National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for minimum efficiency performance

  1. Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael

    2012-07-01

    As part of the ongoing effort to estimate the foreseeable impacts of aggressive minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) programs in the worlds major economies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a scenario to analyze the technical potential of MEPS in 13 major economies around the world1 . The best available technology (BAT) scenario seeks to determine the maximum potential savings that would result from diffusion of the most efficient available technologies in these major economies.

  2. Confronting Regulatory Cost and Quality Expectations. An Exploration of Technical Change in Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Margaret; Spurlock, C. Anna; Yang, Hung-Chia

    2015-09-21

    The dual purpose of this project was to contribute to basic knowledge about the interaction between regulation and innovation and to inform the cost and benefit expectations related to technical change which are embedded in the rulemaking process of an important area of national regulation. The area of regulation focused on here is minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances and other energy-using products. Relevant both to U.S. climate policy and energy policy for buildings, MEPS remove certain product models from the market that do not meet specified efficiency thresholds.

  3. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

  4. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

  5. Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-07-01

    This study analyzes the financial impacts on consumers of minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances that could be implemented in 13 major economies around the world. We use the Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), to analyze various appliance efficiency target levels to estimate the net present value (NPV) of policies designed to provide maximum energy savings while not penalizing consumers financially. These policies constitute what we call the cost-effective potential (CEP) scenario. The CEP scenario is designed to answer the question: How high can we raise the efficiency bar in mandatory programs while still saving consumers money?

  6. Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of ...

  7. Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Products into Federal Acquisition Documents | Department of Energy Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling Products into Federal Acquisition Documents Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling Products into Federal Acquisition Documents The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) organized information about FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and water heating products into tables

  8. Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product categories. Download the tables below to incorporate FEMP and ENERGY STAR purchasing requirements into federal product acquisition documents.

  9. Solar Performance and Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The conversion efficiency of a photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, is the percentage of the solar energy shining on a PV device that is converted into usable electricity. Improving this conversion efficiency is a key goal of research and helps make PV technologies cost-competitive with conventional sources of energy.

  10. ASHRAE Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product categories. Download the tables below to incorporate FEMP and ENERGY STAR purchasing requirements into federal product acquisition documents.

  11. Sandia Inverter Performance Test Protocol Efficiency Weighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inverter Performance Test Protocol Efficiency Weighting Alternatives Jeff Newmiller , ... Abstract-The Sandia Inverter Performance Test Protocol defined two possible ...

  12. Industrial and Process Efficiency Performance Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers the Industrial and Process Efficiency (IPE) Program to provide performance-based incentives to manufacturers and data...

  13. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Case study describes...

  14. Example Performance Targets and Efficiency Packages Greensburg, Kansas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation shows the energy performance targets and efficiency packages for residential buildings in Greensburg, Kansas.

  15. Performance of the Low-Efficiency Diesel Particulate Filter for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of the Low-Efficiency Diesel Particulate Filter for Diesel PM Reduction Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) ...

  16. Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale ...

  17. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study describes an outline of energy efficiency opportunities in federal high-performance computing data centers.

  18. Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Centrifugal Contactors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors Annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) are being evaluated for process-scale solvent extraction operations in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) separations goals. Process-scale annular

  19. Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Centrifugal Contactors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service.

  20. Measure Guideline: Energy-Efficient Window Performance and Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

    2012-11-01

    This document provides guidelines for the selection of energy-efficient windows in new and existing residential construction in all US climate zones. It includes information on window products, their attributes and performance. It provides cost/benefit information on window energy savings as well as information on non-energy benefits such as thermal comfort and reduced HVAC demands. The document also provides information on energy impacts of design decisions such as window orientation, total glazing area and shading devices and conditions. Information on resources for proper window installation is included as well. This document is for builders, homeowners, designers and anyone making decisions about selecting energy efficient window. It is intended to complement other Building America information and efforts.

  1. FASTSim: A Model to Estimate Vehicle Efficiency, Cost and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Wang, L.; Wood, E.; Lopp, S.; Ramroth, L.

    2015-05-04

    The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is a high-level advanced vehicle powertrain systems analysis tool supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. FASTSim provides a quick and simple approach to compare powertrains and estimate the impact of technology improvements on light- and heavy-duty vehicle efficiency, performance, cost, and battery batches of real-world drive cycles. FASTSim’s calculation framework and balance among detail, accuracy, and speed enable it to simulate thousands of driven miles in minutes. The key components and vehicle outputs have been validated by comparing the model outputs to test data for many different vehicles to provide confidence in the results. A graphical user interface makes FASTSim easy and efficient to use. FASTSim is freely available for download from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s website (see www.nrel.gov/fastsim).

  2. Measure Guideline. Energy-Efficient Window Performance and Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmody, John; Haglund, Kerry

    2012-11-01

    This document provides guidelines for the selection of energy-efficient windows in new and existing residential construction in all U.S. climate zones. It includes information on window products, their attributes and performance. It provides cost/benefit information on window energy savings as well as information on non-energy benefits such as thermal comfort and reduced HVAC demands. The report also provides information on energy impacts of design decisions such as window orientation, total glazing area and shading devices and conditions. Information on resources for proper window installation is included as well.

  3. High Performance Healthcare Buildings: A Roadmap to Improved Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett C.; Tschudi, William F.

    2009-09-08

    This document presents a road map for improving the energy efficiency of hospitals and other healthcare facilities. The report compiles input from a broad array of experts in healthcare facility design and operations. The initial section lists challenges and barriers to efficiency improvements in healthcare. Opportunities are organized around the following ten themes: understanding and benchmarking energy use; best practices and training; codes and standards; improved utilization of existing HVAC designs and technology; innovation in HVAC design and technology; electrical system design; lighting; medical equipment and process loads; economic and organizational issues; and the design of next generation sustainable hospitals. Achieving energy efficiency will require a broad set of activities including research, development, deployment, demonstration, training, etc., organized around 48 specific objectives. Specific activities are prioritized in consideration of potential impact, likelihood of near- or mid-term feasibility and anticipated cost-effectiveness. This document is intended to be broad in consideration though not exhaustive. Opportunities and needs are identified and described with the goal of focusing efforts and resources.

  4. Standardized Retrofit Packages - What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance: Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Webinar Series Standardized Retrofit Packages - What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance: Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Scott Yee March 19 th , 2014 1 Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance 2 MEEA is a collaborative network whose purpose is to advance energy efficiency to support sustainable economic development and environmental preservation. Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Midwest Energy Efficiency

  5. Consumer-products minimum energy-efficiency-standards program. Topical report on Subtask 3. 1. Evaluation of energy consumption savings of boost heaters in dishwashers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    An analysis of the energy conservation and life cycle cost benefits of boost heaters for dishwashers is presented to provide technical information to assist in determining whether to modify the dishwasher test procedure to include boost heaters. Two manufacturers are offering dishwashers which have an inlet water temperature requirement of 120/sup 0/F. Cleaning performance in these appliances is maintained with an electric coil in the sump of the dishwasher, which boosts the incoming water to its final temperature. Both manufacturers have petitioned DOE for exemption from efficiency standards, since current DOE test procedures give no credit for water heater energy savings. The evaluation shows boost heaters to be energy conserving for all conditions. The life cycle cost analysis indicates boost heaters are cost effective in all cases for homes with electric water heaters, and in most cases for homes having gas water heaters. Additionally the proposed standards for dishwashers will lower water consumption in 1985 model dishwashers such that boost heaters will become cost effective in all cases.

  6. Preserving Envelope Efficiency in Performance Based Code Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Sullivan, Greg P.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2015-06-20

    The City of Seattle 2012 Energy Code (Seattle 2014), one of the most progressive in the country, is under revision for its 2015 edition. Additionally, city personnel participate in the development of the next generation of the Washington State Energy Code and the International Energy Code. Seattle has pledged carbon neutrality by 2050 including buildings, transportation and other sectors. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Seattle in order to understand the implications of one potential direction for its code development, limiting trade-offs of long-lived building envelope components less stringent than the prescriptive code envelope requirements by using better-than-code but shorter-lived lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) components through the total building performance modeled energy compliance path. Weaker building envelopes can permanently limit building energy performance even as lighting and HVAC components are upgraded over time, because retrofitting the envelope is less likely and more expensive. Weaker building envelopes may also increase the required size, cost and complexity of HVAC systems and may adversely affect occupant comfort. This report presents the results of this technical assistance. The use of modeled energy code compliance to trade-off envelope components with shorter-lived building components is not unique to Seattle and the lessons and possible solutions described in this report have implications for other jurisdictions and energy codes.

  7. Webinar: Impacts of Energy Efficiency on the Financial Performance of Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy conducted a review of existing market research on the impact of Energy Efficiency and Green Labels on building financial performance. This webinar will review the results...

  8. Demonstration and Performance Monitoring of Foundation Heat Exchangers (FHX) in Ultra-High Energy Efficient Research Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Piljae; Hughes, Patrick; Liu, Xiaobing

    2012-01-01

    The more widespread use of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) systems has been hindered by their high first cost, which is mainly driven by the cost of the drilling and excavation for installation of ground heat exchangers (GHXs). A new foundation heat exchanger (FHX) technology was proposed to reduce first cost by placing the heat exchanger into the excavations made during the course of construction (e.g., the overcut for the basement and/or foundation and run-outs for water supply and the septic field). Since they reduce or eliminate the need for additional drilling or excavation, foundation heat exchangers have the potential to significantly reduce or eliminate the first cost premium associated with GSHPs. Since December 2009, this FHX technology has been demonstrated in two ultra-high energy efficient new research houses in the Tennessee Valley, and the performance data has been closely monitored as well. This paper introduces the FHX technology with the design, construction and demonstration of the FHX and presents performance monitoring results of the FHX after one year of monitoring. The performance monitoring includes hourly maximum and minimum entering water temperature (EWT) in the FHX compared with the typical design range, temperature difference (i.e., T) across the FHX, and hourly heat transfer rate to/from the surrounding soil.

  9. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  10. Expert Meeting Report: Achieving the Best Installed Performance from High-Efficiency Residential Gas Furnaces

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Achieving the Best Installed Performance from High- Efficiency Residential Gas Furnaces Larry Brand Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) March 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the

  11. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  12. Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Characterization of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Fueled with Hydrogen/Natural Gas Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Amar Patil

    2007-06-30

    Hydrogen is an attractive fuel source not only because it is abundant and renewable but also because it produces almost zero regulated emissions. Internal combustion engines fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) are operated throughout a variety of industries in a number of mobile and stationary applications. While CNG engines offer many advantages over conventional gasoline and diesel combustion engines, CNG engine performance can be substantially improved in the lean operating region. Lean operation has a number of benefits, the most notable of which is reduced emissions. However, the extremely low flame propagation velocities of CNG greatly restrict the lean operating limits of CNG engines. Hydrogen, however, has a high flame speed and a wide operating limit that extends into the lean region. The addition of hydrogen to a CNG engine makes it a viable and economical method to significantly extend the lean operating limit and thereby improve performance and reduce emissions. Drawbacks of hydrogen as a fuel source, however, include lower power density due to a lower heating value per unit volume as compared to CNG, and susceptibility to pre-ignition and engine knock due to wide flammability limits and low minimum ignition energy. Combining hydrogen with CNG, however, overcomes the drawbacks inherent in each fuel type. Objectives of the current study were to evaluate the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas as a fuel for conventional natural gas engines. The experiment and data analysis included evaluation of engine performance, efficiency, and emissions along with detailed in-cylinder measurements of key physical parameters. This provided a detailed knowledge base of the impact of using hydrogen/natural gas blends. A four-stroke, 4.2 L, V-6 naturally aspirated natural gas engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer was used to measure the impact of hydrogen/natural gas blends on performance, thermodynamic efficiency and exhaust gas emissions in a reciprocating four stroke cycle engine. The test matrix varied engine load and air-to-fuel ratio at throttle openings of 50% and 100% at equivalence ratios of 1.00 and 0.90 for hydrogen percentages of 10%, 20% and 30% by volume. In addition, tests were performed at 100% throttle opening, with an equivalence ratio of 0.98 and a hydrogen blend of 20% to further investigate CO emission variations. Data analysis indicated that the use of hydrogen/natural gas fuel blend penalizes the engine operation with a 1.5 to 2.0% decrease in torque, but provided up to a 36% reduction in CO, a 30% reduction in NOX, and a 5% increase in brake thermal efficiency. These results concur with previous results published in the open literature. Further reduction in emissions can be obtained by retarding the ignition timing.

  13. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program: High Performance Manufactured Home Prototyping and Construction Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewes, T.; Peeks, B.

    2013-11-01

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50 percent over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

  14. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program: High Performance Manufactured Home Prototyping and Construction Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewes, Tom; Peeks, Brady

    2013-11-01

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50% over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

  15. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650C to 1000C. Selective efficiency (?sel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ?sel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  16. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from themore » receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.« less

  17. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiencysel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  18. EFFECT OF ELECTROLYZER CONFIGURATION AND PERFORMANCE ON HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS NET THERMAL EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M

    2007-03-16

    Hybrid Sulfur cycle is gaining popularity as a possible means for massive production of hydrogen from nuclear energy. Several different ways of carrying out the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis step are being pursued by a number of researchers. These alternatives are evaluated with complete flowsheet simulations and on a common design basis using Aspen Plus{trademark}. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assess the performance potential of each configuration, and the flowsheets are optimized for energy recovery. Net thermal efficiencies are calculated for the best set of operating conditions for each flowsheet and the results compared. This will help focus attention on the most promising electrolysis alternatives. The sensitivity analyses should also help identify those features that offer the greatest potential for improvement.

  19. Chapter 20: Data Center IT Efficiency Measures. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures; Period of Performance: September 2011 … December 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Data Center IT Efficiency Measures The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Robert Huang The Cadmus Group, Inc. Waltham, Massachusetts Eric Masanet Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-63181 January 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy

  20. Targeting 100! Advanced Energy Efficient Building Technologies for High Performance Hospitals: Executive Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burpee, Heather; Loveland, Joel; Helmers, Aaron

    2015-09-02

    This research, Targeting 100!, provides a conceptual framework and decision-making structure at a schematic design level of precision for hospital owners, architects and engineers to radically reduce energy use in hospitals. Following the goals of Architecture 2030 and The 2030 Challenge, it offers access to design strategies and the cost implications of those strategies for new hospitals to utilize 60% less energy. The name, Targeting 100!, comes from the 2030 Challenge energy reduction goal for hospitals; a 60% energy use reduction from typical acute care hospital targets approximately 100 KBtu/SF Year, thus the name Targeting 100!. Targeting 100! was developed through funding partnerships with the US Department of Energy and the Northwest Energy Efficiencys BetterBricks Initiative. The technical team was led by the University of Washington Integrated Design Lab supported by deep collaboration with Solarc Architecture and Engineering, TBD Cost Consultants, and NBBJ Architecture. Through extensive research and design development, Targeting 100! provides a framework for developing high performance healthcare projects today and into the future. An online tool houses a Targeting 100! knowlegebase and roadmap. It can be accessed at: www.idlseattle.com/t100. The webtool is structured from high-level overview materials to detailed library with modeling inputs and outputs, providing a comprehensive report of the background, data, and outcomes from the project.

  1. Measuring and tuning energy efficiency on large scale high performance computing platforms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laros, James H., III

    2011-08-01

    Recognition of the importance of power in the field of High Performance Computing, whether it be as an obstacle, expense or design consideration, has never been greater and more pervasive. While research has been conducted on many related aspects, there is a stark absence of work focused on large scale High Performance Computing. Part of the reason is the lack of measurement capability currently available on small or large platforms. Typically, research is conducted using coarse methods of measurement such as inserting a power meter between the power source and the platform, or fine grained measurements using custom instrumented boards (with obvious limitations in scale). To collect the measurements necessary to analyze real scientific computing applications at large scale, an in-situ measurement capability must exist on a large scale capability class platform. In response to this challenge, we exploit the unique power measurement capabilities of the Cray XT architecture to gain an understanding of power use and the effects of tuning. We apply these capabilities at the operating system level by deterministically halting cores when idle. At the application level, we gain an understanding of the power requirements of a range of important DOE/NNSA production scientific computing applications running at large scale (thousands of nodes), while simultaneously collecting current and voltage measurements on the hosting nodes. We examine the effects of both CPU and network bandwidth tuning and demonstrate energy savings opportunities of up to 39% with little or no impact on run-time performance. Capturing scale effects in our experimental results was key. Our results provide strong evidence that next generation large-scale platforms should not only approach CPU frequency scaling differently, but could also benefit from the capability to tune other platform components, such as the network, to achieve energy efficient performance.

  2. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: AligningManagement, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2007-07-01

    More than fifteen years after the launch of programs in theU.K. and U.S., industry still offers one of the largest opportunities forenergy savings worldwide. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimatesthe savings potential from cost-optimization of industrial motor-drivensystems alone at 7 percent of global electricity use. The U.S. Departmentof Energy (USDOE) Industrial Technologies Program estimates 7 percentsavings potential in total US industrial energy use through theapplication of proven best practice. Simple paybacks for these types ofprojects are frequently two years or less. The technology required toachieve these savings is widely available; the technical skills requiredto identify energy saving opportunities are known and transferable.Although programs like USDOE's Best Practices have been highlysuccessful, most plants, as supported by 2002 MECS data, remain eitherunaware or unmotivated to improve their energy efficiency--as evidencedby the 98 percent of US industrial facilities reporting to MECS say thatthey lack a full-time energy manager. With the renewed interest in energyefficiency worldwide and the emergence of carbon trading and newfinancial instruments such as white certificates1, there is a need tointroduce greater transparency into the way that industrial facilitiesidentify, develop, and document energy efficiency projects. Historically,industrial energy efficiency projects have been developed by plantengineers, frequently with assistance from consultants and/or supplierswith highly specialized technical skills. Under this scenario,implementation of energy efficiency improvements is dependent onindividuals. These individuals typically include "champions" within anindustrial facility or corporation, working in cooperation withconsultants or suppliers who have substantial knowledge based on years ofexperience. This approach is not easily understood by others without thisspecialized technical knowledge, penetrates the market fairly slowly, andhas no assurance of persistence, since champions may leave the company orbe reassigned after project completion.This paper presents an alternatescenario that builds on the body of expert knowledge concerning energymanagement best practices and the experience of industrial champions toengage industry in continuous energy efficiency improvement at thefacility rather than the individual level. Under this scenario,standardized methodologies for applying and validating energy managementbest practices in industrial facilities will be developed through aconsensus process involving both plant personnel and specializedconsultants and suppliers. The resulting protocols will describe aprocess or framework for conducting an energy savings assessment andverifying the results that will be transparent to policymakers, managers,and the financial community, and validated by a third-party organization.Additionally, a global dialogue is being initiated by the United NationsIndustrial Development Organization (UNIDO) concerning the development ofan international industrial energy management standard that would be ISOcompatible. The proposed scenario will combine the resulting standardwith the best practice protocols for specific energy systems (i.e.,steam, process heating, compressed air, pumping systems, etc.) to formthe foundation of a third party, performance-based certification programfor the overall industrial facility that is compatible with existingmanagement systems, including ISO 9001:2000, 14001:2004 and 6 Sigma. Thelong term goal of this voluntary, industry designed certification programis to develop a transparent, globally accepted system for validatingenergy efficiency projects and management practices. This system wouldcreate a verified record of energy savings with potential market valuethat could be recognized among sectors and countries.

  3. Building America Expert Meeting: Achieving the Best Installed Performance from High-Efficiency Residential Gas Furnaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes a Building America expert meeting hosted on July 28, 2011, by the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit team. The purpose of this meeting was to identify installation practices that provide the best installed efficiency for residential gas furnaces, explain how AFUE and field efficiency can differ, and investigate the impact of installation practices on the efficiency and long-term durability of the furnace.

  4. Expert Meeting Report: Achieving the Best Installed Performance from High-Efficiency Residential Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, Larry

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a Building America expert meeting hosted on July 28, 2011, by the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) team. The purpose of this meeting was to identify installation practices that provide the best installed efficiency for residential gas furnaces, explain how AFUE and field efficiency can differ, and investigate the impact of installation practices on the efficiency and long-term durability of the furnace.

  5. Performance of the Low-Efficiency Diesel Particulate Filter for Diesel PM Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  6. Investigating the Interplay between Energy Efficiency and Resilience in High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Li; Song, Shuaiwen; Wu, Panruo; Chen, Zizhong; Ge, Rong; Kerbyson, Darren J.

    2015-05-29

    Energy efficiency and resilience are two crucial challenges for HPC systems to reach exascale. While energy efficiency and resilience issues have been extensively studied individually, little has been done to understand the interplay between energy efficiency and resilience for HPC systems. Decreasing the supply voltage associated with a given operating frequency for processors and other CMOS-based components can significantly reduce power consumption. However, this often raises system failure rates and consequently increases application execution time. In this work, we present an energy saving undervolting approach that leverages the mainstream resilience techniques to tolerate the increased failures caused by undervolting.

  7. NREL Enables Efficient Data Exchange for Home Performance Companies (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merket, N.

    2014-01-01

    NREL supports standard data transfer protocol to streamline communication of home performance tracking systems and upgrade analysis software.

  8. Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2004 the Energy Efficiency Standards Act (EESA of 2004) became law in the State of Maryland. The General Assembly passed the EESA to establish minimum energy efficiency standards on nine...

  9. Development of an Online Toolkit for Measuring Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Performance -- Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Na

    2013-03-13

    This study analyzes the market needs for building performance evaluation tools. It identifies the existing gaps and provides a roadmap for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a toolkit with which to optimize energy performance of a commercial building over its life cycle.

  10. Fuel-efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkinson, R.C.H.

    1982-01-01

    The uses and limitations of typical Pilot Operating Handbook cruise performance data, for constructing cruise performance models suitable for maximizing specific range, are first examined. These data are found to be inadequate for constructing such models. A new model of General Aviation piston-prop airplane cruise performance is then developed. This model consists of two subsystem models: the airframe-propeller-atmosphere subsystem model; and the engine-atmosphere subsystem model. The new model facilitates maximizing specific range; and by virtue of its simplicity and low volume data storage requirements, appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation.

  11. Use of non evaporable getter pumps to ensure long term performances of high quantum efficiency photocathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sertore, Daniele Michelato, Paolo; Monaco, Laura; Manini, Paolo; Siviero, Fabrizio

    2014-05-15

    High quantum efficiency photocathodes are routinely used as laser triggered emitters in the advanced high brightness electron sources based on radio frequency guns. The sensitivity of “semiconductor” type photocathodes to vacuum levels and gas composition requires special care during preparation and handling. This paper will discuss the results obtained using a novel pumping approach based on coupling a 20 l s{sup −1} sputter ion getter pump with a CapaciTorr® D100 non evaporable getter (NEG) pump. A pressure of 8⋅10{sup −8} Pa was achieved using only a sputter ion pump after a 6 day bake-out. With the addition of a NEG pump, a pressure of 2⋅10{sup −9} Pa was achieved after a 2 day bake-out. These pressure values were maintained without power due to the ability of the NEG to pump gases by chemical reaction. Long term monitoring of cathodes quantum efficiencies was also carried out at different photon wavelengths for more than two years, showing no degradation of the photoemissive film properties.

  12. Micro-optics for high-efficiency optical performance and simplified tracking for concentrated photovoltaics (CPV).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Filatov, Anton; Lentine, Anthony L.; Sweatt, William C.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2010-02-01

    Micro-optical 5mm lenses in 50mm sub-arrays illuminate arrays of photovoltaic cells with 49X concentration. Fine tracking over {+-}10{sup o} FOV in sub-array allows coarse tracking by meter-sized solar panels. Plastic prototype demonstrated for 400nm < {lambda} < 1600 nm. We have designed a solar collector that will be composed of 50-mm-diameter sub-arrays, each containing {approx}100 5-mm plastic micro-lenses. Each micro-lens illuminates a stack of about four 0.7mm PV cells that collect sunlight from 400nm to 1600 nm with a theoretical efficiency approaching 50%. Each sub-array has internal solar tracking and alignment over a {+-}10{sup o} field, so a large array of sub-arrays only needs to coarsely track the sun. The refractive lenses in the design are thin so the optical transmission can be >90% and the optics will weigh very little. There are other optical properties incorporated in this design that help the photovoltaic cells to operate very efficiently. We are building a pre-prototype system now, and will describe our progress at the conference.

  13. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program High-Performance Test Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewes, Tom; Peeks, Brady

    2015-09-01

    This project represents the third phase of a multi-year effort to develop and bring to market a High Performance Manufactured Home (HPMH), which is intended to make significant progress toward performing as zero-net-energy ready. The scope of this project involved building four HPMH prototypes, resulting in what is expected to be a 30% savings relative to the Building America Benchmark. (The actual percent savings varies depending on choice of heating equipment and climate zone). Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This report describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability during 2014. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.

  14. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program High-Performance Test Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewes, Tom; Peeks, Brady

    2015-09-15

    ?This project represents the third phase of a multi-year effort to develop and bring to market a High Performance Manufactured Home (HPMH). The scope of this project involved building four HPMH prototypes, resulting in what is expected to be a 30% savings relative to the Building America Benchmark. (The actual % savings varies depending on choice of heating equipment and climate zone). The HPMH home is intended to make significant progress toward performing as zero-net-energy ready. Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This report describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability during 2014. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.

  15. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation – Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-04-29

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles.

  16. HybridStore: A Cost-Efficient, High-Performance Storage System Combining SSDs and HDDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae; Gupta, Aayush; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Piotr, Berman; Sivasubramaniam, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Unlike the use of DRAM for caching or buffering, certain idiosyncrasies of NAND Flash-based solid-state drives (SSDs) make their integration into existing systems non-trivial. Flash memory suffers from limits on its reliability, is an order of magnitude more expensive than the magnetic hard disk drives (HDDs), and can sometimes be as slow as the HDD (due to excessive garbage collection (GC) induced by high intensity of random writes). Given these trade-offs between HDDs and SSDs in terms of cost, performance, and lifetime, the current consensus among several storage experts is to view SSDs not as a replacement for HDD but rather as a complementary device within the high-performance storage hierarchy. We design and evaluate such a hybrid system called HybridStore to provide: (a) HybridPlan: improved capacity planning technique to administrators with the overall goal of operating within cost-budgets and (b) HybridDyn: improved performance/lifetime guarantees during episodes of deviations from expected workloads through two novel mechanisms: write-regulation and fragmentation busting. As an illustrative example of HybridStore s ef cacy, HybridPlan is able to nd the most cost-effective storage con guration for a large scale workload of Microsoft Research and suggest one MLC SSD with ten 7.2K RPM HDDs instead of fourteen 7.2K RPM HDDs only. HybridDyn is able to reduce the average response time for an enterprise scale random-write dominant workload by about 71% as compared to a HDD-based system.

  17. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation – Cumulative; Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  18. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation – Gen 2 – Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  19. Annual Performance Evaluation of a Pair of Energy Efficient Houses (WC3 and WC4) in Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C; Jackson, Roderick K; Boudreaux, Philip R

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in 2008, two pairs of energy-saver houses were built at Wolf Creek in Oak Ridge, TN. These houses were designed to maximize energy efficiency using new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The first two houses contained 3713 square feet of conditioned area and were designated as WC1 and WC2; the second pair consisted of 2721 square feet conditioned area with crawlspace foundation and they re called WC3 and WC4. This report is focused on the annual energy performance of WC3 and WC4, and how they compare against a previously benchmarked maximum energy efficient house of a similar footprint. WC3 and WC4 are both about 55-60% more efficient than traditional new construction. Each house showcases a different envelope system: WC3 is built with advanced framing featured cellulose insulation partially mixed with phase change materials (PCM); and WC4 house has cladding composed of an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS). The previously benchmarked house was one of three built at the Campbell Creek subdivision in Knoxville, TN. This house (CC3) was designed as a transformation of a builder house (CC1) with the most advanced energy-efficiency features, including solar electricity and hot water, which market conditions are likely to permit within the 2012 2015 period. The builder house itself was representative of a standard, IECC 2006 code-certified, all-electric house built by the builder to sell around 2005 2008.

  20. Performance Verification of Production-Scalable Energy-Efficient Solutions: Winchester/Camberley Homes Mixed-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-07-01

    Winchester/Camberley Homes collaborated with the Building America team Partnership for Home Innovation to develop a new set of high performance home designs that could be applicable on a production scale. The new home designs are to be constructed in the mixed humid climate zone and could eventually apply to all of the builder's home designs to meet or exceed future energy codes or performance-based programs. However, the builder recognized that the combination of new wall framing designs and materials, higher levels of insulation in the wall cavity, and more detailed air sealing to achieve lower infiltration rates changes the moisture characteristics of the wall system. In order to ensure long term durability and repeatable successful implementation with few call-backs, the project team demonstrated through measured data that the wall system functions as a dynamic system, responding to changing interior and outdoor environmental conditions within recognized limits of the materials that make up the wall system. A similar investigation was made with respect to the complete redesign of the HVAC systems to significantly improve efficiency while maintaining indoor comfort. Recognizing the need to demonstrate the benefits of these efficiency features, the builder offered a new house model to serve as a test case to develop framing designs, evaluate material selections and installation requirements, changes to work scopes and contractor learning curves, as well as to compare theoretical performance characteristics with measured results.

  1. Performance Verification of Production-Scalable Energy-Efficient Solutions: Winchester/Camberley Homes Mixed-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-07-01

    Winchester/Camberley Homes with the Building America program and its NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership collaborated to develop a new set of high performance home designs that could be applicable on a production scale. The new home designs are to be constructed in the mixed humid climate zone four and could eventually apply to all of the builder's home designs to meet or exceed future energy codes or performance-based programs. However, the builder recognized that the combination of new wall framing designs and materials, higher levels of insulation in the wall cavity, and more detailed air sealing to achieve lower infiltration rates changes the moisture characteristics of the wall system. In order to ensure long term durability and repeatable successful implementation with few call-backs, this report demonstrates through measured data that the wall system functions as a dynamic system, responding to changing interior and outdoor environmental conditions within recognized limits of the materials that make up the wall system. A similar investigation was made with respect to the complete redesign of the heating, cooling, air distribution, and ventilation systems intended to optimize the equipment size and configuration to significantly improve efficiency while maintaining indoor comfort. Recognizing the need to demonstrate the benefits of these efficiency features, the builder offered a new house model to serve as a test case to develop framing designs, evaluate material selections and installation requirements, changes to work scopes and contractor learning curves, as well as to compare theoretical performance characteristics with measured results.

  2. Position Paper on Practicable Performance Criteria for the Removal Efficiency of Volatile Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. T. Jubin; N. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan

    2012-03-01

    As a result of fuel reprocessing, volatile radionuclides may be released from the facility stack if no processes are put in place to remove them. The radionuclides that are of concern in this document are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. The question we attempted to answer is how efficient must this removal process be for each of these radionuclides? To answer this question, we examined the three regulations that may impact the degree to which these radionuclides must be reduced before process gases can be released from the facility. These regulations are 40 CFR 61 (EPA 2010a), 40 CFR 190(EPA 2010b), and 10 CFR 20 (NRC 2012). These regulations apply to the total radionuclide release and to a particular organ - the thyroid. Because these doses can be divided amongst all the radionuclides in different ways and even within the four radionuclides in question, we provided several cases. We first looked at the inventories for these radionuclides for three fuel types (PWR UOX, PWR MOX, and AHTGR), several burn-up values, and time out of reactor extending to 200 y. We calculated doses to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) with the EPA code CAP-88 (Rosnick 1992). Finally, we looked at two dose cases. Allocating all of the allowable dose to be used by the volatile radionuclides is one case, but, perhaps, unrealistic. In lieu of this, we arbitrarily selected a value of 10% of the allowable dose to be assigned to the volatile radionuclides. We calculated the required decontamination factors (DFs) for both of these cases, including the case for the thyroid dose for which 14C and 129I were the main contributors. With respect to 129I doses, we found that the highest dose was calculated with iodine as a fine particulate. The dose scaled as the fraction of the total 129I that was particulate. Therefore, we assumed for all of our calculations that 100% of the 129I was particulate and allow the user of the results given here to scale our calculated doses to their needs.

  3. Energy Efficiency Investments in Public Facilities - Developing a Pilot Mechanism for Energy Performance Contracts (EPCs) in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Roshchanka, Volha; Parker, Steven A.; Baranovskiy, Aleksandr

    2012-02-01

    : Russian public sector buildings tend to be very inefficient, which creates vast opportunities for savings. This report overviews the latest developments in the Russian legislation related to energy efficiency in the public sector, describes the major challenges the regulations pose, and proposes ways to overcome these challenges. Given Russia’s limited experience with energy performance contracts (EPCs), a pilot project can help test an implementation mechanism. This paper discusses how EPCs and other mechanisms can help harness energy savings opportunities in Russia in general, and thus, can be applicable to any Russian region.

  4. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program High-Performance Test Homes - Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    This project represents the third phase of a multi-year effort to develop and bring to market a High Performance Manufactured Home (HPMH). In this project, the Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program worked with Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction and Bonneville Power Administration to help four factory homebuilders build prototype zero energy ready manufactured homes, resulting in what is expected to be a 30% savings relative to the Building America Benchmark. (The actual % savings varies depending on choice of heating equipment and climate zone). Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This case study describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.

  5. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  6. Energy Efficiency Product Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, which were preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. Future standards, if...

  7. Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and water heating products into tables that mirror American Society of Heating, ...

  8. Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been...

  9. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  10. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents additional resources on loan standards and requirements from Elise Avers' presentation on HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements.

  11. Performance and efficiency of old newspaper deinking by combining cellulase/hemicellulase with laccase-violuric acid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Qinghua Fu Yingjuan; Gao Yang; Qin Menghua

    2009-05-15

    Performance and efficiency of old newspaper (ONP) deinking by combining cellulase/hemicellulase with laccase-violuric acid system (LVS) were investigated in this study. Brightness, effective residual ink concentration (ERIC) and physical properties were evaluated for the deinked pulp. Fiber length, coarseness, specific surface area and specific volume were also tested. The changes of dissolved lignin during the deinking processes were measured with UV spectroscopy. The fiber morphology was observed with environmental scanning electronic microscopy (ESEM). Experimental results showed that, compared to the pulp deinked with each individual enzyme, ERIC was lower for the cellulase/hemicellulase-LVS-deinked pulp. This indicated that a synergy existed in ONP deinking using a combination of enzymes. After being bleached by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, enzyme-combining deinked pulp gave higher brightness and better strength properties. Compared with individual enzyme deinked pulp, average fiber length and coarseness decreased a little for the enzyme-combining deinked pulps. A higher specific surface area and specific volume of the pulp fibers were achieved. UV analysis proved that more lignin was released during the enzyme-combining deinking process. ESEM images showed that more fibrillation was observed on the fiber surface due to synergistic treatment.

  12. Building America Case Study: Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program High-Performance Test Homes; Whole-House Solutions for New Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    ?This project represents the third phase of a multi-year effort to develop and bring to market a High Performance Manufactured Home (HPMH). The scope of this project involved building four HPMH prototypes, resulting in what is expected to be a 30% savings relative to the Building America Benchmark. (The actual % savings varies depending on choice of heating equipment and climate zone). The HPMH home is intended to make significant progress toward performing as zero-net-energy ready. Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This report describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability during 2014. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.
    home is intended to make significant progress toward performing as zero-net-energy ready. Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This report describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability during 2014. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.

  13. Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties: Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program Rois Langner, Bob Hendron, and Eric Bonnema Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-60976 August 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National

  14. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2005, Oregon passed legislation setting minimum energy efficiency standards for 11 appliances. The standards have been updated to include additional products, most recently by Senate Bill...

  15. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... DPU 36 Supplemental Review Screens * Penetration screen (Minimum load screen) * Power quality and voltage screen * Safety and reliability screen 37 Federal Energy Regulatory ...

  16. CIBO Energy Efficiency Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    The Energy Efficiency Handbook was prepared to help owner/operators get the best and most energy-efficient performance out of their boiler systems.

  17. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings Meeting Energy Savings Goals (Brochure) (Revised), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2007, a massive tornado destroyed or severely damaged 95% of Greensburg, Kansas. Since then, city and community leaders have been committed to rebuilding the town as a model sustainable community. Experts from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) worked with city leaders, business owners, and residents to identify ways to incorporate energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies into the new buildings. The town showcases energy-saving

  18. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington enacted appliance efficiency legislation in 2005, creating minimum efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have been preempted by federal law. HB 1004, signed in May 2009...

  19. Chapter 17: Residential Behavior Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures; Period of Performance September 2011 … December 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    17: Residential Behavior Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 James Stewart The Cadmus Group Waltham, Massachusetts Annika Todd Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-62497 January 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of

  20. Ultra-High-Efficiency Multijunction Cell and Receiver Module, Phase 1B: High Performance PV Exploring and Accelerating Ultimate Pathways; Final Subcontract Report, 13 May 2005 - 10 December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R. R.

    2010-03-01

    Spectrolab's two High Performance Photovoltaics primary objectives: (1) develop ultra-high-efficiency concentrator multijunction cells and (2) develop a robust concentrator cell receiver package.

  1. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    you must meet the following minimum standards listed below. * New natural gas or propane boilers must be at least 90% AFUE to be eligible. * New oil boilers must be at least...

  2. A fast tomographic method for searching the minimum free energy path

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Changjun; Huang, Yanzhao; Xiao, Yi; Jiang, Xuewei

    2014-10-21

    Minimum Free Energy Path (MFEP) provides a lot of important information about the chemical reactions, like the free energy barrier, the location of the transition state, and the relative stability between reactant and product. With MFEP, one can study the mechanisms of the reaction in an efficient way. Due to a large number of degrees of freedom, searching the MFEP is a very time-consuming process. Here, we present a fast tomographic method to perform the search. Our approach first calculates the free energy surfaces in a sequence of hyperplanes perpendicular to a transition path. Based on an objective function and the free energy gradient, the transition path is optimized in the collective variable space iteratively. Applications of the present method to model systems show that our method is practical. It can be an alternative approach for finding the state-to-state MFEP.

  3. Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties: Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langner, R.; Hendron, B.; Bonnema, E.

    2014-08-01

    The small buildings and small portfolios (SBSP) sector face a number of barriers that inhibit SBSP owners from adopting energy efficiency solutions. This pilot project focused on overcoming two of the largest barriers to financing energy efficiency in small buildings: disproportionately high transaction costs and unknown or unacceptable risk. Solutions to these barriers can often be at odds, because inexpensive turnkey solutions are often not sufficiently tailored to the unique circumstances of each building, reducing confidence that the expected energy savings will be achieved. To address these barriers, NREL worked with two innovative, forward-thinking lead partners, Michigan Saves and Energi, to develop technical solutions that provide a quick and easy process to encourage energy efficiency investments while managing risk. The pilot project was broken into two stages: the first stage focused on reducing transaction costs, and the second stage focused on reducing performance risk. In the first stage, NREL worked with the non-profit organization, Michigan Saves, to analyze the effects of 8 energy efficiency measures (EEMs) on 81 different baseline small office building models in Holland, Michigan (climate zone 5A). The results of this analysis (totaling over 30,000 cases) are summarized in a simple spreadsheet tool that enables users to easily sort through the results and find appropriate small office EEM packages that meet a particular energy savings threshold and are likely to be cost-effective.

  4. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 1st Quarter 2014; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragatz, A.

    2014-04-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  5. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 3rd Quarter 2013; Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  6. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation – 1st Quarter 2013; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  7. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation – 2nd Quarter 2013; Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  8. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation -- Gen 2 -- Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  9. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country. This cumulative report covers the project from initiation through the second quarter of 2013.

  10. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - 4th Quarter 2012; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-05-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  11. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country. This cumulative report covers the period through the third quarter of 2013.

  12. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragatz, Adam

    2013-07-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country. purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  13. Chevron: Refinery Identifies $4.4 Million in Annual Savings by Using Process Simulation Models to Perform Energy-Efficiency Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-05-01

    In an energy-efficiency study at its refinery near Salt Lake City, Utah, Chevron focused on light hydrocarbons processing. The company found it could recover hydrocarbons from its fuel gas system and sell them. By using process simulation models of special distillation columns and associated reboilers and condensers, Chevron could predict the performance of potential equipment configuration changes and process modifications. More than 25,000 MMBtu in natural gas could be saved annually if a debutanizer upgrade project and a new saturated gas plant project were completed. Together, these projects would save $4.4 million annually.

  14. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT (EECBG) - BETTER BUILDINGS NEIGHBORHOOD PROGRAM AT GREATER CINCINNATI ENERGY ALLIANCE Project Title: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training Center, a program that was developed and funded by the Energy Alliance and housed at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Nearly 100 residential and commercial contractors currently participate in the Energy Alliance’s two major programs, which have together served over 2,800 residential and 100 commercial customers. Additionally, the Energy Alliance established loan programs for homeowners, nonprofits and commercial businesses. The GC-HELP program was established to provide up to ten year low interest, unsecured loans to homeowners to cover the energy efficiency products they purchased through the Energy Alliance approved contractor base. To date the Energy Alliance has financed over $1 million in energy efficiency loans for homeowners, without any loans written off. The nonprofit business community is offered five year, fixed-interest rate loans through the Building Communities Loan Fund of $250,000. Additionally, the Energy Alliance has developed GC-PACE, a commercial financing tool that enables buildings owners to finance their energy upgrades through voluntary property assessments deploying low-interest extended-term capital from the bond market. The Energy Alliance and its partners are actively evaluating additional market-based financing solutions.

  15. DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS puzzle-693870960720.jpg PDF icon DOE CYBER ...

  16. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 PDF ...

  17. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presents additional resources on loan standards and requirements from Elise Avers' presentation on HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements. PDF icon Minimum Standards and ...

  18. Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    minimum federal and state mandated efficiency standards. Rebates will be paid within 30 days of an inspection of the system. Custom rebates are available to non-residential...

  19. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening" Dora Nakafuji and Anthony Hong, Hawaiian Electric Co. Babak Enayati, DG Techincal Standards Review Group April 30, 2014 2 Speakers Babak Enayati Chair of Massachusetts DG Technical Standards Review Group Dora Nakafuji Director of Renewable Energy Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL Anthony Hong Director of Distribution Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Standardization of

  20. Questar Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To qualify for rebates, appliances and equipment must run on gas and must meet the minimum efficiency levels stated on the program web site. The website maintains a list of appliance models which...

  1. Minimum wear tube support hole design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

    1986-01-01

    A minimum-wear through-bore (16) is defined within a heat exchanger tube support plate (14) so as to have an hourglass configuration as determined by means of a constant radiused surface curvature (18) as defined by means of an external radius (R3), wherein the surface (18) extends between the upper surface (20) and lower surface (22) of the tube support plate (14). When a heat exchange tube (12) is disposed within the tube support plate (14) so as to pass through the through-bore (16), the heat exchange tube (12) is always in contact with a smoothly curved or radiused portion of the through-bore surface (16) whereby unacceptably excessive wear upon the heat exchange tube (12), as normally developed by means of sharp edges, lands, ridges, or the like conventionally part of the tube support plates, is eliminated or substantially reduced.

  2. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Amidan, Brett G.; Sydor, Michael A.; Barrett, Christopher A.

    2015-03-31

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in. × 2 in.) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest for vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS, 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS, 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG, with values increasing as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2, where CFU denotes ‘colony forming units’). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results will be discussed in a subsequent report.

  3. Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the full transcript of the Energy Efficiency video Learn More Cool School Challenge Money Saving Energy Efficiency Tips Alliance to Save Energy: Consumer Tips Bonneville...

  4. Efficient parallel global garbage collection on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamada, Tomio; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Akinori

    1994-12-31

    On distributed-memory high-performance MPPs where processors are interconnected by an asynchronous network, efficient Garbage Collection (GC) becomes difficult due to inter-node references and references within pending, unprocessed messages. The parallel global GC algorithm (1) takes advantage of reference locality, (2) efficiently traverses references over nodes, (3) admits minimum pause time of ongoing computations, and (4) has been shown to scale up to 1024 node MPPs. The algorithm employs a global weight counting scheme to substantially reduce message traffic. The two methods for confirming the arrival of pending messages are used: one counts numbers of messages and the other uses network `bulldozing.` Performance evaluation in actual implementations on a multicomputer with 32-1024 nodes, Fujitsu AP1000, reveals various favorable properties of the algorithm.

  5. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conditions, March 2000 | Department of Energy Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 PDF icon theoretical_minimum_energies.pdf More Documents & Publications Ironmaking Process Alternatives Screening Study ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005 ITP Steel: Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study October 2004

  6. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energyspin-flip density functional theory approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  7. Energy Efficient Operation of Ammonia Refrigeration Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Abdul Qayyum; Wenning, Thomas J; Sever, Franc; Kissock, Professor Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia refrigeration systems typically offer many energy efficiency opportunities because of their size and complexity. This paper develops a model for simulating single-stage ammonia refrigeration systems, describes common energy saving opportunities, and uses the model to quantify those opportunities. The simulation model uses data that are typically available during site visits to ammonia refrigeration plants and can be calibrated to actual consumption and performance data if available. Annual electricity consumption for a base-case ammonia refrigeration system is simulated. The model is then used to quantify energy savings for six specific energy efficiency opportunities; reduce refrigeration load, increase suction pressure, employ dual suction, decrease minimum head pressure set-point, increase evaporative condenser capacity, and reclaim heat. Methods and considerations for achieving each saving opportunity are discussed. The model captures synergistic effects that result when more than one component or parameter is changed. This methodology represents an effective method to model and quantify common energy saving opportunities in ammonia refrigeration systems. The results indicate the range of savings that might be expected from common energy efficiency opportunities.

  8. Teuchos C++ memory management classes, idioms, and related topics, the complete reference : a comprehensive strategy for safe and efficient memory management in C++ for high performance computing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth

    2010-05-01

    The ubiquitous use of raw pointers in higher-level code is the primary cause of all memory usage problems and memory leaks in C++ programs. This paper describes what might be considered a radical approach to the problem which is to encapsulate the use of all raw pointers and all raw calls to new and delete in higher-level C++ code. Instead, a set of cooperating template classes developed in the Trilinos package Teuchos are used to encapsulate every use of raw C++ pointers in every use case where it appears in high-level code. Included in the set of memory management classes is the typical reference-counted smart pointer class similar to boost::shared ptr (and therefore C++0x std::shared ptr). However, what is missing in boost and the new standard library are non-reference counted classes for remaining use cases where raw C++ pointers would need to be used. These classes have a debug build mode where nearly all programmer errors are caught and gracefully reported at runtime. The default optimized build mode strips all runtime checks and allows the code to perform as efficiently as raw C++ pointers with reasonable usage. Also included is a novel approach for dealing with the circular references problem that imparts little extra overhead and is almost completely invisible to most of the code (unlike the boost and therefore C++0x approach). Rather than being a radical approach, encapsulating all raw C++ pointers is simply the logical progression of a trend in the C++ development and standards community that started with std::auto ptr and is continued (but not finished) with std::shared ptr in C++0x. Using the Teuchos reference-counted memory management classes allows one to remove unnecessary constraints in the use of objects by removing arbitrary lifetime ordering constraints which are a type of unnecessary coupling [23]. The code one writes with these classes will be more likely to be correct on first writing, will be less likely to contain silent (but deadly) memory usage errors, and will be much more robust to later refactoring and maintenance. The level of debug-mode runtime checking provided by the Teuchos memory management classes is stronger in many respects than what is provided by memory checking tools like Valgrind and Purify while being much less expensive. However, tools like Valgrind and Purify perform a number of types of checks (like usage of uninitialized memory) that makes these tools very valuable and therefore complement the Teuchos memory management debug-mode runtime checking. The Teuchos memory management classes and idioms largely address the technical issues in resolving the fragile built-in C++ memory management model (with the exception of circular references which has no easy solution but can be managed as discussed). All that remains is to teach these classes and idioms and expand their usage in C++ codes. The long-term viability of C++ as a usable and productive language depends on it. Otherwise, if C++ is no safer than C, then is the greater complexity of C++ worth what one gets as extra features? Given that C is smaller and easier to learn than C++ and since most programmers don't know object-orientation (or templates or X, Y, and Z features of C++) all that well anyway, then what really are most programmers getting extra out of C++ that would outweigh the extra complexity of C++ over C? C++ zealots will argue this point but the reality is that C++ popularity has peaked and is becoming less popular while the popularity of C has remained fairly stable over the last decade22. Idioms like are advocated in this paper can help to avert this trend but it will require wide community buy-in and a change in the way C++ is taught in order to have the greatest impact. To make these programs more secure, compiler vendors or static analysis tools (e.g. klocwork23) could implement a preprocessor-like language similar to OpenMP24 that would allow the programmer to declare (in comments) that certain blocks of code should be ''pointer-free'' or allow smaller blocks to be 'pointers allowed'. This would significantly improve the robustness of code that uses the memory management classes described here.

  9. ESPC 2.0: How New Twists on Energy Savings Performance Contracting are Improving Energy Efficiency in U.S. Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join Better Buildings Challenge Partners and Allies to learn how Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) is moving beyond the traditional education and hospital sector markets.

  10. Theoretical minimum energies to produce steel for selected conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R. J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H. W.; Brindle, R.

    2000-03-01

    An ITP study has determined the theoretical minimum energy requirements for producing steel from ore, scrap, and direct reduced iron. Dr. Richard Fruehan's report, Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, provides insight into the potential energy savings (and associated reductions in carbon dioxide emissions) for ironmaking, steelmaking, and rolling processes (PDF459 KB).

  11. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Minimizing User Burden in Building Energy Analysis Minimizing User Burden in Building Energy Analysis Lead Performer: ThermoAnalytics Inc. - Calumet, MI DOE Funding: $145,684 Cost Share: N/A Project Term: June 2014 - March 2015 Funding Opportunity: Small Business Innovation Research FY 2014 Phase 1 Release 2 Awards Project Objective ThermoAnalytics Inc. (TAI), in partnership with Skidmore, Owings, & amp; Merrill LLP (SOM), will develop an integrated workflow for constructing energy models of

  12. Electric motor systems in developing countries: Opportunities for efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, S.; Monahan, P.; Lewis, P.; Greenberg, S.; Nadel, S.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents an overview of the current status and efficiency improvement potential of industrial motor systems in developing countries. Better management of electric motor systems is of particular relevance in developing countries, where improved efficiency can lead to increased productivity and slower growth in electricity demand. Motor systems currently consume some 65--80% of the industrial electricity in developing countries. Drawing on studies from Thailand, India, Brazil, China, Pakistan, and Costa Rica, we describe potential efficiency gains in various parts of the motor system, from the electricity delivery system through the motor to the point where useful work is performed. We report evidence of a significant electricity conservation potential. Most of the efficiency improvement methods we examine are very cost-effective from a societal viewpoint, but are generally not implemented due to various barriers that deter their adoption. Drawing on experiences in North America, we discuss a range of policies to overcome these barriers, including education, training, minimum efficiency standards, motor efficiency testing protocols, technical assistance programs, and financial incentives.

  13. NREL Enables Efficient Data Exchange for Home Performance Companies (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supports standard data transfer protocol to streamline communication of home performance tracking systems and upgrade analysis software. In the world of home energy analysis, a variety of software tools are available for compiling and evaluating home energy audit data, requiring home performance companies to be fluent in several reporting platforms that span multiple utility companies and regions. A new data transfer standard, supported by researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  14. (Energy Efficiency)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... energy efficiency improvements require conditions that enable investment inflow, such as access to capital, stronger markets for energy services and market-based energy pricing. ...

  15. Water Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership ...ate.mcmordie@pnnl.gov * Francis Wheeler - Water Savers, LLC * fwheeler@watersaversllc.com ...

  16. Efficiency Vermont

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 1999, Vermont enacted legislation authorizing the Vermont Public Service Board (PSB) to establish a volumetric charge on all electric customers' bills to support energy efficiency programs....

  17. Building America Case Study: High Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    ?Ducts in conditioned space (DCS) represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. Various strategies exist for incorporating ducts within the conditioned thermal envelope. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of various DCS strategies. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, diagnostic testing, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into California's 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project complemented information collected in the California project with BEopt simulations of DCS performance in hot/dry climate regions.

  18. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To develop a new class of tires in the replacement market that improves fuel efficiency by a minimum of 3% and reduces overall tire weight by 20%. This presentation does...

  19. Building America Case Study: High Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates Partners: Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, arbi.davisenergy.com Pacific Gas and Electric Company, pge.com Building Component: Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning Application: New; single- and/or multifamily Year Tested: 2013-2014 Climate Zones: Hot-dry and mixed-dry PERFORMANCE DATA In early stages of HPD implementation, costs averaged about $1-$2/ft 2 of conditioned floor

  20. Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls Credit: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Credit: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Lead Performer: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships, Lexington, MA Partners: -- Burlington Electric Department -- Cape Light Compact -- Connecticut Light and Power -- Efficiency Vermont -- National Grid -- NSTAR Electric and Gas --

  1. Minimum Velocity Required to Transport Solid Particles from the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Required to Transport Solid Particles from the 2H-Evaporator to the Tank Farm Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Minimum Velocity Required to Transport Solid Particles ...

  2. EERE Efficiency Expert Nominated for American Service Award | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Expert Nominated for American Service Award EERE Efficiency Expert Nominated for American Service Award October 9, 2014 - 2:29pm Addthis EERE has codified minimum energy conservation standards for more than 60 categories of appliances and equipment. EERE has codified minimum energy conservation standards for more than 60 categories of appliances and equipment. John Cymbalsky, leader of EERE's Appliance Standards Program since 2010 and Sammies Award Nominee. | Photo credit

  3. Rating the performance of fenestration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arasteh, D.K.; Beck, F.A. . Windows and Daylighting Group); duPont, W.C.; Mathis, R.C. )

    1994-08-01

    During the 1980s, a wide variety of new, energy efficient fenestration systems (windows, skylights, doors, etc.) emerged on the market. However, while the products' energy efficiency had increased significantly, little effort was made to standardize the procedures used to determine and report the products' thermal performance properties. Specifiers relied heavily on manufacturers' data. These data were often determined using different procedures, often specified different properties, and some times sounded to good to be true. In addition, code officials could not accurately or efficiently implement state energy codes, so they began mandating rating procedures that often differed from state to state and sometimes within a state. NFRC's mission is to create rating procedures for thermal properties, not to set maximum or minimum property values for specific applications. Other groups -- such as ASHRAE, other code agencies or state governments -- set standards that specify minimum property requirements. Many such standards already require that fenestration thermal properties be determined using NFRC procedures. This article briefly explains NFRC's procedures for determining window heat transfer indices, discusses NFRC's efforts to validate its technical procedures, and explains how specifiers can use the NFRC rating system.

  4. National Grid (Gas)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Custom incentives are available for projects that demonstrate the use of natural gas more efficiently than industry practices and/or more efficiently than the minimum building code requirements....

  5. National Grid (Gas)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Metro New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Custom Incentives are available for projects that demonstrate the use of natural gas more efficiently than industry practices and/or more efficiently than the minimum building code requirements....

  6. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation – 4th Quarter 2013; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  7. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation – 1st Quarter 2013; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-05-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  8. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evalution - 2nd Quarter 2013; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country. This report covers the second quarter of 2013.

  9. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation – 3rd Quarter 2012; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-05-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  10. Synthesis and photocatalytic performance of an efficient Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalyst under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Yinghua; Lin, Shuanglong; Liu, Li; Hu, Jinshan; Cui, Wenquan

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: The plasmatic Ag@AgBr sensitized K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalysts. Ag@AgBr greatly increased visible light absorption for K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}. The plamonic photocatalysts exhibited enhanced activity for the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Ag@AgBr nanoparticle-sensitized K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalysts (Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}) were prepared by a facile precipitationphotoreduction method. The photocatalytic activities of the Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} nanocomposites were evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The composites exhibited excellent visible light absorption, which was attributable to the surface plasmon effect of Ag nanoparticles. The Ag@AgBr was uniformly scattered on the surface of K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and possessed sizes in the range of 2050 nm. The loading amount of Ag@AgBr was also studied, and was found to influence the absorption spectra of the resulting composites. Approximately 95.9% of RhB was degraded by Ag@AgBr (20 wt.%)/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} after irradiation for 1 h. The stability of the material was also investigated by performing consecutive runs. Additionally, studies performed using radical scavengers indicated that O{sub 2}{sup ?} and Br{sup 0} acted as the main reactive species. Based on the experimental results, a photocatalytic mechanism for organics degradation over Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} photocatalysts was proposed.

  11. THE TURBULENT CASCADE AND PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Joshua.Stawarz@Colorado.edu

    2012-08-01

    The recently protracted solar minimum provided years of interplanetary data that were largely absent in any association with observed large-scale transient behavior on the Sun. With large-scale shear at 1 AU generally isolated to corotating interaction regions, it is reasonable to ask whether the solar wind is significantly turbulent at this time. We perform a series of third-moment analyses using data from the Advanced Composition Explorer. We show that the solar wind at 1 AU is just as turbulent as at any other time in the solar cycle. Specifically, the turbulent cascade of energy scales in the same manner proportional to the product of wind speed and temperature. Energy cascade rates during solar minimum average a factor of 2-4 higher than during solar maximum, but we contend that this is likely the result of having a different admixture of high-latitude sources.

  12. Theoretical solution of the minimum charge problem for gaseous detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1990-12-01

    A theoretical model was developed for the minimum charge to trigger a gaseous detonation in spherical geometry as a generalization of the Zeldovich model. Careful comparisons were made between the theoretical predictions and experimental data on the minimum charge to trigger detonations in propane-air mixtures. The predictions are an order of magnitude too high, and there is no apparent resolution to the discrepancy. A dynamic model, which takes into account the experimentally observed oscillations in the detonation zone, may be necessary for reliable predictions. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  13. The National Fuel End-Use Efficiency Field Test: Energy Savings and Performance of an Improved Energy Conservation Measure Selection Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of an advanced residential energy conservation measure (ECM) selection technique was tested in Buffalo, New York, to verify the energy savings and program improvements achieved from use of the technique in conservation programs and provide input into determining whether utility investments in residential gas end-use conservation are cost effective. The technique analyzes a house to identify all ECMs that are cost effective in the building envelope, space-heating system, and water-heating system. The benefit-to-cost ratio (BCR) for each ECM is determined and cost-effective ECMs (BCR > 1.0) are selected once interactions between ECMs are taken into account. Eighty-nine houses with the following characteristics were monitored for the duration of the field test: occupants were low-income, houses were single-family detached houses but not mobile homes, and primary space- and water-heating systems were gas-fired. Forty-five houses received a mix of ECMs as selected by the measure selection technique (audit houses) and 44 served as a control group. Pre-weatherization data were collected from January to April 1988 and post-weatherization data were collected from December 1988 to April 1989. Space- and waterheating gas consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the two winters. A house energy consumption model and regression analysis were employed to normalize the space-heating energy savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and a 68 F indoor temperature. Space and water-heating energy savings for the audit houses were adjusted by the savings for the control houses. The average savings of 257 therms/year for the audit houses was 17% of the average pre-weatherization house gas consumption and 78% of that predicted. Average space-heating energy savings was 252 therms/year (25% of pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption and 85% of the predicted value) and average water-heating savings was 5 therms/year (2% of pre-weatherization water-heating energy consumption and 17% of predicted). The overall BCR for the ECMs was 1.24 using the same assumptions followed in the selection technique: no administration cost, residential fuel costs, real discount rate of 0.05, and no fuel escalation. A weatherization program would be cost effective at an administration cost less than $335/house. On average, the indoor temperature increased in the audit houses by 0.5 F following weatherization and decreased in the control houses by 0.1 F. The following conclusions regarding the measure selection technique were drawn from the study: (1) a significant cost-effective level of energy savings resulted, (2) space-heating energy savings and total installation costs were predicted with reasonable accuracy, indicating that the technique's recommendations are justified, (3) effectiveness improved from earlier versions and can continue to be improved, and (4) a wider variety of ECMs were installed compared to most weatherization programs. An additional conclusion of the study was that a significant indoor temperature take-back effect had not occurred.

  14. SEED: Standard Energy Efficiency Data Platform

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ordinances, portfolio managers, energy efficiency program managers, etc. Key Partners: ... building performance reporting ... workflow management and relieves ...

  15. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  16. Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  17. Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  18. Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  19. Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  20. Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  1. Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge Status graphic. May 9, 2014, the president announced an additional 2 billion goal in federal energy-efficiency upgrades to federal...

  2. Commercial building energy efficiency standards & performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... relative shorter payback periods in China 3. Huge impact: 500M m2 new construction added every year in China 4. Big potentials to push more stringent standards in the future ...

  3. Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerating the Deployment of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Technologies in South Africa A Summary of the Trust for Conservation Global Cool Cities Alliance Project In 2010, the Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Energy Minister of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) launched the U.S. - RSA Energy Dialogue to facilitate coopera- tion in a number of areas, including energy effciency and renew- able energy. In support of the U.S. - RSA Energy Dialogue, the U.S.

  4. Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane Davidson

    2008-09-30

    Energy consumption in buildings represents 40 percent of primary U.S. energy consumption, split almost equally between residential (22%) and commercial (18%) buildings.1 Space heating (31%) and cooling (12%) account for approximately 9 quadrillion Btu. Improvements in the building envelope can have a significant impact on reducing energy consumption. Thermal losses (or gains) from the roof make up 14 percent of the building component energy load. Infiltration through the building envelope, including the roof, accounts for an additional 28 percent of the heating loads and 16 percent of the cooling loads. These figures provide a strong incentive to develop and implement more energy efficient roof systems. The roof is perhaps the most challenging component of the building envelope to change for many reasons. The engineered roof truss, which has been around since 1956, is relatively low cost and is the industry standard. The roof has multiple functions. A typical wood frame home lasts a long time. Building codes vary across the country. Customer and trade acceptance of new building products and materials may impede market penetration. The energy savings of a new roof system must be balanced with other requirements such as first and life-cycle costs, durability, appearance, and ease of construction. Conventional residential roof construction utilizes closely spaced roof trusses supporting a layer of sheathing and roofing materials. Gypsum board is typically attached to the lower chord of the trusses forming the finished ceiling for the occupied space. Often in warmer climates, the HVAC system and ducts are placed in the unconditioned and otherwise unusable attic. High temperature differentials and leaky ducts result in thermal losses. Penetrations through the ceilings are notoriously difficult to seal and lead to moisture and air infiltration. These issues all contribute to greater energy use and have led builders to consider construction of a conditioned attic. The options considered to date are not ideal. One approach is to insulate between the trusses at the roof plane. The construction process is time consuming and costs more than conventional attic construction. Moreover, the problems of air infiltration and thermal bridges across the insulation remain. Another approach is to use structurally insulated panels (SIPs), but conventional SIPs are unlikely to be the ultimate solution because an additional underlying support structure is required except for short spans. In addition, wood spline and metal locking joints can result in thermal bridges and gaps in the foam. This study undertook a more innovative approach to roof construction. The goal was to design and evaluate a modular energy efficient panelized roof system with the following attributes: (1) a conditioned and clear attic space for HVAC equipment and additional finished area in the attic; (2) manufactured panels that provide structure, insulation, and accommodate a variety of roofing materials; (3) panels that require support only at the ends; (4) optimal energy performance by minimizing thermal bridging and air infiltration; (5) minimal risk of moisture problems; (6) minimum 50-year life; (7) applicable to a range of house styles, climates and conditions; (8) easy erection in the field; (9) the option to incorporate factory-installed solar systems into the panel; and (10) lowest possible cost. A nationwide market study shows there is a defined market opportunity for such a panelized roof system with production and semi-custom builders in the United States. Senior personnel at top builders expressed interest in the performance attributes and indicate long-term opportunity exists if the system can deliver a clear value proposition. Specifically, builders are interested in (1) reducing construction cycle time (cost) and (2) offering increased energy efficiency to the homebuyer. Additional living space under the roof panels is another low-cost asset identified as part of the study. The market potential is enhanced through construction activity levels in target marke

  5. Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nils Petermann

    2010-02-28

    The project goals covered both the residential and commercial windows markets and involved a range of audiences such as window manufacturers, builders, homeowners, design professionals, utilities, and public agencies. Essential goals included: (1) Creation of 'Master Toolkits' of information that integrate diverse tools, rating systems, and incentive programs, customized for key audiences such as window manufacturers, design professionals, and utility programs. (2) Delivery of education and outreach programs to multiple audiences through conference presentations, publication of articles for builders and other industry professionals, and targeted dissemination of efficient window curricula to professionals and students. (3) Design and implementation of mechanisms to encourage and track sales of more efficient products through the existing Window Products Database as an incentive for manufacturers to improve products and participate in programs such as NFRC and ENERGY STAR. (4) Development of utility incentive programs to promote more efficient residential and commercial windows. Partnership with regional and local entities on the development of programs and customized information to move the market toward the highest performing products. An overarching project goal was to ensure that different audiences adopt and use the developed information, design and promotion tools and thus increase the market penetration of energy efficient fenestration products. In particular, a crucial success criterion was to move gas and electric utilities to increase the promotion of energy efficient windows through demand side management programs as an important step toward increasing the market share of energy efficient windows.

  6. Improved initial guess for minimum energy path calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidstrup, Sren; Pedersen, Andreas; Stokbro, Kurt

    2014-06-07

    A method is presented for generating a good initial guess of a transition path between given initial and final states of a system without evaluation of the energy. An objective function surface is constructed using an interpolation of pairwise distances at each discretization point along the path and the nudged elastic band method then used to find an optimal path on this image dependent pair potential (IDPP) surface. This provides an initial path for the more computationally intensive calculations of a minimum energy path on an energy surface obtained, for example, by ab initio or density functional theory. The optimal path on the IDPP surface is significantly closer to a minimum energy path than a linear interpolation of the Cartesian coordinates and, therefore, reduces the number of iterations needed to reach convergence and averts divergence in the electronic structure calculations when atoms are brought too close to each other in the initial path. The method is illustrated with three examples: (1) rotation of a methyl group in an ethane molecule, (2) an exchange of atoms in an island on a crystal surface, and (3) an exchange of two Si-atoms in amorphous silicon. In all three cases, the computational effort in finding the minimum energy path with DFT was reduced by a factor ranging from 50% to an order of magnitude by using an IDPP path as the initial path. The time required for parallel computations was reduced even more because of load imbalance when linear interpolation of Cartesian coordinates was used.

  7. Definition of Energy Efficiency

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Users Energy Efficiency Page Energy Efficiency Definition Energy Efficiency: Definition Stairs) "Take the Stairs--Be More Energy Efficient" Person A interprets the sign as...

  8. Performance House -- A Cold Climate Challenge Home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, S.; Grab, J.; Williamson, J.

    2013-08-01

    Working with builder partners on a test homes allows for vetting of whole-house building strategies to eliminate any potential unintended consequences prior to implementing these solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, CARB partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 'Performance House' was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adapt with the homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the 'Performance House' were not cutting-edge, but simply 'best practices practiced'. The focus was on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. When seeking a 30% source energy savings targets over a comparable 2009 IECC code-built home in the cold climate zone, nearly all components of a home must be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. To help builders and architects seeking to match the performance of this home, a step-by-step guide through the building shell components of DOE's Challenge Home are provided in a pictorial story book. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a HERS Index Score of 20 (43 without PV, the minimum target was 55 for compliance). This home was also awarded the 2012 HOBI for Best Green Energy Efficient Home from the Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Connecticut.

  9. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J. R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J. A.

    2011-05-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences - the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The 'environmental packages' apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we present the minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS). Adoption of MIxS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  10. A High Efficiency PSOFC/ATS-Gas Turbine Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; M.D. Moeckel; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2001-02-01

    A study is described in which the conceptual design of a hybrid power system integrating a pressurized Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell generator and the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine was developed. The Mercury{trademark} 50 was designed by Solar Turbines as part of the US. Department of Energy Advanced Turbine Systems program. The focus of the study was to develop the hybrid power system concept that principally would exhibit an attractively-low cost of electricity (COE). The inherently-high efficiency of the hybrid cycle contributes directly to achieving this objective, and by employing the efficient, power-intensive Mercury{trademark} 50, with its relatively-low installed cost, the higher-cost SOFC generator can be optimally sized such that the minimum-COE objective is achieved. The system cycle is described, major system components are specified, the system installed cost and COE are estimated, and the physical arrangement of the major system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the system design point are also presented. In addition, two bottoming cycle options are described, and estimates of their effects on overall-system performance, cost, and COE are provided.

  11. Maryland Efficiency Program Options | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maryland Efficiency Program Options Maryland Efficiency Program Options Maryland Efficiency Program Options, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP). PDF icon E6a Maryland Efficiency Program Options.pdf More Documents & Publications STEP Financial Incentives Summary STEP Participant Financing Options Home Performance with ENERGY STAR -- 10 Years of Continued Growth!

  12. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Home improvement can be expensive. The good news is that many energy efficiency improvements quickly pay for themselves in energy savings. Having accurate and consistent performance and cost data...

  13. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

    2013-03-01

    Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

  14. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r?0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  15. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards & Labeling Programs for Copy Machines, External Power Supplies, LED Displays, Residential Gas Cooktops and Televisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

    2012-03-01

    This report presents a technical review of international minimum energy performance standards (MEPS), voluntary and mandatory energy efficiency labels and test procedures for five products being considered for new or revised MEPS in China: copy machines, external power supply, LED displays, residential gas cooktops and flat-screen televisions. For each product, an overview of the scope of existing international standards and labeling programs, energy values and energy performance metrics and description and detailed summary table of criteria and procedures in major test standards are presented.

  16. Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H.W.; Brindle, R.

    2000-05-01

    The energy used to produce liquid steel in today's integrated and electric arc furnace (EAF) facilities is significantly higher than the theoretical minimum energy requirements. This study presents the absolute minimum energy required to produce steel from ore and mixtures of scrap and scrap alternatives. Additional cases in which the assumptions are changed to more closely approximate actual operating conditions are also analyzed. The results, summarized in Table E-1, should give insight into the theoretical and practical potentials for reducing steelmaking energy requirements. The energy values have also been converted to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in order to indicate the potential for reduction in emissions of this greenhouse gas (Table E-2). The study showed that increasing scrap melting has the largest impact on energy consumption. However, scrap should be viewed as having ''invested'' energy since at one time it was produced by reducing ore. Increasing scrap melting in the BOF mayor may not decrease energy if the ''invested'' energy in scrap is considered.

  17. CIBO Energy Efficiency Handbook | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CIBO Energy Efficiency Handbook CIBO Energy Efficiency Handbook The Energy Efficiency Handbook was prepared by the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO) to help owners and operators get the best and most energy-efficient performance out of their boilers and steam systems. PDF icon CIBO Energy Efficiency Handbook (November 1997) More Documents & Publications Steam System Survey Guide Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection Deaerators in Industrial Steam S

  18. High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Kruiswyk

    2010-07-13

    Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in on-engine testing. (2) A compressor technology that demonstrated 1.5% improvement in compressor efficiency on gas stand compared to production available compressors. (3) A power turbine with high efficiency bearing system that demonstrated excellent rotordynamic stability throughout the required speed range, up to 60,000 rpm. (4) A predicted improvement (using engine simulation) in engine thermal efficiency of 7% at the peak torque design point, when combining the technologies developed in this program.

  19. MidAmerican Energy (Gas and Electric)- Commercial New Construction Energy-Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MidAmerican Energy's Commercial New Construction Program offers incentives to businesses for energy-efficient construction and design of new or pre-existing buildings.  A minimum energy savings of...

  20. Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance and Optimization Running Jobs Efficiently This page defines job efficiency and how to measure the efficiency of your jobs. Read More » PDSF IO Monitoring Plots of continuous IO monitoring for the eliza file systems and project. Read More » Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:20

  1. Efficiency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Companies in Efficiency Sector Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEfficiency&...

  2. Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This case study lists project information, cost and energy efficiency performance data, energy efficiency measures and lessons learned for a 100-year-old home in Portland, Oregon, ...

  3. Energy Efficiency at LBNL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Efficiency at LBNL Jump to: navigation, search The mission of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division is to perform analysis, research and development...

  4. Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of Recent Efforts at Decoupling and Performance Incentives Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Aligning...

  5. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Residential Furnaces | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Column Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE): Ratio of useful energy output to energy input, expressed as a percentage (%), over the entire heating season. Output ...

  6. Running Jobs Efficiently

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Running Jobs Efficiently Running Jobs Efficiently Job Efficiency A job's efficiency is the ratio of its CPU time to the actual time it took to run, i.e., cputime ...

  7. Energy Efficiency on Display: Using Demonstration Projects to Showcase Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Opportunities (201) | Department of Energy Efficiency on Display: Using Demonstration Projects to Showcase Home Performance Opportunities (201) Energy Efficiency on Display: Using Demonstration Projects to Showcase Home Performance Opportunities (201) Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Energy Efficiency on Display: Using Demonstration Projects to Showcase Home Performance Opportunities (201), call slides and discussion summary. PDF icon Call Slides

  8. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, the Minnesota legislature passed the Next Generation Energy Act (NGEA), which requires both electric and natural gas investor-owned utilities to reduce energy sales, and spend a minimum ...

  9. Comprehensive Water-Efficiency Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate

    2015-07-15

    Energy performance contracts can be an effective way to integrate comprehensive water-efficient technologies and solutions into energy efficiency projects. Current practices often miss key opportunities to incorporate a full suite of water measures primarily because a comprehensive approach is not taken in the assessment. This article provides information on how to develop a comprehensive water project that leads to innovative solutions and potential for large water reduction.

  10. Minimum Fisher regularization of image reconstruction for infrared imaging bolometer on HL-2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Lu, J.; Dong, Y. B.; Xia, Z. W.; Yi, P.; Yang, Q. W.

    2013-09-15

    An infrared imaging bolometer diagnostic has been developed recently for the HL-2A tokamak to measure the temporal and spatial distribution of plasma radiation. The three-dimensional tomography, reduced to a two-dimensional problem by the assumption of plasma radiation toroidal symmetry, has been performed. A three-dimensional geometry matrix is calculated with the one-dimensional pencil beam approximation. The solid angles viewed by the detector elements are taken into account in defining the chord brightness. And the local plasma emission is obtained by inverting the measured brightness with the minimum Fisher regularization method. A typical HL-2A plasma radiation model was chosen to optimize a regularization parameter on the criterion of generalized cross validation. Finally, this method was applied to HL-2A experiments, demonstrating the plasma radiated power density distribution in limiter and divertor discharges.

  11. ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Savings, Jobs, and Competitiveness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Savings, Jobs, and Competitiveness www.eere.energy.gov DOE Priorities Savings Economy Jobs Environment Competiveness Accelerating progress across technology pipeline Growing energy efficiency industry - adoption at scale Growing clean energy manufacturing Energy Efficiency: Top Priority Energy Resource www.eere.energy.gov * Technologies * Materials * Processes * Driving Demand * Building performance information * Quality workforce * Financing solutions * Energy savings

  12. High Efficiency, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-03-31

    Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous challenges to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases, meet stringent emissions regulations, provide customer value, and improve safety. The HECC program successfully reduced engine fuel consumption and greenhouse gases while providing greater customer valve. The US EPA 2010 emissions standard poses a significant challenge for developing clean diesel powertrains that meet the DoE Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for fuel efficiency improvement while remaining affordable. Along with exhaust emissions, an emphasis on heavy duty vehicle fuel efficiency is being driven by increased energy costs as well as the potential regulation of greenhouse gases. An important element of the success of meeting emissions while significantly improving efficiency is leveraging Cummins component technologies such as fuel injection equipment, aftertreatment, turbomahcinery, electronic controls, and combustion systems. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 55% peak brake thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The first step in developing high efficiency clean products has been supported by the DoE co-sponsored HECC program. The objectives of the HECC program are: (1) To design and develop advanced diesel engine architectures capable of achieving US EPA 2010 emission regulations while improving the brake thermal efficiency by 10% compared to the baseline (a state of the art 2007 production diesel engine). (2) To design and develop components and subsystems (fuel systems, air handling, controls, etc) to enable construction and development of multi-cylinder engines. (3) To perform an assessment of the commercial viability of the newly developed engine technology. (4) To specify fuel properties conducive to improvements in emissions, reliability, and fuel efficiency for engines using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) technologies. To demonstrate the technology is compatible with B20 (biodiesel). (5) To further improve the brake thermal efficiency of the engine as integrated into the vehicle. To demonstrate robustness and commercial viability of the HECC engine technology as integrated into the vehicles. The Cummins HECC program supported the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D and Fuels Technology initiatives of the DoE Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). In particular, the HECC project goals enabled the DoE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) to meet energy-efficiency improvement targets for advanced combustion engines suitable for passenger and commercial vehicles, as well as addressing technology barriers and R&D needs that are common between passenger and commercial vehicle applications of advanced combustion engines.

  13. Appliance Efficiency Standards and Price Discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spurlock, Cecily Anna

    2013-05-08

    I explore the effects of two simultaneous changes in minimum energy efficiency and ENERGY STAR standards for clothes washers. Adapting the Mussa and Rosen (1978) and Ronnen (1991) second-degree price discrimination model, I demonstrate that clothes washer prices and menus adjusted to the new standards in patterns consistent with a market in which firms had been price discriminating. In particular, I show evidence of discontinuous price drops at the time the standards were imposed, driven largely by mid-low efficiency segments of the market. The price discrimination model predicts this result. On the other hand, in a perfectly competition market, prices should increase for these market segments. Additionally, new models proliferated in the highest efficiency market segment following the standard changes. Finally, I show that firms appeared to use different adaptation strategies at the two instances of the standards changing.

  14. ACEEE Intelligent Efficiency Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) is hosting an Intelligent Efficiency Conference to share ideas and form partnerships that will advance the adoption of intelligent efficiency in the marketplace.

  15. Xcel Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Customers interested in comprehensive home energy efficiency improvements may alternatively receive rebates through the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program.

  16. Energy Efficiency Links

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Organizations Energy Efficiency Organizations Release Date: October 1999 Last Updated: Septembert 2009 EIA Links Disclaimer: These pages contain hypertext links...

  17. Energy Efficiency -- Home Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home >Energy Users EEnergy Efficiency Page Energy-Efficiency Measurement MEASUREMENT DISCUSSION: Measures and Policy Issues...

  18. Energy Efficiency Conference Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How do You Compare to Your Neighbors? Energy efficiency improvement loans Smart Grid E3T Technology Assessment Pilots Energy Smart Industrial Distribution Efficiency Heat Pump...

  19. Running Jobs Efficiently

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization » Running Jobs Efficiently Running Jobs Efficiently Job Efficiency A job's efficiency is the ratio of its CPU time to the actual time it took to run, i.e., cputime / walltime. A good efficiency at PDSF might be 70% or higher. Certainly an efficiency of less than 50% is indicative of some sort of problem with the job. The most common reason for low efficiency is slow IO reading data from disk but other factors, such as loading software, also can contribute. To see the efficiency for

  20. power conversion efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power conversion efficiency - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar ...

  1. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, NREL developed this tool to help users determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for improving energy efficiency of existing homes. Software developers who require residential retrofit performance and cost data for applications that evaluate residential efficiency measures are the primary audience for this database. In addition, home performance contractors and manufacturers of residential materials and equipment may find this information useful. The database offers the following types of retrofit measures: 1) Appliances, 2) Domestic Hot Water, 3) Enclosure, 4) Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), 5) Lighting, 6) Miscellaneous.

  2. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Title: Shape-memory ...

  3. IDAPA 37.03.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction and Use of Injection Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  4. Efficiency Exchange highlights energy efficiency innovations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can thrive in a world where customers, technology and energy are intersecting in disruptive ways. Attendees will also get an insider's look at how energy efficient...

  5. The Performance House - A Cold Climate Challenge Home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, S.; Grab, J.; Williamson, J.

    2013-08-01

    Working with builder partners on test homes allows for vetting of whole-house building strategies to eliminate any potential unintended consequences prior to implementing these solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, CARB partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 "Performance House" was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adapt with the homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the "Performance House" were not cutting-edge, but simply "best practices practiced". The focus was on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. When seeking a 30% source energy savings targets over a comparable 2009 IECC code-built home in the cold climate zone, nearly all components of a home must be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. To help builders and architects seeking to match the performance of this home, a step-by-step guide through the building shell components of DOE's Challenge Home are provided in a pictorial story book. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a HERS Index Score of 20 (43 without PV, the minimum target was 55 for compliance). This home was also awarded the 2012 HOBI for Best Green Energy Efficient Home from the Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Connecticut.

  6. Designing a minimum-functionality neutron and gamma measurement instrument with a focus on authentication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpius, Peter J; Williams, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    During the design and construction of the Next-Generation Attribute-Measurement System, which included a largely commercial off-the-shelf (COTS), nondestructive assay (NDA) system, we realized that commercial NDA equipment tends to include numerous features that are not required for an attribute-measurement system. Authentication of the hardware, firmware, and software in these instruments is still required, even for those features not used in this application. However, such a process adds to the complexity, cost, and time required for authentication. To avoid these added authenticat ion difficulties, we began to design NDA systems capable of performing neutron multiplicity and gamma-ray spectrometry measurements by using simplified hardware and software that avoids unused features and complexity. This paper discusses one possible approach to this design: A hardware-centric system that attempts to perform signal analysis as much as possible in the hardware. Simpler processors and minimal firmware are used because computational requirements are kept to a bare minimum. By hard-coding the majority of the device's operational parameters, we could cull large sections of flexible, configurable hardware and software found in COTS instruments, thus yielding a functional core that is more straightforward to authenticate.

  7. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  8. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  9. Pay for Performance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Hampshire Pay for Performance (P4P) program works with large energy consumers to improve energy efficiency in their facilities. This program is available to commercial, industrial, and...

  10. Technology Performance Exchange | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings » Analysis Tools » Technology Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange The Technology Performance Exchange(tm) (TPEx(tm)) is a Web-based portal that allows technology manufacturers, evaluators, utilities, consumers, modelers, and researchers to share building-related product energy performance data. The TPEx uses documents termed data entry forms to preemptively define the minimum product-specific energy performance characteristics necessary to evaluate a

  11. Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion ...

  12. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-05-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of key transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturers factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCBs actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  13. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-05-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  14. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-08-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  15. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Won Young; Phadke, Amol; Shah, Nihar; Letschert, Virginie

    2011-07-01

    The SEAD initiative aims to transform the global market by increasing the penetration of highly efficient equipment and appliances. SEAD is a government initiative whose activities and projects engage the private sector to realize the large global energy savings potential from improved appliance and equipment efficiency. SEAD seeks to enable high-level global action by informing the Clean Energy Ministerial dialogue as one of the initiatives in the Global Energy Efficiency Challenge. In keeping with its goal of achieving global energy savings through efficiency, SEAD was approved as a task within the International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation (IPEEC) in January 2010. SEAD partners work together in voluntary activities to: (1) ?raise the efficiency ceiling? by pulling super-efficient appliances and equipment into the market through cooperation on measures like incentives, procurement, awards, and research and development (R&D) investments; (2) ?raise the efficiency floor? by working together to bolster national or regional policies like minimum efficiency standards; and (3) ?strengthen the efficiency foundations? of programs by coordinating technical work to support these activities. Although not all SEAD partners may decide to participate in every SEAD activity, SEAD partners have agreed to engage actively in their particular areas of interest through commitment of financing, staff, consultant experts, and other resources. In addition, all SEAD partners are committed to share information, e.g., on implementation schedules for and the technical detail of minimum efficiency standards and other efficiency programs. Information collected and created through SEAD activities will be shared among all SEAD partners and, to the extent appropriate, with the global public.As of April 2011, the governments participating in SEAD are: Australia, Brazil, Canada, the European Commission, France, Germany, India, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, and the United States. More information on SEAD is available from its website at http://www.superefficient.org/.

  16. Efficiency bounds for nonequilibrium heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-05-15

    We analyze the efficiency of thermal engines (either quantum or classical) working with a single heat reservoir like an atmosphere. The engine first gets an energy intake, which can be done in an arbitrary nonequilibrium way e.g. combustion of fuel. Then the engine performs the work and returns to the initial state. We distinguish two general classes of engines where the working body first equilibrates within itself and then performs the work (ergodic engine) or when it performs the work before equilibrating (non-ergodic engine). We show that in both cases the second law of thermodynamics limits their efficiency. For ergodic engines we find a rigorous upper bound for the efficiency, which is strictly smaller than the equivalent Carnot efficiency. I.e. the Carnot efficiency can be never achieved in single reservoir heat engines. For non-ergodic engines the efficiency can be higher and can exceed the equilibrium Carnot bound. By extending the fundamental thermodynamic relation to nonequilibrium processes, we find a rigorous thermodynamic bound for the efficiency of both ergodic and non-ergodic engines and show that it is given by the relative entropy of the nonequilibrium and initial equilibrium distributions. These results suggest a new general strategy for designing more efficient engines. We illustrate our ideas by using simple examples. -- Highlights: ? Derived efficiency bounds for heat engines working with a single reservoir. ? Analyzed both ergodic and non-ergodic engines. ? Showed that non-ergodic engines can be more efficient. ? Extended fundamental thermodynamic relation to arbitrary nonequilibrium processes.

  17. Enabling Detailed Energy Analyses via the Technology Performance Exchange: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, D.; Fleming, K.; Lee, E.; Livingood, W.

    2014-08-01

    One of the key tenets to increasing adoption of energy efficiency solutions in the built environment is improving confidence in energy performance. Current industry practices make extensive use of predictive modeling, often via the use of sophisticated hourly or sub-hourly energy simulation programs, to account for site-specific parameters (e.g., climate zone, hours of operation, and space type) and arrive at a performance estimate. While such methods are highly precise, they invariably provide less than ideal accuracy due to a lack of high-quality, foundational energy performance input data. The Technology Performance Exchange was constructed to allow the transparent sharing of foundational, product-specific energy performance data, and leverages significant, external engineering efforts and a modular architecture to efficiently identify and codify the minimum information necessary to accurately predict product energy performance. This strongly-typed database resource represents a novel solution to a difficult and established problem. One of the most exciting benefits is the way in which the Technology Performance Exchange's application programming interface has been leveraged to integrate contributed foundational data into the Building Component Library. Via a series of scripts, data is automatically translated and parsed into the Building Component Library in a format that is immediately usable to the energy modeling community. This paper (1) presents a high-level overview of the project drivers and the structure of the Technology Performance Exchange; (2) offers a detailed examination of how technologies are incorporated and translated into powerful energy modeling code snippets; and (3) examines several benefits of this robust workflow.

  18. FY 2008 Annual Performance Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... the target of 35-percent fuel-cell electrical efficiency. ... It enhanced the performance culture and made improvements as ... of their commercial functions using a variety of techniques. ...

  19. Post Secondary Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post Secondary Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) continued > We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services ...

  20. Assessing Energy Efficiency Opportunities in US Industrial and Commercial Building Motor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Prakash; Sheaffer, Paul; McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul

    2015-09-01

    In 2002, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) published an energy efficiency assessment of U.S. industrial sector motor systems titled United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment. The assessment advanced motor system efficiency by providing a greater understanding of the energy consumption, use characteristics, and energy efficiency improvement potential of industrial sector motor systems in the U.S. Since 2002, regulations such as Minimum Energy Performance Standards, cost reductions for motor system components such as variable frequency drives, system-integrated motor-driven equipment, and awareness programs for motor system energy efficiency have changed the landscape of U.S. motor system energy consumption. To capture the new landscape, the USDOE has initiated a three-year Motor System Market Assessment (MSMA), led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The MSMA will assess the energy consumption, operational and maintenance characteristics, and efficiency improvement opportunity of U.S. industrial sector and commercial building motor systems. As part of the MSMA, a significant effort is currently underway to conduct field assessments of motor systems from a sample of facilities representative of U.S. commercial and industrial motor system energy consumption. The Field Assessment Plan used for these assessments builds on recent LBNL research presented at EEMODS 2011 and EEMODS 2013 using methods for characterizing and determining regional motor system energy efficiency opportunities. This paper provides an update on the development and progress of the MSMA, focusing on the Field Assessment Plan and the framework for assessing the global supply chain for emerging motors and drive technologies.

  1. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Planning | Department of Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning How Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning Provides an overview of seven energy efficiency program types that offer large savings opportunities, including building energy codes, city-led efficiency programs, combined heat and power, energy savings performance contracting, industrial energy efficiency, low income energy efficiency, and ratepayer-funded energy

  2. Building America Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet), Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Study Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit Stockton, California PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Whole-house retrofit Type: Single-family, affordable Partners: Builder: Green Home Solutions, greenbygrupe.com Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, http://arbi.davisenergy.com Size: 2,152 ft 2 Date completed: 2011 Climate Zone(s): Hot-Dry PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index: Pre-retrofit rating = 314; post-retrofit rating = 156 Projected annual energy cost savings: $837 Incremental

  3. Building America Case study: Advanced Controls Improve Performance of Combination Space and Water Heating Systems, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Controls Improve Performance of Combination Space- and Water-Heating Systems Minneapolis, Minnesota PROJECT INFORMATION Combined Space and Water Heating: Next Steps to Improved Performance Location: Minneapolis, MN Partners: University of Minnesota and The Energy Conservatory Center for Energy and Environment, mncee.org NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Building Component: Space conditioning and water heating Application: New and retrofit; single-family Year Tested: 2011-2014 Applicable

  4. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Davidson, Carolyn; McLaren, Joyce; Miller, John

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  5. Neutronics Analyses of the Minimum Original HEU TREAT Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontogeorgakos, D.; Connaway, H.; Yesilyurt, G.; Wright, A.

    2014-04-01

    This work was performed to support the feasibility study on the potential conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory from the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by the GTRI Reactor Conversion staff at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of this study was to validate the MCNP model of the TREAT reactor with the well-documented measurements which were taken during the start-up and early operation of TREAT. Furthermore, the effect of carbon graphitization was also addressed. The graphitization level was assumed to be 100% (ANL/GTRI/TM-13/4). For this purpose, a set of experiments was chosen to validate the TREAT MCNP model, involving the approach to criticality procedure, in-core neutron flux measurements with foils, and isothermal temperature coefficient and temperature distribution measurements. The results of this study extended the knowledge base for the TREAT MCNP calculations and established the credibility of the MCNP model to be used in the core conversion feasibility analysis.

  6. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ≥ 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873K and 83 CRI. As such, the package’s performance exceeds DOE’s warm-white phosphor LED efficacy target for 2013. At the end of the program, we assembled an A19 sized demonstration bulb housing the integrated package which met Energy Star intensity variation requirements. With further development to reduce overall component cost, we anticipate that an integrated remote converter package such as developed during this program will find application in compact, high-efficacy LED-based lamps, particularly those requiring omnidirectional emission.

  7. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRI

    2002-05-15

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as resins. The Coking Indexes focus on the amount of these intermediate polarity species since coke formation begins when these are depleted. Currently the Coking Indexes are determined by either titration or solubility measurements which must be performed in a laboratory. In the current work, various spectral, microscopic, and thermal techniques possibly leading to on-line analysis were explored for measuring the Coking Indexes.

  8. developing-compute-efficient

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing Compute-efficient, Quality Models with LS-PrePost 3 on the TRACC Cluster Oct. ... with an emphasis on applying these capabilities to build computationally efficient models. ...

  9. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008, New Mexico enacted H.B. 305, the Efficient Use of Energy Act, which created an Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS) for New Mexico’s electric utilities, and a requirement that all ...

  10. Efficiency Maine Trust

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009, the Act Regarding Maine's Energy Future (Public Law 372) established a new entity, the Efficiency Maine Trust, which became responsible for Maine's energy efficiency and renewable energy...

  11. Occupational Safety Performance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Safety Performance More Documents & Publications Acquisition and Project Management Continuous Improvement Presentation DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution I:...

  12. Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency Report to Congress June 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | June 2015 Message from the Assistant Secretary The industrial sector has shown steady progress in improving energy efficiency over the past few decades and energy efficiency improvements are expected to continue. Studies suggest, however, that there is potential to accelerate the rate of adopting energy efficient technologies and practices that

  13. Energy Efficiency Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information and examples of state financing for energy efficiency programs, with descriptions on implementation methods and concerns.

  14. Technical and economic analysis of energy efficiency of Chinese room air conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David G.; Rosenquist, Gregory; Jiang, Lin; Li, Aixian; Xin, Dingguo; Cheng, Jianhong

    2001-02-01

    China has experienced tremendous growth in the production and sales of room air conditioners over the last decade. Although minimum room air conditioner energy efficiency standards have been in effect since 1989, no efforts were made during most of the 1990's to update the standard to be more reflective of current market conditions. In 1999, China's State Bureau of Technical Supervision (SBTS) included in their annual plan the development and revision of the 1989 room air conditioner standard, and experts from SBTS worked together with LBNL to analyze the new standards. Based on the engineering and life cycle-cost analyses performed, the most predominant type of room air conditioner in the Chinese market (split-type with a cooling capacity between 2500 and 4500 W (8500 Btu/h and 15,300Btu/h)) can have its efficiency increased cost-effectively to an energy efficiency ratio (EER) of 2.92 W/W (9.9 Btu/hr/W). If an EER standard of 2.92 W/W became effective in 2001, Chinese consumers would be estimated to save over 3.5 billion Yuan (420 million U.S. dollars) over the period of 2001-2020. Carbon emissions over the same period would be reduced by approximately 12 million metric tonnes.

  15. Georgia Power- Energy Efficiency Home Improvement Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia Power offers up to $2,575 in rebates to customers who choose to improve home performance with whole building BPI certified efficiency measures or up to $700 for individual improvements from...

  16. Clean and Efficient Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    Task 1 was to design study for fuel-efficient system configuration. The objective of task 1 was to perform a system design study of locomotive engine configurations leading to a 5% improvement in fuel efficiency. Modeling studies were conducted in GT-Power to perform this task. GT-Power is an engine simulation tool that facilitates modeling of engine components and their system level interactions. It provides the capability to evaluate a variety of engine technologies such as exhaust gas circulation (EGR), variable valve timing, and advanced turbo charging. The setup of GT-Power includes a flexible format that allows the effects of variations in available technologies (i.e., varying EGR fractions or fuel injection timing) to be systematically evaluated. Therefore, development can be driven by the simultaneous evaluation of several technology configurations.

  17. Superior Energy Performance Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency, Competitiveness, Transparency. These are the tenets of the Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™). SEP is a market-based program that helps manufacturers to improve their plants' energy performance, which in turn helps to make them more competitive.

  18. Method for Determining Optimal Residential Energy Efficiency Retrofit Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polly, B.; Gestwick, M.; Bianchi, M.; Anderson, R.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Judkoff, R.

    2011-04-01

    Businesses, government agencies, consumers, policy makers, and utilities currently have limited access to occupant-, building-, and location-specific recommendations for optimal energy retrofit packages, as defined by estimated costs and energy savings. This report describes an analysis method for determining optimal residential energy efficiency retrofit packages and, as an illustrative example, applies the analysis method to a 1960s-era home in eight U.S. cities covering a range of International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate regions. The method uses an optimization scheme that considers average energy use (determined from building energy simulations) and equivalent annual cost to recommend optimal retrofit packages specific to the building, occupants, and location. Energy savings and incremental costs are calculated relative to a minimum upgrade reference scenario, which accounts for efficiency upgrades that would occur in the absence of a retrofit because of equipment wear-out and replacement with current minimum standards.

  19. NREL Solves Residential Window Air Conditioner Performance Limitations (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    Comprehensive performance tests lead to enhanced modeling capability and affordable methods to increase energy efficiency.

  20. HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

    2005-02-01

    This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the sorbent and observed that it has both a good oxygen capacity and operates as a highly effective reforming catalyst. We conducted a long duration tests of the sorbent (1,500 hours of continuous operation in the HOP cycle). Although the sorbent lost some oxygen capacity with cycling, the sorbent oxygen capacity stabilized after 1,000 hours and remained constant to the end of the test, 1,500 hour. The activity of the catalyst to reform methane to a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture was unchanged through the oxidation/reduction cycling. Our cost and performance analyses indicated a significant reduction in the cost of GTL production when using the HOP process integrated into a GTL plant.

  1. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hallam, Steven

    2011-04-26

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  2. Title 43 CFR 3206.12 What are the Minimum and Maximum Lease Sizes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .12 What are the Minimum and Maximum Lease Sizes? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43...

  3. Building America Case Study: Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, New Orleans, Louisiana (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate New Orleans, Louisiana PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: New Orleans Dehumidification Study Location: New Orleans, LA Partners: Project Home Again Building Science Corporation, buildingscience.com National Renewable Energy Laboratory, nrel.gov Mountain Energy Partnership Building Component: Supplemental dehumidification Application: New; single- and multifamily homes Year Tested: 2012-2013 Applicable

  4. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated

  5. Local Option- Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An energy-efficient building is defined as any building that exceeds the energy efficiency standards of the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code by 30%; meets performance standards of the...

  6. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... TABLE 1. LIFETIME SAVINGS FOR EFFICIENT LIGHT BULB MODELS Performance Best Available ENERGY STAR Less Efficient Light Output 1,100 lm 1,100 lm 1,100 lm Input Power 15 W 20 W 75 W ...

  7. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.7 Efficiency Standards for Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Efficiency Standards for Lighting March 2011 7.7.2 Efficiency Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps Effective for products manufactured before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Lamp Average Lamp Lamp Type (1) Wattage (W) Minimum CRI Efficacy (lm/W) Effective Date 4-Foot Medium Bipin >35 69 75.0 November 1, 1995 4-Foot Medium Bipin 45 75.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped >35 69 68.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped 45 64.0 November 1, 1995 8-Foot Slimline >65 69 80.0 May 1, 1994

  9. Energy Efficiency Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Massachusetts's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation created separate public benefits funds to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency for all customer classes. Both funds were...

  10. Appliance Efficiency Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of...

  11. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Activities - National Energy Conservation Center, LBNL, and ORNL - Developing an English-Chinese energy efficiency dictionary - Exchanging study reports and publications ...

  12. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington voters passed Initiative 937 in 2006, creating a renewable energy standard and an energy efficiency resource standard for the state's electric utilities. Initiative 937, enacted as th...

  13. Energy Efficient Upgrades

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that Uwajimaya has so strongly embraced the EnergySmart Grocer program. We applaud their leadership and dedication to improving energy efficiency in their grocery stores....

  14. Location, Location, Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Problem Statement: This project addresses the following challenges, barriers, and knowledge gaps: * Perception that investing in efficiency is too expensive or complicated * ...

  15. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  16. Energy Efficiency Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December of 2014 the Florida Public Service Commission (FPSC) approved new numerical conservation goals for five seven utilities subject to the Florida Energy Efficiency and Conservation Act ...

  17. Energy Efficiency Calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Efficiency-Calendar Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

  18. BPA Energy Efficiency Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPA Energy Efficiency Plan Pages default Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE...

  19. Insight From Efficiency Maine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents an in-depth look at Efficiency Maine's transition to weatherization financing, its PowerSaver program, and much more.

  20. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Science and industry work together to improve energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions of both new and existing buildings while also stimulating private investment and quality job creation.

  1. Energy Efficiency Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Michigan Energy Office (MEO), within the Michigan Agency for Energy (MAE), provides funding for energy efficiency activities on a recurring basis, subject to availability of funds. Eligible...

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    managed the overall development and maturation of this Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap, the effort would not have been possible without the active engagement of a diverse...

  3. Thermal efficiency of single-pass solar air collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, Zamry; Ibarahim, Zahari; Yatim, Baharudin; Ruslan, Mohd Hafidz

    2013-11-27

    Efficiency of a finned single-pass solar air collector was studied. This paper presents the experimental study to investigate the effect of solar radiation and mass flow rate on efficiency. The fins attached at the back of absorbing plate to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. The results show that the efficiency is increased proportional to solar radiation and mass flow rate. Efficiency of the collector archived steady state when reach to certain value or can be said the maximum performance.

  4. Best Management Practice #5: Water-Efficient Irrigation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5: Water-Efficient Irrigation Best Management Practice #5: Water-Efficient Irrigation Best Management Practice #5: Water-Efficient Irrigation Water efficiency must be considered from the initial irrigation system design phase through installation to ensure optimal performance. Consistent management and maintenance are also essential. Failure to do so can result in significant losses in system efficiency from poor management, improper system design, installation, or maintenance. With

  5. Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Below are resources for Tribes on energy efficiency. ... Source: Northwest SEED. Home and Building Technologies Basics Learn about energy ...

  6. bpa.gov - Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Files BPA Energy Efficiency Plan BPA Post 2011 EE Role Low Income Efficiency Smart Grid Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Behavior Based EE Programs News &...

  7. Research Cell Efficiency Records

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory maintains a plot of compiled values of highest confirmed conversion efficiencies for research cells, from 1976 to the present, for a range of photovoltaic technologies. This chart highlights cell efficiency results within different families of semiconductors: (1) multijunction cells, (2) single-junction gallium arsenide cells, (3) crystalline silicon cells, (4) thinfilm technologies, and (5) emerging photovoltaics.

  8. Landscaping for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    This publication by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses the use of landscaping for energy efficiency. The topics of the publication include minimizing energy expenses; landscaping for a cleaner environment; climate, site, and design considerations; planning landscape; and selecting and planting trees and shrubs. A source list for more information on landscaping for energy efficiency and a reading list are included.

  9. Improving the Energy Performance of New and Existing Commercial Buildings: A DOE Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holuj, Brian; Nicholls, Andrew K.; Sandahl, Linda J.; Torcellini, Paul

    2010-08-01

    It is technically and economically feasible for our nations commercial buildings to consume substantially less energy--and produce substantially less carbon dioxide--than they do. Yet owners of existing buildings are not taking full advantage of todays best energy saving technologies and practices; and developers of new buildings are, most often, constructing to minimum energy codes rather than pushing for greater efficiency. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges by developing cost-effective technologies and practices that deliver significant improvements in commercial building performance. DOE, through its Commercial Building Initiative, is also collaborating with industry-leading companies and organizations to demonstrate, monitor, and help move these technologies from the laboratory to the marketplace. Ultimately, DOEs dual strategy of pairing aggressive research and development with market engagement, demonstration, and deployment will dramatically improve the energy performance of new and existing commercial buildings throughout the nation.

  10. Stable and Efficient White OLEDs Based on a Single Emissive Material...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stable and Efficient White OLEDs Based on a Single Emissive Material Stable and Efficient White OLEDs Based on a Single Emissive Material Lead Performer: Arizona State University - ...

  11. DOE Announces Webinar on Tying Energy Efficiency to Compensation and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Reviews, and More | Department of Energy Webinar on Tying Energy Efficiency to Compensation and Performance Reviews, and More DOE Announces Webinar on Tying Energy Efficiency to Compensation and Performance Reviews, and More August 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced

  12. Energy Efficiency: A Competitive Advantage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Assistance » Superior Energy Performance » Energy Efficiency: A Competitive Advantage Energy Efficiency: A Competitive Advantage Superior Energy Performance logo This presentation from 3M provides case studies on their experience with ISO 50001 and Superior Energy Performance® (SEP(tm)). PDF icon Energy Efficiency: A Competitive Advantage (November 2012) More Documents & Publications SEP and ISO 50001 at 3M Canada's Brockville Plant 3M COMPANY SEP PRESENTATION AT 2015 EMERGING

  13. Energy efficient laboratory fume hood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feustel, Helmut E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a low energy consumption fume hood that provides an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A low-flow fume hood in accordance with the present invention works on the principal of providing an air supply, preferably with low turbulence intensity, in the face of the hood. The air flow supplied displaces the volume currently present in the hood's face without significant mixing between the two volumes and with minimum injection of air from either side of the flow. This air flow provides a protective layer of clean air between the contaminated low-flow fume hood work chamber and the laboratory room. Because this protective layer of air will be free of contaminants, even temporary mixing between the air in the face of the fume hood and room air, which may result from short term pressure fluctuations or turbulence in the laboratory, will keep contaminants contained within the hood. Protection of the face of the hood by an air flow with low turbulence intensity in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 75% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance.

  14. PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, L.W.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1982-12-01

    Recent accomplishments in buildings energy research by the diverse groups in the Energy Efficient Buildings Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are summarized. We review technological progress in the areas of ventilation and indoor air quality, buildings energy performance, computer modeling, windows, and artificial lighting. The need for actual consumption data to track accurately the improving energy efficiency of buildings is being addressed by the Buildings Energy Data (BED) Group at LBL. We summarize results to date from our Building Energy Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) studies, which include time trends in the energy consumption of new commercial and new residential buildings, the measured savings being attained by both commercial and residential retrofits, and the cost-effectiveness of buildings energy conservation measures. We also examine recent comparisons of predicted vs. actual energy usage/savings, and present the case for building energy use labels.

  15. Southern Energy Efficiency Center (SEEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieira, Robin; Sonne, Jeffrey; Withers, Charles; Cummings, James; Verdict, Malcolm; Roberts, Sydney

    2009-09-30

    The Southern Energy Efficiency Center (SEEC) builds collaborative partnerships with: state and local governments and their program support offices, the building delivery industry (designers, contractors, realtors and commissioning agents), product manufacturers and their supply chains, utilities and their program implementers, consumers and other stakeholders in order to forge a strong regional network of building energy efficiency allies. Through a project Steering Committee composed of the state energy offices and building industry stakeholders, the SEEC works to establish consensus-based goals, priorities and strategies at the regional, state and local levels that will materially advance the deployment of high-performance “beyond code” buildings. In its first Phase, SEEC will provide limited technical and policy support assistance, training, certification and education to a wide spectrum of the building construction, codes and standards, and the consumer marketplace.

  16. DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution I: What's...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    both energy efficiency and performance. Hot water distribution is one of these critical systems - affecting energy use , water consumption, and resident convenience and comfort. ...

  17. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tommy Williams Homes Initial Performance of Two Zero Energy Homes, Gainesville, Florida Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes Initial ...

  18. DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Zero Energy Ready Homes include critical systems to ensure both energy efficiency and performance. Hot water distribution is one of these critical systems - affecting energy use , ...

  19. Sample Contract Language for Construction Using Energy-Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Method of Assessment - Random Sampling. (3) Performance Threshold - Up to 100 compliance, assuming life cycle cost efficient. Section H - Special Contract Requirements H-xx. ...

  20. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP VOLUME 5: HEATING, VENTILATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and space conditioning systems in a cost effective efficient package Need information on energy performance and optimization Need for cost effective demand response capability...

  1. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle ... NSFDOE Thermoelectric Partnership: High-Performance ... approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost ...

  2. Select an Energy-Efficient Centrifugal Pump | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This tip sheet details important considerations when selecting an energy-efficient centrifugal pump, such as performance curve. PUMPING SYSTEMS TIP SHEET 3 PDF icon Select an ...

  3. Anaheim Public Utilities- Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upon request, Anaheim Public Utilities will perform a free home efficiency inspection, in which they will recommend energy saving improvements, rebates and provide some free energy saving devices....

  4. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    efficiency incentive programs for its residential members. First, members can receive a free Home Energy Analysis through the Home Performance with Energy Star Program. The...

  5. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis...

  6. Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ongoing work exploring fuel chemistry, analysis of and improving simulation methodologies for high efficiency clean combustion regimes, and computational performance PDF icon ...

  7. H2 Internal Combustion Engine Research Towards 45% efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling

  8. High-Efficiency Commercial Cold Climate Heat Pump

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Commercial Cold Climate Heat Pump 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer ... performance cold climate commercial heat pump system 2) Execute a Technology Readiness ...

  9. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coral, Florida Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes Initial Performance of Two Zero Energy Homes, Gainesville, Florida Building ...

  10. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes Initial Performance of Two Zero Energy Homes, Gainesville, Florida ...

  11. Best Management Practice #5: Water-Efficient Irrigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water efficiency must be considered from the initial irrigation system design phase through installation to ensure optimal performance. Consistent management and maintenance is also essential.

  12. Report: President's Energy Efficiency Contracting for Federal Buildings a Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An industry report lauds the successes resulting from the President's challenge to federal agencies to enter into $2 billion worth of performance-based energy efficiency contracts.

  13. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Waste Heat Reduction and ...

  14. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … High-Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comprehensive performance tests lead to affordable methods for increasing the energy efficiency of window air conditioners. Window air conditioners are an inexpensive, portable ...

  15. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  16. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-12-31

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  17. Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Philippe H. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A point-sensitive NMR imaging system (10) in which a main solenoid coil (11) produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils (PZ1 and PZ2) powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils (PX1, PX2; PY1, PY2) superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An RF generator (22) irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

  18. Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency, and Emissions Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle ...

  19. Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward New $4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Billion Goal | Department of Energy Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward New $4 Billion Goal Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward New $4 Billion Goal Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge Status graphic. May 9, 2014, the president announced an additional $2 billion goal in federal energy-efficiency upgrades to federal buildings through 2016. This goal, in combination with the initial commitment of $2 billion in 2011, will

  20. Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) adopted rules in August 2010 and December 2010 requiring certain electric and gas utilities in the state to meet prescribed energy efficiency requirements...

  1. Empower Maryland Efficiency Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In July 2015, the Public Service Commission (PSC) Order 87082 set post-2015 electric energy efficiency goal of 2% of annual retail sales beginning from 2018. The order initiates proceedings...

  2. Energy Efficient Supercomputing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anypas, Katie

    2014-10-17

    Katie Anypas, Head of NERSC's Services Department discusses the Lab's research into developing increasingly powerful and energy efficient supercomputers at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  3. Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our mission is to increase the availability of high-quality, safe, affordable and workforce housing options. Through innovative reuse and rehabilitation we incorporate economic benefits, environmental stewardship/energy efficiency, and social solutions.

  4. Express Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Express Energy Efficiency Program provides free installation of energy-saving products. This program travels around Wisconsin, community-by-community, to see if they are installing in your...

  5. Energy Efficiency Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Fund is funded by a surcharge of $0.003 per kilowatt-hour (3 mills per kWh) on Connecticut Light and Power (CL&P) and United Illuminating (UI) customers' electric bills....

  6. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The California Legislature emphasized the importance of energy efficiency and established broad goals with the enactment of Assembly Bill 2021 of 2006. The bill calls for a 10% reduction in forec...

  7. Energy Efficiency Trust Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additional funds may be accumulated through non-compliance fees as part of the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS). For both natural gas and electric utilities, failure to submit an energ...

  8. Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 2015, the NY PSC issued an order extending the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) and Customer-Sited Tier (CST) of the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) till Feb 29, 2016...

  9. Energizing Efficiency's Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhn, Thomas R.

    2006-10-15

    Advances such as 'smart' meters, two-way communication, and automation technology are rapidly improving information exchange between utilities and their customers, and enabling further energy efficiency gains. (author)

  10. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy created the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to promote regional job creation and economic growth while also improving the energy...

  11. Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Power Agency Act (IPAA), enacted in 2007, created energy efficiency and demand response programs in Illinois. Under the IPAA, electric utilities are required to demonstrate 2% annual...

  12. Energy Efficiency of LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet on energy efficiency of LEDs, characterizing the current state of the market and discussing package efficacy, luminaire efficacy, and application efficacy.

  13. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    n E n v e l o p e This document is one component of the Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap (EE Roadmap), published by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on behalf of...

  14. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 : L i g h t i n g This document is one component of the Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap (EE Roadmap), published by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on behalf of...

  15. Transportation Efficiency Strategies

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Advanced Technology Vehicles: Overview and Constraints John German, ICCT EIA Energy Conference April 26, 2011 Where Does the Energy Go? http://www.fueleconomy.gov/FEG/atv.shtml Friction reduction Cylinder deactivation DI turbo Aero, tires Variable valves weight High efficient gasoline engine Clean diesel HEV expansion Base engine and vehicle improvements Efficiency/CO2 reduction EV/FCV development for future Fleet tests Research for mass production HCCI No single solution - multi-pronged

  16. Energy Efficiency on Parade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency: Beyond the Wish EIA Annual Conference 2008 April 8, 2008 Joe Loper Vice President, Policy & Research About the Alliance n Mission: To advance energy efficiency world-wide through policy, education, research, technology deployment, market transformation and communication initiatives. n Chaired by Senator Mark Pryor (D-AR) and James Rogers (CEO, Duke Energy) with strong bi-partisan congressional, corporate & public interest leadership. About the Alliance (cont'd) n Mission: To

  17. photoionization efficiency curve

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photoionization efficiency curve - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  18. Enabling Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  19. Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

    2008-03-31

    This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability changes during CO{sub 2} flooding due to saturation changes, dissolution, and precipitation.

  20. High Performance Sustainable Buildings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buildings Goal 3: High Performance Sustainable Buildings Maintaining the conditions of a building improves the health of not only the surrounding ecosystems, but also the well-being of its occupants. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL The Radiological Laboratory

  1. Application Porting and Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application Porting and Performance Application Porting and Performance We expect many applications will need to make code modifications in order to run efficiently on the Cori Phase 2 Knights Landing manycore architecture. To run well on Cori Phase 2, your application will need to have good thread scalability, take advantage of vectorization opportunities, and manage multiple hierarchies of memory effectively. In the web pages that follow we document strategies for improving your application's

  2. Energy efficient sensor network implementations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigo, Janette R; Raby, Eric Y; Brennan, Sean M; Kulathumani, Vinod; Rosten, Ed; Wolinski, Christophe; Wagner, Charles; Charot, Francois

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. We analyze the following modes of operation; event detection, sleep(wake-up), data acquisition, data processing modes using low power, high performance embedded technology such as specialized embedded DSP processors and a low power FPGAs at the sensing node. We use compute intensive sensor node applications: an acoustic vehicle classifier (frequency domain analysis) and a video license plate identification application (learning algorithm) as a case study. We report performance and total energy usage for our system implementations and discuss the system architecture design trade offs.

  3. Integrated Efficiency Test for Pyrochemical Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.X.; Vaden, D.; Westphal, B.R.; Fredrickson, G.L.; Benedict, R.W.; Johnson, T.A.

    2007-07-01

    An integrated efficiency test was conducted with sodium bonded, spent EBR-II drive fuel elements. The major equipment involved in the test were the element chopper, Mk-IV electro-refiner, cathode processor, and casting furnace. Four electrorefining batches (containing 54.4 kg heavy metal) were processed under the fixed operating parameters that have been developed for this equipment based on over a decade's worth of processing experience. A mass balance across this equipment was performed. Actinide dissolution and recovery efficiencies were established based on the mass balance and chemical analytical results of various samples taken from process streams during the integrated efficiency test. (authors)

  4. Integrated Efficiency Test for Pyrochemical Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. X. Li; D. Vaden; R. W. Benedict; T. A. Johnson; B. R. Westphal; Guy L. Frederickson

    2007-09-01

    An integrated efficiency test was conducted with sodium bonded, spent EBR-II drive fuel elements. The major equipment involved in the test were the element chopper, Mk-IV electrorefiner, cathode processor, and casting furnace. Four electrorefining batches (containing 54.4 kg heavy metal) were processes under the fixed operating parameters that have been developed for this equipment based on over a decades worth of processing experience. A mass balance across this equipment was performed. Actinide dissolution and recovery efficiencies were established based on the mass balance and chemical analytical results of various samples taken from process streams during the integrated efficiency test.

  5. Efficiency and large deviations in time-asymmetric stochastic heat engines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingrich, Todd R.; Rotskoff, Grant M.; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2014-10-24

    In a stochastic heat engine driven by a cyclic non-equilibrium protocol, fluctuations in work and heat give rise to a fluctuating efficiency. Using computer simulations and tools from large deviation theory, we have examined these fluctuations in detail for a model two-state engine. We find in general that the form of efficiency probability distributions is similar to those described by Verley et al (2014 Nat. Commun. 5 4721), in particular featuring a local minimum in the long-time limit. In contrast to the time-symmetric engine protocols studied previously, however, this minimum need not occur at the value characteristic of a reversible Carnot engine. Furthermore, while the local minimum may reside at the global minimum of a large deviation rate function, it does not generally correspond to the least likely efficiency measured over finite time. Lastly, we introduce a general approximation for the finite-time efficiency distribution,more » $$P(\\eta )$$, based on large deviation statistics of work and heat, that remains very accurate even when $$P(\\eta )$$ deviates significantly from its large deviation form.« less

  6. Program predicts waterflooding performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassihi, M.R.; O'Brien, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    Water is a handheld calculator program for estimating waterflooding performance in a multilayered oil reservoir for patterns such as five-spot, direct line drive and staggered line drive. Topics considered in this paper include oil wells, sweep efficiency, well stimulation, computer calculations, stratification, enhanced recovery, calculators, reservoir rock, and reservoir engineering.

  7. Buildings Performance Database Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Performance Database Overview Buildings Performance Database Overview Buildings Performance Database Overview, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. PDF icon bpd_overview_2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Buildings Performance Database (BPD) - 2014 BTO Peer Review Buildings Performance Database - 2013 BTO Peer Review Data Preparation Process for the Buildings Performance Database

  8. Higher Efficiency HVAC Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: QM Power, Inc. – Lee’s Summit, MOPartners: United Technologies Research Center – East Hartford, CT

  9. Performance Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procurement and Acquisition » Guidance » Contracting for Support Services » Performance Based Service Acquisition Toolkit Performance Based Service Acquisition Toolkit Performance-based Service Acquisition (PBA) means an acquisition structured around the results to be achieved as opposed to the manner by which the work is to be performed. Performance-based Work Statement (PWS) means that a statement of work for performance-based acquisitions that describes the required results in clear,

  10. Energy Efficiency Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IUEP

    2004-03-01

    The International Utility Efficiency Partnerships, Inc. (IUEP) has been a leader among the industry groups that have supported voluntary initiatives to promote international energy efficiency projects and address global climate change. The IUEP maintains its leadership by both supporting international greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction projects under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by partnering with U.S. and international organizations to develop and implement strategies and specific energy efficiency projects. The goals of the IUEP program are to (1) provide a way for U.S. industry to maintain a leadership role in international energy efficiency infrastructure projects; (2) identify international energy project development opportunities to continue its leadership in supporting voluntary market-based mechanisms to reduce GHG emissions; and (3) demonstrate private sector commitment to voluntary approaches to global climate issues. The IUEP is dedicated to identifying, promoting, managing, and assisting in the registration of international energy efficiency projects that result in demonstrated voluntary reductions of GHG emissions. This Final Technical Report summarizes the IUEP's work in identifying, promoting, managing, and assisting in development of these projects and IUEP's effort in creating international cooperative partnerships to support project development activities that develop and deploy technologies that (1) increase efficiency in the production, delivery and use of energy; (2) increase the use of cleaner, low-carbon fuels in processing products; and (3) capture/sequester carbon gases from energy systems. Through international cooperative efforts, the IUEP intends to strengthen partnerships for energy technology innovation and demonstration projects capable of providing cleaner energy in a cost-effective manner. As detailed in this report, the IUEP met program objectives and goals during the reporting period January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2002. At the request of the DOE, we have also included in this report additional activities during the reporting period January, 1999 through January, 2001. This additional information had been reported earlier in the Final Technical Reports that summarized activities undertaken in those earlier periods.

  11. Performance Modeling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The prediction methodology will form the foundation of a more robust resource management ... Accurate performance prediction requires accurate performance models of the components ...

  12. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization » Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:30

  13. Optimizing Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimizing Performance Optimizing Performance Storage Optimization Optimizing the sizes of the files you store in HPSS and minimizing the number of tapes they are on will lead to...

  14. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  15. Application Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NESAP Application Porting and Performance IXPUG Performance and Debugging Tools Measuring Arithmetic Intensity Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users...

  16. Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Metrics Terminology Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology This document provides the terms and definitions used in the Department of Energys Performance Metrics Research Project. PDF icon metrics_terminology_20090203.pdf More Documents & Publications Procuring Architectural and Engineering Services for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Transmittal Letter for the Statewide Benchmarking Process Evaluation Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program

  17. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Specific Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan | Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Specific Recovery Plan Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Specific Recovery Plan PDF icon Microsoft Word - PSRP June 5 2009 _EERE_ Final1.docx More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - EERE PSRP 7 23 2010 Environmental Compliance Performance Scorecard - Fourth Quarter FY2009 Environmental Compliance Performance Scorecard - First Quarter FY

  18. High Efficiency Recoil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Recoil Spectrometer for Superheavy Element Factory Super H eavy N uclei 2 015, C ollege S ta8on, T exas, M arch 3 1 - A pril 0 2, 2 015 G. Chubarian T exas A &M U niversity, C yclotron I ns7tute Signal / Noise Efficiency Super H eavy N uclei 2 015, C ollege S ta8on, T exas, M arch 3 1 - A pril 0 2, 2 015 Peter J . T win a nd F rancis B eck --- Eurogam P roject (late 8 0's) Signal Number of Events Energy Resolution Time Resolution Space Resolution etc. Noise Background Counts and

  19. CBERD: Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency CBERD: Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency Triple bottomline framework being utilized for the CBERD Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency cross-cutting activity. Triple bottomline framework being utilized for the CBERD Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency cross-cutting activity. Lead performer: Carnegie Mellon University - Pittsburgh PA Partner: --Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology - Ahmedabad, India FY16 DOE Funding: $50,000 per year

  20. Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench Greenville Tube Company, a manufacturer of high-precision, small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system performance optimization project to improve the efficiency of its No. 6 tube drawing bench. This four-page case study summarizes their experience. PDF icon Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench (February 1997) More Documents & Publications Impacts of IPv6 on Infrastructure Control

  1. Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and that ...

  2. Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and that ...

  3. Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program, which provides industrial facilities and commercial buildings a framework for achieving continual improvement in energy efficiency while maintaining market competitiveness.

  4. Performance Contracting and Energy Efficiency in the State Government...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Market More Documents & Publications 2015 Peer Review | Plenaries 2015 GTO Peer Review | Poster Session track 3: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review...

  5. Preserving Envelope Efficiency in Performance Based Code Compliance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION Word Cloud More Like This Full Text ...

  6. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Sites Payback years Annual Energy Saving MWh Annual Greenhouse Gas Reduction (GHG) Emission ... gear, UPS, PDU, etc.), and power usage estimation facilitated the calculation ...

  7. Building Performance Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building Performance Database (BPD) unlocks the power of building data by providing access to the largest publicly-available dataset of information about the physical and operational characteristics of real buildings. The BPD enables users to perform statistical analysis on an anonymous dataset of hundreds of thousands of commercial and residential buildings from across the country. Users can examine specific building types and geographic areas, compare performance trends among similar buildings, identify and prioritize cost-saving energy efficiency improvements, and assess the range of likely savings from these improvements.

  8. Efficiency Nova Scotia Releases Energy Efficiency Mobile App...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Our ultimate goal is to help make energy efficiency normal behavior," said Leanne Hachey, Efficiency Nova Scotia's director of communications and stakeholder relations. "One way ...

  9. Eco-efficiency Indicators: Measuring Resource-use Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eco-efficiency Indicators: Measuring Resource-use Efficiency and the Impact of Economic Activities on the Environment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  10. Two new design tools maximize safety and efficiency for coiled tubing pumping treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S.C.; Walton, I.C.; Gu, H.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes the use of two new computer tools to assist the engineer in the design and evaluation of coiled tubing (CT) pumping treatments. Sand fill cleanouts and nitrogen kickoffs continue to comprise the majority of the operations performed by CT; however, the ability to design and evaluate jobs of this type has been limited for many years to simple steady-state calculations and general rules of thumb, both strictly applicable to vertical wells. Using these tools and an engineering design methodology, these treatments can be performed in the most efficient manner possible. The tools optimize the fluids, rates and penetration schedules by considering the effect of deviation on particle transport, reservoir influx or leakoff or both, mixing of gases in the wellbore, and other aspects of the operation. Additionally, by optimizing the required movement of the CT, pipe fatigue can be held to a minimum, providing safer and more cost-effective treatments. Examples that use these tools to design CT treatments are presented.

  11. How Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview of seven energy efficiency program types that offer large savings opportunities, including building energy codes, city-led efficiency programs, combined heat and power, energy savings performance contracting, industrial energy efficiency, low income energy efficiency, and ratepayer-funded energy efficiency.

  12. MASSACHUSETTS DRIVES PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MASSACHUSETTS DRIVES PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT MASSACHUSETTS DRIVES PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT MASSACHUSETTS DRIVES PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT Massachusetts' longstanding statewide Mass Save energy efficiency program, supported by ratepayer funds and sponsored by utilities, has resulted in the state being named first in energy efficiency by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy for the past four years. Even with this accolade, the state wanted to test strategies to achieve more-and

  13. Performance improvement options for the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-17

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is under development at Argonne National Laboratory as an advanced power conversion technology for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) as well as other Generation IV advanced reactors as an alternative to the traditional Rankine steam cycle. For SFRs, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle eliminates the need to consider sodium-water reactions in the licensing and safety evaluation, reduces the capital cost of the SFR plant, and increases the SFR plant efficiency. Even though the S-CO{sub 2} cycle has been under development for some time and optimal sets of operating parameters have been determined, those earlier development and optimization studies have largely been directed at applications to other systems such as gas-cooled reactors which have higher operating temperatures than SFRs. In addition, little analysis has been carried out to investigate cycle configurations deviating from the selected 'recompression' S-CO{sub 2} cycle configuration. In this work, several possible ways to improve S-CO{sub 2} cycle performance for SFR applications have been identified and analyzed. One set of options incorporates optimization approaches investigated previously, such as variations in the maximum and minimum cycle pressure and minimum cycle temperature, as well as a tradeoff between the component sizes and the cycle performance. In addition, the present investigation also covers options which have received little or no attention in the previous studies. Specific options include a 'multiple-recompression' cycle configuration, intercooling and reheating, as well as liquid-phase CO{sub 2} compression (pumping) either by CO{sub 2} condensation or by a direct transition from the supercritical to the liquid phase. Some of the options considered did not improve the cycle efficiency as could be anticipated beforehand. Those options include: a double recompression cycle, intercooling between the compressor stages, and reheating between the turbine stages. Analyses carried out as part of the current investigation confirm the possibilities of improving the cycle efficiency that have been identified in previous investigations. The options in this group include: increasing the heat exchanger and turbomachinery sizes, raising of the cycle high end pressure (although the improvement potential of this option is very limited), and optimization of the low end temperature and/or pressure to operate as close to the (pseudo) critical point as possible. Analyses carried out for the present investigation show that significant cycle performance improvement can sometimes be realized if the cycle operates below the critical temperature at its low end. Such operation, however, requires the availability of a heat sink with a temperature lower than 30 C for which applicability of this configuration is dependent upon the climate conditions where the plant is constructed (i.e., potential performance improvements are site specific). Overall, it is shown that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle efficiency can potentially be increased to 45 %, if a low temperature heat sink is available and incorporation of larger components (e.g.., heat exchangers or turbomachinery) having greater component efficiencies does not significantly increase the overall plant cost.

  14. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibility of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.

  15. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibilitymore » of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.« less

  16. Sandia Energy - Enabling Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling Energy Efficiency Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Enabling Energy Efficiency Enabling Energy EfficiencyTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-26T16:33:50+0...

  17. Residential Energy Efficiency Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This credit applies to energy efficiency improvements in the building envelope of existing homes and for the purchase of high-efficiency heating, cooling and water-heating equipment. Efficiency...

  18. ACEEE Energy Efficiency Finance Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) is hosting an Energy Efficiency Finance Forum is dedicated to catalyzing investment in and scaling the market for energy efficiency.

  19. Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2007-05-01

    The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

  20. Surface Additives for Enhanced Electrode Performance - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...efficient and almost non-polluting, making them an attractive alternative for energy generation. Some solid oxide fuel cells burn ... High performance additives then can be ...

  1. Buildings Performance Database Recommended Data Fields | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Buildings Performance Database Recommended Data Fields, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. BPD Priority List.pdf More Documents...

  2. Buildings Performance Database Recommended Data Fields

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Buildings Performance Database Recommended Data Fields, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  3. Center for Energy Efficient Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Overview The Center for Energy Efficient Materials (CEEM) is an Energy Frontier ... Innovative materials and novel devices for sustainable energy efficient applications are ...

  4. Alaska Energy Efficiency Finance Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Energy Authority (AEA) is hosting an Alaska Energy Efficiency Finance Seminar to cover community- and commercial-scale energy efficiency in Alaska.

  5. Cleco- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cleco energy efficiency program provides a number of incentives to its residential customers for energy efficiency upgrades. Rebates and cash incentives are available for qualifying Air...

  6. Energy Efficiency Program Best Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-11-30

    Presents best practices for operating successful portfolio-level efficiency programs, including assessing efficiency potential, cost-effectiveness screening, and developing a portfolio of approaches.

  7. Energy Efficiency: Challenges and Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency: Challenges and Progress State Energy Advisory Board Meeting June 7, 2011 2 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov EE Priorities Spend ARRA ...

  8. Energy Efficiency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Energy Efficiency refers to products or systems using less energy to do the same or better job than conventional products or systems....

  9. Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    you can't see the value, such as efficiency, comfort, health, durability, and safety... ... based on six different value positions: comfort, health, energy efficiency, advanced ...

  10. Simply Efficient | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Simply Efficient Name: Simply Efficient Address: 7717 W. 6th Ave Place: Lakewood, Colorado Zip: 80214 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Solar...

  11. NREL: Transportation Research - Fuels Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels Performance Photo of a man working with laboratory equipment. NREL fuel performance chemists evaluate a broad range of performance criteria, including storage stability. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's applied fuels performance research takes a whole-vehicle-systems approach, examining not just co-optimization of low-carbon fuels and internal combustion engines, but also fuel production, infrastructure, handling, combustion, and emissions. Putting more energy-efficient vehicles on

  12. A Stable Whole Building Performance Method for Standard 90.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Eley, Charles

    2013-05-01

    Wouldnt it be great if a single energy model could be used to demonstrate minimum code compliance, green code compliance, establish a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating, and determine eligibility for federal tax and utility incentives? Even better, what if the basic rules for creating those models did not change every few years? This paper descibes a recently proposed addendum to ASHRAE/ANSI/IES Standard 90.1 aims to meet those goals. Addendum BM establishes the Performance Rating Method found in Appendix G of Standard 90.1 as a new method of compliance while maintaining its traditional use in gauging the efficiency of beyond code buildings. Furthermore, Addendum BM sets a common baseline building that does not change with each update to the standard.

  13. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliot, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorn, Jennifer

    2005-05-05

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of thenation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly,society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, moresustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing globalcompetitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges.We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologiesfor industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologiesare characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics andenvironmental performance. This paper provides an overview of theresults, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies toimprove energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, andneither will we in the future. The study shows that many of thetechnologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reducedenvironmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costscompared to current technologies.

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Efficiency Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps Effective for products manufactured before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Lamp Average Lamp Lamp Type (1) Wattage (W) Minimum CRI Efficacy (lm/W) Effective Date 4-Foot Medium Bipin >35 69 75.0 November 1, 1995 4-Foot Medium Bipin ≤35 45 75.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped >35 69 68.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped ≤35 45 64.0 November 1, 1995 8-Foot Slimline >65 69 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot Slimline ≤65 45 80.0 May 1,

  15. Rig Efficiency Paper

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Author: John Cochener, john.cochener@eia.doe.gov, (202) 586-9882 Disclaimer: Views not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration Quantifying Drilling Efficiency John Cochener Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Energy Information Administration Initial Release: June 28, 2010 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of the U. S. Energy

  16. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  17. Building on Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two administration-led, industry-driven efforts marked milestones today. The first will put Americans to work on more than $2 billion in energy upgrades for federal buildings. The second will offer 30 million households and businesses more control over their energy bills. And together, these efforts will support an economy that’s built to last, one that makes use of every source of American energy – more efficiently.

  18. Energy- and Water-Efficient Product Efficiency Programs | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Energy- and Water-Efficient Product Efficiency Programs Energy- and Water-Efficient Product Efficiency Programs The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established four programs that specify products as energy- or water-efficient. ENERGY STAR FEMP Designated FEMP Low Standby Power WaterSense Learn about product categories that have been suspended or sunsetted by FEMP and ENERGY STAR. ENERGY STAR The ENERGY STAR program is a

  19. Optimizing Asset Utilization and Operating Efficiency Efficiently, June

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2008 | Department of Energy Optimizing Asset Utilization and Operating Efficiency Efficiently, June 2008 Optimizing Asset Utilization and Operating Efficiency Efficiently, June 2008 Smart Grid Implementation Workshop Breakout Group Report, a discussion of metrics for smart grid implementation. The following major caveats and findings were identified: Optimizing asset utilization and operating efficiently depends on proper integration of technologies with business processes and associated IT

  20. Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engines | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace012_flowers_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms Development

  1. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight Tommy Williams Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-05

    Builders Challenge fact sheet highlighting performance and energy-efficiency features of Tommy Williams Homes, Longleaf case study, Gainesville, FL

  2. Performance Tuning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance Tuning Performance Tuning Hints and tips on how to optimize your Burst Buffer performance Note: this only applies to the Cori Phase 1 Burst Buffer and should not be taken as general Burst Buffer advice. This page will be updated as the DataWarp software is updated and performance continues to improve. For larger files, ensure your Burst Buffer allocation will be striped over multiple nodes Currently, the Burst Buffer granularity is 213GB. If you request an allocation smaller than

  3. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief | Department of Energy Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief This technical brief is a guide to help plant operators reduce waste heat

  4. (Energy Efficiency) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Energy Efficiency) (Energy Efficiency) PDF icon (Energy Efficiency) More Documents & Publications Joint Statement by Energy Ministers of G8, The People's Republic of China, India and The Republic of Korea Joint Statement by Energy Ministers of G8, The People's Republic of China, India and The Republic of Korea (June 2008) (Energy Efficiency)

  5. (Energy Efficiency) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Energy Efficiency) (Energy Efficiency) PDF icon (Energy Efficiency) More Documents & Publications Declaration of International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation Joint Statement by Energy Ministers of G8, The People's Republic of China, India and The Republic of Korea Joint Statement by Energy Ministers of G8, The People's Republic of China, India and The Republic of Korea (June 2008)

  6. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR -- Webinar Slides | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with ENERGY STAR -- Webinar Slides Home Performance with ENERGY STAR -- Webinar Slides "Existing Homes Efficiency - If You Want BetterBuildings - Go with Home Performance with...

  7. Energy Performance Ratings for Windows, Doors, and Skylights...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Performance Ratings for Windows, Doors, and Skylights Energy Performance Ratings for Windows, Doors, and Skylights Before you shop for energy-efficient windows, doors, and ...

  8. Developing an Energy Performance Modeling Startup Kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the NAHB Research Center began assessing the needs and motivations of residential remodelers regarding energy performance remodeling. This report outlines: the current remodeling industry and the role of energy efficiency; gaps and barriers to adding energy efficiency into remodeling; and support needs of professional remodelers to increase sales and projects involving improving home energy efficiency.

  9. Effects of gas injection condition on mixing efficiency in the ladle refining process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, S.M.; Chiang, J.D.; Hwang, W.S.

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of injection condition on the mixing efficiency of the gas injection treatment of the ladle refining process in steelmaking. A water modeling approach was employed. A NaCl solution was injected into the vessel and the electric conductivity value of the water solution was measured to represent the concentration of the additive. The results of this investigation reveal that up to a certain level, mixing efficiency is improved as the gas flow rate increases. Off-center injection is better than centerline injection. However, the injection lance should not be too close to the wall. Also, mixing efficiency is improved when the submerged depth of the immersion lance increases. The immersion hood has a optimal size as far as mixing efficiency is concerned. A larger or smaller hood would reduce its efficiency. The submerged depth of the immersion hood should be kept to a minimum to improve mixing efficiency.

  10. High-efficiency CARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratman, V.L.; Kol`chugin, B.D.; Samsonov, S.V.; Volkov, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Cyclotron Autoresonance Maser (CARM) is a well-known variety of FEMs. Unlike the ubitron in which electrons move in a periodical undulator field, in the CARM the particles move along helical trajectories in a uniform magnetic field. Since it is much simpler to generate strong homogeneous magnetic fields than periodical ones for a relatively low electron energy ({Brit_pounds}{le}1-3 MeV) the period of particles` trajectories in the CARM can be sufficiently smaller than in the undulator in which, moreover, the field decreases rapidly in the transverse direction. In spite of this evident advantage, the number of papers on CARM is an order less than on ubitron, which is apparently caused by the low (not more than 10 %) CARM efficiency in experiments. At the same time, ubitrons operating in two rather complicated regimes-trapping and adiabatic deceleration of particles and combined undulator and reversed guiding fields - yielded efficiencies of 34 % and 27 %, respectively. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that high efficiency can be reached even for a simplest version of the CARM. In order to reduce sensitivity to an axial velocity spread of particles, a short interaction length where electrons underwent only 4-5 cyclotron oscillations was used in this work. Like experiments, a narrow anode outlet of a field-emission electron gun cut out the {open_quotes}most rectilinear{close_quotes} near-axis part of the electron beam. Additionally, magnetic field of a small correcting coil compensated spurious electron oscillations pumped by the anode aperture. A kicker in the form of a sloping to the axis frame with current provided a control value of rotary velocity at a small additional velocity spread. A simple cavity consisting of a cylindrical waveguide section restricted by a cut-off waveguide on the cathode side and by a Bragg reflector on the collector side was used as the CARM-oscillator microwave system.

  11. Underhood Thermal Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underhood Thermal Performance This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Computational Fluid Dynamics Project Leader Background As vehicle technology advances, automakers need a better understanding of underhood heat loads, especially as they relate to emissions and fuel efficiency. Manufacturers of heavy-duty vehicles and off-road machines have similar concerns. Ineffective underhood thermal management can lead to higher emissions, reduced

  12. High Performance Window Attachments

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Performance Window Attachments D. Charlie Curcija Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory dccurcija@lbl.gov 510-495-2602 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Impact of Project: * Motivate manufacturers to make improvements in Window systems U-Factors, SHGC and daylighting utilization * Increase awareness of benefits from energy efficient window attachments Problem Statement: * A wide range of residential window attachments are available, but

  13. PV Performance and Reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance and Reliability - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  14. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  15. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  16. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case study findings, and participation in data center industry meetings and workshops. Industry partners enthusiastically provided valuable insight into current practice, and helped to identify areas where additional public interest research could lead to significant efficiency improvement. This helped to define and prioritize the research agenda. The interaction involved industry representatives with expertise in all aspects of data center facilities, including specialized facility infrastructure systems and computing equipment. In addition to the input obtained through industry workshops, LBNL's participation in a three-day, comprehensive design ''charrette'' hosted by the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) yielded a number of innovative ideas for future research.

  17. R&D to Enhance the Performance of Superconducting RF Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    2015-10-30

    This report proposes techniques on how to increase the performance and efficiency of superconducting RF structures.

  18. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2010-06-01

    Since the late 1970s, energy labeling programs and mandatory energy performance standards have been used in many different countries to improve the efficiency levels of major residential and commercial equipment. As more countries and regions launch programs covering a greater range of products that are traded worldwide, greater attention has been given to harmonizing the specific efficiency criteria in these programs and the test methods for measurements. For example, an international compact fluorescent light (CFL) harmonization initiative was launched in 2006 to focus on collaboration between Australia, China, Europe and North America. Given the long history of standards and labeling programs, most major energy-consuming residential appliances and commercial equipment are already covered under minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and/or energy labels. For these products, such as clothes washers and CFLs, harmonization may still be possible when national MEPS or labeling thresholds are revised. Greater opportunity for harmonization exists in newer energy-consuming products that are not commonly regulated but are under consideration for new standards and labeling programs. This may include commercial products such as water dispensers and vending machines, which are only covered by MEPS or energy labels in a few countries or regions. As China continues to expand its appliance standards and labeling programs and revise existing standards and labels, it is important to learn from recent international experiences with efficiency criteria and test procedures for the same products. Specifically, various types of standards and labeling programs already exist in North America, Europe and throughout Asia for products in China's 2010 standards and labeling programs, namely clothes washers, water dispensers, vending machines and CFLs. This report thus examines similarities and critical differences in energy efficiency values, test procedure specifications and other technical performance requirements in existing international programs in order to shed light on where Chinese programs currently stands and considerations for their 2010 programs.

  19. The use of negotiated agreements to improve efficiency of end-use appliances: First results from the European experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoldi, P.; Bowie, R.; Hagen, L.

    1998-07-01

    The European Union is pursuing measures to improve end-use equipment efficiency through a variety of policy instruments, in particular for domestic appliances. One of the most effective methods to achieve market transformation is through minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS). However, after the difficulties and controversy following the adoption of legislation for MEPS for domestic refrigerators/freezers, a new policy instrument, i.e. negotiated agreements by manufacturers, has been investigated and tested for two type of appliances: domestic washing machines and TVs and VCRs. Based on the positive experience of the above two agreements, other products (e.g. dryers, dishwasher, electric water heaters, etc.) will be the subject of future negotiated agreements. Based on the results of the two negotiated agreements, this paper describes the energy efficiency potential, the procedures, and the advantages and disadvantages of negotiated agreements compared to legislated mandatory for MEPS, as developed in the European context. The paper concludes that negotiated agreements are a viable policy option, which allow flexibility in the implementation of the efficiency targets and therefore the adoption of cost-effective solutions for manufacturers. In addition, negotiated agreements can be implemented more quickly compared to mandatory MEPS and they allow a closer monitoring of the results. The main question asked in the paper is whether the negotiated agreements can deliver the results in the long term compared to what could be achieved through legislation. The European experience indicates that this instrument can deliver the results and that it offer a number of advantages compared to MEPS.

  20. Economic Performance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance ... of greenhouse gas emissions a priority for Federal agencies, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. ...

  1. Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance characterization efforts within the SunShot Systems Integration activities focus on collaborations with U.S. solar companies to:

  2. Efficiency Nova Scotia Releases Energy Efficiency Mobile App

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network member Efficiency Nova Scotia recently released Spot it!—an energy efficiency game app for mobile devices. The app features 13 levels where players are...

  3. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Details about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments program and its implementation in ...

  4. Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls Credit: Northeast Energy Efficiency...

  5. Transportation Efficiency Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Transportation Efficiency Resources Transportation efficiency reduces travel demand as measured by vehicle miles traveled (VMT). While transportation efficiency policies ...

  6. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Details about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments program and its implementation in...

  7. Efficiency Improvement through Reduction in Friction and Wear in Powertrain Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Killian

    2009-09-30

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency of truck drivelines through reduction of friction and parasitic losses in transmission and drive axles. Known efficiencies for these products exceeded 97 percent, so the task was not trivial. The project relied on a working relationship between modeling and hardware testing. Modeling was to shorten the development cycle by guiding the selection of materials, processes and strategies. Bench top and fixture tests were to validate the models. Modeling was performed at a world class, high academic level, but in the end, modeling did not impact the hardware development as much as intended. Insights leading to the most significant accomplishments came from bench top and fixture tests and full scale dynamometer tests. A key development in the project was the formulation of the implementation strategy. Five technical elements with potential to minimize friction and parasitic losses were identified. These elements included churning, lubrication, surface roughness, coatings and textures. An interesting fact is that both Caterpillar and Eaton independently converged on the same set of technical elements in formulating their implementation strategies. Exploiting technical elements of the implementation strategy had a positive impact on transmission and drive axle efficiencies. During one dynamometer test of an Eaton Best Tech 1 transmission, all three gear ranges tested: Under drive, direct drive and over drive, showed efficiencies greater than 99 percent. Technology boosts to efficiency for transmissions reached 1 percent, while efficiency improvements to drive axle pushed 2 percent. These advancements seem small, but the accomplishment is large considering that these products normally run at greater than 97 percent efficiency. Barriers and risks to implementing these technology elements are clear. Schemes using a low fill sump and spray tubes endanger the gears and bearings by lubricant starvation. Gear coatings have exhibited durability issues, stripping away under conditions less demanding than 750,000 miles in service on the road. Failed coatings compound the problem by contaminating the lubricant with hard particles. Under the most severe conditions, super finished surfaces may polish further, reaching a surface roughness unable to support the critical oil film thickness. Low viscosity and low friction lubricants may not protect the gears and bearings adequately leading to excessive pitting, wear and noise. Additives in low friction oils may not stay in solution or suspended thus settling to the bottom and unavailable when they are needed most. Technical barriers and risks can be overcome through engineering, but two barriers remain formidable: (1) cost of the technology and (2) convincing fleet owners that the technology provides a tangible benefit. Dry sumps lower lubricant operating temperatures so the removal of heat exchangers and hoses and reduced demand on engine cooling systems justify their use. The benefits of surface texturing are varied and remain unproven. Lubricant costs seem manageable, but the cost of super finishing and gear coating are high. These are issues of scale and processing technology. Going across the board with gear super finishing and coating will reduce costs. Pushing the envelope to applications with higher torque and higher power density should drive the adoption of these technologies. Fleet owners are an educated and seasoned lot. Only technology measureable in dollars returned is used on truck fleets. To convince fleet owners of the benefit of these technologies, new precision in measuring fuel efficiency must be introduced. Legislation for a minimum standard in truck miles per gallon would also enable the use of these technologies. Improving the efficiency of truck transmissions and axle will make a noticeable impact on the fuel consumption by heavy vehicles in the United States. However, the greatest benefit will come when all the individual efficiency technologies like hybrid power, aerodynamic fairings, auxiliary power units, super

  8. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2013-06-20

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  9. ORNL Energy Efficiency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ORNL Energy Efficiency (Redirected from Energy Efficiency Capabilities at ORNL) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Energy Efficiency Capabilities at ORNL Name Energy Efficiency...

  10. Fort Collins Utilities - Home Efficiency Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    who pursue energy efficiency projects. Either the Efficiency Audit or Efficiency Audit Plus is a required prerequisite for all efficiency rebates. Specific rebate amounts may...

  11. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Energy Efficiency energy consumption savings households, buildings, industry & vehicles The Energy Efficiency Page reflects EIA's information on energy efficiency and...

  12. Exotic equilibria of Harary graphs and a new minimum degree lower bound for synchronization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canale, Eduardo A.; Monzn, Pablo

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with stability of equilibria in the homogeneous (equal frequencies) Kuramoto model of weakly coupled oscillators. In 2012 [R. Taylor, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 115 (2012)], a sufficient condition for almost global synchronization was found in terms of the minimum degreeorder ratio of the graph. In this work, a new lower bound for this ratio is given. The improvement is achieved by a concrete infinite sequence of regular graphs. Besides, non standard unstable equilibria of the graphs studied in Wiley et al. [Chaos 16, 015103 (2006)] are shown to exist as conjectured in that work.

  13. Efficient Graffiti Image Retrieval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Chunlei; Wong, Pak C.; Ribarsky, William; Fan, Jianping

    2012-07-05

    Research of graffiti character recognition and retrieval, as a branch of traditional optical character recognition (OCR), has started to gain attention in recent years. We have investigated the special challenge of the graffiti image retrieval problem and propose a series of novel techniques to overcome the challenges. The proposed bounding box framework locates the character components in the graffiti images to construct meaningful character strings and conduct image-wise and semantic-wise retrieval on the strings rather than the entire image. Using real world data provided by the law enforcement community to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we show that the proposed framework outperforms the traditional image retrieval framework with better retrieval results and improved computational efficiency.

  14. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Data centers provide mission-critical computing functions vital to the daily operation of top U.S. economic, scientific, and technological organizations. These data centers consume large amounts of energy to run and maintain their computer systems, servers, and associated high-performance componentsup to 3% of all U.S. electricity powers data centers. And as more information comes online, data centers will consume even more energy. Data centers can become more energy efficient by incorporating features like power-saving "stand-by" modes, energy monitoring software, and efficient cooling systems instead of energy-intensive air conditioners. These and other efficiency improvements to data centers can produce significant energy savings, reduce the load on the electric grid, and help protect the nation by increasing the reliability of critical computer operations.

  15. An Efficient RF Source for Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng

    2013-12-01

    We propose the development of a highly reliable high efficiency RF source for JLAB with a lower lifetime cost operating at 80% efficiency with system operating costs of about 0.7M$/year for the 6 GeV machine. The design of the RF source will be based upon two injection locked magnetrons in a novel combining architecture for amplitude modulation and a cross field amplifier (CFA) as an output tube for the 12 GeV upgrade. A cost analysis including efficiency and reliability will be performed to determine the optimum system architecture. Several different system architectures will be designed and evaluated for a dual injection locked magnetron source using novel combining techniques and possibly a CFA as the output tube. A paper design for the 1497 MHz magnetron system will be completed. The optimum system architecture with all relevant specifications will be completed so that a prototype can be built.

  16. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Data Centers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Data centers provide mission-critical computing functions vital to the daily operation of top U.S. economic, scientific, and technological organizations. These data centers consume large amounts of energy to run and maintain their computer systems, servers, and associated high-performance components?up to 3% of all U.S. electricity powers data centers. And as more information comes online, data centers will consume even more energy. Data centers can become more energy efficient by incorporating features like power-saving "stand-by" modes, energy monitoring software, and efficient cooling systems instead of energy-intensive air conditioners. These and other efficiency improvements to data centers can produce significant energy savings, reduce the load on the electric grid, and help protect the nation by increasing the reliability of critical computer operations.

  17. NREL: Education Center - A Model of Energy-Efficient Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Model of Energy-Efficient Design Photo of the Education Center trombe wall. The Education Center itself is an exhibit of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Passive solar energy features, energy-efficient lighting, an energy management system and other strategies help cut energy costs and optimize building performance. Heating An innovative Trombe wall-the building's most striking architectural feature-lights and heats the exhibit hall. The huge, undulating Trombe wall has

  18. What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 2011 | Department of Energy What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 On May 20, 2011, the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program held the What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs workshop. Better Buildings hosted the workshop in collaboration with Home Performance with ENERGY STAR, EPA Climate Showcase Communities, and the Doris Duke

  19. BlocPower: Crowdsourced Microfinance for Energy Efficiency in Underserved

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communities | Department of Energy BlocPower: Crowdsourced Microfinance for Energy Efficiency in Underserved Communities BlocPower: Crowdsourced Microfinance for Energy Efficiency in Underserved Communities BlocPower: Crowdsourced Microfinance for Energy Efficiency in Underserved Communities Lead Performer: BlocPower - New York, NY Partners: - New York State Energy Research and Development Authority - Albany, NY - Emerald Cities Collaborative-NY - New York, NY - Orrick, Herrington, &

  20. Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Deep

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Retrofit of 1910 House, Portland, Oregon | Department of Energy Deep Energy Retrofit of 1910 House, Portland, Oregon Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Deep Energy Retrofit of 1910 House, Portland, Oregon This case study lists project information, cost and energy efficiency performance data, energy efficiency measures and lessons learned for a 100-year-old home in Portland, Oregon, audited by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for a deep energy

  1. Water Efficiency in Federal Buildings and Campuses | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Innovative Water Measures? | Department of Energy Efficiency and ESPCs: How Effective are ESPCs at Integrating Innovative Water Measures? Water Efficiency and ESPCs: How Effective are ESPCs at Integrating Innovative Water Measures? The Federal Energy Management Program investigated how effective energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are at integrating innovative water efficiency measures and identified ways to improve the process. This fact sheet shares the results of this assessment.

  2. DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certification | Department of Energy First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency Certification DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency Certification December 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the first industrial plants in the country to be certified under the Superior Energy Performance program -- a new, market-based industrial energy efficiency program. The energy management certification program

  3. DOE ZERH Webinar: LED Lighting Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LED Lighting Efficiency DOE ZERH Webinar: LED Lighting Efficiency Description: LED lighting offers efficiency and performance benefits we've never seen in traditional lighting technologies. Commercial buildings have seen rapid growth in LED deployment, and in the residential arena leading builders are now integrating LED lighting packages. And as with any new building system, there are integration challenges along with the process of consumer understanding and acceptance. This webinar will

  4. 13-Energy Efficiency Ratio Window Air Conditioner | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -Energy Efficiency Ratio Window Air Conditioner 13-Energy Efficiency Ratio Window Air Conditioner Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: General Electric - Fairfield, CT DOE Funding: $1,540,000 Cost Share: Provided by CRADA partners Project Term: October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2015 Project Objective This project is designing and developing a high-efficiency 13 energy-efficiecy-ratio (EER) window air

  5. Launching a Global Energy Efficiency Challenge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Global Energy Efficiency Challenge Launching a Global Energy Efficiency Challenge July 21, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the four initiatives? Super-Efficient Equipment and Appliance Deployment Initiative Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership International Smart Grid Action Network Electric Vehicles Initiative The first-ever Clean Energy Ministerial has come to a close, but the real work is just

  6. Countries Launch Initiative to Drive Energy Efficiency in the Commercial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Industrial Sectors | Department of Energy Countries Launch Initiative to Drive Energy Efficiency in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors Countries Launch Initiative to Drive Energy Efficiency in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors A fact sheet on the global superior energy performance partnership from the Clean Energy Ministerial. PDF icon Countries Launch Initiative to Drive Energy Efficiency in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors More Documents & Publications Countries Launch

  7. Einstein and Energy Efficiency: Making Homes Smarter (301) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Einstein and Energy Efficiency: Making Homes Smarter (301) Einstein and Energy Efficiency: Making Homes Smarter (301) Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Einstein and Energy Efficiency: Making Homes Smarter (301), call slides and discussion summary. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications The Future is Here - Smart Home Technology Driving Accountability for Program Performance Using Measured Energy Savings (201) Energy

  8. Energy Efficient Schools Initiative- Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficient Schools Initiative (EESI) was created in May 2008 to provide grants and loans to Tennessee school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and te...

  9. Energy Efficiency Investment Fund Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Specific efficiency requirements for rebates are available at  the Energy Efficiency Investment Fund Website in applications for Lighting and Lighting Control Rebates, Natural Gas and Water Heati...

  10. Energy Efficiency Standards for Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007 the District of Columbia (D.C.) enacted legislation, entitled the Energy Efficiency Standards Act of 2007, which created efficiency standards for six products, four of which were...

  11. Behavior-based Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Behavior-based Energy Efficiency in the Pacific Northwest Clark PUD and BPA teamed up for a pilot of an innovative behavior-based energy efficiency program. Clark's pilot design...

  12. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these values agree well with previous results and computer simulations of Ikon B performance versus R-22. The lower cooling capacity of Ikon B is not a concern unless a particular air conditioner is near its maximum cooling capacity in application. Typically, oversized A/C systems are installed by contractors to cover contingencies. In the extended run with Ikon B, which lasted about 4.5 months at 100 deg F ambient temperature and 68% compressor on time, the air conditioner performed well with no significant loss of energy efficiency. Post-run analysis of the refrigerant, compressor lubricant oil, compressor, compressor outlet tubing, and the filter/dryer showed minor effects but nothing that was considered significant. The project was very successful. All objectives were achieved, and the performance of Ikon B indicates that it can easily be retrofitted into R-22 air conditioners to give 15 - 20% energy savings and a 1 - 3 year payback of retrofit costs depending on location and use. Ikon B has the potential to be a successful commercial product.

  13. Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Energy Efficiency The Energy Department's efforts to develop and deploy energy efficient solutions for buildings and manufacturing supply lines means large-scale energy and cost savings for all Americans. <a href="/node/993676">Learn about these successful efforts.</a> The Energy Department's efforts to develop and deploy energy efficient solutions for buildings and manufacturing supply lines means large-scale energy and cost savings for all Americans. Learn

  14. Water-Efficiency Program Prioritization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation outlines water-efficiency program requirements and priorities as presented to Federal agencies by the Federal Energy Management Program.

  15. Midwest Industrial Energy Efficiency Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This Industrial Technologies Program handbook connects industry with the various energy efficiency resources available in the midwest.

  16. Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs 101

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar covers national energy efficiency program funding levels, funding sources, residential program characteristics, and a case study.

  17. CEMI Industrial Efficiency (text version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video.  

  18. Clothes washer standards in China -- The problem of water andenergy trade-offs in establishing efficiency standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biermayer, Peter J.; Lin, Jiang

    2004-05-19

    Currently the sales of clothes washers in China consist ofseveral general varieties. Some use more energy (with or withoutincluding hot water energy use) and some use more water. Both energy andwater are in short supply in China. This poses the question - how do youtrade off water versus energy in establishing efficiency standards? Thispaper discusses how China dealt with this situation and how itestablished minimum efficiency standards for clothes washers.

  19. Optimizing Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimizing Performance Optimizing Performance Storage Optimization Optimizing the sizes of the files you store in HPSS and minimizing the number of tapes they are on will lead to the most effient use of NERSC HPSS: File sizes of about 1 GB or larger will give the best network performance (see graph below) Files sizes greater than about 500 GB can be more difficult to work with and lead to longer transfer times. Files larger than 15 TB cannot be uploaded to HPSS. Aggregate groups of small files

  20. Minimum separation distances for natural gas pipeline and boilers in the 300 area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Graham, T.M.

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing actions to reduce energy expenditures and improve energy system reliability at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. These actions include replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing a new natural gas distribution system to provide a fuel source for many of these units, and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. The individual heating units will include steam boilers that are to be housed in individual annex buildings located at some distance away from nearby 300 Area nuclear facilities. This analysis develops the basis for siting the package boilers and natural gas distribution systems to be used to supply steam to 300 Area nuclear facilities. The effects of four potential fire and explosion scenarios involving the boiler and natural gas pipeline were quantified to determine minimum separation distances that would reduce the risks to nearby nuclear facilities. The resulting minimum separation distances are shown in Table ES.1.

  1. Apparatus and method for closed-loop control of reactor power in minimum time

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Jr., John A.

    1988-11-01

    Closed-loop control law for altering the power level of nuclear reactors in a safe manner and without overshoot and in minimum time. Apparatus is provided for moving a fast-acting control element such as a control rod or a control drum for altering the nuclear reactor power level. A computer computes at short time intervals either the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e '.rho.-.SIGMA..beta..sub.i (.lambda..sub.i -.lambda..sub.e ')+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e '.omega.] or the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e .rho.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e)(.beta.-.rho.)+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e .omega.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e).omega.] These functions each specify the rate of change of reactivity that is necessary to achieve a specified rate of change of reactor power. The direction and speed of motion of the control element is altered so as to provide the rate of reactivity change calculated using either or both of these functions thereby resulting in the attainment of a new power level without overshoot and in minimum time. These functions are computed at intervals of approximately 0.01-1.0 seconds depending on the specific application.

  2. Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward New 4 Billion Goal Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward New 4 Billion Goal ...

  3. Building America Top Innovations 2012: National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, which contains performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 energy retrofit measures. To date, it is used in four prominent DOE software packages to help optimize energy-efficiency recommendations.

  4. Refractories for Industrial Processing. Opportunities for Improved Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James G.; Hayden, H. Wayne; Angelini, Peter; Moore, Robert E.; Headrick, William L.

    2005-01-01

    Refractories are a class of materials of critical importance to manufacturing industries with high-temperature unit processes. This study describes industrial refractory applications and identifies refractory performance barriers to energy efficiency for processing. The report provides recommendations for R&D pathways leading to improved refractories for energy-efficient manufacturing and processing.

  5. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allgood, Tiffany L.; Sorter, Andy

    2015-01-13

    The Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study (EEFS) is the culminating document that compiles the energy efficiency and building performance assessment and project prioritization process completed on 36 Tribally owned and operated facilities within Tribal lands. The EEFS contains sections on initial findings, utility billing analyses, energy conservation measures and prioritization and funding sources and strategies for energy project implementation.

  6. Building Efficiency Technologies by Tomorrow's Engineers and Researchers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (BETTER) Capstone | Department of Energy Efficiency Technologies by Tomorrow's Engineers and Researchers (BETTER) Capstone Building Efficiency Technologies by Tomorrow's Engineers and Researchers (BETTER) Capstone Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology. Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology. Lead Performer: Georgia Institute of Technology - Atlanta, GA Partners: - Alphabet Energy - Hayward, CA - Alabama Heat Exchangers, AL - Advanced Renewable Energy - Emrgy Hydro -

  7. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, which contains performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 energy retrofit measures. To date, it is used in four prominent DOE software packages to help optimize energy-efficiency recommendations.

  8. State Electric Efficiency Regulatory Frameworks (July 2012 IEE Report)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report summarizes ongoing and recent policy developments that support utility investments in energy efficiency, including program cost recovery, fixed cost recovery, and performance incentives for electric utilities on a state-by-state basis.

  9. Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED) Platform- 2014 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED) software application helps organizations easily manage data on the energy performance of large groups of buildings, thus also improving the consistency and interoperability of the data.

  10. Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED) Platform Homepage Screenshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED) Platform™ is an open source software application that helps organizations easily manage data on the energy performance of large groups of buildings. This is a screenshot of the application homepage.

  11. Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system performance optimization project to improve the efficiency of its No. 6 tube drawing bench. This four-page...

  12. Insulated Concrete Homes Increase Durability and Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-05-01

    New houses designed by Mercedes Homes in Melbourne, Florida, save their homeowners money by using energy efficient features such as a high performance heat pump and solar control glazing to reduce cooling costs.

  13. SU-F-18C-01: Minimum Detectability Analysis for Comprehensive Sized Based Optimization of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Across CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smitherman, C; Chen, B; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work involved a comprehensive modeling of task-based performance of CT across a wide range of protocols. The approach was used for optimization and consistency of dose and image quality within a large multi-vendor clinical facility. Methods: 150 adult protocols from the Duke University Medical Center were grouped into sub-protocols with similar acquisition characteristics. A size based image quality phantom (Duke Mercury Phantom) was imaged using these sub-protocols for a range of clinically relevant doses on two CT manufacturer platforms (Siemens, GE). The images were analyzed to extract task-based image quality metrics such as the Task Transfer Function (TTF), Noise Power Spectrum, and Az based on designer nodule task functions. The data were analyzed in terms of the detectability of a lesion size/contrast as a function of dose, patient size, and protocol. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed to predict image quality and dose to achieve a minimum level of detectability. Results: Image quality trends with variations in dose, patient size, and lesion contrast/size were evaluated and calculated data behaved as predicted. The GUI proved effective to predict the Az values representing radiologist confidence for a targeted lesion, patient size, and dose. As an example, an abdomen pelvis exam for the GE scanner, with a task size/contrast of 5-mm/50-HU, and an Az of 0.9 requires a dose of 4.0, 8.9, and 16.9 mGy for patient diameters of 25, 30, and 35 cm, respectively. For a constant patient diameter of 30 cm, the minimum detected lesion size at those dose levels would be 8.4, 5, and 3.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The designed CT protocol optimization platform can be used to evaluate minimum detectability across dose levels and patient diameters. The method can be used to improve individual protocols as well as to improve protocol consistency across CT scanners.

  14. Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance assessment (PA) is defined in the United States by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations as a process to be used in estimating the long-term performance of deep geologic disposal sites for high-level and transuranic radioactive waste. Although specific regulatory requirements differ for individual projects (e.g., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the potential repository at Yucca Mountain), the overall approach to PA is

  15. Performance Period

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill | Department of Energy Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter

  16. Solar ADEPT: Efficient Solar Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Solar ADEPT Project: The 7 projects that make up ARPA-E's Solar ADEPT program, short for 'Solar Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,' aim to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) solar energy systems, which convert the sun's rays into electricity. Solar ADEPT projects are integrating advanced electrical components into PV systems to make the process of converting solar energy to electricity more efficient.

  17. Publications | Center for Energy Efficient Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Zhang, Y., Bahk, J.-H., Lee, J., Birkel, C. S., Snedaker, M. L., Liu, D., Zeng, H., Moskovits, M., Shakouri, A. and Stucky, G. D. (2014), HOT CARRIER FILTERING IN SOLUTION PROCESSED HETEROSTRUCTURES: A PARADIGM FOR IMPROVING THERMOELECTRIC EFFICIENCY. Adv. Mater., 26: 2755-2761. [10.1002/adma.201304419] Huang, Ye; Wen, Wen; Mukherjee, Subhrangsu; Ade, Harald; Kramer, Edward J.; and Bazan, Guillermo C. High-Molecular-Weight Insulating Polymers Can Improve the Performance of Molecular

  18. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Addthis Description Learn how commercial buildings can incorporate whole-building design to save energy and money while enhancing performance and comfort. This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-a model for high-performance office building design. Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy

  19. Future EfficientDynamics with Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A 15% increase in engine performance could be demonstrated with a Dual-Loop-Rankine and 10% increase in engine performance could result from a Single-Loop-Rankine PDF icon deer09_obieglo.pdf More Documents & Publications Efficient and Dynamic … The BMW Group Roadmap for the Application of Thermoelectric Generators Efficient and Dynamic … The BMW Group Roadmap for the Application of Thermoelectric Generators Vehicular Thermoelectric Applications Session DEER 2009

  20. The Laboratory Performance Appraisal Process and Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 1.0 Provide for Efficient and Effective Mission Accomplishment ... 17 2.0 Provide for Efficient and Effective Design, Fabrication, ...

  1. High efficiency photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Chi C.; Xu, Xi Xiang

    1999-11-02

    An N-I-P type photovoltaic device includes a multi-layered body of N-doped semiconductor material which has an amorphous, N doped layer in contact with the amorphous body of intrinsic semiconductor material, and a microcrystalline, N doped layer overlying the amorphous, N doped material. A tandem device comprising stacked N-I-P cells may further include a second amorphous, N doped layer interposed between the microcrystalline, N doped layer and a microcrystalline P doped layer. Photovoltaic devices thus configured manifest improved performance, particularly when configured as tandem devices.

  2. Rating fenestration for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markway, R.

    1993-09-01

    The grading of windows and doors by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) opens a new era regarding the energy efficiency of fenestration products. For the first time, architects, designers, and other specifiers will find themselves on a level playing field when it comes to comparing the thermal performance of fenestration products. Although only one state, California, now requires the use of fenestration products that have gone through the NFRC's simulation and testing procedures, five other states will soon be doing so, including Washington, Alaska, Oregon, Idaho, and Wisconsin. Others will follow suit; Florida, Arizona, Texas, Louisiana, New York, Massachusetts, and Colorado have shown interest. Exactly what does this mean to architects The NFRC, which was established last year, has developed a procedure to determine accurately the U-value of fenestration products. Under the NFRC program a number of independent simulation and testing laboratories have been approved. These laboratories are charged with the responsibility of determining whether products conform to the U-values represented by the manufacturers. The rating procedure and benefits from it are described.

  3. High-efficiency photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, H.T.; Zehr, S.W.

    1982-06-21

    High efficiency solar converters comprised of a two cell, non-lattice matched, monolithic stacked semiconductor configuration using optimum pairs of cells having bandgaps in the range 1.6 to 1.7 eV and 0.95 to 1.1 eV, and a method of fabrication thereof, are disclosed. The high band gap subcells are fabricated using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to produce the required AlGaAs layers of optimized composition, thickness and doping to produce high performance, heteroface homojunction devices. The low bandgap subcells are similarly fabricated from AlGa(As)Sb compositions by LPE, MBE or MOCVD. These subcells are then coupled to form a monolithic structure by an appropriate bonding technique which also forms the required transparent intercell ohmic contact (IOC) between the two subcells. Improved ohmic contacts to the high bandgap semiconductor structure can be formed by vacuum evaporating to suitable metal or semiconductor materials which react during laser annealing to form a low bandgap semiconductor which provides a low contact resistance structure.

  4. Making Efficiency a More Efficient Business | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... employment opportunities for local residents to help him meet his growing labor needs. Mr. ... for today's residential energy efficiency market, the Better Buildings Neighborhood ...

  5. On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it

    2013-07-01

    We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

  6. The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A.

    2013-06-13

    Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

  7. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-03-21

    Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

  8. Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

  9. NEWLY DISCOVERED GLOBAL TEMPERATURE STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Zhenguang; Frazin, Richard A.; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward B.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Vasquez, Alberto M.

    2012-08-20

    Magnetic loops are building blocks of the closed-field corona. While active region loops are readily seen in images taken at EUV and X-ray wavelengths, quiet-Sun (QS) loops are seldom identifiable and are therefore difficult to study on an individual basis. The first analysis of solar minimum (Carrington Rotation 2077) QS coronal loops utilizing a novel technique called the Michigan Loop Diagnostic Technique (MLDT) is presented. This technique combines Differential Emission Measure Tomography and a potential field source surface (PFSS) model, and consists of tracing PFSS field lines through the tomographic grid on which the local differential emission measure is determined. As a result, the electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} at each point along each individual field line can be obtained. Using data from STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/MDI, the MLDT identifies two types of QS loops in the corona: so-called up loops in which the temperature increases with height and so-called down loops in which the temperature decreases with height. Up loops are expected, however, down loops are a surprise, and furthermore, they are ubiquitous in the low-latitude corona. Up loops dominate the QS at higher latitudes. The MLDT allows independent determination of the empirical pressure and density scale heights, and the differences between the two remain to be explained. The down loops appear to be a newly discovered property of the solar minimum corona that may shed light on the physics of coronal heating. The results are shown to be robust to the calibration uncertainties of the EUVI instrument.

  10. About the Building Performance Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent technology, market and policy drivers - smart meters, energy performance disclosure laws, etc. - are resulting in a rapid increase in generation of data about buildings and their energy performance. But this data is still hard to access, and analyze because it is being housed in many decentralized and often proprietary databases. The DOE Building Performance Database (BPD) aims to bridge this gap by compiling and cleansing a large dataset required to assess the likely performance of energy efficiency retrofit measures and services. By making the data available anonymously and in aggregate, the BPD enables the public to gain value from the data while addressing the privacy needs of contributors.

  11. Expedited site characterization (ESC) using the M{sup 3} approach, M{sup 3} = massive, moderate, minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tindall, S.

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of this approach is to quickly and cost effectively identify and classify potential Areas of Concern (AOCS) as clean or contaminated, thus allowing potentially responsible parties (PRPS) to save limited resources by ceasing costly investigations and undertaking removal type actions expeditiously. The ESC M{sup 3} approach also overcomes the high degree of uncertainty typically associated with traditional site investigations resulting from a lack of comprehensive scoping. Thus, EPA Region 9 has agreed to accept and use, for risk assessment purposes, the data generated from the ESC M{sup 3} approach, providing the data quality is known and confirmation analyses are performed. The extraordinary benefit will be to eliminate any further action on those AOCs found to be clean using this approach. Finally this approach reduces the large number of non-detect samples that are customarily submitted for CLP-type (i.e., Contract Laboratory Program) analyses. The ESC M{sup 3} approach consists of the following three steps: (1) a massive sampling effort is first conducted at an AOC (e.g., 200 samples are collected using a grid approach); the samples are analyzed on a daily basis using real time onsite methods and field screening (FS)-type data are generated; (2) a moderate sampling effort is then conducted to provide onsite verification of the FS-type data; the samples are analyzed using onsite CLP-type methods and field quantitation (FQ)-type data are generated with an agreed upon level of QC; and finally, (3) a minimum sampling effort is conducted to provide verification of the FQ-type data; these confirmation samples are sent to an offsite laboratory for analysis, and CLP-type data are generated.

  12. The Laboratory Performance Appraisal Process and Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 3.2 Provide Effective and Efficient Science and Technology ProjectProgramFacilities ...... Management ......

  13. Establishing an energy efficiency recommendation for commercial boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ware, Michelle J.

    2000-08-01

    To assist the federal government in meeting its energy reduction goals, President Clinton's Executive Order 12902 established the Procurement Challenge, which directed all federal agencies to purchase equipment within the top 25th percentile of efficiency. Under the direction of DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Procurement Challenge's goal is to create efficiency recommendations for all energy-using products that could substantially impact the government's energy reduction goals, like commercial boilers. A typical 5,000,000 Btuh boiler, with a thermal efficiency of 83.2%, can have lifetime energy cost savings of $40,000 when compared to a boiler with a thermal efficiency of 78%. For the federal market, which makes up 2% of the boiler market, this means lifetime energy cost savings of over $25,600,000. To establish efficiency recommendations, FEMP uses standardized performance ratings for products sold in the marketplace. Currently, the boiler industry uses combustion efficiency and, sometimes, thermal efficiency performance measures when specifying a commercial boiler. For many years, the industry has used these efficiency measures interchangeably, causing confusion about boiler performance measurements, and making it difficult for FEMP to establish the top 25th percentile of efficiency. This paper will illustrate the method used to establish FEMP's recommendation for boilers. The method involved defining a correlation between thermal and combustion efficiency among boiler classifications; using the correlation to model a data set of all the boiler types available in the market; and identifying how the correlation affected the top 25th percentile analysis. The paper also will discuss the applicability of this method for evaluating other equipment for which there are limited data on performance ratings.

  14. Energy Efficiency Potential Studies Catalog

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These studies can be used to fulfill a variety of needs, including energy efficiency program planning, state goal setting, utility resource planning, and other priorities.

  15. Sector Collaborative on Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-06-01

    Helps stakeholders identify and act on cost-effective opportunities for expanding energy efficiency resources in the hospitality, retail, commercial real estate, grocery, and municipal sectors.

  16. 2015 Energy Efficiency Global Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Alliance to Save Energy, this two-day, invite-only conference is the premier forum dedicated to energy efficiency.

  17. Behavior Based Energy Efficiency (BBEE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on encouraging the adoption of energy efficient technology. There is a substantial body of knowledge and experience associated with behavior change that is rooted in the...

  18. Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LPO Has More than 40 Billion in Remaining Loan Authority 3 Existing Portfolio > 30 Billion Remaining Authority 41.8 Billion 4 Renewable Energy & Efficient Energy Projects ...

  19. UES (Electric)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UniSource Energy Services (UES) offers rebates to its residential customers who have certain energy efficient equipment installed by participating contractors. The rebate is provided directly to...

  20. Electrofuels: More Efficient Than Photosynthesis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency -- Energy (ARPA-E) has funded successful programs with OPXBIO, NC State and others to create hyper efficient processes for manufacturing biofuels and...

  1. Home Energy Efficiency Twitter Chat

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Did you miss our home energy efficiency Twitter Chat? We compiled the discussion so you can learn ways to save energy and money at home.

  2. Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency, call slides and discussion summary, December 6, 2012.

  3. Energy Efficient State Building Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOA has incorporated the requirements of the Executive Order into Indiana's standard instructions to designers for projects on state-owned buildings. Efficiency can be demonstrated through...

  4. Hooper Bay Efficiency Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (OUR PEOPLE) Hooper Bay Energy Efficiency Feasibility ... The name Hooper Bay came into common usage after a post ... BAY IS MARITIME. THE MEAN ANNUAL SNOWFALL IS 75 INCHES ...

  5. Considerations for efficient airflow design in cleanrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang

    2004-07-29

    A high-performance cleanroom should provide efficient energy performance in addition to effective contamination control. Energy-efficient designs can yield capital and operational cost savings, and can be part of a strategy to improve productivity in the cleanroom industry. Based upon in-situ measurement data from ISO Class 5 clean rooms, this article discusses key factors affecting cleanroom air system performance and benefits of efficient airflow design in clean rooms. Cleanroom HVAC systems used in the semiconductor, pharmaceutical, and healthcare industries are very energy intensive, requiring large volumes of cleaned air to remove or dilute contaminants for satisfactory operations. There is a tendency, however, to design excessive airflow rates into cleanroom HVAC systems, due to factors such as design conservatism, lack of thorough understanding of airflow requirements, concerns about cleanliness reliability, and potential design and operational liabilities. Energy use of cleanroom environmental systems varies with system type and design, cleanroom functions, and the control of critical parameters such as temperature and humidity. In particular, cleanroom cleanliness requirements specified by cleanliness class have an impact on overall energy use. A previous study covering Europe and the US reveals annual cleanroom electricity usage for cooling and fan energy varies significantly depending on cleanliness class, and may account for up to three-quarters of total annual operating costs. A study on a semiconductor cleanroom in Japan found air delivery systems account for more than 30% of total power consumption. It is evident that the main factors dictating cleanroom operation energy include airflow rates and HVAC system efficiency. Improving energy efficiency in clean rooms may potentially contribute to significant savings in the initial costs of the facilities as well as operation and maintenance costs. For example, energy consumption by a typical chip manufacturer can be cut 40% or more, and the associated greenhouse emissions even more. Cleanroom HVAC systems provide huge opportunities for energy savings in the semiconductor industry. In addition to direct cost reductions in cleanroom investment and operation, energy-efficient designs can reduce maintenance costs, increase power reliability, improve time-to-market in cleanroom production, and improve environmental quality. Companies that use energy efficiency to lower costs and increase productivity can gain a competitive advantage and achieve a higher return on investment. In addition, energy-efficient cleanroom systems conserve energy and natural resources, heightening the company's reputation as an environmentally conscious leader in the community and the industry. A significant portion of energy use in cleanroom environmental systems is associated with recirculating air systems. We will review and analyze design factors and operational performance of airflow systems in ISO Class 5 clean rooms. We will also discuss benefits of efficient cleanroom airflow designs in conjunction with effective cleanroom contamination control. We will consider the following common recirculating air system designs: fan-tower (FT) with pressurized-plenum; distributed air handler unit (AHU); and fan-filter unit (FFU).

  6. Method for assessing in-service motor efficiency and in-service motor/load efficiency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kueck, John D.; Otaduy, Pedro J.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for assessing the efficiency of an in-service motor. The operating characteristics of the in-service motor are remotely measured. The operating characteristics are then applied to an equivalent circuit for electrical motors. Finally the equivalent circuit is evaluated to determine the performance characteristics of said in-service motor. Based upon the evaluation an individual is able to determine the rotor speed, power output, efficiency, and toque of the in-service motor. Additionally, an individual is able to confirm the calculations by comparing measured values with values obtained as a result of the motor equivalent circuit evaluation.

  7. PORTFOLIO PERFORMANCE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The U.S. Department of Energy’s Loan Programs Oce (LPO) provides the critical financing needed to deploy some of the world’s largest and most innovative clean energy and advanced technology vehicle manufacturing projects to date. Despite its mission to help finance innovation, which carries some degree of financial risk, LPO has maintained strong financial performance, even when compared with private financing of conventional energy projects in the United States. As of September 2014, more than $810 million of interest has already been earned and the estimated loss ratio on LPO’s portfolio is approximately 2% of LPO’s total commitments. This strong performance demonstrates our commitment to protecting taxpayer interests while helping deploy the innovative energy technology necessary to make the United States a global leader in clean energy.

  8. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing the decision on whether to adopt an emerging technology. The technologies were characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics, and environmental performance. The results demonstrate that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. We show that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity and worker safety, and reduced capital costs.

  9. WIPP Workers Perform Filter Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 10, 2015 WIPP Workers Perform Filter Replacement As recovery operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant continue, increased work activity in the underground results in higher levels of airborne salt dust, increasing the frequency with which filters are replaced. Last week, workers performed a filter replacement on WIPP's Underground Ventilation System. WIPP's ventilation system has two filter units. Each unit has 84 separate filters arranges in four layers- moderate efficiency

  10. Energy-efficient distributed constructions of miniumum spanning tree for wireless ad-hoc networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, V. S. A.; Pandurangan, G.; Khan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) problem is one of the most important and commonly occurring primitive in the design and operation of data and communication networks. While there a redistributed algorithms for the MST problem these require relatively large number of messages and time, and are fairly involved, require synchronization and a lot of book keeping; this makes these algorithms impractical for emerging technologies such as ad hoc and sensor networks. In such networks, a sensor has very limited power, and any algorithm needs to be simple, local and energy efficient for being practical. Motivated by these considerations, we study the performance of a class of simple and local algorithms called Nearest Neighbor Tree (NNT) algorithms for energy-efficient construction of MSTs in a wireless ad hoc setting. These employ a very simple idea to eliminate the work involved in cycle detection in other MST algorithms: each node chooses a distinct rank, and connects to the closest node of higher rank. We consider two variants of the NNT algorithms, obtained by two ways of choosing the ranks: (i) Random NNT, in which each node chooses a rank randomly, and (ii) Directional NNT, in which each node uses directional information for choosing the rank. We show provable bounds on the performance of these algorithms in instances obtained by uniformly distributed points in the unit square. Finally, we perform extensive simulations of our algorithms. We tested our algorithms on both uniformly random distributions of points, and on realistic distributions of points in an urban setting. The cost of the tree found by the NNT algorithms is within a factor of 2 of the MST, but there is more than a ten-fold saving on the energy and about a five fold saving on the number of messages sent. Also, our algorithms are significantly simpler to implement compared to, for instance, the GHS algorithm, which is essentially optimal with regards to the message complexity. Thus, our results demonstrate the first such tradeoff between the quality of approximation and the energy cost for spanning trees on ad hoc networks, and motivates similar considerations for other important problems.

  11. Determination of Thermoelectric Module Efficiency A Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin; McCarty, Robin; Salvador, James R.; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Konig, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The development of thermoelectrics (TE) for energy conversion is in the transition phase from laboratory research to device development. There is an increasing demand to accurately determine the module efficiency, especially for the power generation mode. For many thermoelectrics, the figure of merit, ZT, of the material sometimes cannot be fully realized at the device level. Reliable efficiency testing of thermoelectric modules is important to assess the device ZT and provide the end-users with realistic values on how much power can be generated under specific conditions. We conducted a general survey of efficiency testing devices and their performance. The results indicated the lack of industry standards and test procedures. This study included a commercial test system and several laboratory systems. Most systems are based on the heat flow meter method and some are based on the Harman method. They are usually reproducible in evaluating thermoelectric modules. However, cross-checking among different systems often showed large errors that are likely caused by unaccounted heat loss and thermal resistance. Efficiency testing is an important area for the thermoelectric community to focus on. A follow-up international standardization effort is planned.

  12. Energy Efficiency Through Lighting Upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berst, Kara; Howeth, Maria

    2013-02-26

    Lighting upgrades including neon to LED, incandescent to CFL's and T-12 to T-8 and T-5's were completed through this grant. A total of 16 Chickasaw nation facilities decreased their carbon footprint because of these grant funds. Calculations used were based on comparing the energy usage from the previous year's average and the current energy usage. For facilities without a full year's set of energy bills, the month after installation was compared to the same month from the previous year. Overall, the effect the lighting change-outs had for the gaming centers and casinos far exceeded expectations. For the Madill Gaming Center; both an interior and exterior upgrade was performed which resulted in a 31% decrease in energy consumption. This same reduction was seen in every facility that participated in the grant. Just by simply changing out light bulbs to newer energy efficient equivalents, a decrease in energy usage can be achieved and this was validated by the return on investment seen at Chickasaw Nation facilities. Along with the technical project tasks were awareness sessions presented at Chickasaw Head Starts. The positive message of environmental stewardship was passed down to head start students and passed along to Chickasaw employees. Excitement was created in those that learned what they could do to help reduce their energy bills and many followed through and took the idea home. For a fairy low cost, the general public can also use this technique to lower their energy consumption both at home and at work. Although the idea behind the project was somewhat simple, true benefits have been gained through environmental awareness and reductions of energy costs.

  13. Introduction to Energy Performance Contracting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides a tutorial in the fundamentals of Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) for policymakers who need to understand how ESPC fits into the broader context of energy efficiency policy and programs. Author: ICF International National Association of Energy Services Companies for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  14. The transition from the open minimum to the ring minimum on the ground state and on the lowest excited state of like symmetry in ozone: A configuration interaction study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Theis, Daniel; Ivanic, Joseph; Windus, Theresa L.; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2016-03-10

    The metastable ring structure of the ozone 11A1 ground state, which theoretical calculations have shown to exist, has so far eluded experimental detection. An accurate prediction for the energy difference between this isomer and the lower open structure is therefore of interest, as is a prediction for the isomerization barrier between them, which results from interactions between the lowest two 1A1 states. In the present work, valence correlated energies of the 11A1 state and the 21A1 state were calculated at the 11A1 open minimum, the 11A1 ring minimum, the transition state between these two minima, the minimum of the 21A1more » state, and the conical intersection between the two states. The geometries were determined at the full-valence multi-configuration self-consistent-field level. Configuration interaction (CI) expansions up to quadruple excitations were calculated with triple-zeta atomic basis sets. The CI expansions based on eight different reference configuration spaces were explored. To obtain some of the quadruple excitation energies, the method of CorrelationEnergy Extrapolation by Intrinsic Scaling was generalized to the simultaneous extrapolation for two states. This extrapolation method was shown to be very accurate. On the other hand, none of the CI expansions were found to have converged to millihartree (mh) accuracy at the quadruple excitation level. The data suggest that convergence to mh accuracy is probably attained at the sextuple excitation level. On the 11A1 state, the present calculations yield the estimates of (ring minimum—open minimum) ~45–50 mh and (transition state—open minimum) ~85–90 mh. For the (21A1–1A1) excitation energy, the estimate of ~130–170 mh is found at the open minimum and 270–310 mh at the ring minimum. At the transition state, the difference (21A1–1A1) is found to be between 1 and 10 mh. The geometry of the transition state on the 11A1 surface and that of the minimum on the 21A1 surface nearly coincide. More accurate predictions of the energydifferences also require CI expansions to at least sextuple excitations with respect to the valence space. Furthermore, for every wave function considered, the omission of the correlations of the 2s oxygen orbitals, which is a widely used approximation, was found to cause errors of about ±10 mh with respect to the energy differences.« less

  15. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Energy Efficiency Programs Regional Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation covers regional industrial energy efficiency programs in the Midwest, Southeast, and ...

  16. Research Laboratory Experiments with Energy Efficiency Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Laboratory Experiments with Energy Efficiency Upgrades Research Laboratory Experiments with Energy Efficiency Upgrades August 30, 2012 - 11:52am Addthis Energy efficiency ...

  17. Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-11-01

    Provides guidance on determining the efficiency potential in a utility footprint, state, or region; evaluating efficiency as a supply-side resource; and developing detailed efficiency program plans.

  18. ORNL Energy Efficiency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ORNL Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Energy Efficiency Capabilities at ORNL Name Energy Efficiency Capabilities at ORNL AgencyCompany Organization Oak Ridge...

  19. Efficiency Maine Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Dashboard Efficiency Maine Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Efficiency Maine, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. File Efficiency Maine Data Dashboard ...

  20. Maryland Efficiency Program Options | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maryland Efficiency Program Options Maryland Efficiency Program Options Maryland Efficiency Program Options, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program...

  1. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress as ...

  2. Shared Value in Utility and Efficiency Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions Conference: Shared Value in Utility and Efficiency Partnerships, July 10, 2012. Presents four case studies highlighting partnerships between local utilities and energy efficiency programs.

  3. Consortium for Energy Efficiency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Consortium for Energy Efficiency Name: Consortium for Energy Efficiency Address: 98 North Washington St Place: Boston,...

  4. Western Cooling Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cooling Efficiency Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Western Cooling Efficiency Center Place: Davis, CA Website: http: References: Western Cooling Efficiency Center 1...

  5. High efficiency turbine blade coatings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600 oC and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the production of layered periodic microstructures in the coating, the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) modeling of particle transport in the PVD plume, functional graded layer development, the deposition of all layers to form a complete coating, and materials characterization including thermal testing. Ion beam-assisted deposition, beam sharing through advanced digital rastering, substrate pivoting, hearth calorimetry, infrared imaging, fiber optic-enabled optical emission spectroscopy and careful thermal management were used to achieve all the milestones outlined in the FY02 LDRD proposal.

  6. Standard Energy Efficiency Data Platform

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED) Platform™ is an open source software application that fills a major market need for data-driven energy efficiency program design and implementation. The SEED Platform enables streamlining of complex building data and allows users to share selected data with partners or make it publicly available.

  7. Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation The Building Technologies Office (BTO) uses performance metrics to standardize the measurement and characterization of energy performance in commercial buildings. These metrics help inform the effectiveness of energy efficiency measures in existing buildings and highlight opportunities to improve performance. Various tiers of metrics are available for different users. Performance

  8. Effects of minimum monitor unit threshold on spot scanning proton plan quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Michelle Beltran, Chris; Mayo, Charles S.; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the minimum monitor unit (MU) on the quality of clinical treatment plans for scanned proton therapy. Methods: Delivery system characteristics limit the minimum number of protons that can be delivered per spot, resulting in a min-MU limit. Plan quality can be impacted by the min-MU limit. Two sites were used to investigate the impact of min-MU on treatment plans: pediatric brain tumor at a depth of 5–10 cm; a head and neck tumor at a depth of 1–20 cm. Three-field, intensity modulated spot scanning proton plans were created for each site with the following parameter variations: min-MU limit range of 0.0000–0.0060; and spot spacing range of 2–8 mm. Comparisons were based on target homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. For the pediatric brain, two versions of the treatment planning system were also compared to judge the effects of the min-MU limit based on when it is accounted for in the optimization process (Eclipse v.10 and v.13, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Results: The increase of the min-MU limit with a fixed spot spacing decreases plan quality both in homogeneous target coverage and in the avoidance of critical structures. Both head and neck and pediatric brain plans show a 20% increase in relative dose for the hot spot in the CTV and 10% increase in key critical structures when comparing min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0060 with a fixed spot spacing of 4 mm. The DVHs of CTVs show min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0010 produce similar plan quality and quality decreases as the min-MU limit increases beyond 0.0020. As spot spacing approaches 8 mm, degradation in plan quality is observed when no min-MU limit is imposed. Conclusions: Given a fixed spot spacing of ≤4 mm, plan quality decreases as min-MU increased beyond 0.0020. The effect of min-MU needs to be taken into consideration while planning proton therapy treatments.

  9. Maximizing Operational Efficiencies in Waste Management on the Hanford Plateau Remediation Contract in a Down-turned Market - 13484

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simiele, Connie J.; Blackford, L. Ty; West, Lori D.

    2013-07-01

    Recent changes in DOE priorities and funding have pressed DOE and its contractors to look for innovative methods to sustain critical operations at sites across the Complex. At the Hanford Site, DOE Richland Operations and its prime contractor, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), have completed in-depth assessments of the Plateau Remediation Contract (PRC) operations that compared available funding to mission and operational objectives in an effort to maintain requisite safety and compliance margins while realizing cost savings that meet funding profiles. These assessments included confirmation of current baseline activities, identification of potential efficiencies, barriers to implementation, and potential increased risks associated with implementation. Six operating PRC waste management facilities were evaluated against three possible end-states: complete facility closure, maintaining base operations, and performing minimum safe surveillance and maintenance activities. The costs to completely close evaluated facilities were determined to be prohibitively high and this end-state was quickly dropped from consideration. A summary of the analysis of remaining options by facility, efficiencies identified, impact to risk profiles, and expected cost savings is provided in Table I. The expected cost savings are a result of: - right-sizing and cross-training work crews to address maintenance activities across facilities; - combining and sequencing 'like-moded' operational processes; - cross-cutting emergency planning and preparedness staffing; - resource redistribution and optimization; - reducing areas requiring routine surveillance and inspection. For the efficiencies identified, there are corresponding increases in risk, including a loss of breadth and depth of available resources; lengthened response time to emergent issues; inability to invest in opportunities for improvement (OFIs); potential single-point failures or non-compliancies due to resource scarcity; limited cross-training capability; and reduced capability to respond to changes in DOE priorities. Finally, there are many challenges to achieving these cost savings. With a workforce nearing retirement effective succession planning becomes critical to success and requires establishing a balance between the cost of hiring and training and cost-saving activities. With six active waste management facilities spread across nearly 15 square miles, scheduling and deploying cross-trained surveillance and maintenance teams is a logistical challenge, particularly as the loss of funding has not diminished emphasis by regulatory agencies placed on the safe and compliant performance of DOE and its contractors. As reflected in Table I, efficiencies are currently being implemented on the Hanford Plateau Remediation Contract (PRC) that deliver cost savings that align with the current site budget while maintaining critical capabilities. It is currently estimated that these efficiencies will result in a cost savings of approximately $9 million for FY13 in base and minimum safe operations on the PRC - a cost reduction of more than 13 percent over FY12 and nearly 30 percent over FY09 levels. (authors)

  10. Affordable Energy-Efficient New Housing Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, Subrato; Widder, Sarah H.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Beal, David; Sutherland, Karen; Abbott, , K.; Fonorow, Ken; Eklund, Ken; Lubliner, Michael; Salzberg, Emily; Peeks, B.; Hewes, T.; Kosar, D.

    2012-05-31

    Since 2010, the U.S. Department of Energys Building America has sponsored research at PNNL to investigate cost-effective, energy-saving home-building technologies and to demonstrate how high-performance homes can deliver lower utility bills, increased comfort, and improved indoor air quality, while maintaining accessibility for low-income homeowners. PNNL and its contractors have been investigating 1) cost-effective whole-house solutions for Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) and specific HFH affiliates in hot-humid and marine climates; 2) cost-effective energy-efficiency improvements for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in new, stick-built and manufactured homes; and 3) energy-efficient domestic hot-water systems.

  11. Final Report: Efficient Databases for MPC Microdata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Bender; Martin Farach-Colton; Bradley C. Kuszmaul

    2011-08-31

    The purpose of this grant was to develop the theory and practice of high-performance databases for massive streamed datasets. Over the last three years, we have developed fast indexing technology, that is, technology for rapidly ingesting data and storing that data so that it can be efficiently queried and analyzed. During this project we developed the technology so that high-bandwidth data streams can be indexed and queried efficiently. Our technology has been proven to work data sets composed of tens of billions of rows when the data streams arrives at over 40,000 rows per second. We achieved these numbers even on a single disk driven by two cores. Our work comprised (1) new write-optimized data structures with better asymptotic complexity than traditional structures, (2) implementation, and (3) benchmarking. We furthermore developed a prototype of TokuFS, a middleware layer that can handle microdata I/O packaged up in an MPI-IO abstraction.

  12. Army Reserve Comprehensive Water Efficiency Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Kearney, Jaime

    2015-04-14

    The Army Reserve has partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop comprehensive water assessments for numerous Army Reserve Centers in all five regions including the Pacific islands and Puerto Rico, and at Fort Buchanan and Fort Hunter Liggett. The objective of these assessments is to quantify water use at the site, and identify innovative water efficiency projects that can be implemented to help reduce water demand and increase efficiency. Several of these assessments have focused on a strategic plan for achieving net zero water to help meet the Army’s Net Zero Directive . The Army Reserve has also leveraged this approach as part of the energy conservation investment program (ECIP), energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs), and utility energy service contracts (UESCs). This article documents the process involved.

  13. Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountability and Staff Engagement Throughout the Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study details how corporate leaders at Alcoa established energy efficiency as a priority throughout the organization and achieved plant-wide performance improvements as a result.

  14. Modeling and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compression Ratio High Efficiency ICRE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    performance of a high compression ratio (32:1 to 74:1) high efficiency (50 to 60% BTE) ICRE operating on natural gas and gasoline

  15. High Efficiency CdTe and CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells: Highlights...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Efficiency CdTe and CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells: Highlights of the Technologies Challenges Acknowledgement: Work performed at NREL for US DOE under contract No....

  16. Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses ongoing work exploring fuel chemistry, analysis of and improving simulation methodologies for high efficiency clean combustion regimes, and computational performance

  17. Two color laser fields for studying the Cooper minimum with phase-matched high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ba Dinh, Khuong Vu Le, Hoang; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap

    2014-05-28

    We experimentally study the observation of the Cooper minimum in a semi-infinite argon-filled gas cell using two-color laser fields at wavelengths of 1400 nm and 800 nm. The experimental results show that the additional 800 nm field can change the macroscopic phase-matching condition through change of the atomic dipole phase associated with the electron in the continuum state and that this approach can be used to control the appearance of the Cooper minimum in the high-order harmonic spectrum in order to study the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

  18. High Performance Window Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S; Hun, Diana E; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2013-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Traco partnered to develop high-performance windows for commercial building that are cost-effective. The main performance requirement for these windows was that they needed to have an R-value of at least 5 ft2 F h/Btu. This project seeks to quantify the potential energy savings from installing these windows in commercial buildings that are at least 20 years old. To this end, we are conducting evaluations at a two-story test facility that is representative of a commercial building from the 1980s, and are gathering measurements on the performance of its windows before and after double-pane, clear-glazed units are upgraded with R5 windows. Additionally, we will use these data to calibrate EnergyPlus models that we will allow us to extrapolate results to other climates. Findings from this project will provide empirical data on the benefits from high-performance windows, which will help promote their adoption in new and existing commercial buildings. This report describes the experimental setup, and includes some of the field and simulation results.

  19. Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-08-05

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified marine waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change. This expansion alters marine ecosystem function and the productivity of fisheries due to habitat compression and changes in biogeochemical cycling leading to fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally anoxic fjord, Saanich Inlet to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification and inorganic carbon fixation predominantly co-varied with abundance and distribution patterns of Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Within these groups, pathways mediating inorganic carbon fixation and nitrogen and sulfur transformations were differentially expressed across the redoxcline. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters and denitrification, sulfur-oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with SUP05 dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrite-oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nitrospina and Planctomycetes respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The differential expression of these pathways under changing water column redox conditions has quantitative implications for coupled biogeochemical cycling linking different modes of inorganic carbon fixation with distributed nitrogen and sulfur-based energy metabolism extensible to coastal and open ocean OMZs.

  20. Use of finite volume radiation for predicting the Knudsen minimum in 2D channel flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, Chetan P.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2014-12-09

    In an earlier paper we employed an analogy between surface-to-surface radiation and free-molecular flow to model Knudsen flow through tubes and onto planes. In the current paper we extend the analogy between thermal radiation and molecular flow to model the flow of a gas in a 2D channel across all regimes of rarefaction. To accomplish this, we break down the problem of gaseous flow into three sub-problems (self-diffusion, mass-motion and generation of pressure gradient) and use the finite volume method for modeling radiation through participating media to model the transport in each sub-problem as a radiation problem. We first model molecular self-diffusion in the stationary gas by modeling the transport of the molecular number density through the gas starting from the analytical asymptote for free-molecular flow to the kinetic theory limit of gaseous self-diffusion. We then model the transport of momentum through the gas at unit pressure gradient to predict Poiseuille flow and slip flow in the 2D gas. Lastly, we predict the generation of pressure gradient within the gas due to molecular collisions by modeling the transport of the forces generated due to collisions per unit volume of gas. We then proceed to combine the three radiation problems to predict flow of the gas over the entire Knudsen number regime from free-molecular to transition to continuum flow and successfully capture the Knudsen minimum at Kn ? 1.