Sample records for minimum efficacy levels

  1. Minimum Aberration Blocking Schemes for Two-Level and Three-Level Fractional Factorial Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hongquan; Lau, Sovia

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 k?p fractional factorial designs. Technometrics 3, 311–three-level fractional factorial designs with small runs.of three-level fractional factorial designs. UCLA Statistics

  2. Minimum Aberration Blocking Schemes for Two-Level and Three-Level Fractional Factorial Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongquan Xu; Sovia Lau

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 k?p fractional factorial designs. Technometrics 3, 311–three-level fractional factorial designs with small runs.of three-level fractional factorial designs. UCLA Statistics

  3. Minimum time control of a pair of two-level quantum systems with opposite drifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffaele Romano; Domenico D'Alessandro

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we solve two equivalent time optimal control problems. On one hand, we design the control field to implement in minimum time the SWAP (or equivalent) operator on a two-level system, assuming that it interacts with an additional, uncontrollable, two-level system. On the other hand, we synthesize the SWAP operator simultaneously, in minimum time, on a pair of two-level systems subject to opposite drifts. We assume that it is possible to perform three independent control actions, and that the total control strength is bounded. These controls either affect the dynamics of the target system, under the first perspective, or, simultaneously, the dynamics of both systems, in the second view. We obtain our results by using techniques of geometric control theory on Lie groups. In particular, we apply the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, and provide a complete characterization of singular and non-singular extremals. Our analysis shows that the problem can be formulated as the motion of a material point in a central force, a well known system in classical mechanics. Although we focus on obtaining the SWAP operator, many of the ideas and techniques developed in this work apply to the time optimal implementation of an arbitrary unitary operator.

  4. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  5. Level and length of cyclic solar activity during the Maunder minimum as deduced from the active day statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaquero, J M; Usoskin, I G; Carrasco, V M S; Gallego, M C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maunder minimum (MM) of greatly reduced solar activity took place in 1645-1715, but the exact level of sunspot activity is uncertain as based, to a large extent, on historical generic statements of the absence of spots on the Sun. Here we aim, using a conservative approach, to assess the level and length of solar cycle during the Maunder minimum, on the basis of direct historical records by astronomers of that time. A database of the active and inactive days (days with and without recorded sunspots on the solar disc respectively) is constructed for three models of different levels of conservatism (loose ML, optimum MO and strict MS models) regarding generic no-spot records. We have used the active day fraction to estimate the group sunspot number during the MM. A clear cyclic variability is found throughout the MM with peaks at around 1655--1657, 1675, 1684 and 1705, and possibly 1666, with the active day fraction not exceeding 0.2, 0.3 or 0.4 during the core MM, for the three models. Estimated sunspot nu...

  6. Minimum resource requirements and adjustments needed for specified levels of farm income on the Blackland soils of the Blackland area of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parekh, Jayanti Lal

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHODOLOGY OF THE STUDY 10 10 17 The Linear Programming Technique . Source of' Data General Plan of' the Study Basic Assumptions Equity in Land Labor . Capital . . . . . . . . . . ~ ~ Level of Technology Unallocated Overhead Costs Machinery... Resource Programming Models RESULTS OF MINIMUM RESOURCE PROGRAMMING e 4 17 18 18 21 21 24 25 27 28 28 30 30 31 32 32 33 34 35 38 Comparison of Results of Minimizing Land, Labor and Total Cost $3, 000 Return to Operator's Labor...

  7. This is a preprint of the following article, which is available from http://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    ://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published article.A.M. van Kuik. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines for Minimum Levelized Cost of Energy. Renewable Energy (In press), 2014 Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines

  8. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  9. Efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy After Hand Flexor Tendon Repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayad, K. E.; Abd El Mejeed, S. F. [Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University (Egypt); El Gohary, H. M.; Abd Elrahman, M.; Bekheet, A. B. [Al Sahel Teaching Hospital, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexor tendon injury is a common problem requiring suturing repair followed by early postoperative mobilization. Muscle atrophy, joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, infection, skin necrosis, ulceration of joint cartilage and tendocutaneous adhesion are familiar complications produced by prolonged immobilization of surgically repaired tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the importance of low level laser therapy after hand flexor tendon repair in zone II. Thirty patients aging between 20 and 40 years were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 15) received a conventional therapeutic exercise program while patients in group B (n = 15) received low level laser therapy combined with the same therapeutic exercise program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in total active motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints as well as maximum hand grip strength at three weeks and three months postoperative, but improvement was more significant in group B. It was concluded that the combination of low level laser therapy and early therapeutic exercises was more effective than therapeutic exercises alone in improving total active motion of proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and hand grip strength after hand flexor tendon repair.

  10. Oxygen at Nanomolar Levels Reversibly Suppresses Process Rates and Gene Expression in Anammox and Denitrification in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Northern Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalsgaard, Tage

    A major percentage (20 to 40%) of global marine fixed-nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Concentrations of O[subscript 2] and the sensitivity of the anaerobic N[subscript 2]-producing processes of anammox ...

  11. The Minimum Price Contract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Welch, Mark; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , he can Mark Waller, Steve Amosson, Mark Welch, and Kevin Dhuyvetter* 2 lock in a floor price and still have upside poten- tial if the market rallies. Options-based marketing strategies, such as the minimum price contract, work well in times...

  12. MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

  13. Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to all dams and structures which impound or divert waters on rivers or their tributaries, with some exceptions. The regulations set standards for minimum flow (listed in the...

  14. Minimum Gas Service Standards (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natural gas companies in Ohio are required to follow the Minimum Gas Service Standards, which are set and enforced by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. These rules are found in chapter 4901...

  15. Campus Outdoor Lighting Standards The following standards provide for minimum safe lighting standards for outdoor area of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Campus Outdoor Lighting Standards The following standards provide for minimum safe lighting with a minimum of 3 foot candles. This lighting level is for daytime and at night. Public Streets Streets must have a minimum of one foot candles average with a minimum of .6 foot candles. Augmented lighting should

  16. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

  17. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  18. A Catalogue of Three-Level Fractional Factorial Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hongquan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on 2 n?k fractional factorial designs and search for minimumLevel Fractional Factorial Designs Hongquan Xu Department ofchoice of fractional factorial designs. Minimum aberration

  19. A Catalogue of Three-Level Fractional Factorial Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongquan Xu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on 2 n?k fractional factorial designs and search for minimumLevel Fractional Factorial Designs Hongquan Xu Department ofchoice of fractional factorial designs. Minimum aberration

  20. On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demaine, Erik D.

    We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

  1. Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso M´ario Jesus ´Alberto M´arquez Abstract The NP multiple criteria minimum spanning tree as several applications into the network design problems criteria minimum spanning trees. There are several geometric network design and application problems

  2. Storage Begins with Purchasing purchase minimum needed for experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Storage Begins with Purchasing · purchase minimum needed for experiment ­ do not "buy in bulk://www.ehs.washington.edu/forms/epo/peroxideguidelines.pdf #12;Chemical Storage Basics · https://web.mit.edu/environment/pdf/sop/sop_0023.pdf · http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/chsp/html/storage level · do not store chemicals in fume hoods · flammable storage refrigerator needed for flammable

  3. Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste and other land uses. The regulations require an...

  4. Knots and Minimum Distance Energy Rosanna Speller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denne, Elizabeth

    Knots and Minimum Distance Energy Rosanna Speller (Dated: May 11, 2008) Professor Elizabeth Denne have least Minimum Distance Energy. I previously showed that the energy is minimized for convex polygons. We hope relating the energy to chords of polygons will be a helpful step towards showing

  5. Minimum Time/Minimum Fuel Control of an Axisymmetric Rigid Body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Jonathan Farina

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Many times it is necessary to reorient an aerial vehicle during flight in a minimum time or minimum fuel fashion. This thesis will present a minimum time/fuel control solution to reorienting an axisymmetric rigid body using eigenaxis maneuvers. Any...

  6. Flammability limits of dusts: Minimum inerting concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dastidar, A.G.; Amyotte, P.R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Going, J.; Chatrathi, K. [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)] [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new flammability limit parameter has been defined as the Minimum Inerting Concentration (MIC). This is the concentration of inertant required to prevent a dust explosion regardless of fuel concentration. Previous experimental work at Fike in a 1-m{sup 3} spherical chamber has shown this flammability limit to exist for pulverized coal dust and cornstarch. In the current work, inerting experiments with aluminum, anthraquinone and polyethylene dusts as fuels were performed, using monoammonium phosphate and sodium bicarbonate as inertants. The results show that an MIC exists only for anthraquinone inerted with sodium bicarbonate. The other combustible dust and inertant mixtures did not show a definitive MIC, although they did show a strong dependence between inerting level and suspended fuel concentration. As the fuel concentration increased, the amount of inertant required to prevent an explosion decreased. Even though a definitive MIC was not found for most of the dusts an effective MIC can be estimated from the data. The use of MIC data can aid in the design of explosion suppression schemes.

  7. Minimum Energy Diagrams for Multieffect Distillation Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Minimum Energy Diagrams for Multieffect Distillation Arrangements Hilde K. Engelien and Sigurd distillation arrangements for separating a ternary mixture have been considered. The focus is on a heat-integrated complex distillation configuration, called a multieffect prefractionator arrangement. The comparison

  8. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulloa, Osvaldo

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

  9. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000...

  10. SOLAR ROTATION RATE DURING THE CYCLE 24 MINIMUM IN ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, Sarbani, E-mail: antia@tifr.res.i, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum of solar cycle 24 is significantly different from most other minima in terms of its duration as well as its abnormally low levels of activity. Using available helioseismic data that cover epochs from the minimum of cycle 23 to now, we study the differences in the nature of the solar rotation between the minima of cycles 23 and 24. We find that there are significant differences between the rotation rates during the two minima. There are differences in the zonal-flow pattern too. We find that the band of fast rotating region close to the equator bifurcated around 2005 and recombined by 2008. This behavior is different from that during the cycle 23 minimum. By autocorrelating the zonal-flow pattern with a time shift, we find that in terms of solar dynamics, solar cycle 23 lasted for a period of 11.7 years, consistent with the result of Howe et al. (2009). The autocorrelation coefficient also confirms that the zonal-flow pattern penetrates through the convection zone.

  11. The Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following courses, with a minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    *Management 4640 - Cross-Cultural Work Study Four courses at the 3000/4000 level from any faculty A minimumThe Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length) and Statistics 1770. Admission to Management programs is competitive and is based on academic achievement prior

  12. Minimum Energy Accumulative Routing in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundaram, Ravi

    Minimum Energy Accumulative Routing in Wireless Networks Jiangzhuo Chen, Lujun Jia, Xin Liu to address the energy efficient routing problem in multi-hop wireless networks with accumulative relay. In the accumulative relay model, partially overheard signals of previous transmis- sions for the same packet are used

  13. Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1 David Eppstein 2 Leonidas J. Guibas 3 Monika R. Henzinger 4 Abstract We consider the parametric minimum spanning tree problem- pute the sequence of minimum spanning trees generated as varies. We also consider the kinetic minimum

  14. Minimum and terminal velocities in projectile motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. N. Miranda; S. Nikolskaya; R. Riba

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of a projectile with horizontal initial velocity V0, moving under the action of the gravitational field and a drag force is studied analytically. As it is well known, the projectile reaches a terminal velocity Vterm. There is a curious result concerning the minimum speed Vmin; it turns out that the minimum velocity is lower than the terminal one if V0 > Vterm and is lower than the initial one if V0 < Vterm. These results show that the velocity is not a monotonous function. If the initial speed is not horizontal, there is an angle range where the velocity shows the same behavior mentioned previously. Out of that range, the volocity is a monotonous function. These results come out from numerical simulations.

  15. LED Record Efficacy and Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Designed for general lighting applications such as street, industrial, and parking garage lighting, the Cree XLamp® power LED sets new records for LED brightness and efficacy, up to 85 lm/W at 350 mA. The XLamp utilizes Cree's performance breakthrough EZBright™ LED chip; both products include technology that was developed in part with R&D funding support from DOE.

  16. Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assembly Bill 178, adopted in June 2007, established efficacy* standards for general purpose lights sold in the state of Nevada. The bill set the required efficacy at 25 lumens per watt (lm/W) of...

  17. Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevisan, Luca

    Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time Bernard Chazelle #3; Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum spanning tree- components algorithm picks O(1=#15; 2 ) vertices in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose

  18. Does the current minimum validate (or invalidate) cycle prediction methods?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hathaway, David H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This deep, extended solar minimum and the slow start to Cycle 24 strongly suggest that Cycle 24 will be a small cycle. A wide array of solar cycle prediction techniques have been applied to predicting the amplitude of Cycle 24 with widely different results. Current conditions and new observations indicate that some highly regarded techniques now appear to have doubtful utility. Geomagnetic precursors have been reliable in the past and can be tested with 12 cycles of data. Of the three primary geomagnetic precursors only one (the minimum level of geomagnetic activity) suggests a small cycle. The Sun's polar field strength has also been used to successfully predict the last three cycles. The current weak polar fields are indicative of a small cycle. For the first time, dynamo models have been used to predict the size of a solar cycle but with opposite predictions depending on the model and the data assimilation. However, new measurements of the surface meridional flow indicate that the flow was substantially fa...

  19. Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems David Fern'andez­Baca 1? , Giora with a parameter. The second is an asymptotically optimal algorithm for the minimum ratio spanning tree problem, as well as other search problems, on dense graphs. 1 Introduction In the parametric minimum spanning tree

  20. Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems David Fern´andez-Baca Giora algorithm for the minimum ratio spanning tree problem, as well as other search prob- lems, on dense graphs. 1 Introduction In the parametric minimum spanning tree problem, one is given an n-node, m

  1. Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees in Euclidean Spaces Pegah Kamousi #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Timothy M.

    Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees in Euclidean Spaces Pegah Kamousi # Computer Science University­1­4503­0682­9/11/06 ...$10.00. Keywords Algorithms, Theory General Terms Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees, Geometric Data and arbitrary but known probability p i . We want to compute the expected length of the minimum spanning tree

  2. On Two-Stage Stochastic Minimum Spanning Kedar Dhamdhere1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi, R.

    On Two-Stage Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees Kedar Dhamdhere1 , R. Ravi2 , and Mohit Singh2 1}@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract. We consider the undirected minimum spanning tree problem in a stochastic optimization setting algorithm. We then consider the Stochastic minimum spanning tree problem in a more general black-box model

  3. Minimum Cost Data Aggregation with Localized Processing for Statistical Inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anandkumar, Animashree

    Minimum Cost Data Aggregation with Localized Processing for Statistical Inference Animashree--The problem of minimum cost in-network fusion of measurements, collected from distributed sensors via multihop, which implies that any Steiner- tree approximation can be employed for minimum cost fusion with the same

  4. The stackelberg minimum spanning tree game on planar and bounded-treewidth graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinal, Jean

    The Stackelberg Minimum Spanning Tree Game is a two-level combinatorial pricing problem introduced at WADS’07. The game is played on a graph, whose edges are colored either red or blue, and where the red edges have a given ...

  5. An Efficient Algorithm for Computing Robust Minimum Capacity st Cuts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doug Altner

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 20, 2008 ... In this paper, we present an efficient algorithm for computing minimum capacity s-t cuts under a polyhedral model of robustness. Our algorithm ...

  6. Microbial metatranscriptomics in a permanent marine oxygen minimum zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank J.

    Simultaneous characterization of taxonomic composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) has potential to broaden perspectives on the microbial and biogeochemical dynamics ...

  7. anka karlsruhe minimum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Descrip- tion Length (MDL) principle (Rissanen, 1978, 1987, 1996), and the Minimum Length (MML) principle. Based on this analysis, we present two revised versions of MML: a...

  8. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Abstract: Transition state searches have been...

  9. Optimization Online - Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Recht

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 28, 2007 ... Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization. Benjamin Recht(brecht ***at*** caltech.edu)

  10. Minimum Aberration Blocking Schemes for 128-Run Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hongquan; Mee, Robert W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Split-Plot Fractional Factorial Designs,” Journal of QualityAberration in Blocked Factorial Designs,” Technometrics, 39,Blocked Regular Fractional Factorial Designs With Minimum

  11. Minimum Aberration Blocking Schemes for 128-Run Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongquan Xu; Robert W. Mee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Split-Plot Fractional Factorial Designs,” Journal of QualityAberration in Blocked Factorial Designs,” Technometrics, 39,Blocked Regular Fractional Factorial Designs With Minimum

  12. PJM©2012 Minimum Generation Alert PJM Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluate Schedules (including; Prior Light; Load Period

    – To provide alert that system conditions may require the use of emergency procedures as a result of generation exceeding demand. • Trigger – When expected generation levels approach 2,500 MW of normal generation limits.

  13. Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Shafi

    Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time #3; Bernard Chazelle y Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum span- ning tree in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose sizes are speci#12;ed by a stochastic process. From

  14. Asymptotically minimum BER linear block precoders for MMSE equalisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Tim

    ) [3]. For a general block transmission scheme, optimal detection requires a joint decisionAsymptotically minimum BER linear block precoders for MMSE equalisation S.S. Chan, T.N. Davidson and K.M. Wong Abstract: An asymptotically minimum bit error rate (BER) linear block precoder

  15. THE MINIMUM FREE ENERGY FOR CONTINUOUS SPECTRUM MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deseri, Luca

    THE MINIMUM FREE ENERGY FOR CONTINUOUS SPECTRUM MATERIALS L. DESERI AND J.M. GOLDEN Abstract. A general closed expression is given for the isothermal minimum free energy of a linear viscoelastic states [6] are uniquely related to histories and the work function is the maximum free energy

  16. A Counterexample to Additivity of Minimum Output Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Hastings

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a random construction of a pair of channels which gives, with non-zero probability for sufficiently large dimensions, a counterexample to the minimum output entropy conjecture. As shown by Shor, this implies a violation of the additivity conjecture for the classical capacity of quantum channels. The violation of the minimum output entropy conjecture is relatively small.

  17. Minimum Entangling Power is Close to Its Maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianxin Chen; Zhengfeng Ji; David W Kribs; Bei Zeng

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a quantum gate $U$ acting on a bipartite quantum system, its maximum (average, minimum) entangling power is the maximum (average, minimum) entanglement generation with respect to certain entanglement measure when the inputs are restricted to be product states. In this paper, we mainly focus on the 'weakest' one, i.e., the minimum entangling power, among all these entangling powers. We show that, by choosing von Neumann entropy of reduced density operator or Schmidt rank as entanglement measure, even the 'weakest' entangling power is generically very close to its maximal possible entanglement generation. In other words, maximum, average and minimum entangling powers are generically close. We then study minimum entangling power with respect to other Lipschitiz-continuous entanglement measures and generalize our results to multipartite quantum systems. As a straightforward application, a random quantum gate will almost surely be an intrinsically fault-tolerant entangling device that will always transform every low-entangled state to near-maximally entangled state.

  18. SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market-Based Programs Technical Information Network SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility...

  19. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  20. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopmentHEADQUARTERS MEDIATION PROGRAM MEDIATION

  1. Monthly and Annual Minimum Temperatures - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 ThisBackground The EnergySandand

  2. Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Natural Resources Commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in...

  3. Theoretical Minimum Energy Use of a Building HVAC System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanskyi, O.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the theoretical minimum energy use required by the HVAC system in a particular code compliant office building. This limit might be viewed as the "Carnot Efficiency" for HVAC system. It assumes that all ventilation and air...

  4. TOWARD THE MINIMUM INNER EDGE DISTANCE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zsom, Andras

    We explore the minimum distance from a host star where an exoplanet could potentially be habitable in order not to discard close-in rocky exoplanets for follow-up observations. We find that the inner edge of the Habitable ...

  5. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  6. affecting minimum alveolar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    close to the observed minimum mass. The Hubble mass can also be predicted. It is suggested that assumption 1 above could be tested using a cyclotron to accelerate particles...

  7. Tree-ring reconstruction of maximum and minimum temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimum temperatures, diurnal temperature range, changing tree-ring/climate relationships, b; Vaganov et al. 1999; Bar- ber et al. 2000; Lloyd, Fastie 2002). Similar changes during investigations of tree- ring growth/climate relationships in interior British Columbia (BC

  8. Minimum Purchase Price Regulations (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minimum Purchase Price Regulations establish the price which utilities must pay for power produced by large-scale renewable energy generators – that is those capable of producing more than 100...

  9. Compressing Social Networks The Minimum Logarithmic Arrangement Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safro, Ilya

    Compressing Social Networks The Minimum Logarithmic Arrangement Problem Chad Waters School Orderings Heuristic Conclusion Motivation Determine the extent to which social networks can be compressed adjacency queries. Social networks are not random graphs. Exhibit distinctive local properties

  10. Theoretical Minimum Energy Use of a Building HVAC System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanskyi, O.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the theoretical minimum energy use required by the HVAC system in a particular code compliant office building. This limit might be viewed as the "Carnot Efficiency" for HVAC system. It assumes that all ventilation and air...

  11. The minimum information for a qualified BioBrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Mubing

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the information of many existing BioBricks is incomplete, thus the usage of the BioBricks will be affected. It is necessary to standardize the minimum information required for a qualified BioBrick. Furthermore this ...

  12. Minimum Cost Layout Decomposition and Legalization for Triple ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    problem as a minimum cost coloring problem, and it is relaxed to a nonlinear 0-1 ... ered as a promising technology for next-generation lithogra- phy. However ...

  13. Minimum patch size thresholds of reproductive success of songbirds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butcher, Jerrod Anthony

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1 MINIMUM PATCH SIZE THRESHOLDS OF REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS OF SONGBIRDS A Dissertation by JERROD ANTHONY BUTCHER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2008 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences 2 MINIMUM PATCH SIZE THRESHOLDS OF REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS OF SONGBIRDS A Dissertation by JERROD ANTHONY BUTCHER Submitted to the Office...

  14. Minimum carbon tax level needed to prompt a widespread shift to nuclear power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Katherine C. (Katherine Claire)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide is suspected to be a major contributor to global warming. In the United States, nearly 70% of electricity is produced using coal or natural gas, both of which emit carbon dioxide into the environment. Nuclear ...

  15. Minimum Risk Estimation and Decoding in Large Vocabulary Continuous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, William

    refinements EP(W,A)L(W,(A)) W W ^W = argmin W W W W L(W,W )P(W |A) E(W) = W W L(W,W )P(W |A) #12;Minimum, specifically Word Error Rate ? Efficient Lattice MBR Computation E(W) = W W L(W,W )P(W |A) W W #12;Minimum path to a reference path W ? Word Error Rate Requires String-to-String Alignment W1,...,WN W1,...,WN L(W,W

  16. The minimum distance of classical and quantum turbo-codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbara, Mamdouh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theory of quantum stabilizer turbo-encoders with unbounded minimum distance. This theory is presented under a framework common to both classical and quantum turbo-encoding theory. The main conditions to have an unbounded minimum distance are that the inner seed encoder has to be recursive, and either systematic or with a totally recursive truncated decoder. This last condition has been introduced in order to obtain a theory viable in the quantum stabilizer case, since it was known that in this case the inner seed encoder could not be recursive and systematic in the same time.

  17. The minimum distance of classical and quantum turbo-codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamdouh Abbara; Jean-Pierre Tillich

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theory of quantum stabilizer turbo-encoders with unbounded minimum distance. This theory is presented under a framework common to both classical and quantum turbo-encoding theory. The main conditions to have an unbounded minimum distance are that the inner seed encoder has to be recursive, and either systematic or with a totally recursive truncated decoder. This last condition has been introduced in order to obtain a theory viable in the quantum stabilizer case, since it was known that in this case the inner seed encoder could not be recursive and systematic in the same time.

  18. Apparatus and method for closed-loop control of reactor power in minimum time

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Jr., John A. (72 Paul Revere Rd., Needham Heights, MA 02194)

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed-loop control law for altering the power level of nuclear reactors in a safe manner and without overshoot and in minimum time. Apparatus is provided for moving a fast-acting control element such as a control rod or a control drum for altering the nuclear reactor power level. A computer computes at short time intervals either the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e '.rho.-.SIGMA..beta..sub.i (.lambda..sub.i -.lambda..sub.e ')+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e '.omega.] or the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e .rho.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e)(.beta.-.rho.)+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e .omega.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e).omega.] These functions each specify the rate of change of reactivity that is necessary to achieve a specified rate of change of reactor power. The direction and speed of motion of the control element is altered so as to provide the rate of reactivity change calculated using either or both of these functions thereby resulting in the attainment of a new power level without overshoot and in minimum time. These functions are computed at intervals of approximately 0.01-1.0 seconds depending on the specific application.

  19. BLIND DECONVOLUTION WITH MINIMUM RENYI'S ENTROPY Deniz Erdogmus1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    BLIND DECONVOLUTION WITH MINIMUM RENYI'S ENTROPY Deniz Erdogmus1 , Jose C. Principe1 , Luis Vielva2-mail: [deniz , principe]@cnel.ufl.edu, luis@dicom.unican.es ABSTRACT Blind techniques attract the attention, from communications to control systems. Blind deconvolution is a problem that has been investigated

  20. The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser Abstract on three example applications: generating human-interpretable excuses for failure, motion planning under their failures. · In human-robot interaction, semantically meaningful explanations would help people diagnose

  1. The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser September 13 strategies. It is demonstrated on three example applications: gener- ating human-interpretable excuses, then they provide no explanation for the failure. For several applications, it would be useful for planners

  2. Network Coding for Joint Storage and Transmission with Minimum Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Anxiao "Andrew"

    transmission and data storage in networks. Its power comes from the improved flexibility that codeword symbolsNetwork Coding for Joint Storage and Transmission with Minimum Cost Anxiao (Andrew) Jiang@cs.tamu.edu. Abstract-- Network coding provides elegant solutions to many data transmission problems. The usage

  3. arXiv:condmat/0310072 Minimum dissipation principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrielli, Davide

    uctuation principle which generalizes the well known Boltzmann{Einstein formula for the probability have opposite transformation properties under time reversal, the non dissipative part being in this respect akin to a magnetic term. We emphasize that the minimum dissipation principle is of general

  4. Interior Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interior Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26 Minor standing is prerequisite architecture studio course is required for architecture majors enrolled in the interior architecture minor (1 is required for Architecture majors): IARC 484 Interior Design Studio (6), IARC 486 Furniture

  5. Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26 Minor standing is prerequisite Notes: Required courses in one's major will not count for the minor with one exception: 1 architecture studio course is required for interior architecture majors enrolled in the architecture minor, and this studio

  6. The Clique Partition Problem with Minimum Clique Size ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    May 5, 2005 ... Page 1 ... We will explain later in section 2.1, what we mean by “x is the .... since we don't know a concrete description for R(G, S), we will start from. ¯ ..... Now consider CPPMIN: S is the minimum size for each cluster, so the ...

  7. Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1 S. Irmak, M.ASCE2 ; A. Irmak3 ; J Abstract: Net radiation (Rn) is a key variable for computing reference evapotranspiration and is a driving for predicting daily Rn have been widely used. However, when the paucity of detailed climatological data

  8. A minimum problem with free boundary for a degenerate quasilinear ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 8, 2005 ... By the strong minimum principle, w0 = 0 in B5/8, since w0 ? 0 and w0(0) ..... 4.7 in [2] and pp. 19–20 in [3]; see also our proof of Theorem 5.1.

  9. A stochastic minimum principle and an adaptive pathwise algorithm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric power systems a b s t r a c t We present a numerical method for finite-horizon stochastic optimal control models. We derive a stochastic minimum principle (SMP) and then develop a numerical method based-parametric interpolation methods. We present results from a standard linear quadratic control model, and a realistic case

  10. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  11. Effect of mechanical parameters on dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Effect of mechanical parameters on dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures Jun Shintake energy structures Jun Shintake*a,b , Samuel Rosseta , Dario Floreanob , Herbert R. Sheaa a Microsystems for Space Technologies Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Neuchâtel, Switzerland b

  12. Optimal Allocation of Bandwidth for Minimum Battery Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosman, Pamela C.

    properties of the battery under bursty discharge conditions are exploited. In this paper, we exploitOptimal Allocation of Bandwidth for Minimum Battery Consumption Qinghua Zhao, Pamela C. Cosman, a power amplifier utilizes battery energy more efficiently with a higher transmission power. For a given

  13. Information Delivery in Large Wireless Networks with Minimum Energy Expense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenye

    transmission paths [8], [9]. By spending the energy resources in a wireless network wisely, the existingInformation Delivery in Large Wireless Networks with Minimum Energy Expense Yi Xu and Wenye Wang in large-scale multihop wireless networks because of the limited energy supplies from batteries. We

  14. Jamming-Aware Minimum Energy Routing in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goeckel, Dennis L.

    1 Jamming-Aware Minimum Energy Routing in Wireless Networks Azadeh Sheikholeslami, Majid Ghaderi; however, energy-aware routing in the presence of active adversary (jammers) has not been considered. We. There has been some study of energy-aware ad hoc routing protocols in the literature [13], [14], [15], [16

  15. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  16. Observation of the Density Minimum in Deeply Supercooled Confined Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dazhi Liu; Yang Zhang; Chia-Cheng Chen; Chung-Yuan Mou; Peter H Poole; Sow-Hsin Chen

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is used to measure the density of heavy water contained in 1-D cylindrical pores of mesoporous silica material MCM-41-S-15, with pores of diameter of 15+-1 A. In these pores the homogenous nucleation process of bulk water at 235 K does not occur and the liquid can be supercooled down to at least 160 K. The analysis of SANS data allows us to determine the absolute value of the density of D2O as a function of temperature. We observe a density minimum at 210+-5 K with a value of 1.041+-0.003 g/cm3. We show that the results are consistent with the predictions of molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled bulk water. This is the first experimental report of the existence of the density minimum in supercooled water.

  17. Dangerous implications of a minimum length in quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosimo Bambi; Katherine Freese

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of a minimum length and a generalization of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle seem to be two fundamental ingredients required in any consistent theory of quantum gravity. In this letter we show that they would predict dangerous processes which are phenomenologically unacceptable. For example, long--lived virtual super--Planck mass black holes may lead to rapid proton decay. Possible solutions of this puzzle are briefly discussed.

  18. Investigation of a minimum energy Earth-Mars trajectory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard Emett

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF A MINIMUM ENERGY EARTH-MARS TRAJECTORY A Thesis by Richard Emmett grown Submitted to the Graduate Co11ege of the Texas ASM University in partia1 fulfi11ment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering INVESTIGATION OF A MINIMIIM ENERGy EARTH MARS TRAJECTORy A Thesis by Richard Emmett Brown Approved as to style and content by; (Co-chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) May I967 TABLE...

  19. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H. [Department of Physics and the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  20. Fermion Masses and Mixings from a Minimum Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Alonso

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the structure of quark and lepton mass matrices under the hypothesis that they are determined from a minimum principle applied to a generic potential invariant under the $\\left[U(3)\\right]^5\\otimes {\\mathcal O}(3)$ flavor symmetry, acting on Standard Model fermions and right-handed neutrinos. Unlike the quark case, we show that hierarchical masses for charged leptons are naturally accompanied by degenerate Majorana neutrinos with one mixing angle close to maximal, a second potentially large, a third one necessarily small, and one maximal relative Majorana phase. The scheme presented here could be tested in the near future via neutrino-less double beta decay and cosmological measurements.

  1. Minimum pressure envelope cavitation analysis using two-dimensional panel method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Christopher J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis tool for calculating minimum pressure envelopes was developed using XFOIL. This thesis presents MATLAB® executables that interface with a modified version of XFOIL for determining the minimum pressure of a foil ...

  2. The impact of minimum age of employment regulation on child labor and schooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmonds, Eric V

    Promoting minimum age of employment regulation has been a centerpiece in child labor policy for the last 15 years. If enforced, minimum age regulation would change the age profile of paid child employment. Using micro-data ...

  3. Minimum Time Optimal Synthesis for a Control System on SU(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Albertini; Domenico D'Alessandro

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For the time optimal control on an invariant system on SU(2), with two independent controls and a bound on the norm of the control, the extremals of the maximum principle are explicit functions of time and the resulting differential equations can be explicitly integrated. We use this fact here to perform the optimal synthesis for these systems, i.e., find all optimal trajectories. As a consequence, we describe a simple method to find the minimum time control for every desired final condition. Although the Lie group SU(2) is three dimensional, optimal trajectories can be described in the unit disk of the complex plane. We find that a circular trajectory separates optimal trajectories that reach the boundary of the unit disk from the others. Inside this separatrix circle another trajectory (the critical trajectory) plays an important role in that all optimal trajectories end at an intersection with this curve. Our results are of interest to find the minimum time needed to achieve a given evolution of a two level quantum system.

  4. Pecularities of cosmic ray modulation in the solar minimum 23/24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study changes of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for the ending period of the solar cycle 23 and the beginning of the solar cycle 24 using neutron monitors experimental data. We show that an increase of the GCR intensity in 2009 is generally related with decrease of the solar wind velocity U, the strength B of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and the drift in negative (Aneg) polarity epoch. We present that temporal changes of rigidity dependence of the GCR intensity variation before reaching maximum level in 2009 and after it, do not noticeably differ from each other. The rigidity spectrum of the GCR intensity variations calculated based on neutron monitors data (for rigidities greaten than 10 GV) is hard in the minimum and near minimum epoch. We do not recognize any non-ordinary changes in the physical mechanism of modulation of the GCR intensity in the rigidity range of GCR particles to which neutron monitors respond. We compose 2-D non stationary model of transport equation to describe v...

  5. Minimum Energy Per Bit for Secret Key Acquisition Over Multipath Wireless Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayeed, Akbar M.

    Minimum Energy Per Bit for Secret Key Acquisition Over Multipath Wireless Channels Tzu-Han Chou the secret key capacity. We analyze the low-SNR regime to quantify the minimum energy per secret key bit of conventional channel capacity, there is a non-zero SNR that achieves the minimum energy per key bit. A time

  6. LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

  7. Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings C. R. Sullivan J. D. Mc the IEEE. #12;Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings Charles R. Sullivan://engineering.dartmouth.edu/inductor Abstract--Litz-wire windings for gapped inductors are optimized for minimum cost within a loss constraint

  8. An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Timothy X.

    An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network Sheetalkumar Doshi the necessary features of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms the performance of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol in terms of energy savings with an existing on

  9. An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An On-demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network Sheetalkumar Doshi of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms for their imple- mentation. We of an on-demand minimum energy routing protocol in terms of energy savings with an existing on-demand ad

  10. Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H.W.; Brindle, R.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy used to produce liquid steel in today's integrated and electric arc furnace (EAF) facilities is significantly higher than the theoretical minimum energy requirements. This study presents the absolute minimum energy required to produce steel from ore and mixtures of scrap and scrap alternatives. Additional cases in which the assumptions are changed to more closely approximate actual operating conditions are also analyzed. The results, summarized in Table E-1, should give insight into the theoretical and practical potentials for reducing steelmaking energy requirements. The energy values have also been converted to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in order to indicate the potential for reduction in emissions of this greenhouse gas (Table E-2). The study showed that increasing scrap melting has the largest impact on energy consumption. However, scrap should be viewed as having ''invested'' energy since at one time it was produced by reducing ore. Increasing scrap melting in the BOF mayor may not decrease energy if the ''invested'' energy in scrap is considered.

  11. aom efficacy study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    variations in poor localities influence the capacity for community efficacy. Through a multivariate analysis using 497 households in poor localities of Addis Ababa, we...

  12. When Crime Pays: Measuring Judicial Efficacy against Corruption in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro de Alencar, Carlos Higino; Gico, Ivo Jr.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for now - crime pays in Brazil. Paginal5de27 ReferencesEfficacy against Corruption in Brazil Carlos Higino Ribeiroa widespread perception in Brazil that civil servants caught

  13. DOE Publishes Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a new report, SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning. The report was created in response to requests from utilities and energy efficiency...

  14. The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

  15. EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS). A human health risk assessment conducted by Peterson et al. (2006) for truck-mounted ultra-low volume (ULV to epidemic levels and dispersed to all 58 counties in the state, and was associated with low

  16. Determination of the total fat content of retail cuts of pork at different external fat trim levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Linda Katherine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obtained from each pork subprimal . . . . 18 3. Chemical fat mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test and composite for pork loin retail cuts trimmed to 0. 0 cm or 0. 64 cm external fat level. . 24 4. Chemical fat mean, minimum..., maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test and composite for pork ham retail cuts trimmed to 0. 0 cm or 0. 64 cm external fat level. . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 5. Chemical moisture mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test...

  17. Epistemic levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Daniel (Daniel Louis)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation I defend some controversial "level-bridging" principles in epistemology. In the first chapter, I defend the KK principle-the principle that if one knows that P, then one knows that one knows that P. I ...

  18. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

  19. Reflections on a record minimum The numbers are in 2012 broke the record for minimum sea ice extent and is still heading down (see

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in climate models. The approach was to freeze an icebreaker into the pack ice and drift for a year makingReflections on a record minimum The numbers are in ­ 2012 broke the record for minimum sea ice extent and is still heading down (see Figure 1). The sea ice extent data tell an unequivocal story of ice

  20. 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO): In Vitro Formation of Highly Stable Lanthanide Complexes Translates into Efficacious In Vivo Europium Decorporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into Efficacious In Vivo Europium Decorporation Manuelinto Efficacious In Vivo Europium Decorporation Manuelinto Efficacious In Vivo Europium Decorporation Manuel

  1. Neutrino Mixing and Masses from a Minimum Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, R; Isidori, G; Maiani, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the structure of quark and lepton mass matrices under the hypothesis that they are determined from a minimum principle applied to a generic potential invariant under the $[SU(3)]^5\\otimes {\\mathcal O}(3)$ flavor symmetry, acting on Standard Model fermions and right-handed neutrinos. Unlike the quark case, we show that hierarchical masses for charged leptons are naturally accompanied by degenerate Majorana neutrinos with one angle close to maximal, a second potentially large, a third one necessarily small, and precise values for the two Majorana phases. Adding small perturbations the predicted structure for the neutrino mass matrix is in excellent agreement with present observations and could be tested in the near future via neutrino-less double beta decay. The generalization of these results to arbitrary sew-saw models is also discussed.

  2. R Coronae Borealis Stars at Minimum Light -- UW Cen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kameswara Rao; B. E. Reddy; D. L. Lambert

    2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Two high-resolution optical spectra of the R Coronae Borealis star UW Cen in decline are discussed. A spectrum from mid-1992 when the star had faded by three magnitudes shows just a few differences with the spectrum at maximum light. The ubiquitous sharp emission lines seen in R CrB at a similar drop below maximum light are absent. In contrast, a spectrum from mid-2002 when the star was five magnitudes below maximum light shows an array of sharp emission lines and a collection of broad emission lines. Comparisons are made with spectra of R CrB obtained during the deep 1995-1996 minimum. The many common features are discussed in terms of a torus-jet geometry.

  3. On Hastings' counterexamples to the minimum output entropy additivity conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando G. S. L. Brandao; Michal Horodecki

    2009-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Hastings recently reported a randomized construction of channels violating the minimum output entropy additivity conjecture. Here we revisit his argument, presenting a simplified proof. In particular, we do not resort to the exact probability distribution of the Schmidt coefficients of a random bipartite pure state, as in the original proof, but rather derive the necessary large deviation bounds by a concentration of measure argument. Furthermore, we prove non-additivity for the overwhelming majority of channels consisting of a Haar random isometry followed by partial trace over the environment, for an environment dimension much bigger than the output dimension. This makes Hastings' original reasoning clearer and extends the class of channels for which additivity can be shown to be violated.

  4. Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

  5. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp, E-mail: rahe@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (?f) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the ?f(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the ?f signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f{sub 0} and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of ?f with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the ?f with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the ?f(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f{sub 0} drift. We present isosurfaces of the ?f minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO{sub 3}(101{sup ¯}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  6. Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

  7. Minimum-Bias and Early QCD Physics in ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Fiete Grosse-Oetringhaus; for the ALICE collaboration

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In addition to its heavy-ion physics program, it also has a rich proton-proton physics program benefiting from a detector with a low momentum cut-off (pT about 50 MeV/c) and a small material budget (about 11% of a radiation length until the outer wall of the main tracking detector, the Time-Projection Chamber). ALICE has excellent means of particle identification (PID) with methods ranging from specific energy loss and time of flight to transition and Cherenkov radiation. The good primary and secondary vertex resolution allows for measurements of strangeness and heavy flavor with low backgrounds. ALICE has taken proton-proton collision data at 0.9, 2.36, and 7 TeV. In this article results of the first minimum-bias and soft-QCD measurements are presented. Inclusive pseudorapidity, multiplicity, and transverse momentum distributions are discussed as well as distributions of identified particles including strange particles. Further, results on two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations and the antiproton-to-proton ratio in collisions at the LHC are shown.

  8. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from ENSDF

  9. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from

  10. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O

  11. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O3

  12. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2 O3Be

  13. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2

  14. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2B

  15. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2BBe

  16. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li from2BBeNe

  17. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4Li

  18. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB from

  19. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromC

  20. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe

  1. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe9

  2. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB fromCNe9C

  3. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiB

  4. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from

  5. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5 H

  6. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5 H6

  7. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from5

  8. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from58 C

  9. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4LiBN from58

  10. Job Postings The question was raised about the minimum time a position should remain posted before it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    Job Postings 121610 The question was raised about the minimum time a position should remain: EXTERNAL JOB POSTINGS1, 2 · Staff ­ one week minimum · Administrative ­ two weeks minimum · Faculty ­ two weeks minimum 1 The recruitment process for EXTERNAL job postings may be opened to: all

  11. Efficacy of 45 lm/W Achieved in White OLED

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) successfully demonstrated an all phosphorescent white organic light emitting diode (WOLED™) with a power efficacy of 45 lm/W at 1,000 cd/m2. This high-efficacy device was enabled by lowering the device operating voltage, increasing the outcoupling efficiency to ~40% from ~20%, and by incorporating highly efficient phosphorescent emitters that are capable of converting nearly all current passing through a WOLED into light.

  12. Relation Among Efficacy of Insecticides, Resistance Levels, and Sanitation in the Control of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - roach populations in multiunit apartment complexes, the relationship between sanitation and cockroach of the German cockroach. Two mo- lasses baited sticky monitoring traps (Roach Pot) were placed in the kitchen

  13. Pretreatment levels of bone turnover and the antifracture efficacy of alendronate: The fracture intervention trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Cal- cif Tissue Int 65:359–in postmeno- pausal osteoporosis. J Bone Miner Res 12:624–among women without osteoporosis at baseline. Although they

  14. Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees In Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    algorithm, power awareness, ad hoc networks, energy consumption optimization, broad- cast and multicastConstructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees In Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa Liang Department related to power consump- tion in this kind of network. One is the minimum-energy broadcast tree problem

  15. Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vialatte, François

    1 Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information Backpropagation L;210 Multichannel Blind Deconvolution of Non-minimum Phase Systems Using Information Backpropagation L.-Q. Zhang, A- composition approach, for multichannel blind de- convolution of non-minimumphase systems. In 20] we has

  16. On the random 2-stage minimum spanning tree Abraham D. Flaxman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivelevich, Michael

    On the random 2-stage minimum spanning tree Abraham D. Flaxman Department of Mathematical Sciences random variables, uniformly distributed between 0 and 1, then the expected cost of the minimum spanning tree is asymptotically equal to #16;(3) = P 1 i=1 i 3 . Here we consider the following stochastic two

  17. A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unger, Ron

    in a simple model of protein folding. Results: Three possible evolutionary processes are explored. First can be achieved. The assumption that proteins fold to a conformation which is in the global minimum sequences that can find the global minimum [5]. In computer science terms this means that `protein folding

  18. Changes in the Ventilation of the Oxygen Minimum Zone of the Tropical North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changes in the Ventilation of the Oxygen Minimum Zone of the Tropical North Atlantic PETER BRANDT) ABSTRACT Changes in the ventilation of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the tropical North Atlantic centimeters per second in the depth range of the OMZ contribute to the ventilation of the OMZ. A conceptual

  19. Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Jun Li, Baochun--Distributed storage systems store redundant data to tolerate failures of storage nodes and lost data should be repaired when storage nodes fail. A class of MDS codes, called minimum- storage regenerating (MSR) codes

  20. Guidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    this process we present the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR ExperimentsGuidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments Jim F Vandesompele,6 Carl T. Wittwer,12 and Stephen A. Bustin13 There is growing interest in digital PCR (dPCR) be

  1. Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures O. A. Araromi*a , I. Gavrilovichb , J. Shintakea , S. Rosseta , H. R. Sheaa a Microsystems For Space Technologies Laboratory, �cole Polytechnique Fédérale de

  2. Non-Additivity of Minimum Output p-$\\mathbf{R\\acute{e}nyi}$ Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nengkun Yu; Mingsheng Ying

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hastings disproved additivity conjecture for minimum output entropy by using random unitary channels. In this note, we employ his approach to show that minimum output $p-$R\\'{e}nyi entropy is non-additive for $p\\in(0,p_0)\\cup(1-p_0,1)$ where $p_0\\approx 0.2855$.

  3. Minimum-Energy Broadcast Using Practical Directional Antennas in All-Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Y. Charlie

    Minimum-Energy Broadcast Using Practical Directional Antennas in All-Wireless Networks Sabyasachi ad hoc networks. Previously, minimum-energy broadcast that exploits the broadcast nature of radio not be within direct transmis- sion range of each other. Such decentralized networks can enable flexible

  4. Minimum-Energy Broadcast Using Practical Directional Antennas in All-Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Yang

    Minimum-Energy Broadcast Using Practical Directional Antennas in All-Wireless Networks Sabyasachi-- Energy-efficient broadcast communication is an important problem in wireless ad hoc networks. Previously, minimum-energy broadcast that exploits the broadcast nature of radio transmission has been studied

  5. Minimum-Energy Topology Control Algorithms in Ad Hoc Joseph Y. Halpern Li (Erran) Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, Joseph Y.

    for an extended period of time. In order to accomplish this without a renewable energy source, energy conservationMinimum-Energy Topology Control Algorithms in Ad Hoc Networks1 Joseph Y. Halpern Li (Erran) Li Dept Holmdel, NJ 07733 halpern@cs.cornell.edu erranlli@dnrc.bell-labs.com August 7, 2004 1 Based on "Minimum-Energy

  6. The Minimum Distance of Turbo-Like Codes Louay Bazzi, Mohammad Mahdian, Daniel A. Spielman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spielman, Daniel A.

    1 The Minimum Distance of Turbo-Like Codes Louay Bazzi, Mohammad Mahdian, Daniel A. Spielman Abstract--Worst-case upper bounds are derived on the minimum distance of parallel concatenated Turbo codes that parallel-concatenated Turbo codes and repeat-convolute codes with sub-linear memory are asymptotically bad

  7. Tax advantages of a deferred minimum annual royalty provision in oil and gas leases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.B. Jr.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how a deferred minimum annual royalty provision can serve to meet conflicting economic demands without adverse tax consequences. A deferred minimum annual royalty provision is an economic hybrid of a production royalty and a lease bonus. To a lessor, it has the advantage of guaranteeing a minimum return without regard to production. It should also encourage prompt development of the lease since a lessee will desire to void incurring subsequent minimum annual royalties on unproductive acreage. To an accrual-basis lessee, it has greater tax advantages than a lease bonus because it is deductible in the year paid or incurred. Although it exposes the lessee to more economic risk, this risk can be reduced through proper planning. In appropriate circumstances, a deferred minimum annual-royalty provision may therefore be worthy of consideration by either or both parties in an oil- and gas-leasing transaction. 44 references.

  8. The minimum variance of the squared error adaptive algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Steven Deward

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will be remembered. 41 Output (e&)) jg d(k) I I I kd(k) 6 d(k) p, d(k) ned(k) ~- d(k) Input (e(k)) Fig. 14 T')te t)natttization rnle user) nt ADP(". t). 42 For example, an eight level uniform symmetric quantizer udll have four M values corresponding...

  9. Statistical Methods for Estimating the Minimum Thickness Along a Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    along the pipeline can be used to estimate corrosion levels. The traditional parametric model method for this problem is to estimate parameters of a specified corrosion distribution and then to use these parameters companies use pipelines to transfer oil, gas and other materials from one place to another. Manufactures

  10. Solar wind turbulence at 0.72 AU and solar minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Munteanu, Costel; Zhang, Tielong; Bruno, Roberto; Kovacs, Peter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate Venus Express (VEX) observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of the solar cycle 24. The Power Spectral Densities (PSD) of the magnetic field components have been computed for the time intervals that satisfy data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow defined for speeds larger and respectively smaller than 450 km/s. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast than for the slow wind. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005-0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is -1.60 for fast solar wind and -1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is ...

  11. Determine Minimum Silver Flake Addition to GCM for Iodine Loaded AgZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum amount of silver flake required to prevent loss of I{sub 2} during sintering in air for a SNL Glass Composite Material (GCM) Waste Form containing AgI-MOR (ORNL, 8.7 wt%) was determined to be 1.1 wt% Ag. The final GCM composition prior to sintering was 20 wt% AgI-MOR, 1.1 wt% Ag, and 80 wt% Bi-Si oxide glass. The amount of silver flake needed to suppress iodine loss was determined using thermo gravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopic off-gas analysis. These studies found that the ratio of silver to AgI-MOR required is lower in the presence of the glass than without it. Therefore an additional benefit of the GCM is that it serves to inhibit some iodine loss during processing. Alternatively, heating the AgI-MOR in inert atmosphere instead of air allowed for densified GCM formation without I{sub 2} loss, and no necessity for the addition of Ag. The cause of this behavior is found to be related to the oxidation of the metallic Ag to Ag{sup +} when heated to above ~300{degrees}C in air. Heating rate, iodine loading levels and atmosphere are the important variables that determine AgI migration and results suggest that AgI may be completely incorporated into the mordenite structure by the 550{degrees}C sintering temperature.

  12. WHAT DO THREAT LEVELS AND RESPONSE LEVELS MEAN? THREAT LEVELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    WHAT DO THREAT LEVELS AND RESPONSE LEVELS MEAN? THREAT LEVELS: The UK Threat Level is decided by the Government's Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre (JTAC). It is the system to assess the threat to the UK from Threat Levels: Low - an attack is unlikely Moderate - an attack is possible, but not likely Substantial

  13. DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentIOffshoreDepartmentBegins Demoltion

  14. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs, andCertificates,HAMMER SteeringHCHEADQUARTERS- -

  15. Monthly Number of Days for Minimum Temperature - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 ThisBackground The EnergyS F J

  16. IDAPA 37.03.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction and Use of Injection Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  17. Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 2. Three-Product Petlyuk Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway We show that the minimum energy requirement algebraic procedure, via expressions for pinch zone compositions at the connection points as functions

  18. Online Supplement to "Bounding Distributions for the Weight of a Minimum Spanning Tree in Stochastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shier, Douglas R.

    Online Supplement to "Bounding Distributions for the Weight of a Minimum Spanning Tree in Stochastic Networks" Kevin R. Hutson · Douglas R. Shier Department of Mathematics & Computer Science, Denison

  19. MINIMUM REJECTION SCHEDULING IN ALL-PHOTONIC NETWORKS Nahid Saberi and Mark J. Coates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MINIMUM REJECTION SCHEDULING IN ALL-PHOTONIC NETWORKS Nahid Saberi and Mark J. Coates Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering McGill University Montreal, QC, Canada E-mail: nahid.saberi

  20. Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Maleq

    1 Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc Networks of a class of simple and local algorithms called Nearest Neighbor Tree (NNT) algorithms for energy-efficient

  1. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hallam, Steven

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  2. Statistical Analysis and Time Series Models for Minimum/Maximum Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    temperatures, thereby reducing the adverse effect of global warming in the Antarctic Peninsula. Keywords that the observed increase in the minimum temperatures is a consequence of human activity rather than natural causes

  3. Introducing Minimum Fisher Regularisation Tomography to Bolometric and Soft X-ray Diagnostic Systems of the COMPASS Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introducing Minimum Fisher Regularisation Tomography to Bolometric and Soft X-ray Diagnostic Systems of the COMPASS Tokamak

  4. 322 / JOURNAL OF IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2000 COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN OF MINIMUM COST IRRIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    OF MINIMUM COST IRRIGATION CANAL SECTIONS By Prabhata K. Swamee,1 Govinda C. Mishra,2 and Bhagu R. Chahar3

  5. Double active shielded magnetic field gradient design with minimum inductance method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Physics DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Approved as to style and content by: F. R. Huson (Chair of Committee) Steve Wry (Member) Edward...

  6. Trellis coded modulation and capacity for multi-level intensity modulated optical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jardak, Hadi George

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximum Capacity: Constraint on Average: 5-levels 24 Maximum Capacity: Constraint on Average: 8-levels 132 183 134 185 25 Minimum Error Probability: Constraint on Average per bit: 3-levels. . . 18G 2G Minimum Error Probability: Constraint on Average...-levels case, which will elucidate the way the receiver operates. We have the choice of sending no signal, AI or A2, (0 & AI & A2). ~[5 As derived earlier the optimal receiver implements the decision rule max kin(A;) ? A, . The threshold between AI...

  7. On-the-fly string method for minimum free energy paths calculation Luca Maragliano *, Eric Vanden-Eijnden 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    On-the-fly string method for minimum free energy paths calculation Luca Maragliano *, Eric Vanden and simplified version of the string method in collective variables for computing minimum free energy paths) the minimum free energy path (MFEP) plays an important role. Given a set of collective variables to describe

  8. The therapeutic efficacy of camptothecin-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    The therapeutic efficacy of camptothecin-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles Kuan-Ju Chen a,1 of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign-Urbana, 1304 West Green Street October 2011 Available online 8 November 2011 Keywords: Supramolecular assembly Nanoparticles Drug

  9. Formalizing Concepts for Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Formalizing Concepts for Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred.lohrmann,manfred.reichert}@uni-ulm.de Abstract. In business process design, business objective models can ful- fill the role of formal business process management concepts yet. Moreover, process models are currently not sufficiently

  10. Phytotoxicity and Efficacy of Sumagic (Uniconazole) for Growth Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    Phytotoxicity and Efficacy of Sumagic (Uniconazole) for Growth Control of Mexican Sage (Salvia Bush Sage Salvia leucantha cv. `Santa Barbara' REASON: Height Control SOIL TYPE OR TYPE OF POTTING MIX: UC Mix % SAND 30 % SILT % CLAY % OM 70 pH 6.5 SEEDING DATE EMERGENCE DATE TRANSPLANTING DATE: 3

  11. Efficacy and Phytotoxicity of Sumagic (Uniconazole) for Growth Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    Efficacy and Phytotoxicity of Sumagic (Uniconazole) for Growth Control of Egyptian Star Star-Cluster Pentas lanceolata cv. `Butterfly Pink' REASON: Control of vegetative growth SOIL TYPE OR TYPE OF POTTING MIX: UC Mix % SAND 30 % SILT % CLAY % OM 70 pH 6.5 SEEDING DATE EMERGENCE DATE

  12. Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LED's for Efficacious Generation of White Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1) We studied phosphors for near-UV (nUV) LED application as an alternative to blue LEDs currently being used in SSL systems. We have shown that nUV light sources could be very efficient at high current and will have significantly less binning at both the chip and phosphor levels. We identified phosphor blends that could yield 4100K lamps with a CRI of approximately 80 and LPWnUV,opt equal to 179 for the best performing phosphor blend. Considering the fact that the lamps were not optimized for light coupling, the results are quite impressive. The main bottleneck is an optimum blue phosphor with a peak near 440 nm with a full width half maximum of about 25 nm and a quantum efficiency of >95%. Unfortunately, that may be a very difficult task when we want to excite a phosphor at ~400 nm with a very small margin for Stokes shift. Another way is to have all the phosphors in the blend having the excitation peak at 400 nm or slightly shorter wavelength. This could lead to a white light source with no body color and optimum efficacy due to no self-absorption effects by phosphors in the blend. This is even harder than finding an ideal blue phosphor, but not necessarily impossible. 2) With the phosphor blends identified, light sources using nUV LEDs at high current could be designed with comparable efficacy to those using blue LEDs. It will allow us to design light sources with multiple wattages using the same chips and phosphor blends simply by varying the input current. In the case of blue LEDs, this is not currently possible because varying the current will lower the efficacy at high current and alter the color point. With improvement of phosphor blends, control over CRI could improve. Less binning at the chip level and also at the phosphor blend level could reduce the cost of SSL light sources. 3) This study provided a deeper understanding of phosphor characteristics needed for LEDs in general and nUV LEDs in particular. Two students received Ph.D. degrees and three undergraduates participated in this work. Two of the undergraduate students are now in graduate school. The results were widely disseminated – 20 archival journal publications (published, accepted or in preparation) and three conference proceedings resulted. The students presented their work at 11 different national/international conferences (32 oral or poster presentations) and the PI’s delivered 12 invited, keynote or plenary lectures.

  13. Inves&ga&ng the Trade-Off between Luminous Efficacy of Radia&on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Inves&ga&ng the Trade-Off between Luminous Efficacy of Radia&on and Color;Luminous Efficacy of Radia&on (LER) / Color Rendering Index (CRI) Trade-off study CCT = 3500 K How can we experimentally test this? #12;Luminous Efficacy

  14. On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis number larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.

  15. SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED lamp or luminaire can generally be found that matches or exceeds the efficacy of benchmark technologies in a given product category, and LED products continue to expand into ever-higher lumen output niches. However, the price premium for LED continues to pose a barrier to adoption in many applications, in spite of expected savings from reduced energy use and maintenance. Other factors—such as dimmability and quality of light—can also present challenges. The appropriate type, timing, and magnitude of energy efficiency activities will vary from organization to organization based on local variables and the method of evaluation. A number of factors merit consideration when prioritizing activities for development. Category-specific projections for pricing and efficacy are provided herein to assist in efficiency program planning efforts.

  16. Counterexamples to additivity of minimum output p-Renyi entropy for p close to 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toby Cubitt; Aram W. Harrow; Debbie Leung; Ashley Montanaro; Andreas Winter

    2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Complementing recent progress on the additivity conjecture of quantum information theory, showing that the minimum output p-Renyi entropies of channels are not generally additive for p>1, we demonstrate here by a careful random selection argument that also at p=0, and consequently for sufficiently small p, there exist counterexamples. An explicit construction of two channels from 4 to 3 dimensions is given, which have non-multiplicative minimum output rank; for this pair of channels, numerics strongly suggest that the p-Renyi entropy is non-additive for all p additivity exist for all p<1.

  17. A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen Computer are a popular method for acquiring three-dimensional geometry due to their accuracy and robustness. Maximizing a two camera range scanner design, specifically chosen to minimize calibration complexity and cost

  18. Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodny, Avinoam

    Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints Yoni in a fast circuit by the same factor does not yield an energy-efficient design, and we characterize efficient. A design implementation is considered to be energy efficient when it has the highest performance

  19. The Blob Code is Competitive with EdgeSets in Genetic Algorithms for the Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julstrom, Bryant A.

    with those of, a GA that encodes spanning trees as edge-sets on Euclidean instances of the minimum rout- ing Spanning Tree Problem Bryant A. Julstrom Department of Computer Science St. Cloud State University St. Cloud, MN, 56301 USA julstrom@stcloudstate.edu ABSTRACT Among the many codings of spanning trees

  20. Integrated Column Designs for Minimum Energy and Entropy Requirements in Multicomponent Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Distillation Ivar J. Halvorsen1 and Sigurd Skogestad Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department at the Topical conference on Separations Technology, Session 23 - Distillation Modeling and Processes II. 2001 Column Designs for Minimum Energy and Entropy Requirements in Multicomponent Distillation Ivar J

  1. Graphical Visualisation of Minimum Energy Requirements for Multi-Effect Distillation Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    1 Graphical Visualisation of Minimum Energy Requirements for Multi-Effect Distillation Arrangements-integrated multi-effect and three non-integrated distillation arrangements for separating a ternary mixture have been considered. The focus of the paper is on a heat-integrated complex distillation configuration

  2. eVADER: A Perceptual Approach to Finding Minimum Warning Sound Requirements for Quiet Cars.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , such as hybrid and electric vehicles, to pedestrians has become an important issue for public policy [1], car a localization paradigm to test the detectability of hybrid and internal combustion cars by measuring listenereVADER: A Perceptual Approach to Finding Minimum Warning Sound Requirements for Quiet Cars. Ryan

  3. Analysis on Achieving a Minimum Bunch Length in LCLS Bunch Compressor One

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-short bunch is required by different applications in many aspects. In this paper, the condition to achieve a minimum bunch length at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) [1] bunch compressor one (BC1) is analyzed analytically and evaluated by simulation. The space charge, wake field and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects are not discussed here.

  4. LOWER BOUNDS ON THE GLOBAL MINIMUM OF A M. GHASEMI, J.B. LASSERRE, M. MARSHALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Murray

    LOWER BOUNDS ON THE GLOBAL MINIMUM OF A POLYNOMIAL M. GHASEMI, J.B. LASSERRE, M. MARSHALL Abstract. We extend the method of Ghasemi and Marshall [SIAM. J. Opt. 22(2) (2012), pp 460-473], to obtain compare this bound with the (global) lower bound fgp ob- tained by Ghasemi and Marshall, and also

  5. Minimum Bit Error Probability of Large Randomly Spread MCCDMA Systems in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Ralf R.

    Minimum Bit Error Probability of Large Randomly Spread MC­CDMA Systems in Multipath Rayleigh Fading, to calculate the bit error proba­ bility in the large system limit for randomly assigned spreading sequences detec­ tion with is accurate if the number of users and the spreading factor are large. His calculations

  6. Minimum Bit Error Probability of Large Randomly Spread MC-CDMA Systems in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Ralf R.

    Minimum Bit Error Probability of Large Randomly Spread MC-CDMA Systems in Multipath Rayleigh Fading, to calculate the bit error proba- bility in the large system limit for randomly assigned spreading sequences detec- tion with is accurate if the number of users and the spreading factor are large. His calculations

  7. A steady-state L-mode tokamak fusion reactor : large scale and minimum scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark W. (Mark Wilbert)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform extensive analysis on the physics of L-mode tokamak fusion reactors to identify (1) a favorable parameter space for a large scale steady-state reactor and (2) an operating point for a minimum scale steady-state ...

  8. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO[sub 2]F[sub 2] and H[sub 2]O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF[sub 6] and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % [sup 235]U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  9. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF{sub 6} and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  10. Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 3. More Than Three Products and Generalized Petlyuk Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 3. More Than Three Products products (where normally M e N). We derive the expressions for a generalized extended Pet- lyuk arrangement for the generalized Pet- lyuk column with more than three products. The Vmin diagram was presented in part 1

  11. Speech enhancement using a minimum mean-square error short-time spectral modulation magnitude estimator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speech enhancement using a minimum mean-square error short-time spectral modulation magnitude In this paper we investigate the enhancement of speech by applying MMSE short-time spectral magnitude estimation on the quality of enhanced speech, and find that this method works better with speech uncertainty. Finally we

  12. A design solution to the problem of adaptive output regulation for nonlinear minimum-phase systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the spirit of the internal model principle, the control law needed to fulfill the regulation objective. In [3 regulation and solved by using an "hybrid" control strategy. In that paper it was emphasized how persistenceA design solution to the problem of adaptive output regulation for nonlinear minimum-phase systems

  13. Bachelor of Science with Major in Geology (Minimum of 120 credits required)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Bachelor of Science with Major in Geology (Minimum of 120 credits required) The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree is designed for students planning professional careers in geology, hydrogeology work in geology, geosciences and environmental science. Prerequisite Coursework for Transfer Students

  14. Bachelor of Arts with Major in Geology: Earth and Space Science (Minimum of 120 credits required)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Bachelor of Arts with Major in Geology: Earth and Space Science (Minimum of 120 credits required) The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Geology (Earth Science) is designed for students planning professional 2053 & 2048L 5 College Algebra MAC 1105 3 Introductory Statistics STA 2023 3 Total 19 Geology (Earth

  15. Jet Interaction and the Influence of a Minimum Phase Speed Bound on the Propagation of Eddies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    Jet Interaction and the Influence of a Minimum Phase Speed Bound on the Propagation of Eddies and analogs of the midlatitude eddy-driven jet and the subtropical jet is investigated in a barotropic b-plane model. In the model the subtropical jet is generated by a relaxation process and the eddy-driven jet

  16. Boundaries of the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone shaped by coherent mesoscale dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettencourt, João H; García, Emilio Hernández; Montes, Ivonne; Sudre, Joël; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurélien; Garçon, Véronique

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolved oxygen in sea water is a major factor affecting marine habitats and biogeochemical cycles. Oceanic zones with oxygen deficits represent significant portions of the area and volume of the oceans and are thought to be expanding. The Peruvian oxygen minimum zone is one of the most pronounced and lies in a region of strong mesoscale activity in the form of vortices and frontal regions, whose effect in the dynamics of the oxygen minimum zone is largely unknown. Here, we study this issue from a modeling approach and a Lagrangian point of view, using a coupled physical-biogeochemical simulation of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone and finite-size Lyapunov exponent fields to understand the link between mesoscale dynamics and oxygen variations. Our results show that, at depths between 380 and 600 meters, mesoscale structures have a relevant dual role. First, their mean positions and paths delimit and maintain the oxygen minimum zone boundaries. Second, their high frequency fluctuations entrain oxygen across t...

  17. Minimum Interference Channel Assignment in Multi-Radio Wireless Mesh Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Himanshu

    program and a linear program formulation of our optimization problem to obtain lower bounds on overall Mesh Networks, Channel Assignment, Graph Coloring, Interference, Mathe- matical Programming. I1 Minimum Interference Channel Assignment in Multi-Radio Wireless Mesh Networks Anand Prabhu

  18. A minimum-reaction-flux solution to master-equation models of protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    A minimum-reaction-flux solution to master-equation models of protein folding Huan-Xiang Zhoua; published online 20 May 2008 Master equations are widely used for modeling protein folding. Here- ceptual and quantitative models for protein folding.1­15 In such models, the conformational space

  19. String method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    York University, New York, New York 10012 Giovanni Ciccottid INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica in the free energy. Provided that the number of collective variables is large enough, the new techniqueString method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces Luca

  20. Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules is to protect public health and the environment by establishing minimum standards for the proper location, design, construction and maintenance of onsite wastewater...

  1. Design Considerations for an On-Demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Timothy X.

    1 Design Considerations for an On-Demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc- demand minimum energy routing protocol and suggests mechanisms for their implementation. We highlight of an 'energy aware' link cache for storing this information. We also compare the performance of an on-demand

  2. Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica and dedicated workplace charging infrastructure in the fleet for minimum life cycle cost or GHG emissions over vehicle and battery costs are the major drivers for PHEVs and BEVs to enter and dominate the cost

  3. Charge-Balanced Minimum-Power Controls for Spiking Neuron Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasanayake, Isuru

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the optimal control of phase models for spiking neuron oscillators. We focus on the design of minimum-power current stimuli that elicit spikes in neurons at desired times. We furthermore take the charge-balanced constraint into account because in practice undesirable side effects may occur due to the accumulation of electric charge resulting from external stimuli. Charge-balanced minimum-power controls are derived for a general phase model using the maximum principle, where the cases with unbounded and bounded control amplitude are examined. The latter is of practical importance since phase models are more accurate for weak forcing. The developed optimal control strategies are then applied to both mathematically ideal and experimentally observed phase models to demonstrate their applicability, including the phase model for the widely studied Hodgkin-Huxley equations.

  4. On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strobel, K; Strobel, Klaus; Weigel, Manfred K.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

  5. On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Strobel; Manfred K. Weigel

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

  6. Communication: Minimum in the thermal conductivity of supercooled water: A computer simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresme, F., E-mail: f.bresme@imperial.ac.uk [Chemical Physics Section, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom and Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Biddle, J. W.; Sengers, J. V.; Anisimov, M. A. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a computer simulation study of the thermodynamic properties and the thermal conductivity of supercooled water as a function of pressure and temperature using the TIP4P-2005 water model. The thermodynamic properties can be represented by a two-structure equation of state consistent with the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the supercooled region. Our simulations confirm the presence of a minimum in the thermal conductivity, not only at atmospheric pressure, as previously found for the TIP5P water model, but also at elevated pressures. This anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity of supercooled water appears to be related to the maximum of the isothermal compressibility or the minimum of the speed of sound. However, the magnitudes of the simulated thermal conductivities are sensitive to the water model adopted and appear to be significantly larger than the experimental thermal conductivities of real water at low temperatures.

  7. arthritis forty-eight-week efficacy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    poor localities influence the capacity for community efficacy. Through a multivariate analysis using 497 households in poor localities of Addis Ababa, we investigate how social...

  8. assessor-blind comparative efficacy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    variations in poor localities influence the capacity for community efficacy. Through a multivariate analysis using 497 households in poor localities of Addis Ababa, we...

  9. Mechanisms of NDV-3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infectionFig. 1) and suppression of MRSA proliferation (Fig. 2). Eachseverity and suppression of MRSA bioluminescence (Figs. 1

  10. A minimum hypothesis explanation for an IMF with a lognormal body and power law tail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu; C. E. Jones

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a minimum hypothesis model for an IMF that resembles a lognormal distribution at low masses but has a distinct power-law tail. Even if the central limit theorem ensures a lognormal distribution of condensation masses at birth, a power-law tail in the distribution arises due to accretion from the ambient cloud, coupled with a non-uniform (exponential) distribution of accretion times.

  11. LIGHT SUBGRAPHS IN PLANAR GRAPHS OF MINIMUM DEGREE 4 AND EDGE-DEGREE 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohar, Bojan

    LIGHT SUBGRAPHS IN PLANAR GRAPHS OF MINIMUM DEGREE 4 AND EDGE-DEGREE 9 B. MOHAR , R. SKREKOVSKI vertices of degree 4 are adjacent. A graph H is light in G if there is a constant w such that every graph is w. Then we also write w(H) w. It is proved that the cycle Cs is light if and only if 3 s 6, where

  12. THINNING OF THE SUN'S MAGNETIC LAYER: THE PECULIAR SOLAR MINIMUM COULD HAVE BEEN PREDICTED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar magnetic activity cycle causes changes in the Sun on timescales that are equivalent to human lifetimes. The minimum solar activity that preceded the current solar cycle (cycle 24) was deeper and quieter than any other recent minimum. Using data from the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON), we show that the structure of the solar sub-surface layers during the descending phase of the preceding cycle (cycle 23) was very different from that during cycle 22. This leads us to believe that a detailed examination of the data would have led to the prediction that the cycle 24 minimum would be out of the ordinary. The behavior of the oscillation frequencies allows us to infer that changes in the Sun that affected the oscillation frequencies in cycle 23 were localized mainly to layers above about 0.996 R{sub Sun }, depths shallower than about 3000 km. In cycle 22, on the other hand, the changes must have also occurred in the deeper-lying layers.

  13. Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more insights into the flare process than the free energy above the potential field state.

  14. The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods—2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

  15. Development of High Efficacy, Low Cost Phosphorescent Oled Lightning Luminaire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Hack

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this two year program, UDC together with Armstrong World Industries, Professor Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan) and Professor Mark Thompson (University of Southern California) planned to develop and deliver high efficiency OLED lighting luminaires as part of an integrated ceiling illumination system that exceed the Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 performance projections. Specifically the UDC team in 2010 delivered two prototype OLED ceiling illumination systems, each consisting of four individual OLED lighting panels on glass integrated into Armstrong's novel TechZone open architecture ceiling systems, at an overall system efficacy of 51 lm/W, a CRI = 85 and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 10,000 hours. This accomplishment represents a 50% increase in luminaire efficacy and a factor of two in lifetime over that outlined in the solicitation. In addition, the team has also delivered one 15cm x 15cm lighting panel fabricated on a flexible metal foil substrate, demonstrating the possibility using OLEDs in a range of form factors. During this program, our Team has pursued the commercialization of these OLED based ceiling luminaires, with a goal to launch commercial products within the next three years. We have proven that our team is ideally suited to develop these highly novel and efficient solid state lighting luminaires, having both the technical experience and commercial strategy to leverage work performed under this contract. Our calculations show that the success of our program could lead to energy savings of more than 0.5 quads or 8 MMTC (million metric tons of carbon) per year by 2016.

  16. A Highly Efficacious Lymphocyte Chemoattractant, Stromal Cell-derived Factor 1 (SDF-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Timothy A.

    A Highly Efficacious Lymphocyte Chemoattractant, Stromal Cell-derived Factor 1 (SDF-1) By Conrad C-derived factor 1 (SDF-1). SDF-1 acts on lymphocytes and monocytes but not neutrophils in vitro and is both a highly efficacious and highly potent mononuclear cell attractant in vivo. In addition, SDF-1 induces

  17. Solar coronal loops as non force-free minimum energy relaxed states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bhattacharyya, R. [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur 313 001 (India)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the well established two-fluid relaxation model based on the minimum energy principle is extended to include open systems like the solar corona. The Euler-Lagrange equations obtained are of double curl in nature and support non-zero plasma-{beta} along with mass flow of the magnetofluid. These equations are solved in Cartesian coordinates utilizing a geometry relevant to the solar atmosphere, and a basic comparative study of the non force-free, force-free, and potential magnetic field obtained as solutions of the same Euler-Lagrange equations is presented.

  18. The secondary minimum in YY Her: Evidence for a tidally distorted giant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mikolajewska; E. A. Kolotilov; S. Yu. Shugarov; B. F. Yudin

    2002-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and analyze quiescent UBVRI light curves of the classical symbiotic binary YY Her. We show that the secondary minimum, which is clearly visible only in the quiescent VRI light curves, is due to ellipsoidal variability of the red giant component. Our simple light curve analysis, by fitting of the Fourier cosine series, resulted in a self-consistent phenomenological model of YY Her, in which the periodic changes can be described by a combination of the ellipsoidal changes and a sinusoidal changes of the nebular continuum and line emission.

  19. Variability of the Caribbean Low-Level Jet and its relations Chunzai Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Variability of the Caribbean Low-Level Jet and its relations to climate Chunzai Wang Received: 11 Abstract A maximum of easterly zonal wind at 925 hPa in the Caribbean region is called the Caribbean Low), and a minimum of tropical cyclo- genesis in July in the Caribbean Sea. It is found that both the meridional

  20. A Mandated Minimum Competency Testing Program and Its Impact on Learning Disabled Students: Curricular Validity and Comparative Performances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyen, Edward L.; Alley, Gordon R.; Scannell, Dale P.; Harnden, G. Mack; Miller, Kelly F.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, LD specialists, regular class teachers, and parents of LD students judged that the objectives of the Kansas Minimum Competency Specifications prescribed for nonhandicapped students were applicable to LD ...

  1. Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Marcia Donna

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale completions of the type which have been widely utilized since 2004. There is insufficient production history from real wells to determine an appropriate minimum terminal decline rate. In the absence of suitable analogs for the determination...

  2. Measuring the Efficacy of Leaders to Assess Information and Make Decisions in a Crisis: The C-LEAD Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittinsky, Todd L.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on literature and expert interviews, we developed the Crisis Leader Efficacy in Assessing and Deciding scale (C-LEAD) to capture the efficacy of leaders to assess information and make decisions in a public health and ...

  3. The effect of sand grain size distribution on the minimum oil saturation necessary to support in-situ combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, William Marvin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF SAND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON THE MINIMUM OIL SATURATION NECESSARY TO SUPPORT IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by WILLIAM MARVIN DANIEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Petroleum. Engineering THE EFFECT OF SAND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON THE MINIMUM OIL SATURATION NECESSARY TO SUPPORT IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by WILLIAM MARVIN DANIEL Approved...

  4. Solid low-level waste forecasting guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, K.J.; Dirks, L.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidance for forecasting solid low-level waste (LLW) on a site-wide basis is described in this document. Forecasting is defined as an approach for collecting information about future waste receipts. The forecasting approach discussed in this document is based solely on hanford`s experience within the last six years. Hanford`s forecasting technique is not a statistical forecast based upon past receipts. Due to waste generator mission changes, startup of new facilities, and waste generator uncertainties, statistical methods have proven to be inadequate for the site. It is recommended that an approach similar to Hanford`s annual forecasting strategy be implemented at each US Department of Energy (DOE) installation to ensure that forecast data are collected in a consistent manner across the DOE complex. Hanford`s forecasting strategy consists of a forecast cycle that can take 12 to 30 months to complete. The duration of the cycle depends on the number of LLW generators and staff experience; however, the duration has been reduced with each new cycle. Several uncertainties are associated with collecting data about future waste receipts. Volume, shipping schedule, and characterization data are often reported as estimates with some level of uncertainty. At Hanford, several methods have been implemented to capture the level of uncertainty. Collection of a maximum and minimum volume range has been implemented as well as questionnaires to assess the relative certainty in the requested data.

  5. Minimum separation distances for natural gas pipeline and boilers in the 300 area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Graham, T.M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing actions to reduce energy expenditures and improve energy system reliability at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. These actions include replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing a new natural gas distribution system to provide a fuel source for many of these units, and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. The individual heating units will include steam boilers that are to be housed in individual annex buildings located at some distance away from nearby 300 Area nuclear facilities. This analysis develops the basis for siting the package boilers and natural gas distribution systems to be used to supply steam to 300 Area nuclear facilities. The effects of four potential fire and explosion scenarios involving the boiler and natural gas pipeline were quantified to determine minimum separation distances that would reduce the risks to nearby nuclear facilities. The resulting minimum separation distances are shown in Table ES.1.

  6. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  7. A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical to determine luminous efficacy under different sky conditions. A comparison between these empirical constants. Keywords Global and diffuse luminous efficacy, different sky conditions, solar irradiance, solar

  8. Self-Leadership, Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance in Undergraduate Students and Peer Mentors Lauren M Bouchard1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Self-Leadership, Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance in Undergraduate Students and Peer Mentors of self-leadership and self-efficacy on the academic performance of students--specifically academic peer of self-leadership and self-efficacy as well as in general academic performance. Self-leadership

  9. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

  10. Company Level Imports Archives

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level Imports Company Level

  11. The effects of R/X ratios on power system minimum loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denison, John Scott

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 8 ]0 19 ' B+]40?5 Approx. 1/2 X17 Angle (degrees) I R TOTAL I X I Z I R IX IZ PZR CZ, NT LOSS ' 2?5 5 ' 0 -7 ' 5 -10 -15 2. 88 5 43 2 ' 09 2. 00 2. 54 3 ' 43 6. 69 0 ' 91 2 ~ 51 O. o3 0. 97 1. 96 3 ' 17 7 ?14 2 ~ 98 5. 99... 2. 18 2?22 3 ' 20 4. 67 9. 76 148. 0 278. 0 107. 1 103. 0 130 5 176. 0 343 ' o 144?4 139. 0 398 ' 0 278. 5 700, 5 101. 3 154 ' 0 103 ' 2 311 ~ 5 14. 9 ~ 0 504?0 216?5 1033. 0 455. 0 kt minimum point, ths system I R loss is 7. 3...

  12. On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih, E-mail: giorgio.busoni@sissa.it, E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it, E-mail: wei-chih.huang@sissa.it [SISSA and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

  13. Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bouchiat

    2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

  14. Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrick, Todd

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency in drilling is measured by Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE). MSE is the measure of the amount of energy input required to remove a unit volume of rock, expressed in units of energy input divided by volume removed. It can be expressed mathematically in terms of controllable parameters; Weight on Bit, Torque, Rate of Penetration, and RPM. It is well documented that minimizing MSE by optimizing controllable factors results in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to minimize MSE in the field only through a trial-and-error process. This work makes it possible to compute the optimum drilling parameters that result in minimum MSE. The parameters that have been traditionally used to compute MSE are interdependent. Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional MSE equation was rewritten in terms of a single parameter, Weight on Bit, establishing a form that can be minimized mathematically. Once the optimum Weight on Bit was determined, the interdependent relationship that Weight on Bit has with Torque and Penetration per Revolution was used to determine optimum values for those parameters for a given drilling situation. The improved method was validated through laboratory experimentation and analysis of published data. Two rock types were subjected to four treatments each, and drilled in a controlled laboratory environment. The method was applied in each case, and the optimum parameters for minimum MSE were computed. The method demonstrated an accurate means to determine optimum drilling parameters of Weight on Bit, Torque, and Penetration per Revolution. A unique application of micro-cracking is also presented, which demonstrates that rock failure ahead of the bit is related to axial force more than to rotation speed.

  15. Efficacy of Misuse Detection in Adhoc Networks Dhanant Subhadrabandhu, Saswati Sarkar, and Farooq Anjum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Saswati

    1 Efficacy of Misuse Detection in Adhoc Networks Dhanant Subhadrabandhu, Saswati Sarkar, and Farooq. Subhadrabandhu and S. Sarkar are at the department of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University

  16. Improved freezing level retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Sungwook

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRMM Microwave Imager(TMI)-based passive microwave retrieval techniques result in biased estimates of the freezing level and rainfall over the east Pacific in the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Passive microwave rainfall estimates...

  17. Sea level change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, M.F. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) 1995 Scientific Assessment, Chapter 7. Sea Level Change, presents a modest revision of the similar chapter in the 1990 Assessment. Principal conclusions on observed sea-level change and the principal terms in the sea-level equation (ocean thermal expansion, glaciers, ice sheets, and land hydrology), including our knowledge of the present-day (defined as the 20th Century) components of sea-level rise, and projections of these for the future, are presented here. Some of the interesting glaciological problems which are involved in these studies are discussed in more detail. The emphasis here is on trends over decades to a century, not on shorter variations nor on those of the geologic past. Unfortunately, some of the IPCC projections had not been agreed at the time of writing of this paper, and these projections will not be given here. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Vaidya Solution in General Covariant Ho?ava-Lifshitz Gravity with the Minimum Coupling and without Projectability: Infrared Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Goldoni; M. F. A. da Silva; R. Chan; G. Pinheiro

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have studied nonstationary radiative spherically symmetric spacetime, in general covariant theory ($U(1)$ extension) of {the} Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity with the minimum coupling, in the post-newtonian approximation (PPN), without the projectability condition and in the infrared limit. The Newtonian prepotential $\\varphi$ was assumed null. We have shown that there is not the analogue of the Vaidya's solution in the Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz Theory (HLT) with the minimum coupling, as we know in the General Relativity Theory (GRT).

  19. Two color laser fields for studying the Cooper minimum with phase-matched high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ba Dinh, Khuong, E-mail: kdinh@swin.edu.au; Vu Le, Hoang; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science and Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Vic 3122 (Australia)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the observation of the Cooper minimum in a semi-infinite argon-filled gas cell using two-color laser fields at wavelengths of 1400?nm and 800?nm. The experimental results show that the additional 800?nm field can change the macroscopic phase-matching condition through change of the atomic dipole phase associated with the electron in the continuum state and that this approach can be used to control the appearance of the Cooper minimum in the high-order harmonic spectrum in order to study the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

  20. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  1. DATE SUBMITTED: GRADE LEVEL:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4Customer-Comments Sign InFutureSUBMITTED: GRADE LEVEL:

  2. The Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following courses, with a minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    - Canadian and International Environmental Management Management 4640 - Cross-Cultural Work Study FourThe Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length in Year One. Admission to Management programs is competitive and is based on academic achievement prior

  3. Maximum-rate, Minimum-Decoding-Complexity STBCs from Clifford Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karmakar, Sanjay

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that Space-Time Block Codes (STBCs) from orthogonal designs (ODs) are single-symbol decodable/symbol-by-symbol decodable (SSD) and are obtainable from unitary matrix representations of Clifford algebras. However, SSD codes are obtainable from designs that are not orthogonal also. Recently, two such classes of SSD codes have been studied: (i) Coordinate Interleaved Orthogonal Designs (CIODs) and (ii) Minimum-Decoding-Complexity (MDC) STBCs from Quasi-ODs (QODs). Codes from ODs, CIODs and MDC-QODs are mutually non-intersecting classes of codes. The class of CIODs have {\\it non-unitary weight matrices} when written as a Linear Dispersion Code (LDC) proposed by Hassibi and Hochwald, whereas several known SSD codes including CODs have {\\it unitary weight matrices}. In this paper, we obtain SSD codes with unitary weight matrices (that are not CODs) called Clifford Unitary Weight SSDs (CUW-SSDs) from matrix representations of Clifford algebras. A main result of this paper is the derivation of an ach...

  4. The effect of longitudinal spacer ribs on the minimum pressure drop in a heated annulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, B.S.; Neff, J.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When evaluating a heated flow passage for vulnerability to static flow excursions, special note should be taken of flow restrictions which might allow premature vapor generation. In this study, measurements of steady state pressure drop were made for the downward flow of water in a vertical annulus. The outer wall was uniformly heated to allow subcooled boiling. Minima in the pressure drop characteristics were compared for test sections with and without longitudinal spacer ribs. For a given power and inlet temperature, the minimum occurred at a higher flow rate in the ribbed test section. This is attributed to vapor generation at the ribs. The work cited in this document show how a restriction in a heated channel can produce vapor which would not be observed in the absence of the restriction. In the present study, the effect of a flow restriction on the tendency to flow excursion is explored by finding demand curves for a heated annulus in subcooled boiling flow. The annulus is heated from the outside, and alternately equipped with and without longitudinal spacer ribs. These ribs separate the heated and unheated walls; in pressing against the heated wall they provide a means for premature vapor production.

  5. Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified marine waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change. This expansion alters marine ecosystem function and the productivity of fisheries due to habitat compression and changes in biogeochemical cycling leading to fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally anoxic fjord, Saanich Inlet to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification and inorganic carbon fixation predominantly co-varied with abundance and distribution patterns of Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Within these groups, pathways mediating inorganic carbon fixation and nitrogen and sulfur transformations were differentially expressed across the redoxcline. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters and denitrification, sulfur-oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with SUP05 dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrite-oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nitrospina and Planctomycetes respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The differential expression of these pathways under changing water column redox conditions has quantitative implications for coupled biogeochemical cycling linking different modes of inorganic carbon fixation with distributed nitrogen and sulfur-based energy metabolism extensible to coastal and open ocean OMZs.

  6. Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators for ATLAS: Commissioning and Run 2 Initial Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dano Hoffmann, Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MBTS) delivered the primary trigger for selecting events from low luminosity proton-proton, lead-lead and lead-proton collisions with the smallest possible bias during LHC Run 1 (2009-2013). Similarly, the MBTS will select events for the first Run 2 physics measurements, for instance charge multiplicity, proton-proton cross section, rapidity gap measurements, etc. at the unprecedented 13 TeV center of mass energy of proton-proton collisions. We will review the upgrades to the MBTS detector that have been implemented during the 2013-2014 shutdown. New scintillators have been installed to replace the radiation damaged ones, a modified optical readout scheme have been adopted to increase the light yield and an improved data acquisition chain has been used to cope with the few issues observed during Run 1 operations. Since late 2014, MBTS have been commissioned during cosmic data taking, first LHC beam splashes and single beam LHC fills. The goal is to have a fully commissi...

  7. On the 27-day Variations of Cosmic Ray Intensity in Recent Solar Minimum 23/24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the 27-day variations and their harmonics of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity, solar wind velocity, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components in the recent prolonged solar minimum 23 24. The time evolution of the quasi-periodicity in these parameters connected with the Suns rotation reveals that their synodic period is stable and is aprox 26-27 days. This means that the changes in the solar wind speed and IMF are related to the Suns near equatorial regions in considering the differential rotation of the Sun. However, the solar wind parameters observed near the Earths orbit provide only the conditions in the limited local vicinity of the equatorial region in the heliosphere (within in latitude). We also demonstrate that the observed period of the GCR intensity connected with the Suns rotation increased up to aprox 33-36 days in 2009. This means that the process driving the 27-day variations of the GCR intensity takes place not only in the limited local surroundings of the equato...

  8. Approaching the Minimum Thermal Conductivity in Rhenium-Substituted Higher Manganese Silicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Girard, S. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Meng, F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jin, S [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Goodenough, J. B. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Zhou, J. S. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Shi, L [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) made of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are regarded as promising p-type thermoelectric materials because their complex crystal structure results in low lattice thermal conductivity. It is shown here that the already low thermal conductivity of HMS can be reduced further to approach the minimum thermal conductivity via partial substitu- tion of Mn with heavier rhenium (Re) to increase point defect scattering. The solubility limit of Re in the obtained RexMn1 xSi1.8 is determined to be about x = 0.18. Elemental inhomogeneity and the formation of ReSi1.75 inclusions with 50 200 nm size are found within the HMS matrix. It is found that the power factor does not change markedly at low Re content of x 0.04 before it drops considerably at higher Re contents. Compared to pure HMS, the reduced lattice thermal conductivity in RexMn1 xSi1.8 results in a 25% increase of the peak figure of merit ZT to reach 0.57 0.08 at 800 K for x = 0.04. The suppressed thermal conductivity in the pure RexMn1 xSi1.8 can enable further investigations of the ZT limit of this system by exploring different impurity doping strategies to optimize the carrier concentration and power factor.

  9. The Effect of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on the Solar Minimum Corona and Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto M. Vasquez; Adriaan A. van Ballegooijen; John C. Raymond

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A semi-empirical, axisymmetric model of the solar minimum corona is developed by solving the equations for conservation of mass and momentum with prescribed anisotropic temperature distributions. In the high-latitude regions, the proton temperature anisotropy is strong and the associated mirror force plays an important role in driving the fast solar wind; the critical point where the outflow velocity equals the parallel sound speed is reached already at 1.5 Rsun from Sun center. The slow wind arises from a region with open field lines and weak anisotropy surrounding the equatorial streamer belt. The model parameters were chosen to reproduce the observed latitudinal extent of the equatorial streamer in the corona and at large distance from the Sun. We find that the magnetic cusp of the closed-field streamer core lies at about 1.95 Rsun. The transition from fast to slow wind is due to a decrease in temperature anisotropy combined with the non-monotonic behavior of the non-radial expansion factor in flow tubes that pass near the streamer cusp. In the slow wind, the plasma beta is of order unity and the critical point lies at about 5 Rsun, well beyond the magnetic cusp. The predicted outflow velocities are consistent with OVI Doppler dimming measurements from UVCS/SOHO. We also find good agreement with polarized brightness (pB) measurements from LASCO/SOHO and HI Ly-alpha images from UVCS/SOHO.

  10. Fundamental properties of solar-like oscillating stars from frequencies of minimum $\\Delta \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y?ld?z, M; Kayhan, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large separations between the oscillation frequencies of solar-like stars are measures of stellar mean density. The separations have been thought to be mostly constant in the observed range of frequencies. However, detailed investigation shows that they are not constant, and their variations are not random but have very strong diagnostic potential for our understanding of stellar structure and evolution. In this regard, frequencies of the minimum large separation are very useful tools. From these frequencies, in addition to the large separation and frequency of maximum amplitude, Y\\i ld\\i z et al. recently have developed new methods to find almost all the fundamental stellar properties. In the present study, we aim to find metallicity and helium abundances from the frequencies, and generalize the relations given by Y\\i ld\\i z et al. for a wider stellar mass range and arbitrary metallicity ($Z$) and helium abundance ($Y$). We show that the effect of metallicity is { significant} for most of the fundamental...

  11. Efficacy of dichlorvos in the control of murine acariasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, Clara Jane

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    80 60 40 20 DAYS 15 22 Fig. 2 23 Figure 3. Cholinesterase Levels in Treatment Group III. This group was exposed to 2 tsp. (8. 0 gm. ) of dichlorvos for 14 days. Average (closed circles), approximate standard error (vertical linea). 24 140...

  12. Electric Power Network Security Analysis via Minimum Cut Relaxation Kin Cheong Sou, Henrik Sandberg and Karl Henrik Johansson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    ) and ma directed arcs (i.e., transmission lines) on which power flows. The flow can The authorsElectric Power Network Security Analysis via Minimum Cut Relaxation Kin Cheong Sou, Henrik Sandberg the security of power transmission networks is presented. In order to strategically allocate protection devices

  13. Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based Minimum Mean-Square Error Estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based mean-square error es- timators have been applied to speech enhancement in the tem- poral, transform (e estimator for 8 kHz telephone-quality speech. Index Terms: Speech enhancement, minimum mean-square er- ror

  14. Distributed multichannel speech enhancement with minimum mean-square error short-time spectral amplitude, log-spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    Distributed multichannel speech enhancement with minimum mean-square error short-time spectral Keywords: Acoustic arrays Speech enhancement Amplitude estimation Phase estimation Parameter estimation a b on the development and implementation of speech enhancement algorithms. Whereas the current state-of-the-art methods

  15. A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion, such as the mechanism and the free-energy profile, remains an important challenge not only for enzyme catalysis1 of the reaction free-energy profile is very cumbersome with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) and umbrella

  16. Energy management of power-split plug-in hybrid electric vehicles based on simulated annealing and Pontryagin's minimum principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    Energy management of power-split plug-in hybrid electric vehicles based on simulated annealing Accepted 14 August 2014 Available online 27 August 2014 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Fuel-rate Pontryagin's minimum principle Simulated annealing State of health a b s t r a c t In this paper, an energy

  17. Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required forest areas for Vietnam Erosion Risk Map Cover types C1 Natural Forests >1.7 Plantation forest.2 (ESRI, 2008), to generate a map of required protective forest area for Vietnam. (3) (4) (5Results Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5& · Map

  18. A dual model-free control of non-minimum phase systems for generation of stable limit cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A dual model-free control of non-minimum phase systems for generation of stable limit cycles S parameters tuning. It is therefore easy to build a controller for an unknown system. Model-free control has of flow. In [14], model-free control methodology is applied to a power converter, where stable regulation

  19. Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (7001100 m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen increased animal activity associated with increasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. We examined faunal community responses to oxygen and organic matter gradients across the lower oxygen minimum zone (OMZ

  20. JOURNAL OF IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2001 / 287 DESIGN OF MINIMUM SEEPAGE LOSS CANAL SECTIONS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    conveyance systems for deliv- ering water for irrigation. The seepage loss from irrigation canals constitutesJOURNAL OF IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2001 / 287 DESIGN OF MINIMUM other factors [International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage (ICID) (1967)]. Analytical solutions

  1. 28 / JOURNAL OF IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2000 DESIGN OF MINIMUM SEEPAGE LOSS CANAL SECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    . INTRODUCTION Canals continue to be major conveyance systems for deliv- ering water for irrigation28 / JOURNAL OF IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2000 DESIGN OF MINIMUM in the alluvial plains of India. But the seepage loss from irrigation canals constitutes a substantial percentage

  2. An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum Creditable Coverage Standards for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum, as part of the Massachusetts Health Care Reform Law. HMO Blue New EnglandSM Summary of Benefits Williams College #12;Your Care Your Primary Care Provider. When you enroll in HMO Blue New England, you must choose

  3. Non Intrusive Measures for Determining the Minimum Field of View for User Search Task in 3D Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Non Intrusive Measures for Determining the Minimum Field of View for User Search Task in 3D Virtual on the use of several novel non- intrusive temporal and quantitative measures of visual attention, such as engines. The use of this virtual camera can show interesting results for non-invasive study

  4. Synthesis of controllers for non-minimum phase and unstable systems using non-sequential MIMO quantitative feedback theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Chenyang

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Considered in this thesis is multi-input multi-output (MIMO) systems with non-minimum phase (NMP) zeros and unstable poles where some of the unstable poles are located to the right of the NMP zeros. In the single-input single-output (SISO) case...

  5. Application of a MHD hybrid solar wind model with latitudinal dependences to Ulysses data at minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Aibeo; J. Lima; C. Sauty

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous work, Ulysses data was analyzed to build a complete axisymmetric MHD solution for the solar wind at minimum including rotation and the initial flaring of the solar wind in the low corona. This model has some problems in reproducing the values of magnetic field at 1 AU despite the correct values of the velocity. Here, we intend to extend the previous analysis to another type of solutions and to improve our modelling of the wind from the solar surface to 1 AU. We compare the previous results to those obtained with a fully helicoidal model and construct a hybrid model combining both previous solutions, keeping the flexibility of the parent models in the appropriate domain. From the solar surface to the Alfven, point, a three component solution for velocity and magnetic field is used, reproducing the complex wind geometry and the well-known flaring of the field lines observed in coronal holes. From the Alfven radius to 1 AU and further, the hybrid model keeps the latitudinal dependences as flexible as possible, in order to deal with the sharp variations near the equator and we use the helicoidal solution, turning the poloidal streamlines into radial ones. Despite the absence of the initial flaring, the helicoidal model and the first hybrid solution suffer from the same low values of the magnetic field at 1 AU. However, by adjusting the parameters with a second hybrid solution, we are able to reproduce both the velocity and magnetic profiles observed by Ulysses and a reasonable description of the low corona, provided that a certain amount of energy deposit exists along the flow. The present paper shows that analytical axisymmetric solutions can be constructed to reproduce the solar structure and dynamics from 1 solar radius up to 1 AU.

  6. General Properties on Applying the Principle of Minimum Sensitivity to High-order Perturbative QCD Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Ma; Xing-Gang Wu; Hong-Hao Ma; Hua-Yong Han

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the key components of perturbative QCD theory, it is helpful to find a systematic and reliable way to set the renormalization scale for a high-energy process. The conventional treatment is to take a typical momentum as the renormalization scale, which assigns an arbitrary range and an arbitrary systematic error to pQCD predictions, leading to the well-known renormalization scheme and scale ambiguities. As a practical solution for such scale setting problem, the "Principle of Minimum Sensitivity" (PMS), has been proposed in the literature. The PMS suggests to determine an optimal scale for the pQCD approximant of an observable by requiring its slope over the scheme and scale changes to vanish. In the paper, we present a detailed discussion on general properties of PMS by utilizing three quantities $R_{e^+e^-}$, $R_\\tau$ and $\\Gamma(H\\rightarrow b\\bar{b})$ up to four-loop QCD corrections. After applying the PMS, the accuracy of pQCD prediction, the pQCD convergence, the pQCD predictive power and etc., have been discussed. Furthermore, we compare PMS with another fundamental scale setting approach, i.e. the Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC)... Our results show that PMS does provide a practical way to set the effective scale for high-energy process, and the PMS prediction agrees with the PMC one by including enough high-order QCD corrections, both of which shall be more accurate than the prediction under the conventional scale setting. However, the PMS pQCD convergence is an accidental, which usually fails to achieve a correct prediction of unknown high-order contributions with next-to-leading order QCD correction only, i.e. it is always far from the "true" values predicted by including more high-order contributions.

  7. Determination of the minimum masses of heavy elements in the envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Ulysse Marboeuf; Jonathan I. Lunine; Yann Alibert; Leigh N. Fletcher; Glenn S. Orton; Francoise Pauzat; Yves Ellinger

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the minimum mass of heavy elements required in the envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn to match the observed oversolar abundances of volatiles. Because the clathration efficiency remains unknown in the solar nebula, we have considered a set of sequences of ice formation in which the fraction of water available for clathration is varied between 0 and 100 %. In all the cases considered, we assume that the water abundance remains homogeneous whatever the heliocentric distance in the nebula and directly derives from a gas phase of solar composition. Planetesimals then form in the feeding zones of Jupiter and Saturn from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure condensates in proportions fixed by the clathration efficiency. A fraction of Kr and Xe may have been sequestrated by the H3+ ion in the form of stable XeH3+ and KrH3+ complexes in the solar nebula gas phase, thus implying the formation of at least partly Xe- and Kr-impoverished planetesimals in the feeding zones of Jupiter and Saturn. These planetesimals were subsequently accreted and vaporized into the hydrogen envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn, thus engendering volatiles enrichments in their atmospheres, with respect to hydrogen. Taking into account both refractory and volatile components, and assuming plausible molecular mixing ratios in the gas phase of the outer solar nebula, we show that it is possible to match the observed enrichments in Jupiter and Saturn, whatever the clathration efficiency. Our calculations predict that the O/H enrichment decreases from 6.7 to 5.6 times solar (O/H) in the envelope of Jupiter and from 18.1 to 15.4 times solar (O/H) in the envelope of Saturn with the growing clathration efficiency in the solar nebula.

  8. Level: National Data;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.5 First

  9. Company Level Imports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010 EIA-28 Financial

  10. Level Diagram Format Choice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count the ways. We've13, 2009 InFormWhich

  11. Tables of Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys &8-5070P3. U.S.7.

  12. A comprehensive understanding of the efficacy of N-Ring hardening methodologies in SiGe HBTs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Stanley D.; Dodd, Paul Emerson; Cressler, John D.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Najafizadeh, Laleh; Diestelhorst, Ryan; Moen, Kurt A.; Sutton, Akil K.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the efficacy of mitigating radiation-based single event effects (SEE) within circuits incorporating SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) built with an N-Ring, a transistor-level layout-based radiation hardened by design (RHBD) technique. Previous work of single-device ion-beam induced charge collection (IBICC) studies has demonstrated significant reductions in peak collector charge collection and sensitive area for charge collection; however, few circuit studies using this technique have been performed. Transient studies performed with Sandia National Laboratory's (SNL) 36 MeV 16O microbeam on voltage references built with N-Ring SiGe HBTs have shown mixed results, with reductions in the number of large voltage disruptions in addition to new sensitive areas of low-level output voltage disturbances. Similar discrepancies between device-level IBICC results and circuit measurements are found for the case of digital shift registers implemented with N-Ring SiGe HBTs irradiated in a broadbeam environment at Texas A&M's Cyclotron Institute. The error cross-section curve of the N-Ring based register is found to be larger at larger ion LETs than the standard SiGe register, which is clearly counter-intuitive. We have worked to resolve the discrepancy between the measured circuit results and the device-level IBICC measurements, by re-measuring single-device N-Ring SiGe HBTs using a time-resolved ion beam induced charge (TRIBIC) set-up that allows direct capture of nodal transients. Coupling these measurements with full 3-D TCAD simulations provides complete insight into the origin of transient currents in an N-Ring SiGe HBT. The detailed structure of these transients and their bias dependencies are discussed, together with the ramifications for the design of space-borne analog and digital circuits using SiGe HBTs.

  13. Molecule Nanoweaver Improves Drug Delivery and Treatment Efficacy - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. WilliamEnergyMolecularMolecular-FrameInnovation

  14. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  15. Pinning down energy levels | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    levels Pinning down energy levels Released: September 12, 2014 Scientists discover the energy differences behind green fluorescent protein's glow The research begins with (a)...

  16. OPTIMIZED FUEL INJECTOR DESIGN FOR MAXIMUM IN-FURNACE NOx REDUCTION AND MINIMUM UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.F. SAROFIM; BROWN UNIVERSITY. R.A. LISAUSKAS; D.B. RILEY, INC.; E.G. EDDINGS; J. BROUWER; J.P. KLEWICKI; K.A. DAVIS; M.J. BOCKELIE; M.P. HEAP; REACTION ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL. D.W. PERSHING; UNIVERSITY OF UTAH. R.H. HURT

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction Engineering International (REI) has established a project team of experts to develop a technology for combustion systems which will minimize NO x emissions and minimize carbon in the fly ash. This much need technology will allow users to meet environmental compliance and produce a saleable by-product. This study is concerned with the NO x control technology of choice for pulverized coal fired boilers, ?in-furnace NO x control,? which includes: staged low-NO x burners, reburning, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and hybrid approaches (e.g., reburning with SNCR). The program has two primary objectives: 1) To improve the performance of ?in-furnace? NO x control processes. 2) To devise new, or improve existing, approaches for maximum ?in-furnace? NO x control and minimum unburned carbon. The program involves: 1) fundamental studies at laboratory- and bench-scale to define NO reduction mechanisms in flames and reburning jets; 2) laboratory experiments and computer modeling to improve our two-phase mixing predictive capability; 3) evaluation of commercial low-NO x burner fuel injectors to develop improved designs, and 4) demonstration of coal injectors for reburning and low-NO x burners at commercial scale. The specific objectives of the two-phase program are to: 1 Conduct research to better understand the interaction of heterogeneous chemistry and two phase mixing on NO reduction processes in pulverized coal combustion. 2 Improve our ability to predict combusting coal jets by verifying two phase mixing models under conditions that simulate the near field of low-NO x burners. 3 Determine the limits on NO control by in-furnace NO x control technologies as a function of furnace design and coal type. 5 Develop and demonstrate improved coal injector designs for commercial low-NO x burners and coal reburning systems. 6 Modify the char burnout model in REI?s coal combustion code to take account of recently obtained fundamental data on char reactivity during the late stages of burnout. This will improve our ability to predict carbon burnout with low-NO x firing systems.

  17. Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

  18. Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Hepasphere 30–60 ?m. Safety and Efficacy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malagari, Katerina, E-mail: kmalag@otenet.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece); Pomoni, Maria, E-mail: mpomoni@mail.gr [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Moschouris, Hippokratis, E-mail: hipmosch@gmail.com [Tzanion Hospital, Department of Radiology (Greece); Kelekis, Alexios, E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece); Charokopakis, Angelos, E-mail: axarok@gmail.com; Bouma, Evanthia, E-mail: boumaevanthia@gmail.com; Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Chatziioannou, Achilles, E-mail: ahatzi@cc.uoa.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece); Sotirchos, Vlasios, E-mail: sotirchos@hotmail.com [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Karampelas, Theodoros, E-mail: ctamvakop@bioacademy.gr; Tamvakopoulos, Constantin, E-mail: ctamvakop@bioacademy.gr [Research Academy of University of Athens (Greece); Filippiadis, Dimitrios, E-mail: dfilippiadis@yahoo.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece); Karagiannis, Enangelos, E-mail: kmalag@otenet.gr [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Marinis, Athanasios, E-mail: drmarinis@gmail.com [Tzanion Hospital, 1st Department of Surgery (Greece); Koskinas, John, E-mail: koskinas@ath.forthnet.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatology (Greece); Kelekis, Dimitrios A., E-mail: dkelekis@med.uoa.gr [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece)

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: This study examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a newly developed size of a superabsorbent polymer drug-eluting embolic material.MethodsForty-five patients with documented HCC (Child–Pugh score A/B: 55.5 %/44.5 %) were embolized with HepaSphere microspheres 30–60 ?m with escalation of lesion, dose, and frequency of re-embolization. Local response was evaluated with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Plasma levels of doxorubicin were measured in 24 patients at baseline and at 5, 20, 40, 60, and 120 min, at 6, 24, and 48 h, and at 7 days, respectively, to determine doxorubicin in plasma (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC). Measurements of three patients who underwent lipiodol-based conventional chemoembolization (c-TACE) were also performed.ResultsTACE with HepaSphere was well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile and no 30-day mortality. Response rates were calculated on intention-to-treat basis with complete response (CR) in 17.8 % reaching 22.2 % for the target lesion. Overall partial response (PR) was seen in 51.1 %, stable disease in 20 %, and progressive disease in 11.1 % of patients. Overall objective response (CR + PR), including patients treated at all dosages of doxorubicin, was seen in 68.9 % of cases. After a median follow-up of 15.6 months, 1-year survival is 100 %. Doxorubicin AUC was significantly lower in patients with HepaSphere 30–60 ?m (35,195 ± 27,873 ng × min/ml) than in patients with conventional TACE (103,960 ± 16,652 ng × min/ml; p = 0.009). Cmax was also significantly lower with HepaSphere 30–60 ?m (83.9 ± 32.1 ng/ml) compared with c-TACE (761.3 ± 58.8 ng/ml; p = 0.002).ConclusionHepaSphere 30–60 ?m is an effective drug-eluting embolic material with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile.

  19. Development of Best Practices for Shell Egg Disinfection Based upon Efficacy and Egg Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ajeeli, Morouj N

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ; 2) assess the efficacy of chlorine, quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC), peracetic acid alone or in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (3.5%) in combination with UV light as post-wash sanitizers against aerobic plate...

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of IL-12, but not GM-CSF,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of IL-12, but not GM-CSF, expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus for transgenic mouse derived prostate cancers S Varghese1,2 , SD Rabkin1,2 , R Liu1 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Replication competent oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSV

  1. Heat of the Moment: Characterizing the Efficacy of Thermal Camera-Based Attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heat of the Moment: Characterizing the Efficacy of Thermal Camera-Based Attacks Keaton Mowery UC to analyze the data. First, we present code recovery re- sults from human review of our test data set lock on an industrial safe, he found that body heat from the user transferred to the individual keys

  2. Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert Ulm University. In business process design, business objective models can ful- fill the role of formal requirement definitions for progressive appli- cations like automated process optimization. Key words: Business Process Modeling

  3. We compared the efficacy of positive pressure ventilation (PPV) vs negative pressure ventilation (NPV) in providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmehr, Reza

    the rationale for the use ofintermittent assisted ventilation is based on the premise that it alleviates muscleWe compared the efficacy of positive pressure ventilation (PPV) vs negative pressure ventilationEMG), minute ventilation (VE),tidal volume (VT), and end-tidal CO (etCOÃ during 15 minutes of PPV and NPV

  4. Young drivers and the efficacy of the Texas drug and alcohol driving awareness program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darnell, Richard

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of the Texas Drug and Alcohol Driving Awareness Program (TDADAP) in relation to alcohol-related offenses among young drivers. Participants in this study were students in pre-license programs...

  5. Comparison of the Efficacy of Popular Weight Loss Programs in Sedentary Overweight Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baetge, Claire

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compared the efficacy of the Curves® Complete 90-day Challenge (CC), Weight Watchers® Points Plus (WW), Jenny Craig® At Home (JC), and Nutrisystem® Advance Select™ (NS) on weight loss, body composition and/or markers of health and fitness...

  6. Neuropharmacology and analgesia Comparative efficacy of 3 soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Neuropharmacology and analgesia Comparative efficacy of 3 soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors in rat neuropathic and inflammatory pain models Karen Wagner, Bora Inceoglu, Hua Dong, Jun Yang, Sung Hee Inflammatory pain Diabetic neuropathic pain Epoxygenated fatty acid a b s t r a c t Epoxy-fatty acids have been

  7. A study of the relationships of self-efficacy of self-management of asthma and asthma self-management knowledge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCorkle, Laura Steed

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of this study are to examine the relationship of self-efficacy regarding self-management of asthma and student self-management knowledge and also examine the extent to which self-efficacy and self-management ...

  8. High-level waste tank farm set point document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, J.A. III

    1995-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

  9. Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronicCurvesSpeedingScientific and TechnicalConference:

  10. Sea Level Rise Media Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    Sea Level Rise Media Release Coverage Report 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves 06/11/2009 Rising sea levels could see U.S. Atlantic coast cities make hard choices; Where to let Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid rise in sea levels on East Coast predicted Pittsburgh

  11. High Efficacy Green LEDs by Polarization Controlled MOVPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, Christian

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Amazing performance in GaInN/GaN based LEDs has become possible by advanced epitaxial growth on a wide variety of substrates over the last decade. An immediate push towards product development and worldwide competition for market share have effectively reduced production cost and generated substantial primary energy savings on a worldwide scale. At all times of the development, this economic pressure forced very fundamental decisions that would shape huge industrial investment. One of those major aspects is the choice of epitaxial growth substrate. The natural questions are to what extend a decision for a certain substrate will limit the ultimate performance and to what extent, the choice of a currently more expensive substrate such as native GaN could overcome any of the remaining performance limitations. Therefore, this project has set out to explore what performance characteristic could be achieved under the utilization of bulk GaN substrate. Our work was guided by the hypotheses that line defects such as threading dislocations in the active region should be avoided and the huge piezoelectric polarization needs to be attenuated – if not turned off – for higher performing LEDs, particularly in the longer wavelength green and deep green portions of the visible spectrum. At their relatively lower performance level, deep green LEDs are a stronger indicator of relative performance improvements and seem particular sensitive to the challenges at hand. The project therefore made use of recently developed non-polar and semipolar bulk GaN substrates that were made available at Kyma Technologies by crystallographic cuts from thick polar growth of GaN. This approach naturally leads to rather small pieces of substrates, cm along the long side while mm along the short one. Small size and limited volume of sample material therefore set the limits of the ensuing development work. During the course of the project we achieved green and deep green LEDs in all those crystal growth orientations: polar c-plane, non- polar a-plane, non-polar m-plane, and semipolar planes. The active region in those structures shows dramatically reduced densities of threading dislocations unless the wavelength was extended as far as 510 nm and beyond. With the appearance of such defects, the light output power dropped precipitously supporting the necessity to avoid any and all of such defects to reach the active region. Further aspects of the non-polar growth orientation proved extremely promising for the development of such structures. Chief among them is our success to achieve extremely uniform quantum wells in these various crystal orientations that prove devoid of any alloy fluctuation beyond the theoretical limit of a binominal distribution. This became very Rensselaer Wetzel DE?EE0000627 3 directly apparent in highly advanced atom probe tomography performed in collaboration at Northwestern University. Furthermore, under reduced or absence of piezoelectric polarization, green emitters in those growth geometries exhibit an unsurpassed wavelength stability over very wide excitation and drive current ranges. Such a performance had not been possible in any polar c-plane growth and now places green LEDs in terms of wavelength stability up par with typical 450 nm blue emitters. The project also incorporated enabling opportunities in the development of micro and nano- patterned substrate technologies. Originally developped as a means to enhance generated light extraction we have demonstrated that the method of nano-patterning, in contrast to micro- patterning also results in a substantial reduction of threading dislocation generation. In green LEDs, we thereby see equal contributions of enhanced light extraction and reduced defect generation to a threefold enhancement of the green light output power. These results have opened entirely new approaches for future rapid and low cost epitaxial material development by avoidance of thick defect accommodation layers. All methods developed within this project have meanwhile widely been publicized by the members o

  12. Required Courses for the PhD degree (10 credits minimum) 1) LAAS 5xxx, Integrated Topics in Land & Atmospheric Science (3 cr, Fall)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Required Courses for the PhD degree (10 credits minimum) 1) LAAS 5xxx, Integrated Topics in Land with (3) below) 3) LAAS 5xxx, Research in Land & Atmospheric Science (2 cr, Spring) 4) LAAS 8123

  13. THE ROCHE LIMIT FOR CLOSE-ORBITING PLANETS: MINIMUM DENSITY, COMPOSITION CONSTRAINTS, AND APPLICATION TO THE 4.2 hr PLANET KOI 1843.03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Leslie A.

    The requirement that a planet must orbit outside of its Roche limit gives a lower limit on the planet's mean density. The minimum density depends almost entirely on the orbital period and is immune to systematic errors in ...

  14. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  15. Influence of Agricultural Dual Credit on Student College Readiness Self-Efficacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Alanna L.

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    INFLUENCE OF AGRICULTURAL DUAL CREDIT ON STUDENT COLLEGE READINESS SELF-EFFICACY A Record of Study by ALANNA LEE NEELY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... should consider earning postsecondary degrees and credentials. The Completion Agenda states: This increased focus on college completion (not simply college access) is reflected in, for example, President Obama?s goal for the United States...

  16. Structured communication: effects on teaching efficacy of student teachers and student teacher - cooperating teacher relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, Don Wayne

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    STRUCTURED COMMUNICATION: EFFECTS ON TEACHING EFFICACY OF STUDENT TEACHERS AND STUDENT TEACHER – COOPERATING TEACHER RELATIONSHIPS A Dissertation by DON WAYNE EDGAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... – COOPERATING TEACHER RELATIONSHIPS A Dissertation by DON WAYNE EDGAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co...

  17. Self-Efficacy of Early-Career Agricultural Science Teachers in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, Bodie

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    in the classroom instruction domain (Edgar, Roberts, & Murphy, 2009; Roberts, Harlin, & Briers, 2008; Stripling, Ricketts, Roberts, & Harlin, 2008; Roberts, Mowen, Edgar, Harlin, & Briers, 2007; Harlin, Roberts, Briers, Mowen, & Edgar, 2007; Roberts, Harlin..., & Ricketts, 2006; Edgar, Roberts, & Murphy, 2011) Additionally, Burris, McLaughlin, McCullough, Brashears, & Fraze, (2010) conducted a study examining the differences in general efficacy among first and fifth year teachers. Roberts, Harlin, & Briers (2008...

  18. AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION INTO THE MODERATING RELATIONSHIP OF COMPUTER SELF-EFFICACY ON PERFORMANCE IN A COMPUTER-SUPPORTED TASK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre Urreta, Miguel Ignacio

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer Self-Efficacy has been shown to be a critical construct in a number of research areas within the Information Systems literature, most notably training, technology adoption, and performance in computer-related tasks. Attention has been...

  19. Teacher self-efficacy in Cape Town : a bottom up approach to enhancing the quality of education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, YeSeul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personal teacher self-efficacy (PTE), or the belief in one's own ability to overcome a particular challenge, often acts as a catalyst for teachers to improve the effectiveness of their teaching. Gaining PTE can translate ...

  20. Leadership behaviors and collective efficacy as perceived by teachers of schools in the Katy Independent School District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Joe Wilson

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purposes of this study were to discover any connections between leadership effectiveness and collective efficacy from campuses in the Katy Independent School District. It also was designed to discover other possible connections between...

  1. Baldrige Education Criteria for Performance Excellence: perceptions of district personnel of implementation and impact on collective teacher efficacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeRoy, Kathryn A.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to identify those elements of the Baldrige Education Criteria for Performance Excellence that central office leaders, principals, and teachers perceive as having an impact on collective teacher efficacy. The study...

  2. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  3. ALIGNMENT, LEVELING AND DEPLOYMENT CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Crew Deployment Description Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) Crew Deployment and Alignment Central Station Antenna Crew Deployment Description Leveling, Alignment, and Pointing Radioisotope

  4. STEADY-STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HU TA

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

  5. Evaluations of average level spacings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liou, H.I.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average level spacing for highly excited nuclei is a key parameter in cross section formulas based on statistical nuclear models, and also plays an important role in determining many physics quantities. Various methods to evaluate average level spacings are reviewed. Because of the finite experimental resolution, to detect a complete sequence of levels without mixing other parities is extremely difficult, if not totally impossible. Most methods derive the average level spacings by applying a fit, with different degrees of generality, to the truncated Porter-Thomas distribution for reduced neutron widths. A method that tests both distributions of level widths and positions is discussed extensivey with an example of /sup 168/Er data. 19 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Levelling of microprofiles in electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, K.G.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses current distribution phenomena in the smoothing of advancing and receding microprofiles during electrodeposition in the following areas: levelling in the presence of inhibitors, levelling in the presence of corrosive agents, and levelling caused by periodic current reversal. These phenomena are relevant to many commercial electrodeposition processes. Theoretical analysis of moving boundaries in electrodeposition is addressed, focusing on the levelling of microscopic surface contours. The literature relevant to the solution of current distribution problems is reviewed. Convection of inhibitors to the depth of trenches is evaluated using the finite element method, and characterized as a function of Reynolds number, notch angle, and depth. Secondary flows are shown to noticeably enhance transport into microscopic trenches only at high Peclet numbers, i.e. at very high flow velocities. The boundary element method (BEM) is used to analyze levelling caused by inhibitors consumed at the transport limiting rate during electrodeposition. It is predicted that (1) better levelling performance can be obtained if the microscopic surface waviness is oriented perpendicular to the convective flow, and (2) for surface roughness oriented parallel to the flow, there is an optimum boundary layer thickness, or flux of additive, which results in superior levelling performance. Profilometry and photomicrography is applied to obtain the current distribution, current efficiency and levelling performance on novel microprofiled electrodes for two orientations with respect to the fluid flow during nickel electrodeposition in the presence of coumarin. Slightly better levelling occurs in flows transverse to grooves, and the deposit thickness increases in the flow direction. It is concluded that coumarin acts by simultaneously lowering the current efficiency, and blocking metal deposition. 331 refs., 86 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  8. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  9. Low Level Heat Recovery Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

  10. Phase I high-level waste pretreatment and feed staging plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel, A.F.

    1996-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the preliminary planning basis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a sufficient quantity of high-level waste feed to the privatization contractor during Phase I. By this analysis of candidate high-level waste feed sources, the initial quantity of high-level waste feed totals more than twice the minimum feed requirements. The flexibility of the current infrastructure within tank farms provides a variety of methods to transfer the feed to the privatization contractor`s site location. The amount and type of pretreatment (sludge washing) necessary for the Phase I processing can be tailored to support the demonstration goals without having a significant impact on glass volume (i.e., either inhibited water or caustic leaching can be used).

  11. Promoting system-level learning from project-level lessons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jong, Amos A. de, E-mail: amosdejong@gmail.com [Innovation Management, Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Hens A.C., E-mail: h.a.c.runhaar@uu.nl [Section of Environmental Governance, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Piety R., E-mail: piety.runhaar@wur.nl [Organisational Psychology and Human Resource Development, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Kolhoff, Arend J., E-mail: Akolhoff@eia.nl [The Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, Utrecht (Netherlands); Driessen, Peter P.J., E-mail: p.driessen@geo.uu.nl [Department of Innovation and Environment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A growing number of low and middle income nations (LMCs) have adopted some sort of system for environmental impact assessment (EIA). However, generally many of these EIA systems are characterised by a low performance in terms of timely information dissemination, monitoring and enforcement after licencing. Donor actors (such as the World Bank) have attempted to contribute to a higher performance of EIA systems in LMCs by intervening at two levels: the project level (e.g. by providing scoping advice or EIS quality review) and the system level (e.g. by advising on EIA legislation or by capacity building). The aims of these interventions are environmental protection in concrete cases and enforcing the institutionalisation of environmental protection, respectively. Learning by actors involved is an important condition for realising these aims. A relatively underexplored form of learning concerns learning at EIA system-level via project level donor interventions. This 'indirect' learning potentially results in system changes that better fit the specific context(s) and hence contribute to higher performances. Our exploratory research in Ghana and the Maldives shows that thus far, 'indirect' learning only occurs incidentally and that donors play a modest role in promoting it. Barriers to indirect learning are related to the institutional context rather than to individual characteristics. Moreover, 'indirect' learning seems to flourish best in large projects where donors achieved a position of influence that they can use to evoke reflection upon system malfunctions. In order to enhance learning at all levels donors should thereby present the outcomes of the intervention elaborately (i.e. discuss the outcomes with a large audience), include practical suggestions about post-EIS activities such as monitoring procedures and enforcement options and stimulate the use of their advisory reports to generate organisational memory and ensure a better information dissemination.

  12. High Level Waste Management Division High. Level Waste System Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May| ArgonneHigh Level

  13. THE EFFICACY OF AN EMOTIONAL ROLE-PLAY INTERVENTION VERSUS A PROBLEM-SOLVING APPROACH ON STRESS LEVELS AND AFFECT EXPERIENCED BY COLLEGE FRESHMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirridge, Kathryn McLean

    2009-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -play intervention. Participants were randomly assigned to a role-play intervention, problem-solving intervention, or control group condition. Perceived stress, positive affect, and negative affect were measured before and after the intervention and two weeks...

  14. Space elevator systems level analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laubscher, B. E. (Bryan E.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Space Elevator (SE) represents a major paradigm shift in space access. It involves new, untried technologies in most of its subsystems. Thus the successful construction of the SE requires a significant amount of development, This in turn implies a high level of risk for the SE. This paper will present a systems level analysis of the SE by subdividing its components into their subsystems to determine their level of technological maturity. such a high-risk endeavor is to follow a disciplined approach to the challenges. A systems level analysis informs this process and is the guide to where resources should be applied in the development processes. It is an efficient path that, if followed, minimizes the overall risk of the system's development. systems level analysis is that the overall system is divided naturally into its subsystems, and those subsystems are further subdivided as appropriate for the analysis. By dealing with the complex system in layers, the parameter space of decisions is kept manageable. Moreover, A rational way to manage One key aspect of a resources are not expended capriciously; rather, resources are put toward the biggest challenges and most promising solutions. This overall graded approach is a proven road to success. The analysis includes topics such as nanotube technology, deployment scenario, power beaming technology, ground-based hardware and operations, ribbon maintenance and repair and climber technology.

  15. Official Certificate List Level(s)* Academic Administrative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk, Uncertainty and Decision Analysis EGRU335 Certificate in Engineering Thermal Energy Systems EGRU International Certificate ALSU198 Certificate for Biology in Engineering for Engineering Majors EGRU135 Level IESG310 Certificate in Engineering for Energy Sustainability EGRU340 Certificate in Engineering

  16. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  17. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  18. Simulation of leveling in electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukovic, J.O.; Tobias, C.W. (Materials and Chemical Sciences Div., Lawrence Berkeley Lab. and Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a model of current distribution and electrode shape change for electrodeposition in the presence of diffusion-controlled leveling agents that have been developed. The system is treated as a special case of secondary current distribution, with the surface overpotential taken to depend on both the current density and the transport-limited flux of the leveling agent, according to an empirical relation adapted from polarization data measured at different conditions of agitation. The spatial variation of the leveling-agent flux is determined from a concentration field problem based on the assumption of a stagnant diffusion layer. The solution is obtained by the boundary element method, with a flexible moving-boundary algorithm for simulating the advancement of the electrode profile. To illustrate the model's performance, the evolution of a groove profile during deposition of nickel from a Watts-type bath containing coumarin is predicted and compared with measurements reported in the literature.

  19. The CMS High Level Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, W; Deldicque, C; Ero, J; Frühwirth, R; Jeitler, Manfred; Kastner, K; Köstner, S; Neumeister, N; Porth, M; Padrta P; Rohringer, H; Sakulinb, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Walzel, G; Wulz, C E; Lowette, S; Van De Vyver, B; De Lentdecker, G; Vanlaer, P; Delaere, C; Lemaître, V; Ninane, A; van der Aa, O; Damgov, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampen, T; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lehti, S; Nysten, J; Tuominiemi, J; Busson, P; Todorov, T; Schwering, G; Gras, P; Daskalakis, G; Sfyrla, A; Barone, M; Geralis, T; Markou, C; Zachariadou, K; Hidas, P; Banerjee, S; Mazumdara, K; Abbrescia, M; Colaleoa, A; D'Amato, N; De Filippis, N; Giordano, D; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Silvestris, L; Zito, G; Arcelli, S; Bonacorsi, D; Capiluppi, P; Dallavalle, G M; Fanfani, A; Grandi, C; Marcellini, S; Montanari, A; Odorici, F; Travaglini, R; Costa, S; Tricomi, A; Ciulli, a V; Magini, N; Ranieri, R; Berti, L; Biasotto, M; Gulminia, M; Maron, G; Toniolo, N; Zangrando, L; Bellato, M; Gasparini, U; Lacaprara, S; Parenti, A; Ronchese, P; Vanini, S; Zotto, S; Ventura P L; Perugia; Benedetti, D; Biasini, M; Fano, L; Servoli, L; Bagliesi, a G; Boccali, T; Dutta, S; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Palla, F; Segneri, G; Starodumov, A; Tenchini, R; Meridiani, P; Organtini, G; Amapane, a N; Bertolino, F; Cirio, R; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Pac, Y; Joo, K; Kim, S B; Suwon; Choi, Y I; Yu, I T; Cho, K; Chung, J; Ham, S W; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, W; CKim, J; Oh, S K; Park, H; Ro, S R; Son, D C; Suh, J S; Aftab, Z; Hoorani, H; Osmana, A; Bunkowski, K; Cwiok, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, K; Kazana, M; Królikowski, J; Kudla, I; Pietrusinski, M; Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Zabolotny, W M; Zalipska, J; Zych, P; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Almeida, C; Almeida, N; Da Silva, J C; Santos, M; Teixeira, I; Teixeira, J P; Varelaa, J; Vaz-Cardoso, N; Konoplyanikov, V F; Urkinbaev, A R; Toropin, A; Gavrilov, V; Kolosov, V; Krokhotin, A; Oulianov, A; Stepanov, N; Kodolova, O L; Vardanyan, I; Ilic, J; Skoro, G P; Albajar, C; De Troconiz, J F; Calderón, A; López-Virto, M A; Marco, R; Martínez-Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Vila, I; Cucciarelli, S; Konecki, M; Ashby, S; Barney, D; Bartalini, P; Benetta, R; Brigljevic, V; Bruno, G; Cano, E; Cittolin, S; Della Negra, M; de Roeck, A; Favre, P; Frey, A; Funk, W; Futyan, D; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Innocente, V; Jacobs, C; Jank, W; Kozlovszky, Miklos; Larsen, H; Lenzi, M; Magrans, I; Mannelli, M; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Mirabito, L; Murray, S J; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Palomares-Espiga, C; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Reynaud, S; Samyn, D; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schwick, C; Sguazzoni, G; Sinanis, N; Sphicas, P; Spiropulu, M; Strandlie, A; Taylor, B G; Van Vulpen, I; Wellisch, J P; Winkler, M; Villigen; Kotlinski, D; Zurich; Prokofiev, K; Speer, T; Dumanoglu, I; Bristol; Bailey, S; Brooke, J J; Cussans, D; Heath, G P; Machin, D; Nash, S J; Newbold, D; Didcot; Coughlan, A; Halsall, R; Haynes, W J; Tomalin, I R; Marinelli, N; Nikitenko, A; Rutherford, S; Seeza, C; Sharif, O; Antchev, G; Hazen, E; Rohlf, J; Wu, S; Breedon, R; Cox, P T; Murray, P; Tripathi, M; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Kreuzer, P; Lindgren, M; Mumford, J; Schlein, P E; Shi, Y; Tannenbaum, B; Valuev, V; Von der Mey, M; Andreevaa, I; Clare, R; Villa, S; Bhattacharya, S; Branson, J G; Fisk, I; Letts, J; Mojaver, M; Paar, H P; Trepagnier, E; Litvine, V; Shevchenko, S; Singh, S; Wilkinson, R; Aziz, S; Bowden, M; Elias, J E; Graham, G; Green, D; Litmaath, M; Los, S; O'Dell, V; Ratnikova, N; Suzuki, I; Wenzel, H; Acosta, D; Bourilkov, D; Korytov, A; Madorsky, A; Mitselmakher, G; Rodríguez, J L; Scurlock, B; Abdullin, S; Baden, D; Eno, S; Grassi, T; Kunori, S; Pavlon, S; Sumorok, K; Tether, S; Cremaldi, L M; Sanders, D; Summers, D; Osborne, I; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Fisher,W C; Mans6, J; Stickland, D P; Tully, C; Wildish, T; Wynhoff, S; Padley, B P; Chumney, P; Dasu, S; Smith, W H; CMS Trigger Data Acquisition Group

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Large Hadron Collider at CERN the proton bunches cross at a rate of 40MHz. At the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment the original collision rate is reduced by a factor of O (1000) using a Level-1 hardware trigger. A subsequent factor of O(1000) data reduction is obtained by a software-implemented High Level Trigger (HLT) selection that is executed on a multi-processor farm. In this review we present in detail prototype CMS HLT physics selection algorithms, expected trigger rates and trigger performance in terms of both physics efficiency and timing.

  20. Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption TheX I A OCompany Level

  1. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  2. Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    L-5455 10/06 Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three C. Wayne Hanselka, Charles R. Hart and Allan McGinty* Monitoring is an essential tool in rangeland management. Monitoring is the way to determine whether goals are being achieved with current...

  3. Task Allocation for Minimum System Power in a Homogenous Multi-core Processor Yang Ge, Qinru Qiu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    different levels. At data center level, the cooling infrastructure is becoming a limiting factor. The annual cooling cost for a large data center is considerably high and can reach up to tens of millions of dollars. INTRODUCTION The ever-increasing power consumption of the computing system challenges the cooling system at all

  4. Design Method for the Heating/Cooling Coil in the AHU Based on Fuzzy Logic - Part Two: Design of the Minimum Heat-Exchanging Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Liang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering a heating/cooling coil with adjustable heat-exchange area, an unequal type is put forward in this paper. Aiming at the application of such heat exchanger in an air-handling unit, restriction conditions are given for the minimum heat...

  5. Materials Science Minor (Draft 3/26/12) This minor is intended for students who have chosen to take a minimum of 16 credits of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    Materials Science Minor (Draft 3/26/12) This minor is intended for students who have chosen to take a minimum of 16 credits of materials science coursework in any appropriate department. Required: 1) ME 280 or MSC 202 Introduction to Materials Science Prerequisites below or with permission of instructor: MTH

  6. 24 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 17, NO. 1, JANUARY 1998 Efficient Algorithms for the Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, Jason "Jingsheng"

    of the MSPSA problem is called the minimum rectilinear Steiner arborescence (MRSA) problem. Given a set be shown that an MSPSA of is an MRSA of . The MSPSA and MRSA problems have applications to performance for the MRSA problem can be cl

  7. Change of Major Criteria: Apply on Student Access General Social Ecology Minimum overall UC GPA of 2.0. Completion of two lower-division Social Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Change of Major Criteria: Apply on Student Access General Social Ecology Minimum overall UC GPA of 2.0. Completion of two lower-division Social Ecology core courses (C7, E8, P9, SE10, SE13 overall UC GPA of 2.3. Completion of C7 and one additional lower- division Social Ecology core course (E8

  8. [10] K. Mehlhorn and C. Uhrig. The Minimum Cut Algorithm of Stoer and Wagner. Unpublished manuscript, Max Planck Institute for Computer Science. Available at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fegaras, Leonidas

    [10] K. Mehlhorn and C. Uhrig. The Minimum Cut Algorithm of Stoer and Wagner. Unpublished manuscript, Max Planck Institute for Computer Science. Available at http://www.mpi­sb.mpg.de/guide/staff/uhrig, pp 238--248, May 1997. [15] P. Selinger, M. Astrahan, D. Chamberlin, R. Lorie, and T. Price. Access

  9. Documents Required by the Office of Academic Affairs for Clinician Educator Actions, October 2014 Rank Action Duration Required documents (Number of letters shown are minimums)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Documents Required by the Office of Academic Affairs for Clinician Educator Actions, October 2014 Rank Action Duration Required documents (Number of letters shown are minimums) Clinical Instructor% FTE or greater and who have outside clinical activity, http://med.stanford.edu/academicaffairs/documents

  10. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Isfort, Peter, E-mail: isfort@hia.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Braunschweig, Till, E-mail: tbraunschweig@ukaachen.de; Westphal, Saskia, E-mail: swestphal@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Pathology, Aachen University Hospital (Germany); Woitok, Anna, E-mail: awoitok@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Laboratory Animal Science (Germany); Penzkofer, Tobias, E-mail: penzkofer@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Bruners, Philipp, E-mail: bruners@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Kichikawa, Kimihiko, E-mail: kkichika@naramed-u.ac.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas, E-mail: smiro@hia.rwth-aachen.de; Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean {+-} standard deviation, 3.19 {+-} 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 {+-} 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 {+-} 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 {+-} 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 {+-} 0.55 cm; P < 0.001). The greatest volume of ablation was achieved by performing embolization with 40-{mu}m particles before RFA (group 1a; 20.97 {+-} 9.65 cm{sup 3}). At histology, 40-{mu}m microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-{mu}m microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-{mu}m microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  11. Radiation Segmentectomy: A Novel Approach to Increase Safety and Efficacy of Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riaz, Ahsun; Gates, Vanessa L.; Atassi, Bassel; Lewandowski, Robert J. [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Mulcahy, Mary F. [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Ryu, Robert K.; Sato, Kent T. [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Baker, Talia [Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Kulik, Laura [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramona [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Abecassis, Michael [Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Benson, Al B. [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Omary, Reed [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Millender, Laura [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Kennedy, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Radiology Oncology, Cary, NC (United States); Salem, Riad, E-mail: r-salem@northwestern.ed [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe a technique of segmental radioembolization for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Radiation segmentectomy was defined as radioembolization of two or fewer hepatic segments. We sought to (1) calculate dose when activity is delivered segmentally assuming uniform and nonuniform distribution and, (2) determine safety and efficacy of this novel technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients with HCC who were treated with {sup 90}Y radioembolization using a segmental approach were included in this analysis. The dose delivered to the segment was calculated assuming uniform and nonuniform microsphere distribution within the treatment volume. To calculate dose assuming nonuniform distribution, a tumor hypervascularity ratio was assigned. Posttreatment response (using size and necrosis guidelines), toxicity, time to progression, and survival were determined. Results: The median treatment volume was 110 cm{sup 3}. The median radiation-naive liver volume was 1403 cm{sup 3}. The median dose delivered to the segment(s) assuming uniform distribution was 521 Gy. Taking into account tumor hypervascularity (nonuniform distribution), the median dose delivered to the tumor and normal infused hepatic volume was 1214 Gy and 210 Gy, respectively. Response by size and necrosis guidelines was seen in 59% and 81% of patients. Grade 3/4 biochemical toxicities were observed in 8 patients (9%). Median time to progression was 13.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.3-18.7 months); median survival was 26.9 months (95% confidence interval, 20.5-30.2 months). Conclusions: Radiation segmentectomy is a safe and efficacious method of selectively delivering high dose to the tumor with minimal exposure of normal parenchyma.

  12. High level waste tank farm setpoint document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, J.A. III

    1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 1 modifies Attachment I of this Technical Report as a result of a meeting which was held Friday, January 27, 1994 between Maintenance, Work Control, and Engineering to discuss report contents. Upon completion of the meeting, the Flow Chart was edited accordingly. Attachment 2 is modified for clerical reasons. Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Fanns. The setpoint document (Appendix 2) will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

  13. To Aid or Not to Aid? Competing Narratives on the Efficacy of Foreign Aid in Sub-Saharan African

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Kaleisha

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    goals for which it is intended. This thesis is a cross-national analysis of Sub-Saharan Africa testing the efficacy of foreign aid flows on human welfare as measured by health outcomes. The amount of foreign aid is not significantly correlated...

  14. Efficacy of open-ocean ballast water exchange as a means of preventing invertebrate invasions between freshwater ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    globally. Mandatory ballast water exchange (BWE) was implemented for vessels carrying ballast water experiments to assess the efficacy of BWE on six operational transoceanic vessels traveling from the Great ports. BWE was verified by ship records and, in two cases, by in situ water quality sensors. BWE

  15. Trace and rare earth elemental variation in Arabian sea sediments through a transect across the oxygen minimum zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.; Rao, C.M. [National Institute of Oceanography, Goa (India); Bau, M. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined the calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), organic carbon (C{sub org}), trace element, and rare earth element (REE) composition of surface sediments collected from a transect on the central western continental shelf and slope of India in the Eastern Arabian Sea. The transect samples across the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) allows us to compare the relative abundances of trace elements and REEs in the sediments beneath and beyond the OMZ. Shale-normalized REE patterns, La{sub n}/Yb{sub n} ratios, and Eu/Eu* anamolies indicate that the sediments in the study area are either derived from the adjoining Archaean land masses or from distal Indus source. Sediment deposited in the OMZ have high U values from 3.6 to 8.1 ppm, with their U{sub excess} (of that can be supplied by continental particles) values ranging between 82-91% of the total U, indicating that the U may be precipitated as U{sup +4} in the reducing conditions of OMZ. Sediments deposited beneath the intense OMZ (<0.2 mL/L) and away from the OMZ (1-2 mL/L) show slight negative Ce anomalies, with no significant differences between these two sets of sediments. The Ce/Ce*{sub shale} values are poorly related to U and C{sub org} which are indicators of suboxic bottom waters. Normative calculations suggest that two sources, namely, terrestrial and seawater (terrestrial > seawater) contribute to the total Ce anomaly of the sediments. The Ce anomaly values of the calculated seawater derived component are similar to the anomalies reported for other coastal waters and the oxygenated surface waters of the Arabian Sea and do not show any correspondence to the lowered redox state of the overlying water, probably due to the redirection of dissolved Ce into the oxic deeper water. 103 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Zone Level Occupant-Responsive Building Energy Systems at the GSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Alastair

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The General Services Administration (GSA) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement building energy system retrofits, aiming to reduce energy consumption of at least two building systems by a total of 30 percent or more, as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program, working with the GSA and a team of consultants. This case study reports expected energy savings from appropriate energy efficient design and operations modifications to lighting and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at the selected study sites. These retrofits comprised installation of new lighting systems with dimming capability and occupancy-sensor control at the individual light fixture level, and utilized lighting system occupancy sensor signals to continually readjust zone-level ventilation airflow according to the number of people present, down to minimum rates when vacant.

  17. Minimal time trajectories for two-level quantum systems with two bounded controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boscain, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.boscain@polytechnique.edu [CNRS, CMAP Ecole Polytechnique, France and Team GECO, INRIA Saclay (France); Grönberg, Fredrik, E-mail: gronb@kth.se [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden); Long, Ruixing, E-mail: ruixing.long@gmail.com [General Motors of Canada, 1908 Colonel Sam Drive, Oshawa (Canada); Rabitz, Herschel, E-mail: hrabitz@princeton.edu [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1009 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the minimum time population transfer problem for a two level quantum system driven by two external fields with bounded amplitude. The controls are modeled as real functions and we do not use the Rotating Wave Approximation. After projection on the Bloch sphere, we treat the time-optimal control problem with techniques of optimal synthesis on 2D manifolds. Based on the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, we characterize a restricted set of candidate optimal trajectories. Properties on this set, crucial for complete optimal synthesis, are illustrated by numerical simulations. Furthermore, when the two controls have the same bound and this bound is small with respect to the difference of the two energy levels, we get a complete optimal synthesis up to a small neighborhood of the antipodal point of the initial condition.

  18. Energy Level Diagrams A=10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the following

  19. Energy Level Diagrams A=11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the

  20. Energy Level Diagrams A=12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the2

  1. Energy Level Diagrams A=13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the23

  2. Energy Level Diagrams A=14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the234

  3. Energy Level Diagrams A=15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the2345

  4. Energy Level Diagrams A=16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the23456

  5. Energy Level Diagrams A=17

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the234567

  6. Energy Level Diagrams A=18

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the2345678

  7. Energy Level Diagrams A=19

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in the234567819

  8. Energy Level Diagrams A=20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in

  9. Energy Level Diagrams A=4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available in

  10. Energy Level Diagrams A=5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available

  11. Energy Level Diagrams A=6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available6

  12. Energy Level Diagrams A=7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available67

  13. Energy Level Diagrams A=8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4 Available678

  14. Energy Level Diagrams A=9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 210 Available in4

  15. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLE OF CONTENTS 1of:Microsoft WordREMARKSMicrosoft

  16. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 in theGroup Report |ofM A NNRELU.S.-JapanWear

  17. Sources and levels of ambient ocean sound near the antarctic peninsula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dziak, Robert P. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences.; Stafford, Kathleen M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Park, Minkyu [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Polar Environmental Research Div.; Lee, Won Sang [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Polar Environmental Research Div.; Fowler, Matt J. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Lau, Tai-Kwan [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Haxel, Joseph H. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Mellinger, David K. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Fine, Michael L [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrays of hydrophones were deployed within the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea (Antarctic Peninsula region) from 2005 to 2009 to record ambient ocean sound at frequencies of up to 125 and 500 Hz. Icequakes, which are broadband, short duration signals derived from fracturing of large free-floating icebergs, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Icequake activity peaks during austral summer and is minimum during winter, likely following freeze-thaw cycles. Iceberg grounding and rapid disintegration also releases significant acoustic energy, equivalent to large-scale geophysical events. Overall ambient sound levels can be as much as ~10–20 dB higher in the open, deep ocean of the Scotia Sea compared to the relatively shallow Bransfield Strait. Noise levels become lowest during the austral winter, as sea-ice cover suppresses wind and wave noise. Ambient noise levels are highest during austral spring and summer, as surface noise, ice cracking and biological activity intensifies. Vocalizations of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also dominate the long-term spectra records in the 15–28 and 89 Hz bands. Blue whale call energy is a maximum during austral summer-fall in the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait when ambient noise levels are a maximum and sea-ice cover is a minimum. Fin whale vocalizations were also most common during austral summer-early fall months in both the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea. The hydrophone data overall do not show sustained anthropogenic sources (ships and airguns), likely due to low coastal traffic and the typically rough weather and sea conditions of the Southern Ocean.

  18. Sources and levels of ambient ocean sound near the antarctic peninsula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dziak, Robert P.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi; Park, Minkyu; Lee, Won Sang; Fowler, Matt J.; Lau, Tai-Kwan; Haxel, Joseph H.; Mellinger, David K.; et al

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrays of hydrophones were deployed within the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea (Antarctic Peninsula region) from 2005 to 2009 to record ambient ocean sound at frequencies of up to 125 and 500 Hz. Icequakes, which are broadband, short duration signals derived from fracturing of large free-floating icebergs, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Icequake activity peaks during austral summer and is minimum during winter, likely following freeze-thaw cycles. Iceberg grounding and rapid disintegration also releases significant acoustic energy, equivalent to large-scale geophysical events. Overall ambient sound levels can be as much as ~10–20 dB higher in the open,more »deep ocean of the Scotia Sea compared to the relatively shallow Bransfield Strait. Noise levels become lowest during the austral winter, as sea-ice cover suppresses wind and wave noise. Ambient noise levels are highest during austral spring and summer, as surface noise, ice cracking and biological activity intensifies. Vocalizations of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also dominate the long-term spectra records in the 15–28 and 89 Hz bands. Blue whale call energy is a maximum during austral summer-fall in the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait when ambient noise levels are a maximum and sea-ice cover is a minimum. Fin whale vocalizations were also most common during austral summer-early fall months in both the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea. The hydrophone data overall do not show sustained anthropogenic sources (ships and airguns), likely due to low coastal traffic and the typically rough weather and sea conditions of the Southern Ocean.« less

  19. alcohol oxidation level: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    second, the efficacy of three psychotherapies for alcoholism in treating extreme West, Mike First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23...

  20. All Economics minor requirements must be taken for a letter grade with a minimum grade of C-. The Economics major consists of (1) the Core, (2) History/Theory/Thought, and (3) Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All Economics minor requirements must be taken for a letter grade with a minimum grade of C-. The Economics major consists of (1) the Core, (2) History/Theory/Thought, and (3) Economics Electives. Minimum Minor Hours: 18 1. ECONOMICS CORE: All Economics minors must complete these courses. HISTORY

  1. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theJ. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theby deceleration of sea-level rise. Science, 265: 228-231.

  2. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this process as a biofilter by studying the distribution of methane oxidation and disposition of methanotrophic populations in the Pacific Ocean. We investigated several environments including the basins offshore California, the continental margin off Central America, and the shallow waters around gas seeps. We succeeded in identifying the distributions of activity in these environments, identified potential physical and chemical controls on methanotrophic activity, we further revealed details about the methanotrophic communities active in these settings, and we developed new approaches to study methanotrophic communities. These findings should improve our capacity to predict the methanotrophic response in ocean waters, and further our ability to generate specific hypotheses as to the ecology and efficacy of pelagic methanotrophic communites. The discharge of methane and other hydrocarbons to Gulf of Mexico that followed the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon provided a unique opportunity to study the methanotorphic biofilter in the deep ocean environment. We set out to understand the consumption of methane and the bloom of methanotrophs resulting from this event, as a window into the regional scale release of gas hydrate under rapid warming scenarios. We found that other hydrocarbon gases, notably propane and ethane, were preferred for consumption over methane, but that methane consumption accelerated rapidly and drove the depletion of methane within a matter of months after initial release. These results revealed the identity of the responsible community, and point to the importance of the seed population in determining the rate at which a methanotrophic community is able to respond to an input of methane. Collectively, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the marine methanotrohic biofilter, and further provide direction and context for future investigations of this important phenomenon. This project has resulted in fourteen publications to date, with five more circulating in draft form, and several others planned.

  3. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  4. Short Gamma Ray Burst Formation Rate from BATSE data using E_p-L_p correlation and the minimum gravitational wave event rate of coalescing compact binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Yonetoku; Takashi Nakamura; Tatsuya Sawano; Keitaro Takahashi; Asuka Toyanago

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 72 Short Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRBs) with well determined spectral data observed by BATSE, we determine their redshift and the luminosity by applying $E_p$--$L_p$ correlation for SGRBs found by \\cite{tsutsui13}. For 53 SGRBs with the observed flux brighter than $4 \\times 10^{-6}~{\\rm erg~cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$, the cumulative redshift distribution up to $z=1$ agrees well with that of 22 {\\it Swift}~SGRBs. This suggests that the redshift determination by the $E_p$--$L_p$ correlation for SGRBs works well. The minimum event rate at $z=0$ is estimated as $\\rho_{SGRB}(0) = 6.3_{-3.9}^{+3.1} \\times 10^{-10}~{\\rm events~Mpc^{-3}yr^{-1}}$ so that the minimum beaming angle is $0.6^\\circ-7.8^\\circ$ assuming the merging rate of $10^{-7}-4\\times 10^{-6}~{\\rm events~Mpc^{-3}yr^{-1}}$ suggested from the binary pulsar data. Interestingly, this angle is consistent with that for SGRB130603B of $\\sim 4^\\circ-8^\\circ$\\citep{fong13b}. On the other hand, if we assume the beaming angle of $\\sim 6^\\circ$ suggested from four SGRBs with the observed value of beaming angle, the minimum event rate including off-axis SGRBs is estimated as $\\rho_{SGRB,all}^{min}(0)=1.15_{-0.71}^{+0.57}\\times 10^{-7}~{\\rm events~Mpc^{-3}yr^{-1}}$. If SGRBs are induced by coalescence of binary neutron stars (NSs) and/or black holes (BHs), this event rate leads to the minimum gravitational-wave detection rate of $\\rm 3.9_{-2.4}^{+1.9} (152_{-94}^{+75})~events~y^{-1}$ for NS-NS (NS-BH) binary, respectively, by a worldwide network with KAGRA, advanced-LIGO, advanced-Virgo, and GEO.

  5. Analysis of water-level data in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1985--95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, R.P.; Tucci, P.; O`Brien, G.M.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1985 through 1995, a water-level network that consists of 28 wells for monitoring 36 depth intervals has been maintained in the Yucca Mountain area. The network includes wells that were measured manually, approximately monthly, and/or measured hourly with a transducer/data logger system. Manual water-level measurements were made with either calibrated steel tapes or single or multiconductor-cable units. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks, except one that monitors water levels in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Annual mean water-level altitudes for all wells for the period 1985-95 ranged from 727.93 to 1,034.60 meters. The maximum range in water-level change between monthly measurements and/or monthly mean values was 12.22 meters in well USW H-3 lower interval, and the minimum range was 0.31 meter in wells UE-25 b-1 upper interval, and J-11. In 31 of the 36 depth intervals monitored, the range of water-level change was less than 1 meter. The range of standard deviation of all depth interval measurements for all wells that were monitored was 0.053 to 3.098 meters. No seasonal water-level trends were detected in any of the wells, and regional ground-water withdrawals did not appear to cause water-level changes. Most annual water-level fluctuations can be attributed to barometric and Earth-tide changes. Regional earthquakes, which occurred on June 28--29, 1992, might have simultaneously affected the water level in seven wells. Periods of rising and declining water levels were observed in most wells. However, 11 years of record were not sufficient to determine if these periods were cyclic. Because a goal of monitoring water levels at Yucca Mountain is to determine if there are water-level trends that could affect the potential repository, observed water-level changes over the period of this report may not be representative of the overall long-term trends in water levels.

  6. Personal science teaching efficacy and the beliefs and practices of elementary teachers related to science instruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lardy, Corinne H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    levels are focused more on the goal of student learning thanlevels are focused more on the goal of student learning than

  7. Safety and Efficacy of the Gunther Tulip Retrievable Vena Cava Filter: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffer, Eric K., E-mail: eric.k.hoffer@hitchcock.org; Mueller, Rebecca J.; Luciano, Marcus R.; Lee, Nicole N.; Michaels, Anne T.; Gemery, John M. [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeTo evaluate of the medium-term integrity, efficacy, and complication rate associated with the Gunther Tulip vena cava filter.MethodsA retrospective study was performed of 369 consecutive patients who had infrarenal Gunther Tulip inferior vena cava filters placed over a 5-year period. The mean patient age was 61.8 years, and 59 % were men. Venous thromboembolic disease and a contraindication to or complication of anticoagulation were the indications for filter placement in 86 % of patients; 14 % were placed for prophylaxis in patients with a mean of 2.3 risk factors. Follow-up was obtained by review of medical and radiologic records.ResultsMean clinical follow-up was 780 days. New or recurrent pulmonary embolus occurred in 12 patients (3.3 %). New or recurrent deep-vein thrombosis occurred in 53 patients (14.4 %). There were no symptomatic fractures, migrations, or caval perforations. Imaging follow-up in 287 patients (77.8 %) at a mean of 731 days revealed a single (0.3 %) asymptomatic fracture, migration greater than 2 cm in 36 patients (12.5 %), and no case of embolization. Of 122 patients with CT scans, asymptomatic perforations were identified in 53 patients (43.4 %) at a mean 757 days.ConclusionThe Gunther Tulip filter was safe and effective at 2-year follow-up. Complication rates were similar to those reported for permanent inferior vena cava filters.

  8. Exam Preparation Identifying Levels of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , proposed a six-level model of learning, with each level requiring a different type of cognitive processingSee over Exam Preparation Identifying Levels of Learning When you are preparing for an exam, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, and create. Understanding these levels and the types of exam questions

  9. Lecture course on Sea level variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    level rise from tide gauges "viewpoint of the solid Earth" "A tide staff" Rate is ~ 20 cm/century 7 Level rise between 1993 and 2010 by satellite ALTIMETRY Sea level is rising (by altimetry) "viewpoint of space" 1993-2010 8Friday, November 11, 2011 #12;Sea level will be rising (IPCC scenarios) Figure 11

  10. A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    smelting kgce/t kgce/t Aluminium alloy Base materialsAlloy Tube Nickel Smelting Sector Product/Process/Size Unit Minimum Existing Advanced Minimum Savings Electrolyzed aluminium

  11. The use of starch matrices in slow release fungicide formulations and their efficacy in controlling Phymatotrichum omnivorum on cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Theresa Marie

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE USE OF STARCH MATRICES IN SLO'hl RELEASE FUNGICIDE FORMULATIONS AND THEIR EFFICACY IN CONTROLLING PHYMATOTRICHUM OMNIVORUM ON COTTON A Thesis by THERESA MARIE SMALL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... Thesis by THERESA MARIE SMALL Approved as to style and content by: Stuart . L a (Chairman of Committee) John M. Hal oin (Member) Morri s G. Merk le (Member) Rober . Pe it (Member) r ie owning (Head of Department August 1984 ABSTRACT...

  12. Encapsulated interferon-tau during Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease: efficacy of treatment and immune response profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Dana Deanna

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    that begin to neutralize the IFN and cause the patient to become a ?biological non- responder?. The percentage of patients producing neutralizing antibodies in clinical trials (reviewed in Bertolotto et al., 2004) ranges from 2% (Avonex) to 50% (Betaferon... antibodies to IFNB during the first year of administration which can result in loss of treatment efficacy (Bertolotto et al., 2004). With oral administration in mice, no antibodies were detected against IFNT. IFNT treatment of EAE also resulted...

  13. Stress and self-efficacy of special education and general education student teachers during and after the student teaching internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Kimberly Lynn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    STRESS AND SELF-EFFICACY OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND GENERAL EDUCATION STUDENT TEACHERS DURING AND AFTER THE STUDENT TEACHING INTERNSHIP A Dissertation by KIMBERLY LYNN DICKERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate... EDUCATION STUDENT TEACHERS DURING AND AFTER THE STUDENT TEACHING INTERNSHIP A Dissertation by KIMBERLY LYNN DICKERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  14. Investigating the relationship between urban first and second grade classroom teachers' sense of efficacy for literacy instruction and the reading achievement of their highly mobile students 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valadez, Corinne Montalvo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This correlation design study investigated the relationship between urban first and second grade classroom teachers� sense of efficacy for literacy instruction and the reading achievement of their highly mobile students. Teachers� sense...

  15. Efficacy of artesunate-amodiaquine for treating uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa: a multi-centre analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A, Kamara K, Lam E, Checchi F, Balkan S, Scollo G, Durand R,Francis M, Noël F, Mulemba M, Balkan S: High efficacy of twoDenoncin A, van Herp M, Balkan S, Dujardin JC, D'Alessandro

  16. Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Sedlmair, Martin [Siemens, Healthcare Sector (Germany); Ritter, Christine [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens, Healthcare Sector (Germany)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 Multiplication-Sign 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner's isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at {>=}150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r{sup 2} = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Transarterial Radioembolization Versus Chemoembolization in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno-Luna, Laura E., E-mail: morenoluna.laura@gmail.com; Yang, Ju Dong; Sanchez, William [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Harnois, Denise M.; Mettler, Teresa A. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Gansen, Denise N. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Groen, Piet C. de; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Narayanan Menon, K. V.; LaRusso, Nicholas F. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Alberts, Steven R. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Department of Oncology (United States); Gores, Gregory J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Fleming, Chad J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Slettedahl, Seth W.; Harmsen, William S.; Therneau, Terry M. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Health Sciences Research (United States); Wiseman, Gregory A.; Andrews, James C. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Roberts, Lewis R., E-mail: roberts.lewis@mayo.edu [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. Intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually treated with locoregional therapy using transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Transarterial radioembolization (TARE) using {beta}-emitting yttrium-90 integral to the glass matrix of the microspheres is an alternative to TACE. This retrospective case-control study compared the outcomes and safety of TARE versus TACE in patients with unresectable HCC. Materials and Methods. Patients with unresectable HCC without portal vein thrombosis treated with TARE between 2005 and 2008 (n = 61) were retrospectively frequency-matched by age, sex, and liver dysfunction with TACE-treated patients (n = 55) in the Mayo Clinic Hepatobiliary Neoplasia Registry. Imaging studies were reviewed, and clinical and safety outcomes were abstracted from the medical records. Results. Complete tumor response was more common after TARE (12 %) than after TACE (4 %) (p = 0.17). When complete response was combined with partial response and stable disease, there was no difference between TARE and TACE. Median survival did not differ between the two groups (15.0 months for TARE and 14.4 months for TACE; p = 0.47). Two-year survival rates were 30 % for TARE and 24 % for TACE. TARE patients received fewer treatments (p < 0.001). Fifty-nine (97 %) TARE patients received outpatient treatment. In contrast, 53 (98 %) TACE patients were hospitalized for {>=}1 day (p < 0.001). Compared with TACE, TARE was more likely to induce fatigue (p = 0.003) but less likely to cause fever (p = 0.02). Conclusion. There was no significant difference in efficacy between TARE and TACE. TARE patients reported more fatigue but had less fever than TACE patients. Treatment with TARE required less hospitalization than treatment with TACE. These findings require confirmation in randomized trials.

  18. Endovascular Acute Stroke Treatment Performed by Vascular Interventional Radiologists: Is It Safe and Efficacious?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fjetland, Lars, E-mail: lars.fjetland@lyse.net; Roy, Sumit; Kurz, Kathinka D. [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Norway); Larsen, Jan Petter; Kurz, Martin W. [Stavanger University Hospital, Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders (Norway)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of neurointerventional procedures in acute stroke patients performed by a team of vascular interventional radiologists in close cooperation with diagnostic neuroradiologists and stroke neurologists and to compare the results with those of previous reports from centres with specialised interventional neuroradiologists. Material and Methods: A total of 39 patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion not responding to or not eligible for intravenous thrombolysis were treated with either intra-arterial thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy (Penumbra System or solitaire FR thrombectomy system, respectively) and included in our prospective study. Outcomes were measured using the modified Rankin scale after 90 days, and recanalization was assessed by thrombolysis using the myocardial infarction score. Results: Mean patient age was 68.3 {+-} 14.2 years; the average National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at hospital admission was 17.2 (SD = 6.2 [n = 38]). Successful recanalization was achieved in 74.4 % of patients. Median time from clinical onset to recanalization was 5 h 11 min. Procedure-related complications occurred in 5 % of patients, and 7.5 % had a symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Of the patients, 22.5 % died within the first 90 postprocedural days, 5 % of these from cerebral causes. Patients who were successfully recanalized had a clinical better outcome at follow-up than those in whom treatment failed. Of the patients, 35.9 % had an mRS score {<=}2 after 90 days. Conclusion: Our results are in line with those in the published literature and show that a treatment strategy with general interventional radiologists performing neurointerventional procedures in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusions can be achieved to the benefit of patients.

  19. Intensity profiles of superdeformed bands in Pb isotopes in a two-level mixing model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, A. N.; Szigeti, S. S.; Rogers, J. I. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Davidson, P. M. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Cardamone, D. M. [Physics Department, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed two-level mixing model of the decay out of superdeformed bands is applied to examine the loss of flux from the yrast superdeformed bands in {sup 192}Pb, {sup 194}Pb, and {sup 196}Pb. Probability distributions for decay to states at normal deformations are calculated at each level. The sensitivity of the results to parameters describing the levels at normal deformation and their coupling to levels in the superdeformed well is explored. It is found that except for narrow ranges of the interaction strength coupling the states, the amount of intensity lost is primarily determined by the ratio of {gamma} decay widths in the normal and superdeformed wells. It is also found that while the model can accommodate the observed fractional intensity loss profiles for decay from bands at relatively high excitation, it cannot accommodate the similarly abrupt decay from bands at lower energies if standard estimates of the properties of the states in the first minimum are employed.

  20. Enhancing self-efficacy to enable entrepreneurship: The case of CMI’s Connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, William A.

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancing levels of innovation and entrepreneurship to grow a more competitive economy is the focus of much government effort. Attention is paid to changing a culture seen as antagonistic to entrepreneurship through ...

  1. High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

  2. Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal laws passed in 1980 and 1985 made each state responsible for the low-level radioactive waste produced within its borders. Act 204 of 1987 created the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority ...

  3. Action and Inaction Levels in Pest Management.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Winfield

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984 Action and Inaction Levels in Pest Management Winfield Sterling Department of Entomology Texas A&M University and The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station College Station, Texas 77843 Contents Introduction... of pests does the maintenance of pests below economic (112). The term inaction level for the density of enemies sufficient to maintain the pests below level is suggested (29). McDaniel & Sterling an example of an inaction level. They a ratio of one...

  4. CHARACTERIZING UNCERTAIN SEA LEVEL RISE PROJECTIONS TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    identifies scenarios where a decision to invest in near-term response to extreme sea level rise passes a cost. Keywords: Sea level rise, robust decision-making, climate change adaptation, cost-benefit analysis PleaseCHARACTERIZING UNCERTAIN SEA LEVEL RISE PROJECTIONS TO SUPPORT INVESTMENT DECISIONS

  5. Updating Maryland's Sea-level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    Updating Maryland's Sea-level Rise Projections Scientific and Technical Working Group Maryland Climate Change Commission June 26, 2013 #12;Sea-level Rise Expert Group Donald F. Boesch* , University-author of the National Assessment Scenarios report Author of paper(s) on recent sea-level rise ~ Author contributing

  6. Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

  7. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  8. AVTA Voltec AC Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Systems Testing Results...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results...

  9. Minimum TI4085D interlock setpoint at 1.0 GPM sludge-only feed rate and 14,000 ppm TOC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.S.

    1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    DWPF-Engineering requested that SRTC determine the minimum indicated melter vapor space temperature that must be maintained in order to minimize the potential for off-gas flammability during a steady sludge-only feeding operation at 1.0 GPM containing 14,000 ppm total organic carbon. The detailed scope of this request is described in the technical task request, HLW-DWPF-TTR-960092 (DWPT Activity No. DWPT-96-0065). In response to this request, a dynamic simulation study was conducted in which the concentration of flammable gases was tracked throughout the course of a simulated 3X off-gas surge using the melter off-gas (MOG) dynamics model. The results of simulation showed that as long as the melter vapor space temperature as indicated on TI4085D is kept at 570 degrees C or higher, the peak concentration of combustible gases in the melter off-gas system is not likely to exceed 60 percent of the lower flammability limit (LFL). The minimum TI4085D of 570 degrees C is valid only when the air purges to FIC3221A and FIC3221B are maintained at or above 850 and 250 lb/hr, respectively. All the key bases and assumptions along with the input data used in the simulation are described in the attached E-7 calculation note.

  10. Resonant nature of intrinsic defect energy levels in PbTe revealed by infrared photoreflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bingpo; Cai, Chunfeng; Jin, Shuqiang; Ye, Zhenyu; Wu, Huizhen, E-mail: hzwu@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Qi, Zhen [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Step-scan Fourier-transform infrared photoreflectance and modulated photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the optical transitions of the epitaxial PbTe thin film grown by molecular beam epitaxy on BaF{sub 2} (111) substrate in the vicinity of energy gap of lead telluride at 77?K. It is found that the intrinsic defect energy levels in the electronic structure are of resonant nature. The Te-vacancy energy level is located above the conduction band minimum by 29.1?meV. Another defect (V{sub X}) energy level situated below valance band maximum by 18.1?meV is also revealed. Whether it is associated with the Pb vacancy is still not clear. It might also be related to the misfit dislocations stemming from the lattice mismatch between PbTe and BaF{sub 2} substrate. The experimental results support the theory prediction (N. J. Parada and G. W. Pratt, Jr., Phys. Rev. Lett. 22, 180 (1969), N. J. Parada, Phys. Rev. B 3, 2042 (1971)) and are consistent with the reported Hall experimental results (G. Bauer, H. Burkhard, H. Heinrich, and A. Lopez-Otero, J. Appl. Phys. 47, 1721 (1976)).

  11. Safety and efficacy of NovaSil clay as a dietary supplement to prevent aflatoxicosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afriyie-Gyawu, Evans

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of aflatoxins. Although statistically significant changes to a few parameters were noted, the differences did not appear to be NSP- or dose-dependent, suggesting that NSP at dietary inclusion levels as great as 2.0% (w/w) does not produce overt toxicity. Thus...

  12. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Levelized Costs AEO 2013 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) intensive technologies like coal-fired power and coal-to-liquids (CTL) plants without carbon control and sequestration (CCS)....

  13. Test of luminosity levelling with separated collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Jacquet, D; Miyamoto, R; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Ponce, L; Schaumann, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this test we demonstrated that in the absence of strong long range interactions a levelling of the luminosity can be achieved by a small transverse offset.

  14. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    shown for U.S. Energy Information Administration | Levelized Costs AEO 2012 3 solar, wind, and hydroelectric resources are simple averages of the capacity factor for the...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: high PV deployment level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deployment level ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid...

  16. Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasareanu, Corina

    Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA-level concrete execution for generating test cases that satisfy user-specified testing criteria. We have to testing complex safety critical software that combines unit-level symbolic execution and system

  17. Service Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 -No Service will be provided.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Level 0 ­ Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: Hazardous Material, mechanical, storage, issue, stockService Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 - No Service will be provided. Service Level 1- Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: offices, copy, file, mail, hallways, vestibules

  18. Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 1 Counting Rises, Levels and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heubach, Silvia

    Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 1 Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions Mansour Department of Mathematics, Haifa University, Israel #12;Counting Rises, Levels and Drops;Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 3 Definitions · A composition = 12 . . . m of n N

  19. A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

  20. Chaotic Behaviour of Atomic Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yilmaz; G. Hacibekiroglu; E. Bolcal; Y. Polatoglu

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors of this paper studied Schrodinger wave equation to investiagate the chaotic behavior of atomic energy levels in relation with three quantum numbers n, l, m by means of derived inequality. It could give rise to the siplitting of atomic spectral lines. Keywords: Chaos, Schrodinger wave equation, atomic energy levels

  1. An Integrated Low Level Heat Recovery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, A. V., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large amount of low level thermal energy is lost to air or water in a typical petroleum refinery. This paper discusses a complex integrated low level heat recovery system that is being engineered for installation in a large petroleum refinery...

  2. Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    of automation than previous NASA vehicles, due to program requirements for automation, including Automated Ren into a human space flight vehicle, NASA has created the Function-specific Level of Autonomy and Automation Tool levels of automation than previous NASA vehicles. A key technology to the success of the CEV

  3. Fast System Level Benchmarks for Multicore Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Alper

    Fast System Level Benchmarks for Multicore Architectures Alper Sen, Gokcehan Kara Etem Deniz, Smail level synthetic benchmarks from traditional bench- marks. Synthetic benchmarks have similar performance behavior as the original benchmarks that they are generated from and they can run faster. Synthetics can

  4. Seminar -4. letnik Landau Levels in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsak, Anton

    Seminar - 4. letnik Landau Levels in Graphene Author: Zala Lenarcic Mentor: prof. Anton Ramsak Ljubljana, December 2010 Abstract In this seminar I present graphene, a new material with promising to graphene's unusual energy dispersion. I will derive Landau levels for standard electrons, for electrons

  5. Making Use of Low-Level Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaster, W. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the atmosphere through cooling towers and air fin coolers. We will designate this as "low-level heat". Between 20 to 30% of all the energy that enters a plant is lost as low-level heat. In a 100,000 BPD refinery, this is the equivalent of about 2,500 BPD of oil...

  6. Remarks on the Hylleraas-Undheim and MacDonald Higher Roots, And Functional Having Local Minimum at The Excited States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Xiong, Z.; Karaoulanis, D. [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Vasileos Constantinou 48, GR-116 35 Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The excited states, being energy saddle points in the Hamiltonian eigenfunction Hilbert space, cannot be computed variationally by minimization of the energy. Thus, functionals are presented, that have local minimum at the bound excited states of a non-degenerate Hamiltonian, allowing the computation at any desired accuracy, by using crude approximations of the lower lying states. They are useful for larger systems, because the higher roots of the standard secular equation have, by the Hylleraas-Undheim and MacDonald theorem, several restrictions, which render them of lower quality relative to the lowest root, if the latter is good enough. Preliminary test-results are presented for He {sup 1}S 1s2s.

  7. A liquid-helium-free superconducting coil system forming a flat minimum-magnetic-field distribution of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi, E-mail: yoshida.kennichi71@jaea.go.jp; Nara, Takayuki; Saitoh, Yuichi; Yokota, Watalu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat distribution of the minimum magnetic field (flat-B{sub min}) of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is expected to perform better in highly charged ion production than classical B{sub min}. To form a flat-B{sub min} structure with a liquid helium-free superconducting device, a coil system of seven coils with four current leads has been designed. The lead number was reduced by connecting the plural coils in series to maintain the flat-B{sub min} structure even when the coil currents are changed for adjustment. This coil system can be operated with a helium-free cryostat, since the estimation of heat from the leads to the coils is nearly equivalent to the existing superconducting ECRIS of a similar type.

  8. Feasibility of a minimum bias analysis of $e^+e^-\\to ZH \\to q\\bar{q}+X$ at a 250 GeV ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacine Haddad

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The precision measurements of the Higgs properties is crucial for a better understanding of electroweak symmetry breaking. It can be first achieved at the ILC\\pcite{Behnke2013} at $\\sqrt{s}=250\\rm ~GeV$ via the Higgs-strahlung production process $e^+e^-\\rightarrow ZH$. The hadronic decay mode $Z\\rightarrow \\bar{q}q$ constitutes more than $65%$ of the total, a factor 10 more than $Z\\rightarrow \\mu\\mu$. An analysis based solely on the $Z$ jet pair information could thus lead to a high statistics and provide a minimum biased Higgs sample. A study of the feasibility of such analysis is shown here, based on $e^+e^-$ simulated collisions at $250\\rm ~GeV$ in center of mass, for the equivalent integrated luminosity of $500\\rm ~fb^{-1}$ and using a fast simulation of the ILD detector.

  9. System and method employing a minimum distance and a load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types, each of the different electric load types including a first load feature vector having at least four different load features; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the different electric loads; determining a second load feature vector comprising at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the different electric loads; and identifying by a processor one of the different electric load types by determining a minimum distance of the second load feature vector to the first load feature vector of the different electric load types of the load feature database.

  10. Mobile encapsulation and volume reduction system for wet low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the program entitled ''A Preconceptual Study for a Transportable Vitrification Process''. The objective of the study is to determine the feasibility of a Mobile Encapsulation and Volume Reduction System (MEVS). The report contains design criteria, a preconceptual design of the system, a comparison of disposal costs with other solidification technologies, and an assessment of utility interests in the transportable volume reduction service MEVS can provide. The MEVS design employs the use of a joule-heated glass melter to convert the wet low-level wastes into glass. The process is self-sufficient, requiring no direct facility services or reactor personnel. It is capable of servicing one waste type from a minimum of three reactors. The design was used to prepare capital and operating cost estimates. The capital cost for the MEVS is $4,680,000, which includes all labor necessary for design, engineering, inspection, and licensing. The operating cost of the system for servicing a minimum of three reactors is $1,530,000/y for resins or $2,280,000/y for concentrated liquids. The cost estimates compared favorably to the more common solidification process of cementation. Total MEVS operating costs which include processing, transportation and burial, are $191 to $218/ft/sup 3/ waste, whereas quoted costs for cementation and disposal from reactor operators range from $155 to $350/ft/sup 3/. The report concludes with the requirements for additional development, which can be accomplished for less than one sixth of the capital costs. The report also presents the results of an assessment conducted with utility representatives to obtain their expressions of interest in a service of this type.

  11. Level densities of transitional Sm nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capote, R.; Ventura, A.; Cannata, F.; Quesada, J.M. [Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ente Nuove Tecnologie, Energia e Ambiente, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell Universita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally determined level densities of the transitional isotopes {sup 148,149,150,152}Sm at excitation energies below and around the neutron binding energy are compared with microcanonical calculations based on a Monte Carlo approach to noncollective level densities, folded with a collective enhancement estimated in the frame of the interacting boson model (IBM). The IBM parameters are adjusted so as to reproduce the low-lying discrete levels of both parities, with the exception of the odd-mass nucleus, {sup 149}Sm, where complete decoupling of the unpaired neutron from the core is assumed.

  12. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    origin and distribution of gas hydrates in marine sediments,rise: Associations with gas hydrates. Geology, 23: 89-92.sea-level lowstands above gas hydrate-bearing sediments.

  13. Exploiting level sensitive latches in wire pipelining 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Vikram

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research presents procedures for exploitation of level sensitive latches in wire pipelining. The user gives a Steiner tree, having a signal source and set of destination or sinks, and the location in rectangular plane, capacitive load...

  14. Stability of High Level Radioactive Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, T.M.; Kulkarni, N.S.; Spear, K.E.; Vienna, J.D.; Hanni, J.B.; Crum, J.D.; Hrma, P.

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation was given at the DOE Office of Science-Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) High-Level Waste Workshop held on January 19-20, 2005 at the Savannah River Site.

  15. Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dane R Spearing, Gary L Smith, SK Sundaram

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review outlines important aspects of crystallization in HLW glasses, such as equilibrium, nucleation, growth, and dissolution. The impact of crystallization on continuous melters and the chemical durability of high-level waste glass are briefly discussed.

  16. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rise: Associations with gas hydrates. Geology, 23: 89-92.sea-level lowstands above gas hydrate-bearing sediments.salt diapirism and gas hydrate decomposition, In Schwab, W.

  17. Simulating plant motion with levels of detail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flannery, Rebecca Lynn

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k. Academic Scholarships Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2003 Group: Engineering & Physics I SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships...

  18. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York`s challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria.

  19. Response of rice to soil phosphorus levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quddus, Mohammad Abdul

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESPORSE OF RICE TO SOIL PHOSPHORUS LEVELS MOHJQRiD JL ~ QUDDUS Submitted te the Graduate Sohool of the kgrloultural and Mechanical College of Texas im partial fulfillment of the requirements for the legree of IGLSTER OF SCIENCE Luguet~ 1962... Eager Sub)cot& Agronomy RESPONSE OF RICE TO SOIL PHOSPHORUS LEVELS A Thesis KIHAMNAD Ae QUDDUS Approwed as to style and content by& Chairman of Committee Cpt r Head of Department August, 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes to express his...

  20. QCD Level Density from Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinji Ejiri; Tetsuo Hatsuda

    2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to calculate the QCD level density directly from the thermodynamic quantities obtained by lattice QCD simulations with the use of the maximum entropy method (MEM). Understanding QCD thermodynamics from QCD spectral properties has its own importance. Also it has a close connection to phenomenological analyses of the lattice data as well as experimental data on the basis of hadronic resonances. Our feasibility study shows that the MEM can provide a useful tool to study QCD level density.

  1. Features, Events, and Processes: system Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. McGregor

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

  2. System-level Max Power (SYMPO) -A Systematic Approach for Escalating System-level Power Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    System-level Max Power (SYMPO) - A Systematic Approach for Escalating System-level Power a computer system for the worst case power consumption scenario, system architects often use hand-crafted max SYMPO, an automatic SYstem level Max POwer virus generation framework, which maximizes the power

  3. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

  4. Efficacy of Aqui-S as an Anesthetic for Market-Sized Striped Bass L. CURRY WOODS III,* DANIEL D. THEISEN, AND SHUYANG HE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    for the temperate striped bass Morone saxatilis. Methods Source of fish and anesthetic.--All of the striped bassEfficacy of Aqui-S as an Anesthetic for Market-Sized Striped Bass L. CURRY WOODS III,* DANIEL D 20742, USA Abstract.--Market-sized 2-year-old striped bass Morone saxatilis (average weight, 645 g) were

  5. AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aerovironment AC Level 2 - February 2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: Clipper Creek AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System...

  6. Typical Clothing Ensemble Insulation Levels for Sixteen Body Parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Comfort.1994 CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen Bodya mesh arm chair whose insulation level was measured. FigureExperimental Conditions. CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen

  7. Maximum output at minimum cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    University) + FFA-W3 Material Preimpregnated epoxy glass fiber + carbon fiber Total blade weight 5,800 kg.0 MW wind turbine generator uses the "total lightning protection" system, in accordance with standard working life of the turbine. Gamesa WindNet® The new generation SCADA System (a wind farm control system

  8. MINIMUM DISSATISFACTION PERSONNEL SCHEDULING D ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugurel

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory, Reliability, and Quality of Service, p. 41, 2008. [2] Beddoe, G. R. ... International Symposium on Consumer Electronics, 2008. [8] Fleischer, R., Golin, M. J. ...

  9. Category Measure Minimum Efficiency / Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    -$6200 Xcel rebate: $120 for AFUE >= 84% Fed tax credit: 30%, up to $1500** Ground source heat pump Closed and cooling (floor, wall, and ceiling) Radiant systems must be powered by a heat pump (electric or gas Space Heating and Cooling ENERGY EFFICIENCY MEASURES Residential Eligible Measures List #12;Category

  10. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M. [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Zelevinsky, V. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  11. A Software Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen,G.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

  12. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  13. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke; Kajikawa, Shu-hei [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Uesato, Shin-ichi [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Engineering, Kansai University, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)] [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Engineering, Kansai University, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazushi [Proubase Technology Inc., Kanagawa 211-0063 (Japan)] [Proubase Technology Inc., Kanagawa 211-0063 (Japan); Tanimura, Susumu [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Koji, Takehiko [Department of Histology and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)] [Department of Histology and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kohno, Michiaki, E-mail: kohnom@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan) [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Proubase Technology Inc., Kanagawa 211-0063 (Japan); Kyoto University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the anticancer efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. •MEK inhibitors sensitize human tumor xenografts to HDAC inhibitor cytotoxicity. •Such the enhanced efficacy is achieved by a transient blockade of the ERK pathway. •This drug combination provides a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. -- Abstract: The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showed that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients.

  14. Technical safety requirements control level verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEWART, J.L.

    1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) control level verification process was developed for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) TSRs at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA, at the direction of the US. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The objective of the effort was to develop a process to ensure that the TWRS TSR controls are designated and managed at the appropriate levels as Safety Limits (SLs), Limiting Control Settings (LCSs), Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs), Administrative Controls (ACs), or Design Features. The TSR control level verification process was developed and implemented by a team of contractor personnel with the participation of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH), the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) integrating contractor, and RL representatives. The team was composed of individuals with the following experience base: nuclear safety analysis; licensing; nuclear industry and DOE-complex TSR preparation/review experience; tank farm operations; FDH policy and compliance; and RL-TWRS oversight. Each TSR control level designation was completed utilizing TSR control logic diagrams and TSR criteria checklists based on DOE Orders, Standards, Contractor TSR policy, and other guidance. The control logic diagrams and criteria checklists were reviewed and modified by team members during team meetings. The TSR control level verification process was used to systematically evaluate 12 LCOs, 22 AC programs, and approximately 100 program key elements identified in the TWRS TSR document. The verification of each TSR control required a team consensus. Based on the results of the process, refinements were identified and the TWRS TSRs were modified as appropriate. A final report documenting key assumptions and the control level designation for each TSR control was prepared and is maintained on file for future reference. The results of the process were used as a reference in the RL review of the final TWRS TSRs and control suite. RL concluded that the TSR control level verification process is clear and logically based upon DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements, and other TSR control selection guidelines. The process provides a documented, traceable basis for TSR level decisions and is a valid reference for preparation of new TSRs.

  15. State Level Analysis of Industrial Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; Shipley, A. M.; Brown, E.

    industrial energy use data is not readily available. The only data available is at the national or census regional level (DOE/EIA 200Ia). As a result, a methodology was developed based upon state-level economic activity data and national energy intensity... data reported in the 1998 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS)(DOE/EIA 2001a) and value of shipments data reported in the 1998 Annual Survey of Manufacturing (ASM)(Department of Commerce 2000) are used to estimate energy data from...

  16. Topological insulators with SU(2) Landau levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Li; Shou-Cheng Zhang; Congjun Wu

    2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct continuum models of 3D and 4D topological insulators by coupling spin-1/2 fermions to an SU(2) background gauge field, which is equivalent to a spatially dependent spin-orbit coupling. Higher dimensional generalizations of flat Landau levels are obtained in the Landau-like gauge. The 2D helical Dirac modes with opposite helicities and 3D Weyl modes with opposite chiralities are spatially separated along the third and fourth dimensions, respectively. Stable 2D helical Fermi surfaces and 3D chiral Fermi surfaces appear on open boundaries, respectively. The charge pumping in 4D Landau level systems shows quantized 4D quantum Hall effect.

  17. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

  18. High Level Waste ManagemenfDivision ..

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May| ArgonneHigh Level Waste

  19. Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbetand ModelingHigh-Level Waste (HLW) and

  20. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMakingPast Sea Level Data

  1. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel and Climate Change

  2. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel and Climate

  3. EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Department ofNotices |Notice of38:3:1: FERC2:Collaborates onComplex Level

  4. Energy Level Diagrams A=4-20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavy DutyDistrict |Consumption1Energy Level

  5. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energy/spin-flip density functional theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minezawa, Noriyuki, E-mail: minezawa@fukui.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8103 (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Examining photochemical processes in solution requires understanding the solvent effects on the potential energy profiles near conical intersections (CIs). For that purpose, the CI point in solution is determined as the crossing between nonequilibrium free energy surfaces. In this work, the nonequilibrium free energy is described using the combined method of linear-response free energy and collinear spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory. The proposed approach reveals the solvent effects on the CI geometries of stilbene in an acetonitrile solution and those of thymine in water. Polar acetonitrile decreases the energy difference between the twisted minimum and twisted-pyramidalized CI of stilbene. For thymine in water, the hydrogen bond formation stabilizes significantly the CI puckered at the carbonyl carbon atom. The result is consistent with the recent simulation showing that the reaction path via this geometry is open in water. Therefore, the present method is a promising way of identifying the free-energy crossing points that play an essential role in photochemistry of solvated molecules.

  6. Influence of growth temperature and temperature ramps on deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, A. M., E-mail: aarmstr@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kelchner, K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States) [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Speck, J. S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on bulk m-plane GaN substrates as a function of growth temperature (T{sub g}) and T{sub g} ramping method was investigated using deep level optical spectroscopy. Understanding the influence of T{sub g} on GaN deep level incorporation is important for InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) because GaN quantum barrier (QB) layers are grown much colder than thin film GaN to accommodate InGaN QW growth. Deep level spectra of low T{sub g} (800?°C) GaN films grown under QB conditions were compared to deep level spectra of high T{sub g} (1150?°C) GaN. Reducing T{sub g}, increased the defect density significantly (>50×) through introduction of emergent deep level defects at 2.09?eV and 2.9?eV below the conduction band minimum. However, optimizing growth conditions during the temperature ramp when transitioning from high to low T{sub g} substantially reduced the density of these emergent deep levels by approximately 40%. The results suggest that it is important to consider the potential for non-radiative recombination in QBs of LED or LD active regions, and tailoring the transition from high T{sub g} GaN growth to active layer growth can mitigate such non-radiative channels.

  7. The Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following courses, with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    - Canadian and International Environmental Management Management 4640 - Cross-Cultural Work Study FourThe Bachelor of Management degree in International Management is a minimum of 40 courses in length) and Statistics 1770. Admission to Management programs is competitive and is based on academic achievement prior

  8. We study the continuous extractive distillation of minimum and maximum boiling azeotropic mixtures A-B with a heavy or a light entrainer E, intending to assess its feasibility based on thermodynamic insights.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    #12;#12;Abstract We study the continuous extractive distillation of minimum and maximum boiling on operating parameters: distillate product purity and recovery, reflux ratio R and entrainer ­ feed flow rate. For the 1.0-2 class both A and B can be distillated. For one of them there exists a maximum entrainer - feed

  9. Statistical High-Level Synthesis under Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    designers is process variability, which causes considerable fluctu- ations in performance and power with variability has be- come one of the major design focuses for nanoscale VLSI design. Traditionally, performanceStatistical High-Level Synthesis under Process Variability Yuan Xie and Yibo Chen Pennsylvania

  10. Bosnia and Herzegovina Local Level Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bosnia and Herzegovina Local Level Institutions and Social Capital Study Vol. 1 World Bank, ECSSD World Bank Work on Bosnia-Herzegovina 3 Study's Operational Definition of Social Capital 3 Specific Capital 17 B. Social Cleavages and Population Movements 18 Main Social Cleavages in Bosnia-Herzegovina 18

  11. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an application of variable speed pumping to level control of an industrial process. Topics include a comparison of the process using control valves with a variable speed system, an energy savings and cost...

  12. Level MRes 2013/14 Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Level MRes 2013/14 Materials Engineering MRes Materials Engineering Coordinator: Dr. DH Isaac Semester 1 Modules Semester 2 Modules EG-M85 Strategic Project Planning 10 Credits Professor SJ Hardy EGIM16 Communication Skills for Research Engineers 10 Credits Dr. TN Croft EGTM60 Aerospace Materials

  13. 4, 43614387, 2007 Extreme tidal levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    affected by human interferences, e.g. in-channel dredging, sand mining and the construction of levees-intensive dredging. The stations along the coastal regions show significant increasing extreme high/low water level. The coastal regions are not influenced by in-channel dredging, and furthermore,20 sediment loads from upper

  14. Psychometric Impacts of Above-Level Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warne, Russell Thomas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    education research context and suggestions for further research are included. An appendix to the study gives information about item difficulty indexes for every item in the ITBS/ITED core battery for the eighth, ninth, and tenth grade levels of Form C....

  15. High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, L.H. (ed.)

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

  16. x Integration Level x CAN Controller Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    x Integration Level x CAN Controller Architecture x Message Handling x Acceptance Filtering x-offs between stand-alone and integrated CAN peripherals. The integrated CAN peripheral is cheaper not only developed for an integrated CAN peripheral may not function on another CPU with on-chip CAN. © CiA x Am

  17. Level 2 2013/14 Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Level 2 2013/14 Materials Engineering BEng Materials Science and Engineering[J500,J502,J505] BEng Materials Science and Engineering with a year abroad[J510] MEng Materials Science and Engineering[J504] MEng Materials Science and Engineering (Enhanced with year in industry)[J503] Coordinator: Dr. M Evans Semester 1

  18. POSTGRADUATE Upper Level, Otto Beit Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    FUNDING YOUR POSTGRADUATE STUDIES AT UCT Upper Level, Otto Beit Building University Avenue North, the Postgraduate Funding Office and Postgraduate Centre were established at the University of Cape Town to provide apply for funding from both the University and from as many other sources of support as possible

  19. Designing A High Level Test Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jing

    Designing A High Level Test Specification Language For iec 61499 function block diagram formulae. introduction Mohamad Farid Jaafar Iec 61499 Function block IEC 61499 is one of the standards((input=accelPressed) & (label=throttle.ACCEL))) Figure 1. The IEC 61499 Function Block Notation. (a) Basic Blocks (b) Composite

  20. Keep new concepts Check cognition level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    point "cold" topic "hot" topicTop HealthScience Nuclear Energy Safety& Accidents Concepts at time point· Keep new concepts · Check cognition level = number of news {Japan, nuclear, disaster · Multilingual Wikipedia history analysis Japan footballteam national nuclear disaster Set of candidates per time

  1. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an application of variable speed pumping to level control of an industrial process. Topics include a comparison of the process using control valves with a variable speed system, an energy savings and cost...

  2. The Science of Level Design Kenneth Hullett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    elements and gameplay. The next step is to validate this theory with a series of experiments that test]: Human factors, K.8.0 [Personal Computing]: Games General Terms Design, Human Factors Keywords level propose to conduct a series of experiments. A combination of qualitative and quantitative assessments

  3. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  4. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  5. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  6. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  7. Criteria for releases and disposal of low level and intermediate level waste in Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindbom, G. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Waste Management and Environmental Protection

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In Sweden there exists a complete system for management, including final disposal, of all radioactive wastes which are not classified as long-lived or high-level waste. This paper will present the disposal options and the requirements set on the waste categories as well as Sweden`s four different engineered shallow land disposals. The advantages of having a shallow land disposal together with exemption of waste and a final storage facility for low-level and intermediate-level waste are discussed. Finally, the paper will give a summary of why Sweden has succeeded in establishing a full system for low-level and intermediate-level waste. The discussion is from regulatory point of view.

  8. High level indole signalling in Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaimster, Hannah Dorne

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    indole signalling in Escherichia coli Abstract Indole is a small signalling molecule, produced by many species of bacteria, including Escherichia coli. It is made by the enzyme tryptophanase, which converts tryptophan into indole, pyruvate and ammonia... . Indole has diverse roles in E. coli, including regulation of biofilm formation, acid resistance and pathogenicity. In these cases, E. coli responds to a low, persistent level of indole (0.5-1 mM), similar to the concentration found in an E. coli...

  9. Very Fast Chip-level Thermal Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Nakabayashi; T. Nakabayashi; K. Nakajima

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new technique of VLSI chip-level thermal analysis. We extend a newly developed method of solving two dimensional Laplace equations to thermal analysis of four adjacent materials on a mother board. We implement our technique in C and compare its performance to that of a commercial CAD tool. Our experimental results show that our program runs 5.8 and 8.9 times faster while keeping smaller residuals by 5 and 1 order of magnitude, respectively.

  10. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehner, J.R.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, W. T.

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  11. One-Shot Percutaneous Ethanol Injection of Liver Tumors Under General Anesthesia: Preliminary Data on Efficacy and Complications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgio, Antonio; Tarantino, Luciano; Francica, Giampiero; Mariniello, Nicola; Nuzzo, Antonio [Department of Infectious Diseases, Ospedale D. Cotugno, via Quagliariello, 1, Naples (Italy); Del Viscovo, Luca; Rotondo, Antonio [Department of Radiology, II Policlinico Universita Federico II, Via Pansini, 5 Naples (Italy)

    1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To verify the efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided injection of large amounts of ethanol into large or multiple liver lesions, in a single session under general anesthesia (one-shot PEI) for percutaneous ablation of hepatic tumors. Methods: Twenty-nine patients (27 with 51 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) nodules on cirrhosis, diameter range 1.0<+>-<+>9.0 cm; two patients with a single metastasis from the gastroenteric tract, 5.0 and 9.0 cm, respectively, in diameter) were treated with one-shot PEI. Results: The total volume of alcohol delivered per patient ranged from 16 to 210 ml. Mean ethanol volume in all patients was 49 ml. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) examination showed complete necrosis in 41 of 50 lesions. Two patients died of hypovolemic shock due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 3 and 7 days, respectively, after the interventional procedure. All the remaining patients are alive (follow-up 5<+>-<+>14 months) except one who died of liver failure 5 months after. New HCC nodules occurred in six patients within 6 months and one intralesional relapse was recorded. Conclusion: In this preliminary experience, one-shot PEI is as effective in inducing liver tumor necrosis as traditional PEI; its advantages are shorter treatment time and the capability of treating larger and multiple liver lesions.

  12. Fermi level stabilization and band edge energies in Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detert, Douglas M.; Tom, Kyle B.; Dubon, Oscar D. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Battaglia, Corsin; Javey, Ali [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Denlinger, Jonathan D. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lim, Sunnie H. N. [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Anders, André [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Yu, Kin M.; Walukiewicz, Wladek [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the band edge energies of Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O thin films as a function of composition by three independent techniques: we determine the Fermi level stabilization energy by pinning the Fermi level with ion irradiation, measure the binding energy of valence band states and core levels by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and probe shifts in the conduction band and valence band density of states using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, respectively. The three techniques find consensus in explaining the origin of compositional trends in the optical-bandgap narrowing upon Cd incorporation in wurtzite ZnO and widening upon Zn incorporation in rocksalt CdO. The conduction band minimum is found to be stationary for both wurtzite and rocksalt alloys, and a significant upward rise of the valence band maximum accounts for the majority of these observed bandgap changes. Given these band alignments, alloy disorder scattering is found to play a negligible role in decreasing the electron mobility for all alloys. These band alignment details, combined with the unique optical and electrical properties of the two phase regimes, make CdZnO alloys attractive candidates for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  13. Anthranilimide based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Part 3: X-ray crystallographic characterization, core and urea optimization and in vivo efficacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Stephen A.; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, D. Mark; Boucheron, Joyce A.; Carter, H. Luke; Clancy, Daphne C.; Cooper, Joel P.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Garrido, Dulce M.; Nolte, Robert T.; Peat, Andrew J.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Sparks, Steven M.; Tavares, Francis X.; Wang, Liping; Wang, Tony Y.; Weiel, James E.; (GSKNC)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Key binding interactions of the anthranilimide based glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa) inhibitor 2 from X-ray crystallography studies are described. This series of compounds bind to the AMP site of GP. Using the binding information the core and the phenyl urea moieties were optimized. This work culminated in the identification of compounds with single nanomolar potency as well as in vivo efficacy in a diabetic model.

  14. Supernovae, Landau Levels, and Pulsar Kicks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the energy asymmetry given the proto-neutronstar during the time when the neutrino sphere is near the surface of the proto-neutron star, using the modified URCA process. The electrons produced with the anti-neutrinos are in Landau levels due to the strong magnetic field, and this leads to asymmetry in the neutrino momentum, and a pulsar kick. Our main prediction is that the large pulsar kicks start at about 10 s and last for about 10 s, with the corresponding neutrinos correlated in the direction of the magnetic field.

  15. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, R.H.; Keener, W.E.

    1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame. 6 figs.

  16. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, Richard H. (Clinton, TN); Keener, Wendell E. (Lenior City, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame.

  17. Service Oriented Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Chungming; Chevtsov, Sergei; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Standalone high level applications often suffer from poor performance and reliability due to lengthy initialization, heavy computation and rapid graphical update. Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is trying to separate the initialization and computation from applications and to distribute such work to various service providers. Heavy computation such as beam tracking will be done periodically on a dedicated server and data will be available to client applications at all time. Industrial standard service architecture can help to improve the performance, reliability and maintainability of the service. Robustness will also be improved by reducing the complexity of individual client applications.

  18. The structure of energy levels in ¹?²RU 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouttchenko, Sviatoslav Olegovich

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1968). [21] C. Flaum, D. Cline, A. W. Sunyar, and O. C. Kistner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 973 (1974). [22] O. Scholton, F. Iachello, and A. Arima, Ann. Phys. 115, 325 (1978); F. Iachello and A. Arima, in The Interacting Boson Model (Cambridge University... Level splitting in the two-band mixing model. 19 Total energy for Ru as a function of s for 7 = 0 and e4 ? 0 for different moments of inertia. 26 Total energy for ' Ru as a function of 7 for E = 0. 22 and E'y = 0 for different moments of inertia. 27...

  19. High-level waste qualification: Managing uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsipher, B.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Qualification of high-level waste implies specifications driven by risk against which performance can be assessed. The inherent uncertainties should be addressed in the specifications and statistical methods should be employed to appropriately manage these uncertainties. Uncertainties exist whenever measurements are obtained, sampling is employed, or processes are affected by systematic or random perturbations. This paper presents the approach and statistical methods currently employed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) to characterize, minimize, and control uncertainties pertinent to a waste-form acceptance specification concerned with product consistency.

  20. The structure of energy levels in ¹?²RU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouttchenko, Sviatoslav Olegovich

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1968). [21] C. Flaum, D. Cline, A. W. Sunyar, and O. C. Kistner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 973 (1974). [22] O. Scholton, F. Iachello, and A. Arima, Ann. Phys. 115, 325 (1978); F. Iachello and A. Arima, in The Interacting Boson Model (Cambridge University... Level splitting in the two-band mixing model. 19 Total energy for Ru as a function of s for 7 = 0 and e4 ? 0 for different moments of inertia. 26 Total energy for ' Ru as a function of 7 for E = 0. 22 and E'y = 0 for different moments of inertia. 27...