the criterion is satisfied, there are instances when planets still do not open gaps. We stress that gap-opening is not only dependent on whether a planet has the ability to open a gap, but whether it can do so quickly enough. This can be expressed as an additional condition on the gap-opening timescale versus the crossing time, i.e. the time it takes the planet to cross the region which it is carving out. While this point has been briefly made in the previous literature, our results quantify it for a range of protoplanetary disk properties and planetary masses, demonstrating how crucial it is for gap-opening. This additional condition has important implications for the survival of planets formed by core accretion in low mass disks as well as giant planets or brown dwarf...

  19. Dust Filtration by Planet-Induced Gap Edges: Implications for Transitional Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Dong, Ruobing; Espaillat, Catherine; Hartmann, Lee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By carrying out two-dimensional two-fluid global simulations, we have studied the response of dust to gap formation by a single planet in the gaseous component of a protoplanetary disk - the so-called "dust filtration" mechanism. We have found that a gap opened by a giant planet at 20 AU in a \\alpha=0.01, \\dot{M}=10^{-8} Msun/yr disk can effectively stop dust particles larger than 0.1 mm drifting inwards, leaving a sub-millimeter dust cavity/hole. However, smaller particles are difficult to filter by a planet-induced gap due to 1) dust diffusion, and 2) a high gas accretion velocity at the gap edge. An analytic model is also derived to understand what size particles can be filtered by the gap edge. Finally, with our updated understanding of dust filtration, we have computed Monte-Carlo radiative transfer models with variable dust size distributions to generate the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of disks with gaps. By comparing with transitional disk observations (e.g. GM Aur), we have found that dust fi...

  20. Fundamental gaps with approximate density functionals: The derivative discontinuity revealed from ensemble considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraisler, Eli; Kronik, Leeor [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth 76100 (Israel)] [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth 76100 (Israel)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental gap is a central quantity in the electronic structure of matter. Unfortunately, the fundamental gap is not generally equal to the Kohn-Sham gap of density functional theory (DFT), even in principle. The two gaps differ precisely by the derivative discontinuity, namely, an abrupt change in slope of the exchange-correlation energy as a function of electron number, expected across an integer-electron point. Popular approximate functionals are thought to be devoid of a derivative discontinuity, strongly compromising their performance for prediction of spectroscopic properties. Here we show that, in fact, all exchange-correlation functionals possess a derivative discontinuity, which arises naturally from the application of ensemble considerations within DFT, without any empiricism. This derivative discontinuity can be expressed in closed form using only quantities obtained in the course of a standard DFT calculation of the neutral system. For small, finite systems, addition of this derivative discontinuity indeed results in a greatly improved prediction for the fundamental gap, even when based on the most simple approximate exchange-correlation density functional – the local density approximation (LDA). For solids, the same scheme is exact in principle, but when applied to LDA it results in a vanishing derivative discontinuity correction. This failure is shown to be directly related to the failure of LDA in predicting fundamental gaps from total energy differences in extended systems.

  1. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

  2. Geology of the Wallula Gap Area, Washington. [Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains basalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, J.N.; Snow, M.G.; Fecht, K.R.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on the structure and stratigraphy of an 80-km/sup 2/ area at the southern margin of the Pasco Basin in Wallula Gap. Field stratigraphy, petrography, natural remanent magnetism, and major-element chemistry indicate that the tholeiitic basalt flows of the Wallula Gap area correlate with units of the Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains Formations of the Yakima Subgroup of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Flows of the Frenchman Springs, Umatilla, Pomona, Elephant Mountain, and Ice Harbor Mmebers are present in the area. The Frenchman Springs Member exposed in the Wallula Gap is more than 185 m thick and consists of eight to nine flows. Its thickness and possible contemporaneous structural deformation apparently prevented emplacement of both the Roza and Priest Rapids Members at this locality. Structural uplift of the Horse Heaven Hills began prior to extrusion of the Pomona flow. Both the Pomona and Elephant Mountain Members thin and pinch out over the crest of the uplift near Mound Pond. The Ice Harbor flow was apparently confined to the basin north of the Horse Heaven uplift, but an exposure at Mound Pond suggests it flowed through Wallula Gap as an intracanyon flow. The Wallula Gap fault zone trends N65/sup 0/W and can be traced for at least 11 km along the north flank of the Horse Heaven Hills uplift. Where the fault intersects the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament at Van Sycle Canyon 8 km east of Wallula Gap, it is a broad zone of normal faulting, 300 m wide, with as much as 310 m of displacement of the basalt stratigraphy. Two faults occur in the northern portion of Van Sycle Canyon and define a graben trending N45/sup 0/W. A third fault, roughly parallel to the Wallula Gap fault, transects the The Nub and offsets 14 m of Ice Harbor basalt.

  3. Effect of gaps on the performance of the vertically installed wet thermal insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. I.; Park, C. T.; Choi, S.; Yoon, J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk-daero 989-111, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In SMART, the main flow path of the reactor coolant and the pressurizer partially share common walls in the reactor coolant system. To reduce this heat transfer, the wet thermal insulator (WTI) is installed on the inner wall of the pressurizer. The WTI is constituted of stacked thin stainless steel plates. The water layer width between the plates is chosen to suppress natural convection in each layer. The plates of the WTI require clearance for thermal expansion. When the WTI is installed on a vertical wall, this clearance might cause gaps at the top and bottom at the operating condition. In this study, we focused on the effect of gaps at the both ends on the WTI performance. A numerical simulation was conducted for an 8-layer WTI with gaps at the both ends. To compare with this, a simulation of a WTI without a gap, which is an ideal case, was also conducted. The simulation was conducted in a 2-dimensional manner by a commercial computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT. The simulations showed that the WTI thermal performance was substantially decreased by a flow that circulated through the top and bottom gaps and water layers at the sides of the WTI. This circulation caused a high temperature difference between the wall and the circulating flow. To find a way to prevent this performance deterioration of the WTI we simulated several cases with the smaller gap heights. However, the flow circulation and the higher heat transfer rate were still observed even at a case with the smallest gap, which seems to be hardly achievable in a real installation. Another way of reducing the flow circulation was suggested and also simulated in this study. (authors)

  4. Avian response to microclimate in canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Gumpertz, Marcia L.; Moorman, Christopher E.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - Microclimate may infl uence use of early successional habitat by birds. We assessed the relationships between avian habitat use and microclimate (temperature, light intensity, and relative humidity) in experimentally created canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest on the Savannah River Site, SC. Gaps were 2- to 3-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted from spring through fall, encompassing four bird-use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration), in 2002 and 2003. We used mist netting and simultaneously recorded microclimate variables to determine the influence of microclimate on bird habitat use. Microclimate was strongly affected by net location within canopy gaps in both years. Temperature generally was higher on the west side of gaps, light intensity was greater in gap centers, and relative humidity was higher on the east side of gaps. However, we found few relationships between bird captures and the microclimate variables. Bird captures were inversely correlated with temperature during the breeding and postbreeding periods in 2002 and positively correlated with temperature during spring 2003. Captures were high where humidity was high during post-breeding 2002, and captures were low where humidity was high during spring 2003. We conclude that variations in the local microclimate had minor infl uence on avian habitat use within gaps. Instead, habitat selection in relatively mild regions like the southeastern US is based primarily on vegetation structure, while other factors, including microclimate, are less important.

  5. ANALYSIS OF THE AXIAL GAP VS FIBERBOARD MOISTURE CONTENT IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiberboard assembly within a 9975 shipping package contains a modest amount of moisture, which can migrate to the cooler regions of the package when an internal heat load is present. Typically, this leads to increased moisture levels in the bottom fiberboard layers, along with elevated chloride levels which can leach from the fiberboard. Concerns have been raised that this condition could lead to corrosion of the stainless steel drum. It has been postulated that checking the axial gap at the top of the package against the current 1 inch maximum criterion provides a sufficient indication regarding the integrity of the fiberboard and drum. This report estimates the increase in axial gap that might be expected for a given moisture increase in the bottom fiberboard layers, and the likelihood that the increase will create a nonconforming condition that will lead to identification of the moisture increase. Using data relating the fiberboard moisture content with the degree of compaction under load, the present analysis indicates that the axial gap will increase by 0.282 inch as the bottom fiberboard layers approach the saturation point. This increase will cause approximately 58% of packages with otherwise nominal package component dimensions to fail the axial gap criterion, based on a survey of axial gap values recorded in K-Area surveillance activities. As the moisture content increases above saturation, the predicted increase in axial gap jumps to 0.405 inch, which would result in 92% or more of all packages failing the axial gap criterion. The data and analysis described in this report are specific to cane fiberboard. While it is expected that softwood fiberboard will behave similarly, such behavior has not yet been demonstrated.

  6. Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bouchiat

    2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

  7. The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States); Stawarz, Joshua E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Forman, Miriam A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

  8. The effects of R/X ratios on power system minimum loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denison, John Scott

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 8 ]0 19 ' B+]40?5 Approx. 1/2 X17 Angle (degrees) I R TOTAL I X I Z I R IX IZ PZR CZ, NT LOSS ' 2?5 5 ' 0 -7 ' 5 -10 -15 2. 88 5 43 2 ' 09 2. 00 2. 54 3 ' 43 6. 69 0 ' 91 2 ~ 51 O. o3 0. 97 1. 96 3 ' 17 7 ?14 2 ~ 98 5. 99... 2. 18 2?22 3 ' 20 4. 67 9. 76 148. 0 278. 0 107. 1 103. 0 130 5 176. 0 343 ' o 144?4 139. 0 398 ' 0 278. 5 700, 5 101. 3 154 ' 0 103 ' 2 311 ~ 5 14. 9 ~ 0 504?0 216?5 1033. 0 455. 0 kt minimum point, ths system I R loss is 7. 3...

  9. On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih, E-mail: giorgio.busoni@sissa.it, E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it, E-mail: wei-chih.huang@sissa.it [SISSA and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

  10. Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrick, Todd

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency in drilling is measured by Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE). MSE is the measure of the amount of energy input required to remove a unit volume of rock, expressed in units of energy input divided by volume removed. It can be expressed mathematically in terms of controllable parameters; Weight on Bit, Torque, Rate of Penetration, and RPM. It is well documented that minimizing MSE by optimizing controllable factors results in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to minimize MSE in the field only through a trial-and-error process. This work makes it possible to compute the optimum drilling parameters that result in minimum MSE. The parameters that have been traditionally used to compute MSE are interdependent. Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional MSE equation was rewritten in terms of a single parameter, Weight on Bit, establishing a form that can be minimized mathematically. Once the optimum Weight on Bit was determined, the interdependent relationship that Weight on Bit has with Torque and Penetration per Revolution was used to determine optimum values for those parameters for a given drilling situation. The improved method was validated through laboratory experimentation and analysis of published data. Two rock types were subjected to four treatments each, and drilled in a controlled laboratory environment. The method was applied in each case, and the optimum parameters for minimum MSE were computed. The method demonstrated an accurate means to determine optimum drilling parameters of Weight on Bit, Torque, and Penetration per Revolution. A unique application of micro-cracking is also presented, which demonstrates that rock failure ahead of the bit is related to axial force more than to rotation speed.

  11. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

  12. Band gap engineering for graphene by using Na{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, S. J.; Lee, P. R.; Kim, J. G.; Ryu, M. T.; Park, H. M.; Chung, J. W., E-mail: jwc@postech.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the noble electronic properties of graphene, its industrial application has been hindered mainly by the absence of a stable means of producing a band gap at the Dirac point (DP). We report a new route to open a band gap (E{sub g}) at DP in a controlled way by depositing positively charged Na{sup +} ions on single layer graphene formed on 6H-SiC(0001) surface. The doping of low energy Na{sup +} ions is found to deplete the ?* band of graphene above the DP, and simultaneously shift the DP downward away from Fermi energy indicating the opening of E{sub g}. The band gap increases with increasing Na{sup +} coverage with a maximum E{sub g}?0.70?eV. Our core-level data, C 1s, Na 2p, and Si 2p, consistently suggest that Na{sup +} ions do not intercalate through graphene, but produce a significant charge asymmetry among the carbon atoms of graphene to cause the opening of a band gap. We thus provide a reliable way of producing and tuning the band gap of graphene by using Na{sup +} ions, which may play a vital role in utilizing graphene in future nano-electronic devices.

  13. Large interface diffusion in endotaxial growth of MnP films on GaP substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nateghi, N., E-mail: seyyed-nima.nateghi@polymtl.ca; Ménard, D.; Masut, R. A. [Regroupement québécoise sur les matériaux de pointe (RQMP), Département de Génie Physique, Polytechnique Montréal, C.P. 6079, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The metal organic vapor deposition of MnP films on GaP (100) substrates is shown to have a substantial endotaxial component. A study of the growth time evolution of the endotaxial depths of MnP grains reveals a diffusion-controlled growth with a relatively large diffusion coefficient of Mn in GaP. The value (2.2?±?1.5)?×?10{sup ?15} (cm{sup 2}/s) obtained at 650?°C is at least two orders of magnitude larger than the reported Mn diffusion in bulk GaP. GaP surface mounds provide further indirect evidence that this large diffusion coefficient is concurrent with the out-diffusion of Ga atoms at the growing MnP/GaP interface. No trace of dislocations could be observed at or near this interface, which strongly suggests that Mn diffusion occurs through vacant sites generated by the difference between the crystallographic structures of MnP and GaP.

  14. Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter - GAP - aboard the Small Solar Power Sail Demonstrator IKAROS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonetoku, D; Gunji, S; Mihara, T; Sakashita, T; Morihara, Y; Kikuchi, Y; Fujimoto, H; Toukairin, N; Kodama, Y; Kubo, S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The small solar power sail demonstrator "IKAROS" is a Japanese engineering verification spacecraft launched by H-IIA rocket on May 21, 2010 at JAXA Tanegashima Space Center. IKAROS has a huge sail with 20 m in diameter which is made of thin polyimide membrane. This sail converts the solar radiation-pressure into the propulsion force of IKAROS and accelerates the spacecraft. The Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter (GAP) aboard IKAROS is the first polarimeter to observe the gamma-ray polarization of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) during the IKAROS cruising phase. GAP is a tinny detector of 3.8 kg in weight and 17 cm in size with an energy range between 50-300 keV. The GAP detector also plays a role of the interplanetary network (IPN) to determine the GRB direction. The detection principle of gamma-ray polarization is the anisotropy of the Compton scattering. GAP works as the GRB polarimeter with the full coincidence mode between the central plastic and the surrounding CsI detectors. GAP is the first instrument, devoted for th...

  15. Designing double-gap linear accelerators for a wide mass range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysenko, W.P.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Rusnak, B.; Krawczyk, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Saadatmand, K.; Wan, Z. [Eaton Corp., Beverly, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For applications like ion implantation, rf linacs using double-gap structures with external resonators can be used because they are practical at low frequencies. However, since the two gaps associated with a given resonator cannot be individually phased, it is not obvious how to build a linac that can efficiently accelerate particles having different mass/charge ratios. This paper describes the beam dynamics of double-gap rf linacs and shows how to maximize the range of mass/charge ratios. The theory also tells one how to rescale a linac tune (i.e., reset the voltages and phases) so that a new particle, having a different mass or charge, will behave similarly to the original particle.

  16. Microwave band gap and cavity mode in spoof-insulator-spoof waveguide with multiscale structured surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qiang; Han, Dezhuan; Qin, Fei Fei; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yao, Yong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a multiscale spoof-insulator-spoof (SIS) waveguide by introducing periodic geometry modulation in the wavelength scale to a SIS waveguide made of perfect electric conductor. The MSIS consists of multiple SIS subcells. The dispersion relationship of the fundamental guided mode of the spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) is studied analytically within the small gap approximation. It is shown that the multiscale SIS possesses microwave band gap (MBG) due to the Bragg scattering. The "gap maps" in the design parameter space are provided. We demonstrate that the geometry of the subcells can efficiently adjust the effective refraction index of the elementary SIS and therefore further control the width and the position of the MBG. The results are in good agreement with numerical calculations by the finite element method (FEM). For finite-sized MSIS of given geometry in the millimeter scale, FEM calculations show that the first-order symmetric SSPP mode has zero transmission in the MBG within frequency...

  17. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Sandhya (Bloomington, MN); Tuttle, Gary L. (Ames, IA); Sigalas, Mihail (Ames, IA); McCalmont, Jonathan S. (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  18. Calmodulin Kinase Pathway Mediates the K ?-Induced Increase in Gap Junctional Communication between Mouse Spinal Cord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mara H. De Pina-benabou; Miduturu Srinivas; David C. Spray; Eliana Scemes

    Astrocytes are coupled to one another by gap junction channels that allow the diffusion of ions and small molecules throughout the interconnected syncytium. In astrocytes, gap junctions are believed to participate in spatial buffering removing the focal excess of potassium resultant from intense neuronal activity by current loops through the syncytium and are also implicated in the propagation of astrocytic calcium waves, a form of extraneuronal signaling. Gap junctions can be modulated by several factors, including elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. Because K ? elevation is a component of spinal cord injury, we evaluated the extent to which cultured spinal cord astrocytes is affected by K ? levels and obtained evidence suggesting that a Ca 2 ? –calmodulin (CaM) protein kinase is involved in the K ?-induced increased coupling. Exposure of astrocytes to high K ? solutions induced a

  19. One-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structures formed by discharge plasmas in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Simonchik, L. V., E-mail: l.simonchik@dragon.bas-net.by; Usachonak, M. S. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics of the NAS of Belarus, Ave. Nezavisimostsi 68, 220072 Minsk (Belarus); Callegari, Th.; Sokoloff, J. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE, Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the ability to develop one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure in X-band waveguide solely by using the positive columns of glow discharges in neon at the middle pressure. Plasma inhomogeneities are distributed uniformly along a typical X-band waveguide with cross section of 23?×?10?mm{sup 2}. It is shown that electron densities larger than 10{sup 14?}cm{sup ?3} are needed in order to create an effective one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure. Some applications for using the one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure in waveguide as a control of microwave (broadband filter and device for variation of pulse duration) are demonstrated.

  20. Vaidya Solution in General Covariant Ho?ava-Lifshitz Gravity with the Minimum Coupling and without Projectability: Infrared Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Goldoni; M. F. A. da Silva; R. Chan; G. Pinheiro

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have studied nonstationary radiative spherically symmetric spacetime, in general covariant theory ($U(1)$ extension) of {the} Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity with the minimum coupling, in the post-newtonian approximation (PPN), without the projectability condition and in the infrared limit. The Newtonian prepotential $\\varphi$ was assumed null. We have shown that there is not the analogue of the Vaidya's solution in the Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz Theory (HLT) with the minimum coupling, as we know in the General Relativity Theory (GRT).

  1. Two color laser fields for studying the Cooper minimum with phase-matched high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ba Dinh, Khuong, E-mail: kdinh@swin.edu.au; Vu Le, Hoang; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science and Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Vic 3122 (Australia)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the observation of the Cooper minimum in a semi-infinite argon-filled gas cell using two-color laser fields at wavelengths of 1400?nm and 800?nm. The experimental results show that the additional 800?nm field can change the macroscopic phase-matching condition through change of the atomic dipole phase associated with the electron in the continuum state and that this approach can be used to control the appearance of the Cooper minimum in the high-order harmonic spectrum in order to study the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

  2. Gap anisotropy and universal pairing scale in a spin-fluctuation model of cuprate superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abanov, Artem; Chubukov, A. V.; Norman, M. R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gap anisotropy and universal pairing scale in a spin-fluctuation model of cuprate superconductors Ar. Abanov,1 A. V. Chubukov,2 and M. R. Norman3 1Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA 2Department...-Tc cu- prate superconductors is a key problem.1 Some argue that the pseudogap originates from #1;quasi-#2;long-range order in a non- pairing channel #1;two-gap scenario#2;.2 Others argue instead that the pseudogap is a phase in which fermions already...

  3. Direct measurements of band gap grading in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Heinrich; Z-H. Zhang; Y. Zhang; O. Kiowski; M. Powalla; U. Lemmer; A. Slobodskyy

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct measurements of depth-resolved band gap variations of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers. A new measurement technique combining parallel measurements of local thin-film interference and spectral photoluminescence was developed for this purpose. We find sample-dependent correlation parameters between measured band gap depth and composition profiles, and emphasize the importance of direct measurements. These results bring a quantitative insight into the electronic properties of the solar cells and open a new way to analyze parameters that determine the efficiency of solar cells.

  4. Direct measurements of band gap grading in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, M P; Zhang, Y; Kiowski, O; Powalla, M; Lemmer, U; Slobodskyy, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct measurements of depth-resolved band gap variations of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers. A new measurement technique combining parallel measurements of local thin-film interference and spectral photoluminescence was developed for this purpose. We find sample-dependent correlation parameters between measured band gap depth and composition profiles, and emphasize the importance of direct measurements. These results bring a quantitative insight into the electronic properties of the solar cells and open a new way to analyze parameters that determine the efficiency of solar cells.

  5. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ? Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ? Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ? IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ? Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  6. Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers as a Time-of-Flight System for the PHENIX Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velkovska, Julia [Vanderbilt University] [Vanderbilt University

    2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project a Time-of-Flight detector based on multi-gap resistive plate chambers was built and installed for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

  7. The Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following courses, with a minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    - Canadian and International Environmental Management Management 4640 - Cross-Cultural Work Study FourThe Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length in Year One. Admission to Management programs is competitive and is based on academic achievement prior

  8. Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified marine waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change. This expansion alters marine ecosystem function and the productivity of fisheries due to habitat compression and changes in biogeochemical cycling leading to fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally anoxic fjord, Saanich Inlet to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification and inorganic carbon fixation predominantly co-varied with abundance and distribution patterns of Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Within these groups, pathways mediating inorganic carbon fixation and nitrogen and sulfur transformations were differentially expressed across the redoxcline. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters and denitrification, sulfur-oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with SUP05 dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrite-oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nitrospina and Planctomycetes respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The differential expression of these pathways under changing water column redox conditions has quantitative implications for coupled biogeochemical cycling linking different modes of inorganic carbon fixation with distributed nitrogen and sulfur-based energy metabolism extensible to coastal and open ocean OMZs.

  9. On the 27-day Variations of Cosmic Ray Intensity in Recent Solar Minimum 23/24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the 27-day variations and their harmonics of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity, solar wind velocity, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components in the recent prolonged solar minimum 23 24. The time evolution of the quasi-periodicity in these parameters connected with the Suns rotation reveals that their synodic period is stable and is aprox 26-27 days. This means that the changes in the solar wind speed and IMF are related to the Suns near equatorial regions in considering the differential rotation of the Sun. However, the solar wind parameters observed near the Earths orbit provide only the conditions in the limited local vicinity of the equatorial region in the heliosphere (within in latitude). We also demonstrate that the observed period of the GCR intensity connected with the Suns rotation increased up to aprox 33-36 days in 2009. This means that the process driving the 27-day variations of the GCR intensity takes place not only in the limited local surroundings of the equato...

  10. Can minimum-bias distributions on transverse energy test hadron production models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas A. Trainor

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent study reports measurements of transverse-energy $E_t$ distributions at mid-rapidity for several high-energy nuclear collision systems. The $E_t$ data are analyzed in the context of constituent-quark (CQ) participants estimated with a Glauber-model simulation. The study concludes that systematic variations of hadron and $E_t$ yields previously interpreted in terms of a two-component soft+hard model (TCM) of hadron production including a dijet (hard) contribution are actually the result of CQ participant trends with only soft production. It is claimed that deviations from linear scaling with the number of nucleon participants of hadron yields vs A-A centrality do not actually arise from dijet production as previously assumed. In the present study we examine the new $E_t$ data in the context of the TCM and compare those results with previous differential spectrum and minimum-bias correlation analysis. We present substantial evidence supporting a significant dijet contribution to all high-energy nuclear collisions consistent with the TCM and conclude that the $E_t$ data, given their systematic uncertainties, fail to support claimed CQ model interpretations.

  11. Determine Minimum Silver Flake Addition to GCM for Iodine Loaded AgZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry J. Garino; Tina M. Nenoff; Mark A. Rodriguez

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum amount of silver flake required to prevent loss of I{sub 2} during sintering in air for a SNL Glass Composite Material (GCM) Waste Form containing AgI-MOR (ORNL, 8.7 wt%) was determined to be 1.1 wt% Ag. The final GCM composition prior to sintering was 20 wt% AgI-MOR, 1.1 wt% Ag, and 80 wt% Bi-Si oxide glass. The amount of silver flake needed to suppress iodine loss was determined using thermo gravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopic off-gas analysis. These studies found that the ratio of silver to AgI-MOR required is lower in the presence of the glass than without it. Therefore an additional benefit of the GCM is that it serves to inhibit some iodine loss during processing. Alternatively, heating the AgI-MOR in inert atmosphere instead of air allowed for densified GCM formation without I{sub 2} loss, and no necessity for the addition of Ag. The cause of this behavior is found to be related to the oxidation of the metallic Ag to Ag{sup +} when heated to above ~300{degrees}C in air. Heating rate, iodine loading levels and atmosphere are the important variables that determine AgI migration and results suggest that AgI may be completely incorporated into the mordenite structure by the 550{degrees}C sintering temperature.

  12. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  13. Zero Duality Gap in Optimal Power Flow Problem Javad Lavaei and Steven H. Low

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    power flow (OPF) problem deals with finding an optimal operating point of a power system that mini1 Zero Duality Gap in Optimal Power Flow Problem Javad Lavaei and Steven H. Low Abstract--The optimal power flow (OPF) problem is nonconvex and generally hard to solve. In this paper, we propose

  14. Landau-Zener Transitions Through Small Electronic Eigenvalue Gaps in the Born-Oppenheimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joye, Alain

    Landau-Zener Transitions Through Small Electronic Eigenvalue Gaps in the Born-Oppenheimer it is not practical to solve the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation d* *irectly, the time-dependent Born-Oppenheimer of the masses of the nuclei. In the standard time-dependent Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electrons

  15. LandauZener Transitions Through Small Electronic Eigenvalue Gaps in the Born-Oppenheimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagedorn, George A.

    Landau­Zener Transitions Through Small Electronic Eigenvalue Gaps in the Born-Oppenheimer­dependent Born­Oppenheimer approximation is a principal tool for studying molecular dynamics. This approximation to the average of the masses of the nuclei. In the standard time­dependent Born­Oppenheimer approximation

  16. Making the Right Moves: Guiding Alpha-Expansion using Local Primal-Dual Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    Making the Right Moves: Guiding Alpha-Expansion using Local Primal-Dual Gaps Dhruv Batra Toyota@microsoft.com Abstract This paper presents a new adaptive graph-cut based move-making algorithm for energy minimization-space to search over. At each step, it tries to greedily find the move-space that will lead to biggest de- crease

  17. Band gap structure modification of amorphous anodic Al oxide film by Ti-alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canulescu, S., E-mail: stec@fotonik.dtu.dk; Schou, J. [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Rechendorff, K.; Pleth Nielsen, L. [Danish Technological Institute, Kongsvang Alle 29, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Borca, C. N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Bordo, K.; Ambat, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The band structure of pure and Ti-alloyed anodic aluminum oxide has been examined as a function of Ti concentration varying from 2 to 20 at.?%. The band gap energy of Ti-alloyed anodic Al oxide decreases with increasing Ti concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that Ti atoms are not located in a TiO{sub 2} unit in the oxide layer, but rather in a mixed Ti-Al oxide layer. The optical band gap energy of the anodic oxide layers was determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in the energy range from 4.1 to 9.2?eV (300–135?nm). The results indicate that amorphous anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a direct band gap of 7.3?eV, which is about ?1.4?eV lower than its crystalline counterpart (single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Upon Ti-alloying, extra bands appear within the band gap of amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, mainly caused by Ti 3d orbitals localized at the Ti site.

  18. The political gender gap: Gender bias in facial inferences that predict voting behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Joan Y.

    1 The political gender gap: Gender bias in facial inferences that predict voting behavior Joan Y human history, a disproportionate degree of political power around the world has been held by men. Even in democracies where the opportunity to serve in top political positions is available to any individual elected

  19. Arthropod abundance and seasonal bird use of bottomland forest harvest gaps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moorman, Christopher, E.; Bowen, Liessa T.; Kilgo, John, C.; Hanula, James, L.; Horn, Scott; Ulyshen, Michael, D.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the influence of arthropod abundance and vegetation structure on shifts in avian use of canopy gap, gap edge, and surrounding forest understory in a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. We compared captures of foliage-gleaning birds among locations during four periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration). Foliage arthropod densities were greatest in the forest understory in all four seasons, but understory vegetation density was greatest in gaps. Foliage-gleaning bird abundance was positively associated with foliage-dwelling arthropods during the breeding (F = 18.5, P < 0.001) and post-breeding periods (F = 9.4, P = 0.004), and negatively associated with foliage-dwelling arthropods during fall migration (F = 5.4, P = 0.03). Relationships between birds and arthropods were inconsistent, but the arthropod prey base seemed to be least important during migratory periods. Conversely, bird captures were positively correlated with understory vegetation density during all four periods (P < 0.001). Our study suggests high bird abundance associated with canopy gaps during the non-breeding period resulted less from high arthropod food resource availability than from complex understory and midstory vegetation structure.

  20. The Electrical and Band-Gap Properties of Amorphous Zinc-Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    MRSEC The Electrical and Band-Gap Properties of Amorphous Zinc-Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Films D Science & Engineering Center For zinc-indium-tin oxide (ZITO) films, grown by pulsed-laser deposition was replaced by substitution with zinc and tin in equal molar proportions (co-substitution). All ZITO films

  1. Partial frequency band gap in one-dimensional magnonic crystals M. Kostylev,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adekunle

    approach. It is shown that, due to the one-dimensional artificial periodicity of the medium, the gaps with the artificial spatial periodicity of the structure. In this work, by measuring the frequencies of collective on a silicon substrate using deep ultraviolet lithography with 248 nm exposure wavelength followed by a lift

  2. BETA DECAY STUDIES OF 69Ni AND 58V: DEVELOPMENT OF SUBSHELL GAPS WITHIN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mantica, Paul F.

    BETA DECAY STUDIES OF 69Ni AND 58V: DEVELOPMENT OF SUBSHELL GAPS WITHIN THE N = 28 - 50 SHELL of the requirements for the Degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Department of Chemistry 2001 #12;ABSTRACT BETA DECAY for neutron-rich nuclides within the N = 28 ; 50 shell were investigated. A conventional beta detection system

  3. TABLE OF CONTENTS A Combinatorial Explosion | Cross-Disciplinary Approach Bridges Gaps to New Frontiers 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Gaps to New Frontiers 4 Bending Beams and Extending the Laws of Physics to Focus Electromagnetic Waves with Unparalleled Precision 6 Revolution Evolution On The Net | Harnessing Network Dynamics for a Better Tomorrow 8 with innovative research ideas and projects. This creative energy, in turn, benefits our undergraduate program

  4. Cognitive, Non-Cognitive Skills and Gender Wage Gaps: Evidence from Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Cognitive, Non-Cognitive Skills and Gender Wage Gaps: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data of measures of cognitive and non-cognitive skills. Our results show that personality traits have little for wages of female employees, and in certain parts of the wage distribution. Cognitive skills as measured

  5. Bridging the Gap between the Business Processes and the Service Oriented Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bridging the Gap between the Business Processes and the Service Oriented Architecture Karim Dahman computerized software solutions. The Service Oriented Architecture (SOA [2]) has emerged as a new paradigm]. However, as UML is neither fully service-oriented, nor business process-centered, it needs to address

  6. Bridging the Gaps between eTransforming SMEs and SME -ICT Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of what eTransforming SMEs need based on their current technology and future business requirements. Keywords: SMEs, eTransformation, Information and Communication Technology, ICT providers 1 IntroductionBridging the Gaps between eTransforming SMEs and SME - ICT Providers Ana Hol1 and Athula Ginige1

  7. Lift-and-Project Integrality Gaps for the Traveling Salesperson Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Thomas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the lift-and-project procedures of Lov{\\'a}sz-Schrijver and Sherali-Adams applied to the standard linear programming relaxation of the traveling salesperson problem with triangle inequality. For the asymmetric TSP tour problem, Charikar, Goemans, and Karloff (FOCS 2004) proved that the integrality gap of the standard relaxation is at least 2. We prove that after one round of the Lov{\\'a}sz-Schrijver or Sherali-Adams procedures, the integrality gap of the asymmetric TSP tour problem is at least 3/2, with a small caveat on which version of the standard relaxation is used. For the symmetric TSP tour problem, the integrality gap of the standard relaxation is known to be at least 4/3, and Cheung (SIOPT 2005) proved that it remains at least 4/3 after $o(n)$ rounds of the Lov{\\'a}sz-Schrijver procedure, where $n$ is the number of nodes. For the symmetric TSP path problem, the integrality gap of the standard relaxation is known to be at least 3/2, and we prove that it remains at least 3/2 after $o(n)$ rounds...

  8. Effects of gaps in adhesives that bond elastically deformed panels to parabolic, cylindrical substructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.K.; Reuter, R.C. Jr.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies of the mechanical behavior of line focusing solar collectors, the reflective surface panel was modeled as a thin, initially flat, elastic plate that underwent large displacements to attain the shape of a prescribed parabolic cylinder. Attention was focused upon the stresses that developed in an adhesive layer which bonded the deformed panel to a rigid, parabolic substructure. Among the myriad possible collector designs, some possess longitudinally oriented, hollow ribs or corrugations in the substructure which interrupt the transverse continuity of the bond line between the deformed panel and the substructure. Thus, finite gaps in the adhesive are present which create regions where the panel surface becomes intermittently supported. The presence of these gaps perturbs the otherwise smooth distribution of adhesive contact stresses and it is the analytical modeling of this behavior that is the subject of the present report. In particular, attention is devoted to gaps which overlap with the edge effect zone - a region near the rim or vertex of the deformed panel where, in the absence of uniform edge loads necessary to maintain a true parabolic shape, high stresses and associated deformations occur. Significant influences of the gap size and position in the edge effect zone are demonstrated and discussed.

  9. Studies of electrical breakdown processes across vacuum gaps between metallic electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Studies of electrical breakdown processes across vacuum gaps between metallic electrodes L Available online 3 June 2013 Keywords: Magnetic insulation Vacuum electrical breakdown Bacteria-induced electrical breakdown Accelerator a b s t r a c t An experimental program to elucidate the physical causes

  10. Studies of electrical breakdown processes across vacuum gaps between metallic electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Studies of electrical breakdown processes across vacuum gaps between metallic electrodes L Keywords: Magnetic insulation Vacuum electrical breakdown Bacteria-induced electrical breakdown Accelerator a b s t r a c t An experimental program to elucidate the physical causes of electrical breakdown

  11. High-efficient solar power systems based on thermionic converter with small gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolaev, Y.V.; Eryomin, S.A.; Kalmykov, S.S.; Karpechenko, Y.D.; Kucherov, R.Y.; Lapochkin, N.V. [Research Institute of Scientific Industrial Association ``Lutch``, 142100, Podolsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various configurations of power systems based on thermionic converter with small interelectrode gap have been considered. The results of studies of systems energy characteristics are presented. The high efficiency and perspectivety of such systems for different applications have been shown. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Color-Superconducting Gap in the Presence of a Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efrain J. Ferrer; Vivian de la Incera; Cristina Manuel

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effects of an external magnetic field in the structure and magnitude of the diquark condensate in a three massless quark flavor color superconductor. It is shown that the long-range component $\\widetilde{B}$ of the external magnetic field that penetrates the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase modifies its gap structure, producing a new phase of lower symmetry. Our analysis is performed within an NJL effective field theory with four-fermion interactions, inspired by one-gluon exchange. Using Ritus' method, we compute the quark propagators in the presence of a background magnetic field, and derive the gap equations for arbitrary values of the field. An analytical solution is found for strong magnetic fields. A main outcome of our study is that the $\\widetilde{B}$ field tends to strengthen the gaps that get contributions from pairs of $\\widetilde{Q}$-charged quarks. These gaps are enhanced through the field-dependent density of states of the $\\widetilde{Q}$-charged quarks on the Fermi surface. Our considerations are relevant for the study of highly magnetized compact stars.

  13. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 115431 (2012) Energy gaps in graphene nanomeshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 115431 (2012) Energy gaps in graphene nanomeshes William Oswald and Zhigang opening and electronic structures of graphene nanomeshes (GNMs), the defected graphene containing a high, 71.15.Mb I. INTRODUCTION Graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) single-layer honeycomb structure of carbon

  14. Current transport, gate dielectrics and band gap engineering in graphene devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perebeinos, Vasili

    Current transport, gate dielectrics and band gap engineering in graphene devices Wenjuan Zhu In this work, we studied current transport in mono-, bi- and tri-layer graphene. We find that both of the electrical field of the substrate surface polar phonons in bi-layer/tri-layer graphenes. We also find

  15. Metallic photonic-band-gap filament architectures for optimized incandescent lighting Sajeev John and Rongzhou Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Sajeev

    Metallic photonic-band-gap filament architectures for optimized incandescent lighting Sajeev John occur 3,4 . Tra- ditionally incandescent lighting filaments, despite being driven from equilibrium the blackbody spectrum. This suggests the pos- sibility of higher efficiency incandescent lighting, through

  16. The gap in term of mobility for disabled travellers in France DEJOUX, Virginie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The gap in term of mobility for disabled travellers in France DEJOUX, Virginie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy 12 Verte 93166 Noisy le grand cedex Telephone: 33 1 45 92 55 88 virginie.dejoux@inrets.fr ARMOOGUM Jimmy cedex Telephone: 33 1 45 92 55 79 jimmy.armoogum@inrets.fr ABSTRACT The demographic and social changes

  17. Constraining the nuclear pairing gap with pairing vibrations M. Grasso,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Constraining the nuclear pairing gap with pairing vibrations E. Khan,1 M. Grasso,1 and J. Margueron. Using the same pairing interaction in nuclear matter and in Tin nuclei, the range of densities where I. INTRODUCTION Studies on pairing effects in both nuclear matter and fi- nite nuclei have known

  18. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series The Black-White Test Score Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #05-09 June 2005 The Black-White Test Score Gap This paper is available online at the National Poverty Center Working Paper Series index at: http of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the National Poverty Center or any sponsoring agency

  19. Emergence and evolution of learning gaps across countries: Linked panel evidence from Ethiopia, India, Peru and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    on children in middle or secondary school, raise two important questions. First, at what age do gaps between, prior to school enrolment, with children in Vietnam at the upper end, children in Ethiopia at the lower, and with Peru and India in between. Differences between country samples grow in magnitude at later ages

  20. Size effect on the electronic and optical band gap of CdSe QD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisodia, Namita, E-mail: namitasisodiya@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Holkar Science College, Indore-45200 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Present paper deals with a critical and comprehensive analysis of the dependence of photo emission (PE) electronic band gap and optical absorption (OA) excitonic band gap on the size of CdSe QD, via connecting it with excitonic absorbance wavelength. Excitonic absorbance wavelength is determined through an empirical fit of established experimental evidences. Effective excitonic charge and Bohr radius is determined as a function of size. Increase in size of the CdSe QD results in greater Bohr radius and smaller effective excitonic charge. Excitonic binding energy as a degree of size of QD is also calculated which further relates with the difference in PE electronic and OA optical band gaps. It is also shown that with increase in size of CdSe QD, the excitonic binding energy decreases which consequently increases differences in two band gaps. Our results are very well comparable with the established results. Explanation for the origin of the unusual optical properties of CdSe QD has been also discussed.

  1. Coupling of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to a GaP waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -M. C. Fu; C. Santori; P. E. Barclay; I. Aharonovich; S. Prawer; N. Meyer; A. M. Holm; R. G. Beausoleil

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical coupling of guided modes in a GaP waveguide to nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is demonstrated. The electric field penetration into diamond and the loss of the guided mode are measured. The results indicate that the GaP-diamond system could be useful for realizing coupled microcavity-NV devices for quantum information processing in diamond.

  2. Daily Thermal Predictions of the AGR-1 Experiment with Gas Gaps Varying with Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James Sterbentz; John Maki; Binh Pham

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new daily as-run thermal analysis was performed at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) test experiment number one at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This thermal analysis incorporates gas gaps changing with time during the irradiation experiment. The purpose of this analysis was to calculate the daily average temperatures of each compact to compare with experimental results. Post irradiation examination (PIE) measurements of the graphite holder and fuel compacts showed the gas gaps varying from the beginning of life. The control temperature gas gap and the fuel compact – graphite holder gas gaps were linearly changed from the original fabrication dimensions, to the end of irradiation measurements. A steady-state thermal analysis was performed for each daily calculation. These new thermal predictions more closely match the experimental data taken during the experiment than previous analyses. Results are presented comparing normalized compact average temperatures to normalized log(R/B) Kr-85m. The R/B term is the measured release rate divided by the predicted birth rate for the isotope Kr-85m. Correlations between these two normalized values are presented.

  3. Double Moral Hazard and the Energy Efficiency Gap Louis-Gatan Giraudet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Suppose that the homeowner cannot perfectly observe the energy saving performance of the job completed on installation costs and perform the job poorly. 1 Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (PEEC), Stanford UniversityDouble Moral Hazard and the Energy Efficiency Gap Louis-Gaëtan Giraudet1 , Sébastien Houde2

  4. KNOWLEDGE GAPS IN APPLYING CONDENSATION CALCULATIONS TO CHONDRITES. L. Grossman (yosi@uchicago.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Lawrence

    solar nebula predict the first condensates from a cooling nebular gas to be corundum, hibonite (CaAl12O predicted to condense directly from the solar nebular gas would have the Al, Ti 3+ or Ti 4+ contentsKNOWLEDGE GAPS IN APPLYING CONDENSATION CALCULATIONS TO CHONDRITES. L. Grossman (yosi

  5. Bridging the Gap: Automated Steady Scaffoldings for 3D Printing Jrmie Dumas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lévy, Bruno

    Bridging the Gap: Automated Steady Scaffoldings for 3D Printing Jérémie Dumas Université de Figure 1: The upper leg of the Poppy robot (www.poppy-project.org) cannot be 3D printed on low cost FDM usage. Abstract Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) is the process of 3D printing ob- jects from melted

  6. Exploiting pattern transformation to tune phononic band gaps in a two-dimensional granular crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) cylinders is investigated numerically. This system was previously shown to undergo a pattern transformation with uniaxial compression by Go¨ncu¨ et al. [Soft Matter 7, 2321 (2011)]. The dispersion relations, or elastic waves in certain frequency ranges known as band gaps is an important feature of these materials

  7. Correlation of pulsar radio emission spectrum with peculiarities of particle acceleration in a polar gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontorovich, V. M., E-mail: vkont1001@yahoo.com; Flanchik, A. B. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Radio Astronomy (Ukraine)] [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Radio Astronomy (Ukraine)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical expression for the frequency of radio emission intensity maximum in pulsars with free electron emission from the stellar surface has been found. Peculiarities of the electron acceleration in a polar gap are considered. The correlation between the high-frequency cutoff and low-frequency turnover in the radio emission spectrum of pulsars known from observations has been explained.

  8. Optical gain from the direct gap transition of Ge-on-Si at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jifeng

    We report direct band gap optical gain of tensile strained n+ epitaxial Ge-on-Si at room temperature, which confirms that band-engineered Ge-on-Si is a promising gain medium for monolithic optical amplifiers and lasers on Si.

  9. Using Process Mining to Bridge the Gap between BI and BPM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    offer mature data mining capabilities, and even the tools that do so, are not process-centric, i, and other data attributes (e.g., the size of an order). #12;Typically, three types of process mining canUsing Process Mining to Bridge the Gap between BI and BPM Wil van der Aalst Eindhoven University

  10. On the entropy devil’s staircase in a family of gap-tent maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Zyczkowski; Erik M. Bollt

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To analyze the trade-off between channel capacity and noise-resistance in designing dynamical systems to pursue the idea of communications with chaos, we perform a measure theoretic analysis the topological entropy function of a “gap-tent map ” whose invariant set is an unstable chaotic saddle of the tent map. Our model system, the “gap-tent map ” is a family of tent maps with a symmetric gap, which mimics the presence of noise in physical realizations of chaotic systems, and for this model, we can perform many calculations in closed form. We demonstrate that the dependence of the topological entropy on the size of the gap has a structure of the devil’s staircase. By integrating over a fractal measure, we obtain analytical, piece-wise differentiable approximations of this dependence. Applying concepts of the kneading theory we find the position and the values of the entropy for all leading entropy plateaus. Similar properties hold also for the dependence of the fractal dimension of the invariant set and the escape rate.

  11. A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion, such as the mechanism and the free-energy profile, remains an important challenge not only for enzyme catalysis1 of the reaction free-energy profile is very cumbersome with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) and umbrella

  12. Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based Minimum Mean-Square Error Estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based mean-square error es- timators have been applied to speech enhancement in the tem- poral, transform (e estimator for 8 kHz telephone-quality speech. Index Terms: Speech enhancement, minimum mean-square er- ror

  13. Distributed multichannel speech enhancement with minimum mean-square error short-time spectral amplitude, log-spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    Distributed multichannel speech enhancement with minimum mean-square error short-time spectral Keywords: Acoustic arrays Speech enhancement Amplitude estimation Phase estimation Parameter estimation a b on the development and implementation of speech enhancement algorithms. Whereas the current state-of-the-art methods

  14. Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required forest areas for Vietnam Erosion Risk Map Cover types C1 Natural Forests >1.7 Plantation forest.2 (ESRI, 2008), to generate a map of required protective forest area for Vietnam. (3) (4) (5Results Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5& · Map

  15. In 2006 International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP). SPARSE FORWARD-BACKWARD USING MINIMUM DIVERGENCE BEAMS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Chris

    FORWARD-BACKWARD USING MINIMUM DIVERGENCE BEAMS FOR FAST TRAINING OF CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELDS Chris Pal, however, training can be expensive, because it often requires many iterations of forward-backward. Beam-backward, standard beam heuristics can be danger- ous, as they can make training unstable. We introduce sparse

  16. Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (7001100 m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen increased animal activity associated with increasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. We examined faunal community responses to oxygen and organic matter gradients across the lower oxygen minimum zone (OMZ

  17. An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum Creditable Coverage Standards for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum, as part of the Massachusetts Health Care Reform Law. HMO Blue New EnglandSM Summary of Benefits Williams College #12;Your Care Your Primary Care Provider. When you enroll in HMO Blue New England, you must choose

  18. A Bi-Directional DC-DC Converter with Minimum Energy Storage Elements Leon M. Tolbert1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    uses an internal combustion diesel engine to drive a radial-gap permanent magnet alternator at variable frequency, variable voltage produced by the permanent magnet alternator is diode-rectified to a high voltage synchronous machines are presently used to convert the mechanical power of the rotating shaft into three

  19. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF COMETS 8P/TUTTLE AND 17P/HOLMES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, D. J. [Eureka Scientific, 2420 Delmer Ave, Suite 100, Oakland, CA, 94602 (United States); Bodewits, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar System Exploration Division, Mailstop 690.3, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lisse, C. M. [Planetary Exploration Group, Space Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Dennerl, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1603, 85740 Garching (Germany); Wolk, S. J. [Chandra X-Ray Center, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hsieh, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University Belfast, Astronomy Research Centre, Belfast (United Kingdom); Zurbuchen, T. H.; Zhao, L. [Department of Atmospheric Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)], E-mail: damian.christ@gmail.com, E-mail: damian.christian@csun.edu, E-mail: Dennis.Bodewits@nasa.gov, E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: kod@mpe.mpg.de, E-mail: swolk@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: h.hseih@qub.c.uk, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu, E-mail: lzh@umich.edu

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of two comets made during the minimum of solar cycle 24. The two comets, 17P/Holmes (17P) and 8P/Tuttle (8P), were very different in their activity and geometry. 17P was observed, for 30 ks right after its major outburst, on 2007 October 31 (10:07 UT), and comet 8P/Tuttle was observed in 2008 January for 47 ks. During the two Chandra observations, 17P was producing at least 100 times more water than 8P but was 2.2 times further away from the Sun. Also, 17P was at a relatively high solar latitude (+19.{sup 0}1) while 8P was observed at a lower solar latitude (3.{sup 0}4). The X-ray spectrum of 17P is unusually soft with little significant emission at energies above 500 eV. Depending on our choice of background, we derive a 300-1000 eV flux of 0.5-4.5 x 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with over 90% of the emission in the 300-400 eV range. This corresponds to an X-ray luminosity between 0.4 and 3.3 x 10{sup 15} erg s{sup -1}. However, we cannot distinguish between this significant excess emission and possible instrumental effects, such as incomplete charge transfer across the CCD. 17P is the first comet observed at high latitude during solar minimum. Its lack of X-rays in the 400-1000 eV range, in a simple picture, may be attributed to the polar solar wind, which is depleted in highly charged ions. 8P/Tuttle was much brighter, with an average count rate of 0.20 counts s{sup -1} in the 300-1000 eV range. We derive an average X-ray flux in this range of 9.4 x 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and an X-ray luminosity for the comet of 1.7 x 10{sup 14} erg s{sup -1}. The light curve showed a dramatic decrease in flux of over 60% between observations on January 1 and 4. When comparing outer regions of the coma to inner regions, its spectra showed a decrease in ratios of C VI/C V, O VIII/O VII, as predicted by recent solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission models. There are remarkable differences between the X-ray emission from these two comets, further demonstrating the qualities of cometary X-ray observations, and SWCX emission in general as a means of remote diagnostics of the interaction of astrophysical plasmas.

  20. Rapidity Gaps Between Jets in PHP DIS 2006 , April 22, 2006 -1Patrick Ryan, Univ. of Wisconsin Patrick Ryan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapidity Gaps Between Jets in PHP DIS 2006 , April 22, 2006 - 1Patrick Ryan, Univ. of Wisconsin in PHP DIS 2006 , April 22, 2006 - 2Patrick Ryan, Univ. of Wisconsin Hard Diffractive Photoproduction - = Subject of this analysis #12;Rapidity Gaps Between Jets in PHP DIS 2006 , April 22, 2006 - 3Patrick Ryan

  1. Algebraic Structure of the Minimum Error Discrimination Problem for Linearly Independent Density Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Singal; Sibasish Ghosh

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum error discrimination problem for ensembles of linearly independent pure states are known to have an interesting structure; for such a given ensemble the optimal POVM is given by the pretty good measurment of another ensemble which can be related to the former ensemble by a bijective mapping $\\mathscr{R}$ on the "space of ensembles". In this paper we generalize this result to ensembles of general linearly independent states (not necessarily pure) and also give an analytic expression for the inverse of the map, i.e., for $\\mathscr{R}^{-1}$. In the process of proving this we also simplify the necessary and sufficient conditions that a POVM needs to satisfy to maximize the probability of success for the MED of an LI ensemble of states. This simplification is then employed to arrive at a rotationally invariant necessary and sufficient conditions of optimality. Using these rotationally invariant conditions it is established that every state of a LI mixed state ensemble can be resolved to a pure state decomposition so that the corresponding pure state ensemble (corresponding to pure states of all mixed states together) has as its optimal POVM a pure state decomposition of the optimal POVM of mixed state ensemble. This gives the necessary and sufficient conditions for the PGM of a LI ensemble to be its optimal POVM; another generalization for the pure state case. Also, these rotationally invariant conditions suggest a technique to give the optimal POVM for an ensemble of LI states. This technique is polynomial in time and outpeforms standard barrier-type interior point SDP in terms of computational complexity.

  2. Application of a MHD hybrid solar wind model with latitudinal dependences to Ulysses data at minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Aibeo; J. Lima; C. Sauty

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous work, Ulysses data was analyzed to build a complete axisymmetric MHD solution for the solar wind at minimum including rotation and the initial flaring of the solar wind in the low corona. This model has some problems in reproducing the values of magnetic field at 1 AU despite the correct values of the velocity. Here, we intend to extend the previous analysis to another type of solutions and to improve our modelling of the wind from the solar surface to 1 AU. We compare the previous results to those obtained with a fully helicoidal model and construct a hybrid model combining both previous solutions, keeping the flexibility of the parent models in the appropriate domain. From the solar surface to the Alfven, point, a three component solution for velocity and magnetic field is used, reproducing the complex wind geometry and the well-known flaring of the field lines observed in coronal holes. From the Alfven radius to 1 AU and further, the hybrid model keeps the latitudinal dependences as flexible as possible, in order to deal with the sharp variations near the equator and we use the helicoidal solution, turning the poloidal streamlines into radial ones. Despite the absence of the initial flaring, the helicoidal model and the first hybrid solution suffer from the same low values of the magnetic field at 1 AU. However, by adjusting the parameters with a second hybrid solution, we are able to reproduce both the velocity and magnetic profiles observed by Ulysses and a reasonable description of the low corona, provided that a certain amount of energy deposit exists along the flow. The present paper shows that analytical axisymmetric solutions can be constructed to reproduce the solar structure and dynamics from 1 solar radius up to 1 AU.

  3. Glassy slags for minimum additive waste stabilization. Interim progress report, May 1993--February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, X.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Gong, M.; Emery, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glassy slag waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in implementing Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) for supporting DOE`s environmental restoration efforts. The glassy slag waste form is composed of various crystalline and metal oxide phases embedded in a silicate glass phase. The MAWS approach was adopted by blending multiple waste streams to achieve up to 100% waste loadings. The crystalline phases, such as spinels, are very durable and contain hazardous and radioactive elements in their lattice structures. These crystalline phases may account for up to 80% of the total volume of slags having over 80% metal loading. The structural bond strength model was used to quantify the correlation between glassy slag composition and chemical durability so that optimized slag compositions were obtained with limited crucible melting and testing. Slag compositions developed through crucible melts were also successfully generated in a pilot-scale Retech plasma centrifugal furnace at Ukiah, California. Utilization of glassy slag waste forms allows the MAWS approach to be applied to a much wider range of waste streams than glass waste forms. The initial work at ANL has indicated that glassy slags are good final waste forms because of (1) their high chemical durability; (2) their ability to incorporate large amounts of metal oxides; (3) their ability to incorporate waste streams having low contents of flux components; (4) their less stringent requirements on processing parameters, compared to glass waste forms; and (5) their low requirements for purchased additives, which means greater waste volume reduction and treatment cost savings.

  4. 2013 Runner-up Teams - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bill. Chai's mobile application and device helps utilities take advantage of their Smart Meter Investments while giving ratepayers the power to cut their bill. The...

  5. Design and Development of Performance Metrics for Elite Runners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Nikhil R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feature CPU Speed RAM Storage Battery Capacity Operatingstored locally. For storage and battery life purposes, theSensors CPU Battery Power Management Data Storage Wireless

  6. Design and Development of Performance Metrics for Elite Runners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Nikhil R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metric with distance for Jimmy for both feet Figure 5.29:metric vs. Distance for Jimmy Figure 5.32: Over-strideCDEL metric vs. Distance for Jimmy Figure 5.35: CDEL metric

  7. Selection of a multiple disease resistant runner-type peanut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baring, Michael Robert

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Four F2:4 populations of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) resulting from the complex cross Tamrun 96 X Tx901639-3 X Sun Oleic 95R were grown in three disease nurseries over a 2 year period. Three separate selection techniques were applied to determine...

  8. 2013 Runner-up Teams - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICS H. I.Plasma Camp View larger image

  9. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Runner-Up Presents Hydrogen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    gas. The refinery capacity has always been a premium and down time in the oil and gas industry is always costly. Keeping equipment running and minimizing downtime is...

  10. Design and Development of Performance Metrics for Elite Runners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Nikhil R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System Acceleration in Abduction Direction for Left Shoe inthe toes upwards) and Abduction (pointing the toes out to3.7 shows y-axis abduction data from the accelerometer. It

  11. Fabrication of Ceramic Layer-by-Layer Infrared Wavelength Photonic Band Gap Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Hao-Chuan Kang

    2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals, also known as photonic crystals, are periodic dielectric structures which form a photonic band gap that prohibit the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves of certain frequencies at any incident angles. Photonic crystals have several potential applications including zero-threshold semiconductor lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emission, dielectric mirrors, and wavelength filters. If defect states are introduced in the crystals, light can be guided from one location to another or even a sharp bending of light in micron scale can be achieved. This generates the potential for optical waveguide and optical circuits, which will contribute to the improvement in the fiber-optic communications and the development of high-speed computers.

  12. Band gap tuning in transition metal oxides by site-specific substitution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Chisholm, Jr., Matthew F; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Singh, David J; Choi, Woo Seok

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition metal oxide insulator composition having a tuned band gap includes a transition metal oxide having a perovskite or a perovskite-like crystalline structure. The transition metal oxide includes at least one first element selected form the group of Bi, Ca, Ba, Sr, Li, Na, Mg, K, Pb, and Pr; and at least one second element selected from the group of Ti, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. At least one correlated insulator is integrated into the crystalline structure, including REMO.sub.3, wherein RE is at least one Rare Earth element, and wherein M is at least one element selected from the group of Co, V, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe. The composition is characterized by a band gap of less of 4.5 eV.

  13. Laboratory Studies on Surface Sampling of Bacillus anthracis Contamination: Summary, Gaps, and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Hu, Rebecca

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe, and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the (1) estimates of Bacillus anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates, and (2) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed and recommendations are given for future studies.

  14. Evolution of the N=50 shell gap energy towards $^{78}$Ni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Hakala; S. Rahaman; V. -V. Elomaa; T. Eronen; U. Hager; A. Jokinen; A. Kankainen; I. D. Moore; H. Penttilä; S. Rinta-Antila; J. Rissanen; A. Saastamoinen; T. Sonoda; C. Weber; J. Äystö

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic masses of the neutron-rich isotopes $^{76-80}$Zn, $^{78-83}$Ga, $^{80-85}Ge, $^{81-87}$As and $^{84-89}$Se have been measured with high precision using the Penning trap mass spectrometer JYFLTRAP at the IGISOL facility. The masses of $^{82,83}$Ga, $^{83-85}$Ge, $^{84-87}$As and $^{89}$Se were measured for the first time. These new data represent a major improvement in the knowledge of the masses in this neutron-rich region. Two-neutron separation energies provide evidence for the reduction of the N=50 shell gap energy towards germanium Z=32 and a subsequent increase at gallium (Z=31). The data are compared with a number of theoretical models. An indication of the persistent rigidity of the shell gap towards nickel (Z=28) is obtained.

  15. Singlet-Triplet Energy Gaps for Diradicals from Fractional-Spin Density-Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ess, Daniel H.; Johnson, E R; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, W T

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open-shell singlet diradicals are difficult to model accurately within conventional Kohn?Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT). These methods are hampered by spin contamination because the KS determinant wave function is neither a pure spin state nor an eigenfunction of the S2 operator. Here we present a theoretical foray for using single-reference closed-shell ground states to describe diradicals by fractional-spin DFT (FS-DFT). This approach allows direct, self-consistent calculation of electronic properties using the electron density corresponding to the proper spin eigenfunction. The resulting FS-DFT approach is benchmarked against diradical singlet?triplet gaps for atoms and small molecules. We have also applied FS-DFT to the singlet?triplet gaps of hydrocarbon polyacenes.

  16. The refractive index and electronic gap of water and ice increase with increasing pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ding; Galli, Giulia

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the electronic and dielectric properties of water at high pressure and temperature is an essential prerequisite to understand the physical and chemical properties of aqueous environments under supercritical conditions, e.g. in the Earth interior. However optical measurements of compressed ice and water remain challenging and it has been common practice to assume that their band gap is inversely correlated to the measured refractive index, consistent with observations reported for hundreds of materials. Here we report ab initio molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations showing that both the refractive index and the electronic gap of water and ice increase with pressure, at least up to 30 GPa. Subtle electronic effects, related to the nature of interband transitions and band edge localization under pressure, are responsible for this apparently anomalous behavior.

  17. Pre-Stressed Viscoelastic Composites: Effective Incremental Moduli and Band-Gap Tuning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parnell, William J. [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study viscoelastic wave propagation along pre-stressed nonlinear elastic composite bars. In the pre-stressed state we derive explicit forms for the effective incremental storage and loss moduli with dependence on the pre-stress. We also derive a dispersion relation for the effective wavenumber in the case of arbitrary frequency, hence permitting a study of viscoelastic band-gap tuning via pre-stress.

  18. Generalized parton distributions and rapidity gap survival in exclusive diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde-Wright; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach to the problem of rapidity gap survival (RGS) in the production of high-mass systems (H = dijet, heavy quarkonium, Higgs boson) in double-gap exclusive diffractive pp scattering, pp-->p + (gap) + H + (gap) + p. It is based on the idea that hard and soft interactions proceed over widely different time- and distance scales and are thus approximately independent. The high-mass system is produced in a hard scattering process with exchange of two gluons between the protons. Its amplitude is calculable in terms of the gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in the protons, which can be measured in J= production in exclusive ep scattering. The hard scattering process is modified by soft spectator interactions, which we calculate in a model-independent way in terms of the pp elastic scattering amplitude. Contributions from inelastic intermediate states are suppressed. A simple geometric picture of the interplay of hard and soft interactions in diffraction is obtained. The onset of the black-disk limit in pp scattering at TeV energies strongly suppresses diffraction at small impact parameters and is the main factor in determining the RGS probability. Correlations between hard and soft interactions (e.g. due to scattering from the long-range pion field of the proton, or due to possible short-range transverse correlations between partons) further decrease the RGS probability. We also investigate the dependence of the diffractive cross section on the transverse momenta of the final-state protons (''diffraction pattern''). By measuring this dependence one can perform detailed tests of the interplay of hard and soft interactions, and even extract information about the gluon GPD in the proton. Such studies appear to be feasible with the planned forward detectors at the LHC.

  19. Local droplet etching – Nanoholes, quantum dots, and air-gap heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyn, Ch.; Sonnenberg, D.; Graf, A.; Kerbst, J.; Stemmann, A.; Hansen, W. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Local droplet etching (LDE) allows the self-organized generation of nanoholes in semiconductor surfaces and is fully compatible with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The influence of the process parameters as well as of droplet and substrate materials on the LDE nanohole morphology is discussed. Furthermore, recent applications of LDE, the fabrication of quantum dots by hole filling and the creation of air-gap heterostructures are addressed.

  20. Do Food Availability and Microclimate Determine Bird Use of Forest Canopy Gaps?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHAMPLIN, TRACEY BERNICE

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the influence of arthropod availability and microclimate on avian use of forest canopy gaps in 2002 and 2003. We used mist netting and observation of foraging effort (attack rates) to determine the influence of arthropod abundance on avian habitat use of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, and 0.50 ha) of 2- to 3-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings during four periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration).

  1. The Influence of Caregiver-Child Acculturation Gap on Mexican American Adolescents' Depression and Suicidality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piña-Watson, Brandy Michelle

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    and the passion you had for counseling. Thank you for being part of this journey! Mom, dad, Amber and A.J.—thank you for your love and support in each step of my life, including graduate school and my dissertation. You have always believed in me... teens. However, compared with Latinas, Latino boys are more likely to be successful in their attempts (Wagner, 2009). The purpose of the present manuscript is to present the acculturation gap hypothesis (Birman, 2006) within the cultural...

  2. Computation of the Field in an Axial Gap, Trapped-Flux Type Superconducting Electric Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zejun; Ainslie, Mark D.; Campbell, Archie M.; Cardwell, David A.

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—The Bulk Superconductivity Group at the University of Cambridge is currently investigating the use of high temper- ature superconductors in wire and bulk form to increase the electrical and magnetic loading of an axial gap, trapped flux... electric machines are an importantapplication of superconducting materials in both bulk and wire forms. Bulk high temperature superconductors, in partic- ular, are capable of trapping magnetic fields greater than 17 T below 30 K [1], [2], as well as up to 3...

  3. Growth and characterization of liquid phase epitaxial GaP layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kao, Yung-Chung

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    , and supercooling amount. The results are compared with a diffusion-controlled model predictions for various cooling methods and very good agreements observed. The resistivity and mobility of grown GaP layers at room temperature are studied and the obtained... for further growth. As a result, LPE has the capability of producing multi-layers of controllable composition. The reproducibility of such layers is governed by parameters like: solution concentration, temperature, cooling rate, growth time, and substrate...

  4. THE CASE OF AB AURIGAE'S DISK IN POLARIZED LIGHT: IS THERE TRULY A GAP?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perrin, Marshall D. [Division of Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Schneider, Glenn [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Duchene, Gaspard [University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pinte, Christophe [Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble 1/CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) UMR 5571, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble, Cedex 09 (France); Grady, Carol A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States); Wisniewski, John P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Hines, Dean C., E-mail: mperrin@ucla.ed [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) coronagraph, we have obtained high-contrast 2.0 mum imaging polarimetry and 1.1 mum imaging of the circumstellar disk around AB Aurigae on angular scales of 0.''3-3'' (40-550 AU). Unlike previous observations, these data resolve the disk in both total and polarized intensity, allowing accurate measurement of the spatial variation of polarization fraction across the disk. Using these observations, we investigate the apparent 'gap' in the disk reported by Oppenheimer et al.. In polarized intensity, the NICMOS data closely reproduce the morphology seen by Oppenheimer et al., yet in total intensity we find no evidence for a gap in either our 1.1 or 2.0 mum images. We find instead that region has lower polarization fraction, without a significant decrease in total scattered light, consistent with expectations for backscattered light on the far side of an inclined disk. Radiative transfer models demonstrate this explanation fits the observations. Geometrical scattering effects are entirely sufficient to explain the observed morphology without any need to invoke a gap or a protoplanet at that location.

  5. Localized Excitation in the Hybridization Gap in YbAl{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christianson, A.D.; Fanelli, V.R. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lawrence, J.M. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Goremychkin, E.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Osborn, R. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Bauer, E.D.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Frost, C.D. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Zarestky, J. L. [Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The intermediate valence compound YbAl{sub 3} exhibits a broad magnetic excitation in the inelastic neutron scattering spectrum with characteristic energy E{sub 1}{approx_equal}50 meV, equal to the Kondo energy (T{sub K}{approx}600-700 K). In the low temperature (Tgap that exists in this compound. We report inelastic neutron scattering results for a single-crystal sample. The scattering at energies near E{sub 1} qualitatively has the momentum (Q) dependence expected for interband scattering across the indirect gap. The scattering near E{sub 2} has a very different Q dependence: it is a weak function of Q over a large fraction of the Brillouin zone and is smallest near (1/2,1/2,1/2). A possibility is that the peak at E{sub 2} arises from a spatially localized excitation in the hybridization gap.

  6. Particle Concentration At Planet Induced Gap Edges and Vortices: I. Inviscid 3-D Hydro Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Rafikov, Roman R; Bai, Xuening

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a systematic study of the dynamics of dust particles in protoplanetary disks with embedded planets using global 2-D and 3-D inviscid hydrodynamic simulations. We implement Lagrangian particles into magnetohydrodynamic code Athena with cylindrical coordinates and explore the behavior of dust grains with sizes spanning more than 6 orders of magnitude --- from the well-coupled to decoupled limits. We find two distinct outcomes depending on the mass of the embedded planet, which is varied between 8 M_earth to 9 M_{J}. In the presence of a low mass planet (8 M_earth), two narrow gaps start to open in the gas on each side of the planet where the density waves shock. Although these gaps are quite shallow, they dramatically affect particle drift speed and cause significant, axisymmetric dust depletion near the planet. On the other hand, a more massive planet (>0.1 M_{J}) carves out a deeper gap with sharp edges, which are unstable to the formation of vortices that later merge into a single vortex. The vort...

  7. Photonic-band-gap properties for two-component slow light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.; Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, Vilnius 01108 (Lithuania); Fachbereich Physik and Research Center OPTIMAS, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern D-67663 (Germany)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two-component ''spinor'' slow light in an ensemble of atoms coherently driven by two pairs of counterpropagating control laser fields in a double tripod-type linkage scheme. We derive an equation of motion for the spinor slow light (SSL) representing an effective Dirac equation for a massive particle with the mass determined by the two-photon detuning. By changing the detuning the atomic medium acts as a photonic crystal with a controllable band gap. If the frequency of the incident probe light lies within the band gap, the light experiences reflection from the sample and can tunnel through it. For frequencies outside the band gap, the transmission and reflection probabilities oscillate with the increasing length of the sample. In both cases the reflection takes place into the complementary mode of the probe field. We investigate the influence of the finite excited state lifetime on the transmission and reflection coefficients of the probe light. We discuss possible experimental implementations of the SSL using alkali-metal atoms such as rubidium or sodium.

  8. Coexistence and competition of nematic and gapped states in bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Gorbar; V. P. Gusynin; V. A. Miransky; I. A. Shovkovy

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In bilayer graphene, the phase diagram in the plane of a strain-induced bare nematic term, ${\\cal N}_{0}$, and a top-bottom gates voltage imbalance, $U_{0}$, is obtained by solving the gap equation in the random-phase approximation. At nonzero ${\\cal N}_0$ and $U_0$, the phase diagram consists of two hybrid spin-valley symmetry-broken phases with both nontrivial nematic and mass-type order parameters. The corresponding phases are separated by a critical line of first- and second-order phase transitions at small and large values of ${\\cal N}_0$, respectively. The existence of a critical end point, where the line of first-order phase transitions terminates, is predicted. For ${\\cal N}_0=0$, a pure gapped state with a broken spin-valley symmetry is the ground state of the system. As ${\\cal N}_{0}$ increases, the nematic order parameter increases, and the gap weakens in the hybrid state. For $U_{0}=0$, a quantum second-order phase transition from the hybrid state into a pure gapless nematic state occurs when the strain reaches a critical value. A nonzero $U_{0}$ suppresses the critical value of the strain. The relevance of these results to recent experiments is briefly discussed.

  9. Spectra and gap amplification for systems with two widely different incommensurate periodicities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azbel, M.Y.; Bak, P.; Chaikin, P.M.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive analytically the spectrum for the Schroedinger equation for quasiperiodic systems with two length scales: one large ''macroscopic'' scale (e.g., a-italic cos(2..pi..x-italic/lambda)) and one small ''microscopic'' scale (e.g., v-italic cos(2..pi..x-italic)). The phase diagram includes regimes with exponentially narrow gaps due to the slowly varying potential, regimes where the rapidly varying potential amplifies these narrow gaps, and regimes with exponentially narrow ''Landau bands.'' The full ''devil's-staircase'' spectrum with gaps at wave vectors q-italic = m-italic..pi..+n-italic..pi../lambda develops in a hierarchical manner as a-italic increases. The results apply to systems with superlattices, to celestial orbits with two periodic perturbations, to systems with slowly varying lattice distortions, and, in particular, to quasi-one-dimensional magnets such as bis(tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene) perchlorate ((TMTSF)/sub 2/ClO/sub 4/) in magnetic fields, where our findings may provide insight into the experimentally observed cascade of phase transitions.

  10. Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Kaplan Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2007-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-indexing of hydroturbines is an important means to optimize passage conditions for fish by identifying operations for existing and new design turbines that minimize the probability of injury. Cost-effective implementation of bio-indexing requires the use of tools such as numerical and physical turbine models to generate hypotheses for turbine operations that can be tested at prototype scales using live fish. Numerical deterministic and stochastic blade strike models were developed for a 1:25-scale physical turbine model built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the original design turbine at McNary Dam and for prototype-scale original design and replacement minimum gap runner (MGR) turbines at Bonneville Dam's first powerhouse. Blade strike probabilities predicted by both models were comparable with the overall trends in blade strike probability observed in both prototype-scale live fish survival studies and physical turbine model using neutrally buoyant beads. The predictions from the stochastic model were closer to the experimental data than the predictions from the deterministic model because the stochastic model included more realistic consideration of the aspect of fish approaching to the leading edges of turbine runner blades. Therefore, the stochastic model should be the preferred method for the prediction of blade strike and injury probability for juvenile salmon and steelhead using numerical blade-strike models.

  11. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp, E-mail: rahe@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (?f) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the ?f(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the ?f signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f{sub 0} and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of ?f with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the ?f with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the ?f(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f{sub 0} drift. We present isosurfaces of the ?f minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO{sub 3}(101{sup ¯}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  12. Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

  13. Once Again about the Generation Gap: Women of Ukrainian Descent in the U.S.A. and their Community-Building Efforts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koshulap, Iryna

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 Once Again about the Generation Gap: Women of Ukrainianbeen nurtured by several generations of Ukrainian women. And

  14. IEEE MICROWAVE AND GUIDED WAVE LETTERS, VOL. 7, NO. 10, OCTOBER 1997 329 Air-Gap Stacked Spiral Inductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    Inductor Seung Won Paek and Kwang Seok Seo Abstract--In this letter, we propose an air-gap stacked spiral and Materials Laboratory, LG Corporate Institute of Technology, Seoul 137-140, Korea. K. S. Seo

  15. Twenty Eighth International Conference on Information Systems, Montreal 2007 1 BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN BUSINESS STRATEGY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, Carolyn

    ® Registered trademark application pending, Fraunhofer USA and Fraunhofer IESE. #12;Information SystemsTwenty Eighth International Conference on Information Systems, Montreal 2007 1 BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN BUSINESS STRATEGY AND SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT Information Systems Strategy and Governance Victor

  16. Twenty Eighth International Conference on Information Systems, Montreal 2007 1 BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN BUSINESS STRATEGY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basili, Victor R.

    ® ® Registered trademark application pending, Fraunhofer USA and Fraunhofer IESE. #12;Information SystemsTwenty Eighth International Conference on Information Systems, Montreal 2007 1 BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN BUSINESS STRATEGY AND SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT Information Systems Strategy and Governance Victor

  17. Characterization of Trivalent Graphs with Minimal Eigenvalue Gap* Clemens Brand,a Barry Guiduli,b,** and Wilfried Imrichc,***

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babai, László

    Characterization of Trivalent Graphs with Minimal Eigenvalue Gap* Clemens Brand,a Barry Guiduli is the mirror image of one of these blocks. Each interior block is of the type: or (2) We will refer

  18. Tetracene air-gap single-crystal field-effect transistors Yu Xia, Vivek Kalihari, and C. Daniel Frisbiea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Tetracene air-gap single-crystal field-effect transistors Yu Xia, Vivek Kalihari, and C. Daniel FETs utilizing an air or vacuum gap as the gate dielectric. The linear mobility of the device can be as high as 1.6 cm2 /V s in air, with a subthreshold slope lower than 0.5 V nF/decade cm2 . By changing

  19. Thermal conductivity of the electrode gap of a thermionic converter, filled with inert gases, at low pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modin, V.A.; Nikolaev, Y.V.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data is presented on the thermal conductivity of the electrode gap of a thermionic converter filled with He, Ar, and Xe in the pressure range 40--550 Pa. The need to account for the coefficients of thermal accommodation of the emitter-inert-gas-collector system in this range is shown. The accommodation coefficients for different temperature regimes are measured and expressions are obtained to calculate the heat flux transported by the inert gases in the electrode gap.

  20. RESOLVING THE GAP AND AU-SCALE ASYMMETRIES IN THE PRE-TRANSITIONAL DISK OF V1247 ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, Stefan; Espaillat, Catherine; Wilner, David J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ireland, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Sitko, Michael L.; Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Werren, Chelsea [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Monnier, John D.; Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 918 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Grady, Carol A. [Eureka Scientific Inc., Oakland, CA 94602 (United States); Harries, Tim J. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Hoenig, Sebastian F. [Department of Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Broida Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Russell, Ray W. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre-transitional disks are protoplanetary disks with a gapped disk structure, potentially indicating the presence of young planets in these systems. In order to explore the structure of these objects and their gap-opening mechanism, we observed the pre-transitional disk V1247 Orionis using the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, the Keck Interferometer, Keck-II, Gemini South, and IRTF. This allows us to spatially resolve the AU-scale disk structure from near- to mid-infrared wavelengths (1.5-13 {mu}m), tracing material at different temperatures and over a wide range of stellocentric radii. Our observations reveal a narrow, optically thick inner-disk component (located at 0.18 AU from the star) that is separated from the optically thick outer disk (radii {approx}> 46 AU), providing unambiguous evidence for the existence of a gap in this pre-transitional disk. Surprisingly, we find that the gap region is filled with significant amounts of optically thin material with a carbon-dominated dust mineralogy. The presence of this optically thin gap material cannot be deduced solely from the spectral energy distribution, yet it is the dominant contributor at mid-infrared wavelengths. Furthermore, using Keck/NIRC2 aperture masking observations in the H, K', and L' bands, we detect asymmetries in the brightness distribution on scales of {approx}15-40 AU, i.e., within the gap region. The detected asymmetries are highly significant, yet their amplitude and direction changes with wavelength, which is not consistent with a companion interpretation but indicates an inhomogeneous distribution of the gap material. We interpret this as strong evidence for the presence of complex density structures, possibly reflecting the dynamical interaction of the disk material with sub-stellar mass bodies that are responsible for the gap clearing.