Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The minimum-uncertainty coherent states for Landau levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Glauber minimum-uncertainty coherent states with two variables for Landau levels, based on the representation of Weyl-Heisenberg algebra by two different modes, have been studied about four decades ago. Here, we introduce new two-variable coherent states with minimum uncertainty relationship for Landau levels in three different methods: the infinite unitary representation of su(1, 1) is realized in two different methods, first, by consecutive levels with the same energy gaps and also with the same value for z-angular momentum quantum number, then, by shifting z-angular momentum mode number by two units while the energy level remaining the same. Besides, for su(2), whether by lowest Landau levels or Landau levels with lowest z-angular momentum, just one finite unitary representation is introduced. Having constructed the generalized Klauder-Perelomov coherent states, for any of the three representations, we obtain their Glauber coherency by displacement operator of Weyl-Heisenberg algebra.

Dehghani, A. [Physics Department, Payame Noor University, P. O. Box 19395-4697 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakhri, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, P. O. Box 51666-16471 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mojaveri, B. [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, P. O. Box 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Sea Level Pressure Minimum along the Kuroshio and Its Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric effects of sea surface temperature (SST) fronts along the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension (K-KE) are investigated by examining spatial characteristics of the climatological sea level pressure (SLP), surface winds and surface heat flux (...

Youichi Tanimoto; Tomohisa Kanenari; Hiroki Tokinaga; Shang-Ping Xie

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Alternative Minimum Levels for Utility Aqueous Discharges: Chemical Analytical Measurement Guide for National Pollutant Discharge El imination System (NPDES) Permits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act requires the electric utility industry to monitor their wastewater discharges to ensure compliance with discharge permit limits. EPRI developed a new definition of quantitation level appropriate to water quality compliance monitoring and used data from its previous studies on trace element analysis of utility wastewaters to calculate Alternative Minimum Levels (AMLs). The approach developed in this report will help utilities define reasonable pollutant discharge limits to meet effluen...

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

4

SATURATION LEVELS FOR WHITE-LIGHT FLARES OF FLARE STARS: VARIATION OF MINIMUM FLARE DURATION FOR SATURATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taking into account results obtained from models and from statistical analyses of obtained parameters, we discuss flare activity levels and flare characteristics of five UV Ceti stars. We present the parameters of unpublished flares detected over two years of observations of V1005 Ori. We compare parameters of the U-band flares detected over several seasons of observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, V1054 Oph, and V1005 Ori. Flare frequencies calculated for all program stars and maximum energy levels of the flares are compared, and we consider which is the most correct parameter as an indicator of flare activity levels. Using the One Phase Exponential Association function, the distributions of flare equivalent duration versus flare total duration are modeled for each program star. We use the Independent Samples t-Test in the statistical analyses of the parameters obtained from the models. The results reveal some properties of flare processes occurring on the surfaces of UV Ceti type stars. (1) Flare energies cannot be higher than a specific value regardless of the length of the flare total duration. This must be a saturation level for white-light flares occurring in flare processes observed in the U band. Thus, for the first time it is shown that white-light flares have a saturation in a specific energy range. (2) The span values, which are the difference between the equivalent durations of flares with the shortest and longest total durations, are almost equal for each star. (3) The half-life values, minimum flare durations for saturation, increase toward the later spectral types. (4) Both maximum total durations and maximum rise times computed from the observed flares decrease toward the later spectral types among the UV Ceti stars. According to the maximum energy levels obtained from the models, both EV Lac and EQ Peg are more active than the other three program stars, while AD Leo is the most active flare star according to the flare frequencies.

Dal, H. A.; Evren, S., E-mail: ali.dal@ege.edu.tr [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, University of Ege, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Distributed collaborative problem-based graduate-level learning: Students' perspectives on communication tool selection and efficacy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is growing interest in higher education into graduate-level learning at a distance, where participants are chosen not by where they live but by programmatic match in terms of interest, motivation, intelligence, and academic and professional background. ... Keywords: Academic community, Distance education, Graduate-level problem-based learning, Rich media

Richard C. Overbaugh; Andrew R. Casiello

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

7

Minimum Magnetic Energy Theorem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Thomson's Theorem states that static charge distributions in conductors show up at the conducting surfaces in an equipotential configuration, so that the electrostatic energy is a minimum. In this work we study an analogue statement for magnetic systems: in a given set of conductors, the stored magnetic field energy reaches the minimum value for superficial current distributions so that the magnetic vector potential is tangent to the conductors surfaces. This is the counterpart of Thomson's theorem for the magnetic field.

Fiolhais, M C N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Minimum Price Contract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A minimum price contract is one of many tools a marketer may use to better manage price and production risk while trying to achieve financial goals and objectives. This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages involved in this marketing program and the situations when it can be used.

Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Welch, Mark; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Minimum Description Length Model Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum Description Length Model Selection Problems and Extensions Steven de Rooij #12;#12;Minimum Description Length Model Selection Problems and Extensions #12;ILLC Dissertation Series DS-2008-07 For further-mail: illc@science.uva.nl homepage: http://www.illc.uva.nl/ #12;Minimum Description Length Model Selection

14

MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

15

Quantum games and minimum entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyze Nash's equilibrium (maximum utility MU) and its relations with the order state(minimum entropy ME). I introduce the concept of minimum entropy as a paradigm of both Nash-Hayek's equilibrium. The ME concept is related to Quantum Games. ...

Edward Jiménez

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors October 7, 2013 - 11:28am Addthis Section 313 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 raised Federal minimum efficiency standards for general-purpose, single-speed, polyphase induction motors of 1 to 500 horsepower (hp). This new standard took effect in December 2010. The new minimum efficiency levels match FEMP's performance requirement for these motors. As a result of this increase in mandatory minimum standards and combined with the lack of significant availability of motors exceeding these standards, FEMP is suspending the purchasing specification for electric motors. Federal buyers may select for purchase any motor that meets design requirements.

17

Minimum Gas Service Standards (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas companies in Ohio are required to follow the Minimum Gas Service Standards, which are set and enforced by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. These rules are found in chapter 4901...

18

Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studies SylviaWe assess alternative research designs for minimum wageAllegretto: Institute for Research on Labor and Employment,

Allegretto, Sylvia; Dube, Arindrajit; Reich, Michael; Zipperer, Ben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors Section 313 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 raised Federal minimum efficiency standards for...

20

Do We Know of Any Maunder Minimum Stars?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most stars previously identified as Maunder minimum stars are old stars evolved off of the main sequence. Analysis of activity measurements from the California and Carnegie Planet Search program stars and Hipparcos parallaxes implies that the canonical age-chromospheric activity relation breaks down for stars older than $\\sim 6$ Gyr when activity is calculated from Mount Wilson S values. Stars only 1 magnitude above the main sequence exhibit significantly suppressed activity levels which have been mistaken for examples of Maunder minimum behavior.

Jason T. Wright

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Minimum Bias Measurements with the ATLAS Detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency at the Event Filter MBTS trigger efficiency atand counted at the Event Filter trigger level. Any eventsCHAPTER 3. MINIMUM BIAS TRIGGER Event Selection The analysis

Leyton, Michael A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development and Online Opertation of Minimum Bias Triggers in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of minimum bias triggers should allow for a highly efficient selection on pp-collisions, while minimising any possible bias in the event selection. In ATLAS two main minimum bias triggers have been developed using complementary technologies. A hardware based first level trigger, consisting of 32 plastic scintillators, has proven to efficienctly select pp-interactions. In particular during the start-up phase this trigger played a crucial role for the commissioning of the central trigger processor and detector sub-systems. A complementary selection is achieved by a multi-level minimum bias trigger, seeded off a random trigger on filled bunches. For the event selection at higher trigger levels a dedicated algorithm was developed, able to cope with around 86 millions of detector signals per bunch-crossing. We will present these trigger systems and their deployment online, highlighting their performance and trigger efficiencies. We outline as well the operation with increasing beam intensities and lumin...

Martin, T; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

ATLAS measurements of minimum bias and soft QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first measurements of charged particle production in proton?proton collisions at center?of?mass energy s ?=?900? GeV and 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Minimum bias distributions are measured for events with at least one charged particle in the kinematic range |?| 500? MeV and compared with the predictions from various Monte Carlo models. Activity in the underlying event was measured with respect to the highest p T track in the event. Both the minimum bias and underlying event measurements are fully corrected for detector effects to obtain distributions at the hadron level.

Maaike Limper; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Zero forcing parameters and minimum rank problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zero forcing number Z(G), which is the minimum number of vertices in a zero forcing set of a graph G, is used to study the maximum nullity / minimum rank of the family of symmetric matrices described by G. It is shown that for a connected graph of order at least two, no vertex is in every zero forcing set. The positive semidefinite zero forcing number Z_+(G) is introduced, and shown to be equal to |G|-OS(G), where OS(G) is the recently defined ordered set number that is a lower bound for minimum positive semidefinite rank. The positive semidefinite zero forcing number is applied to the computation of positive semidefinite minimum rank of certain graphs. An example of a graph for which the real positive symmetric semidefinite minimum rank is greater than the complex Hermitian positive semidefinite minimum rank is presented.

Barioli, Francesco; Fallat, Shaun M; Hall, H Tracy; Hogben, Leslie; Shader, Bryan; Driessche, P van den; van der Holst, Hein

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cape Charles - STIP Minimum Sustainability Requirements (Virginia...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cape Charles - STIP Minimum Sustainability Requirements (Virginia) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as...

28

Parabolic equations without a minimum principle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, we consider several parabolic equations for which the minimum principle fails. We first consider a two-point boundary value problem for a one… (more)

Pang, Huadong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY...

30

Stochastic Variational Approach to Minimum Uncertainty States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schr\\"{o}dinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials.

F. Illuminati; L. Viola

1995-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

31

A New Minimum Temperature Record for Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A minimum temperature of ?31°F (?35°C) was recorded at Nowata, Oklahoma, on 10 February 2011. This exceeded the previous record minimum temperature for Oklahoma of ?27°F (?32.8°C). The Nowata station is in the Oklahoma Mesonet network. High pressure was ...

Gary McManus; Thomas W. Schmidlin; Christopher A. Fiebrich

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

Ulloa, Osvaldo

33

Parabolic equations without a minimum principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we consider several parabolic equations for which the minimum principle fails. We first consider a two-point boundary value problem for a one dimensional diffusion equation. We show the uniqueness and ...

Pang, Huadong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Use of Polar-orbiting Satellite Sounding Data to Estimate Rural Maximum and Minimum Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric sounding products from NOAA's polar-orbiting satellites were used to derive and test predictive equations of rural shelter-level maximum and minimum temperatures. Sounding data from both winter and summer months were combined with ...

Gregory L. Johnson; Jerry M. Davis; Thomas R. Karl; Alan L. McNab; J. Dan Tarpley; Peter Bloomfield

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

JBIG2 Symbol Dictionary Design Based on Minimum Spanning Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The JBIG2 standard is a very flexible bi-level image coding strategy based on pattern matching. The encoder collects a set of symbols in a dictionary and encodes a page by reference to the dictionary symbols. JBIG2 allows the encoder to view all symbols and choose a good set for the dictionary. In this paper, we examine the bit rate trade-off that arises in choosing different dictionary sizes. In particular, we propose a suboptimal dictionary design technique based on minimum spanning trees. This technique gives competitive compression ratios and allows us to specify the dictionary size almost arbitrarily, thus providing a way to study the bit rate trade-off problem in detail. Keywords: JBIG2, Text image compression, Symbol dictionary, Minimum spanning tree 1

Yan Ye; Pamela Cosman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Minimum error discrimination of Pauli channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the problem of discriminating with minimum error probability two given Pauli channels. We show that, differently from the case of discrimination between unitary transformations, the use of entanglement with an ancillary system can strictly improve the discrimination, and any maximally entangled state allows to achieve the optimal discrimination. We also provide a simple necessary and sufficient condition in terms of the structure of the channels for which the ultimate minimum error probability can be achieved without entanglement assistance. When such a condition is satisfied, the optimal input state is simply an eigenstate of one of the Pauli matrices.

Massimiliano F. Sacchi

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minimum Efficiency Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Minimum Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

39

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY...

40

Contracting Officer Warrant Requirements Function Experience Minimum Training Continuous Learning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACMP Flash 2011-62 ACMP Flash 2011-62 Contracting Officer Warrant Requirements Function Experience Minimum Training Continuous Learning GS-1105s with a warrant for purchases up to $25,000 At least 6 months of Government Purchase Card experience Certified to Level I in the ACMP Purchasing Program 80 hours every two years GS-1105s with a warrant for purchases $25,000 up to the simplified acquisition threshold At least 1 year of Government Purchase Card experience Certified to Level II in the ACMP Purchasing Program 80 hours every two years GS-1105s with a warrant for purchases over the simplified acquisition threshold At least 5 years of progressively complex contracting experience Certified to Level III in the ACMP Purchasing Program 80 hours every two years

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ozone (o3) efficacy on reduction of phytophthora capsici in recirculated horticultural irrigation water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microorganisms that cause plant disease have been isolated in recirculated irrigation water and increase the risks of disease incidence in horticultural operations. Ozone is an effective oxidizer used to disinfect drinking water supplies and treat industrial wastewater. The objective of this research was to investigate using ozone gas as part of a strategy to reduce the incidence of Phytophthora deBary in recirculated irrigation water. An isolate of Phytophthora capsici Leonian was cultured to induce sporulation. Spore dilutions were placed in aliquots of reverse osmosis water and bubbled with ozone gas (O3) to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1. Ozonated samples were plated and observed for colony forming units. Increasing ozone concentrations reduced the number of colony forming units to 0 at 1.5 mg· L-1 03. Turbidity effects on efficacy on Phytophthora capsici were tested using bentonite clay at 0 to 2.0 nephelometric turbidity units and ozone concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg· L-1. Increasing bentonite did not affect the efficacy of increasing ozone concentrations on reducing colony formation to 0 at 1.5 mg·L-1 O3. Bioassays using Phytophthora capsici on Capsicum annuum L. seedlings confirmed apparent pathogenicity. Reverse osmosis water, containing a soluble fertilizer at 0 to 300 mg· L-1 N, was ozonated to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1 O3 and used to irrigate Chrysanthemum x morifolium T. de Romatuelle. Increasing ozone concentrations did not interact with increasing fertilizer levels to affect the final growth parameters. Chrysanthemum exposed to ozone gas concentrations of 0.5 to 1.5 mg·L-1 showed symptomatic ozone damage. Complete soluble fertilizer solutions with micronutrients were ozonated from 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1 O3 and analysed for nutrient content. Increasing ozone levels did not interact with fertilizers to affect macronutrients. Increasing ozone interacted with iron at a high fertilizer level. Ozone did not affect the efficacy of paclobutralzol in controlling growth in Viola x wittrockiana. Ozone was effective in controlling Phytophthora capsici in recirculated irrigation water with minimum impact on plant growth. Adjustments in fertility regiemes may be needed to counteract the oxidizing affect of ozone on micronutrients.

McDonald, Garry Vernon

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Minimum wear tube support hole design  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A minimum-wear through-bore (16) is defined within a heat exchanger tube support plate (14) so as to have an hourglass configuration as determined by means of a constant radiused surface curvature (18) as defined by means of an external radius (R3), wherein the surface (18) extends between the upper surface (20) and lower surface (22) of the tube support plate (14). When a heat exchange tube (12) is disposed within the tube support plate (14) so as to pass through the through-bore (16), the heat exchange tube (12) is always in contact with a smoothly curved or radiused portion of the through-bore surface (16) whereby unacceptably excessive wear upon the heat exchange tube (12), as normally developed by means of sharp edges, lands, ridges, or the like conventionally part of the tube support plates, is eliminated or substantially reduced.

Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Geometric Complexity and Minimum Description Length Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of how one should decide among competing explanations of data is at the heart of the scientific enterprise. Quantitative methods of selecting among models have been advanced over the years without an underlying theoretical framework to guide the enterprise and evaluate new developments. In this paper, we show that differential geometry provides a unified understanding of the model selection problem. Foremost among its contributions is a reconceptualization of the problem as one of counting probability distributions. This reconceptualization naturally leads to development of a "geometric" complexity measure, which turns out to be equal to the Minimum Description Length (MDL) complexity measure Rissanen (1996) recently proposed. We demonstrate an application of the geometric complexity measure to model selection in cognitive psychology, with models of cognitive modeling in three different areas (psychophysics, information integration, categorization).

In Jae Myung; Shaobo Zhang; Mark A. Pitt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Process of Fixing the British National Minimum Wage, 1997-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to negotiate, with embedded mediation, a level of minimum wage that has been not only 19 acceptable to government but also, at time of writing, overwhelmingly benign in its economic and social impact. The author is grateful for the comments of David...

Brown, William

45

Building Information Modeling - A Minimum Mathematical Configuration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the current context, the standardization of building construction is not limited to a specific country or to a specific building code. Trade globalization has emphasized the need for standardization in the process of exchange of design information, whether it is in the form of drawings or documents. Building Information Modeling is the latest transformational technology that supports interactive development of design information for buildings. No single Building Information Modeling software package is used in the Architecture Engineering Construction and Facilities Management industries, which is strength as new ideas develop, but a hindrance as the new ideas flow at a different pace into the various programs. The standards divergence of various software results in a limited ability to exchange data between and within projects, especially one sees the difficulty in moving data from one program to another. The Document eXchange File format represents an early attempt to standardize the exchange of drawing information by Autodesk. However, the data was limited to geometric data required for the production of plotted drawings. Metadata in a Building Information Model provides a method to add information to the basic geometric configuration provided in a Document eXchange File. Building Information Model programs use data structures to define smart objects that encapsulate building data in a searchable and robust format. Due to the complexity of building designs eXtensible Markup Language schemas of three dimensional models are often large files that can contain considerable amounts of superfluous information. The aim of this research is to exclude all the superfluous information from the design information and determine the absolute minimum information required to execute the construction of a project. A plain concrete beam element was used as the case study for this research. The results show that a minimal information schema can be developed for a simple building element. Further research is required on more complex elements.

Bhandare, Ruchika

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste

47

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to...

48

Microbial metatranscriptomics in a permanent marine oxygen minimum zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simultaneous characterization of taxonomic composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) has potential to broaden perspectives on the microbial and biogeochemical dynamics ...

Stewart, Frank J.

49

Study on optimal train movement for minimum energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The presented thesis project is a study on train energy consumption calculation and optimal train driving strategies for minimum energy consumption. This study is… (more)

Gkortzas, Panagiotis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts Title Estimate of...

51

Minimum Concave Cost Flow Over a Grid Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 12, 2012 ... Abstract The minimum concave cost network flow problem ... a grid network with a general nonnegative separable concave cost function.

52

Minimum cost subset selection with two competing agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 11, 2010 ... Minimum cost subset selection with two competing agents. Claudia Marini( nicosia ***at*** dia.uniroma3.it) Gaia Nicosia(nicosia ***at*** ...

53

Minimum Concave Cost Flow Over a Grid Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 12, 2012 ... Abstract: The minimum concave cost network flow problem (MCCNFP) is NP- hard, but efficient polynomial-time algorithms exist for some ...

54

Minimum cost subset selection with two competing agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

do not require qualified personnel, or when internal costs proportional to skills are incurred .... In conclusion, we tackle four different versions of the minimum cost ...

55

An Efficient Algorithm for Computing Robust Minimum Capacity st Cuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 20, 2008 ... Abstract: The Minimum Capacity s-t Cut Problem (Min Cut) is an intensively studied problem in combinatorial optimization. In this paper, we ...

56

Optimization Online - Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 28, 2007 ... Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization. Benjamin Recht(brecht ***at*** caltech.edu)

57

On the complexity of maximizing the minimum Shannon capacity in ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 18, 2010 ... On the complexity of maximizing the minimum Shannon capacity in wireless networks by joint channel assignment and power allocation.

58

Short title: STOCHASTIC VARIATIONAL APPROACH TO MINIMUM UNCERTAINTY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schrödinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials. PACS numbers:03.65.-w, 03.65.Ca, 03.65.Bz 1.

Fabrizio Illuminati; Lorenza Viola

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Characterization of imaging phone cameras using minimum description length principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach for the characterization of a mobile phone's color camera is presented. The use of high-order polynomials, Fourier sine series, and artificial neural networks (ANN) for solving this problem ... Keywords: artificial neural network, high-order polynomial, imaging mobile phone, minimum description length

Adrian Burian; Aki Happonen; Mihaela Cirlugea

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Theoretical Minimum Energy Use of a Building HVAC System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the theoretical minimum energy use required by the HVAC system in a particular code compliant office building. This limit might be viewed as the "Carnot Efficiency" for HVAC system. It assumes that all ventilation and air conditioning in the building are provided using the minimum energy value that does not violate physical law.

Tanskyi, O.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Underwater vehicles: The minimum time problem Department of Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater vehicles: The minimum time problem M. Chyba Department of Mathematics 2565 McCarthy Mall for a class of underwater vehicles. We focus on the situation of initial and final configurations at rest In this paper we pursue the analysis of the minimum time problem for a special class of underwater vehicles, see

Sontag, Eduardo

62

Underwater vehicles: The minimum time problem Department of Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater vehicles: The minimum time problem M. Chyba Department of Mathematics 2565 McCarthy Mall for a class of underwater vehicles. We focus on the situation of initial and final configurations at rest the analysis of the minimum time problem for a special class of underwater vehicles, see [5], [6] for previous

Sussmann, Hector

63

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations

64

Polynomial Time Algorithms for Minimum Energy Scheduling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of power management policies is to reduce the amount of energy consumed by computer systems while maintaining satisfactory level of performance. One common method for saving energy is to simply suspend the system during the idle times. No energy is consumed in the suspend mode. However, the process of waking up the system itself requires a certain fixed amount of energy, and thus suspending the system is beneficial only if the idle time is long enough to compensate for this additional energy expenditure. In the specific problem studied in the paper, we have a set of jobs with release times and deadlines that need to be executed on a single processor. Preemptions are allowed. The processor requires energy L to be woken up and, when it is on, it uses one unit of energy per one unit of time. It has been an open problem whether a schedule minimizing the overall energy consumption can be computed in polynomial time. We solve this problem in positive, by providing an O(n^5)-time algorithm. In addition we pr...

Baptiste, Philippe; Durr, Christoph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Trends of Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in Northern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of testing the homogeneity of the basic data used in this study, that is, the mean monthly maximum and minimum temperature (as derived from daily observations) of several long-term climatological stations of ...

Ramon A. Quintana-Gomez

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Theory and Applications of the Minimum Spanning Tree Rank Histogram  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A minimum spanning tree (MST) rank histogram (RH) is a multidimensional ensemble reliability verification tool. The construction of debiased, decorrelated, and covariance-homogenized MST RHs is described. Experiments using Euclidean L2, variance, ...

Daniel Gombos; James A. Hansen; Jun Du; Jeff McQueen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Minimum Wage Effects Across State Borders: Estimates Using Contiguous Counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on earnings and employment in restaurants and other low-wageOur primary focus is on restaurants, since they are the mostof minimum wages on restaurant earnings, but the local

Dube, Andrajit; Lester, T. William; Reich, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in reservoir impoundments or parts...

69

Minimum Purchase Price Regulations (Prince Edward Island, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minimum Purchase Price Regulations establish the price which utilities must pay for power produced by large-scale renewable energy generators – that is those capable of producing more than 100...

70

What Solar Oscillation Tell us About the Solar Minimum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of continuous helioseismic data for two consecutive solar minima has provided a unique opportunity to study the changes in the solar interior that might have led to this unusual minimum. We present preliminary analysis of inter mediate-degree mode frequencies in the 3 mHz band during the current period of minimal solar activity and show that the mode frequencies are significantly lower than those during the previous activity minimum. Our analysis do not show any signature of the beginning of cycle 24 till the end of 2008. In addition, the zonal and meridional flow patterns inferred from inverting frequencies also hint for a delayed onset of a new cycle. The estimates of travel time are higher than the previous minimum confirming a relatively weak solar activity during the current minimum.

Jain, Kiran; Burtseva, O; Hernandez, I Gonzalez; Hill, F; Howe, R; Kholikov, S; Komm, R; Leibacher, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Selection of minimum earthquake intensity in calculating pipe failure probabilities  

SciTech Connect

In a piping reliability analysis, it is sometimes necessary to specify a minimum ground motion intensity, usually the peak acceleration, below which the ground motions are not considered as earthquakes and, hence, are neglected. The calculated probability of failure of a piping system is dependent on this selected minimum earthquake intensity chosen for the analysis. A study was conducted to determine the effects of the minimum earthquake intensity on the probability of pipe failure. The results indicated that the probability of failure of the piping system is not very sensitive to the variations of the selected minimum peak ground acceleration. However, it does have significant effects on various scenarios that make up the system failure.

Lo, T.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

An Efficient Algorithm for Computing Robust Minimum Capacity st Cuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2008 ... The Minimum Capacity s-t Cut Problem (Min Cut) is an intensively ... In this paper, we study Min Cut when arc capacities are uncertain but ...

73

Minimum carbon tax level needed to prompt a widespread shift to nuclear power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide is suspected to be a major contributor to global warming. In the United States, nearly 70% of electricity is produced using coal or natural gas, both of which emit carbon dioxide into the environment. Nuclear ...

Thornton, Katherine C. (Katherine Claire)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut) Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut) Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations apply to all dams and structures which impound or divert waters on rivers or their tributaries, with some exceptions. The

75

Maximum Spectral Luminous Efficacy of White Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally-imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and---to a lesser extent---the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250--370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

Murphy, T W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Compliance of clinical trial registries with the World Health Organization minimum data set: a survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organization minimum data set: a survey Lorenzo P Moja* 1 ,of the WHO minimum data set. Methods: A retrospectivethe launch of the WHO minimum data set seemed to positively

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Recent State Minimum Temperature Records in the Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State minimum temperature records were set or tied in Indiana (?37.8°C) and Kentucky (?38.3°C) in January 1994, and in Illinois (?37.2°C), Iowa (?43.9°C), Minnesota (?51.1°C), and Wisconsin (?48.3°C) in February 1996. The veracity of these ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Minimum-outage broadcast in wireless networks with fading channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of cooperative broadcasting for minimum outage in wireless networks. We consider wireless multihop broadcast as a set of transmitters that transmit in a certain order. The receiving nodes are able to combine all the previous transmissions ... Keywords: broadcast, multicast, outage, wireless networks

Tolga Girici; Gulizar Duygu Kurt

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Power Allocations in Minimum-Energy SER Constrained Cooperative Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Power Allocations in Minimum-Energy SER Constrained Cooperative Networks Behrouz Maham-Spring). Behrouz Maham and Are Hjørungnes are with UNIK ­ University Graduate Center, University of Oslo, Norway. Behrouz Maham is currently a visiting scholar at Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

80

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION Seungjin on the variance of decon­ volved signal. We also consider the maximum negen­ tropy principle and show that the CME version, without any prior knowledge (such as channel impulse response, training data). As the demand

Choi, Seungjin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A faster distributed protocol for constructing a minimum spanning tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the problem of constructing a minimum-weight spanning tree (MST) in a distributed network. This is one of the most important problems in the area of distributed computing. There is a long line of gradually improving protocols ...

Michael Elkin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Minimum cost multiple multicast network coding with quantized rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider multiple multicast sessions with intra-session network coding where rates over all links are integer multiples of a basic rate. Although having quantized rates over communication links is quite common, conventional minimum ... Keywords: Decomposition algorithm, Multicast networks, Network coding

M. A. Raayatpanah; H. Salehi Fathabadi; B. H. Khalaj; S. Khodayifar

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Minimum-mirror-area single-stage solar concentrators  

SciTech Connect

A means of generating a comcentrating mirror of minimum size for a given average flux-concentration output is outlined. The method is useful for acceptance angles typical of those required for tilting and tracking solar concentrators and can result in substantial cost savings when expensive mirrors (i.e.,glass) are used. Comparisons are made with compound parabolic concentrators.

Mills, D.; Harting, E.; Giutronich, J.E.; Cellich, W.; Morton, A.; Walker, I.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

THE SOLAR CYCLE AT THE MAUNDER MINIMUM EPOCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE SOLAR CYCLE AT THE MAUNDER MINIMUM EPOCH HIROKO MIYAHARA, DMITRY SOKOLOFF and ILYA G. USOSKIN Solar-Terrestrial Environmental Laboratory, Nagoya University Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601, Japan Department minima, when the solar dynamo was in a special mode. We review available sets of direct and indirect data

Usoskin, Ilya G.

85

MINIMUM EMITTANCE LATTICE FOR SYNCHROTRON RADIATION STORAGE RINGS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MINIMUM EMITTANCE LATTICE FOR MINIMUM EMITTANCE LATTICE FOR SYNCHROTRON RADIATION STORAGE RINGS 1. C. Teng ANL/FNAL LS-17 L. Teng March 18, 1985 The natural emittance of an electron beam in a storage ring is given by (see e.g., M. Sands, SLAC 21) (1) where Cq =~~= 3.832 x 10-l3 m 32/3 mc J x partition factor in the bending plane y = total energy in mc 2 uni ts p orbit radius in bending magnets (assumed the same in all magne ts) H yn 2 - + 2ann ' + Bn I 2 ( a, B, Y = betatron functions ) n, n I dispersion functions <> = averaging over bending magnets We shall calculate for each bending magnet, then average over all magnets. 2 A. General Expression for H This can be calculated in a straightforward manner, but we can save a great deal of arithmetic with some preliminary formal analytical

86

Minimum/maximum excitation limiter performance goals for small generation  

SciTech Connect

Small generators connected to the utility system often act as followers as they tend to follow system bus voltage variations. For the lack of kVA capacity, small machines tend to be susceptible to becoming over or under excited (excessive Vars in or Vars out of the generator) as the voltage regulator tries to maintain its setpoint with variations in system bus voltage. Minimum and maximum excitation limiters are utilized to limit the voltage regulator characteristic response to system bus voltage changes, that can otherwise result in machine overheating and/or pulling out of synchronization. This paper reviews the operating performance of minimum and maximum excitation limiters used on small machines, and provides the user typical performance expectations. The examples will highlight both main field and exciter field applications. Lastly, conditions will be reviewed that may occur during excitation limiter initial startup that can affect their ability to be initially tuned.

Eberly, T.W.; Schaefer, R.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Impact of Minimum Load Operation on Steam Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some utilities, as part of a fleet management strategy, are keeping baseload-design plants that are not competitive for 24/7 dispatch at minimum loads to increase their ability to respond to changing demand. Units being operated this way face some associated risks and may see an additional drop in availability, further exacerbating supply management issues and increasing O&M costs. This report seeks to capture ...

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

Minimum weight perfect matching in O(1) parallel time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider a 2-D square array of qubits of infinite extent. We provide a formal proof that the infinite size minimum weight perfect matching problem associated with running a particular class of topological quantum error correction codes on this array can be exactly solved with a corresponding infinite 2-D square array of classical computing devices in constant average time per round of error detection provided physical error rates are below fixed nonzero values, and other physically reasonable assumptions.

Austin G. Fowler

2013-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

An Obstacle-avoiding Minimum Variation B-spline Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of computing a planar curve, restricted to lie between two given polygonal chains, such that the integral of the square of arc-length derivative of curvature along the curve is minimized. We introduce the Minimum Variation B-spline problem which is a linearly constrained optimization problem over curves defined by Bspline functions only. An empirical investigation indicates that this problem has one unique solution among all uniform quartic B-spline functions. Furthermore, we prove that, for any B-spline function, the convexity properties of the problem are preserved subject to a scaling and translation of the knot sequence defining the B-spline. 1

Tomas Berglund; Inge Söderkvist

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Minimum bias and underlying event studies at CDF  

SciTech Connect

Soft, non-perturbative, interactions are poorly understood from the theoretical point of view even though they form a large part of the hadronic cross section at the energies now available. We review the CDF studies on minimum-bias ad underlying event in p{bar p} collisions at 2 TeV. After proposing an operative definition of 'underlying event', we present part of a systematic set of measurements carried out by the CDF Collaboration with the goal to provide data to test and improve the QCD models of hadron collisions. Different analysis strategies of the underlying event and possible event topologies are discussed. Part of the CDF minimum-bias results are also presented: in this sample, that represent the full inelastic cross-section, we can test simultaneously our knowledge of all the components that concur to form hadronic interactions. Comparisons with MonteCarlo simulations are always shown along with the data. These measurements will also contribute to more precise estimates of the soft QCD background of high-p{sub T} observables.

Moggi, Niccolo; /INFN, Bologna

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The elusive minimum viable population size for white sturgeon  

SciTech Connect

Biological conservation of sturgeon populations is a concern for many species. Those responsible for managing the white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and similar species are interested in identifying extinction thresholds to avoid. Two thresholds that exist in theory are the minimum viable population size (MVP) and minimum amount of suitable habitat. In this paper, we present both model and empirical estimates of these thresholds. We modified a population viability analysis (PVA) model for white sturgeon to include two new Allee mechanisms. Despite this, PVA-based MVP estimates were unrealistically low compared with empirical estimates unless opportunities for spawning were assumed to be less frequent. PVA results revealed a trade-off between MVP and habitat thresholds; smaller populations persisted in longer river segments and vice versa. Our empirical analyses suggested (1) a MVP range based on population trends from 1,194 to 27,700 individuals, and (2) a MVP estimate of 4,000 individuals based on recruitment. Long-term historical population surveys are needed for more populations to pinpoint an MVP based on trends, whereas the available data were sufficient to estimate MVP based on recruitment. Beyond the MVP, we developed a hierarchical model for population status based on empirical data. Metapopulation support was the most important predictor of population health, followed by the length of free-flowing habitat, with habitat thresholds at 26 and 150 km. Together, these results suggest that habitat and connectivity are important determinants of population status that likely influence the site-specific MVP thresholds.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Lepla, Ken B. [Idaho Power Company; Van Winkle, Webb [Van Windle Environmental Consulting; James, Mr Brad [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; McAdam, Dr Steve [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The impact of minimum age of employment regulation on child labor and schooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Promoting minimum age of employment regulation has been a centerpiece in child labor policy for the last 15 years. If enforced, minimum age regulation would change the age profile of paid child employment. Using micro-data ...

Edmonds, Eric V

93

A New Perspective on Recent Global Warming: Asymmetric Trends of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures for over 50% (10%) of the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere landmass, accounting for 37% of the global landmass, indicate that the rise of the minimum temperature has occurred at a rate three times that ...

Thomas R. Karl; Richard W. Knight; Kevin P. Gallo; Thomas C. Peterson; Philip D. Jones; George Kukla; Neil Plummer; Vyacheslav Razuvayev; Janette Lindseay; Robert J. Charlson

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy Tamar Kaffe-Abramovich and Ron Unger Background: Proteins seem to have their native structure in a global minimum of free energy is in the global minimum of free energy. The aim of this study is to investigate such evolutionary processes

Unger, Ron

95

The quadratic minimum spanning tree problem: A lower bounding procedure and an efficient search algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the quadratic minimum spanning tree problem (QMSTP) which is known to be NP-hard. Given a complete graph, the QMSTP consists of finding a minimum spanning tree (MST) where interaction costs between pairs of edges are prescribed. ... Keywords: Lagrangian relaxation, Local search, Quadratic minimum spanning tree problem

Temel Öncan; Abraham P. Punnen

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Minimum Multicolored Subgraph Problem in Multiplex PCR Primer Set Selection and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum Multicolored Subgraph Problem in Multiplex PCR Primer Set Selection and Population is a common generalization of minimum cost multiplex PCR primer set selection and maximum likeli- hood and its variants model two important bioinformatics problems: minimum cost multiplex PCR primer set

Mandoiu, Ion

97

Teacher Efficacy Beliefs:Understanding the Relationship Between Efficacy and Achievement in Urban Elementary Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Chicago Press. McLaughlin, M. W. , & Marsh, D.efficacy construct, McLaughlin and Marsh (1978), researchersinfluence student learning (McLaughlin & Marsh, 1978) (see

Harris, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A soft circuit curriculum to promote technological self-efficacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of technological self-efficacy in young people can have a dramatic impact on diversity in the field of computing. Students'self-efficacy and scientific understanding can benefit from engaging in hands-on ...

Lovell, Emily Marie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

output) per watt (measure of power input). The efficacy of a typical incandescent light bulb ranges between 12 lmW and 18 lmW. The efficacy of a typical compact fluorescent...

100

The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States); Stawarz, Joshua E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Forman, Miriam A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

2009-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

99TechSpecs-LevelIIIMods.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EV AMERICA TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Effective October 1, 1999 Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications 1999 EV AMERICA TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS 2 MINIMUM VEHICLE REQUIREMENTS For a vehicle to be considered qualified as an EV America-USDOE "Production" level vehicle, it must meet the minimum criteria defined by "shall" terminology utilized in the Specification. [For clarity, the use of the word "Shall" defines minimum requirements, whereas the use of the word "Should" defines design and performance objectives.] Vehicles which cannot meet all of the "Shall" requirements will be considered Prototypes, and will not be considered as having "passed" EV America. The following requirements shall be met by any vehicle before it can receive EV America "Production" level status:

103

PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

CERTA, P.J.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

104

On the minimum temperature of the quiet solar chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aims: We aim to provide an estimate of the minimum temperature of the quiet solar chromosphere. methods: We perform a 2D radiation-MHD simulation spanning the upper convection zone to the lower corona. The simulation includes non-LTE radiative transfer and {an equation-of-state that includes non-equilibrium ionization of hydrogen and non-equilibrium H_2 molecule formation}. We analyze the reliability of the various assumptions made in our model in order to assess the realism of the simulation. results: Our simulation contains pockets of cool gas with down to 1660 K from 1 Mm up to 3.2 Mm height. It overestimates the radiative heating, and contains non-physical heating below 1660 K. Therefore we conclude that cool pockets in the quiet solar chromosphere might have even lower temperatures than in the simulation, provided that there exist areas in the chromosphere without significant magnetic heating. We suggest off-limb molecular spectroscopy to look for such cool pockets and 3D simulations including a local dy...

Leenaarts, Jorrit; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Minimum error discrimination between similarity-transformed quantum states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the well-known necessary and sufficient conditions for minimum error discrimination (MED), we extract an equivalent form for the MED conditions. In fact, by replacing the inequalities corresponding to the MED conditions with an equivalent but more suitable and convenient identity, the problem of mixed state discrimination with optimal success probability is solved. Moreover, we show that the mentioned optimality conditions can be viewed as a Helstrom family of ensembles under some circumstances. Using the given identity, MED between N similarity transformed equiprobable quantum states is investigated. In the case that the unitary operators are generating a set of irreducible representation, the optimal set of measurements and corresponding maximum success probability of discrimination can be determined precisely. In particular, it is shown that for equiprobable pure states, the optimal measurement strategy is the square-root measurement (SRM), whereas for the mixed states, SRM is not optimal. In the case that the unitary operators are reducible, there is no closed-form formula in the general case, but the procedure can be applied in each case in accordance to that case. Finally, we give the maximum success probability of optimal discrimination for some important examples of mixed quantum states, such as generalized Bloch sphere m-qubit states, spin-j states, particular nonsymmetric qudit states, etc.

Jafarizadeh, M. A. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sufiani, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazhari Khiavi, Y. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

India’s Credible Minimum Deterrence A Decade Later  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deterrence in the most conventional sense implies the making of military threats in order to prevent an adversary from taking aggressive actions (Buzan 1987). According to Barry Buzan (1987: 136), deterrence as a concept purports to stop an unwanted action by the adversary before they occur and encompasses both denial and the possibility of retaliation. The introduction of nuclear weapons into this complex dynamic of deterrence does not stabilise the crisis situation, as conventional wisdom suggests, but makes it even more threatening. The core of nuclear deterrence involves convincing the adversary that the cost of an undesirable action is more than the rewards. This requires a comprehensive understanding of not only the adversary’s motives, decision-making processes and objectives, but also one’s own capability to influence the calculus of costs and benefits that an adversary attaches to his own belligerence. Therefore, nuclear deterrence also takes into account the credibility of one’s own nuclear threat that is aimed at convincing the adversary that his belligerence will be ‘punished ’ by unacceptable damage through nuclear means. It is in the wake of this that India evolved its own nuclear doctrine which seeks to uphold the notion of credible minimum deterrence.

Tanvi Kulkarni; Alankrita Sinha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Multiple Gravity-Wave Breaking Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is noted that gravity waves for which |u¯?c| (u¯=mean flow speed, c=wave phase speed) has a sharp minimum in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere will have decaying amplitudes above this level despite exponentially decreasing mean ...

Richard S. Lindzen

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Impact on Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

109

The Impact of Minimum Quality Standards on Firm Entry, Exit and Product Quality: The Case of the Child Care Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Theory of Minimum Standards,” Journal of Politi- calto Minimum Quality Standards Regulation,” NBER working paperDuopoly and Quality Standards,” European Economic Review,

Hotz, V. Joseph; Xiao, Mo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

Thomas, L.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Minimum Cost Flow Problems with Value-at-Risk and Conditional ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic minimum cost flow (SMCF) problems have been studied for applica- tions involving random ...... approach to stochastic programming of heating oil.

112

Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico minimum efficiency performance standard million tons (of CO 2 ) national energyand Mexico, produces the largest savings of all the end uses: 780 TWh. The baseline energy

Letschert, Virginie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Experimental Shield Test Facility for the Development of Minimum Weight Shields for Compact Reactor Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Discussions are given of the characteristics of fission-source plate, graphite reactor, and pool-type reactor facilities applicable to development studies of minimum weight shielding materials. Advantages of a proposed SNAP dual-purpose shielding facility are described in terms of a disk-shaped fission-source plate, reactor, and building. A program for the study of advanced shielding materials is discussed for materials and configuations to be evaluted with the fission-source plate, the testing of the prototype at high-power levels, and full-power tests on the actual reactor.

Tomlinson, R.L.

1959-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Influence of Agricultural Dual Credit on Student College Readiness Self-Efficacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this correlational and descriptive study was to examine the influence of an agricultural dual credit course curriculum on student self-efficacy of college readiness as students matriculate to post-secondary education. To evaluate the personal characteristics, postsecondary plans, program perceptions and college readiness self-efficacy, a quantitative survey and online instrument was used to gather data and analyze information on high school students enrolled in agricultural education in both dual credit and non-dual credit courses primarily in the Middle Tennessee Region. The target population (N = 543) for this study was defined as students at 16 schools where the dual credit course was offered with the Middle Tennessee State University, School of Agribusiness and Agriscience in the 2011-2012 academic year. A total of 245 students from 16 secondary agricultural programs in seven different school districts across Tennessee, primarily in the Middle Tennessee region, participated in the study for a response rate of approximately 45%. This study examined college readiness of student participation in an agricultural dual credit course and sought to determine the relationship between student participation in a dual credit course offering and college readiness self-efficacy as well as student perceptions of the course offering. Course self-efficacy was higher among dual credit participants versus non-dual credit participants. Social self-efficacy was also higher for dual credit participants. Females had higher Course self-efficacy, and there was a positive relationship between GPA and each construct of the college readiness self-efficacy inventory. Participant perceptions of the agricultural dual credit program were also high. This study indicates that dual credit participants can confidently approach post-secondary options, and that they are more likely to be successful in college due to level of self-efficacy as they matriculate into college. Recommendations from the study include: Using the MTSU dual credit model in future dual credit course developments and collaborations; using findings as a basis for training future agricultural education teachers on how to improve CRSE; and additional and longitudinal studies to track dual credit students’ success in college.

Neely, Alanna L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Polynomial-time algorithms for minimum energy scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of power management policies is to reduce the amount of energy consumed by computer systems while maintaining a satisfactory level of performance. One common method for saving energy is to simply suspend the system during idle times. No energy ... Keywords: Job scheduling, dynamic programming, minimizing energy consumption

Philippe Baptiste; Marek Chrobak; Christoph Dürr

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Admission REQUiREmEnTsnsC PROGRAMME MINIMUM ADMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCEPTANCE LEVEL SELECTION PROCEDURES HEALTH SCIENCES · Bachelor of Medicine and Bach- elor of Surgery - MB BCh (6 years) · Bachelor of Pharmacy ­ BPharm (4 years) · Bachelor of Dental Science ­ BDS (5 years) · Bachelor of Science in Physio- therapy ­ BSc(Physiotherapy) (4 years) · Bachelor of Health Sciences (Bio

Wagner, Stephan

117

When Crime Pays: Measuring Judicial Efficacy against Corruption in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for now - crime pays in Brazil. Paginal5de27 ReferencesEfficacy against Corruption in Brazil Carlos Higino Ribeiroa widespread perception in Brazil that civil servants caught

Ribeiro de Alencar, Carlos Higino; Gico, Ivo Jr.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Two-Point Boundary Value Problems for Curves: The Case of Minimum Free Energy Paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-Point Boundary Value Problems for Curves: The Case of Minimum Free Energy Paths corrected.S.A. Abstract The calculation of a minimum free energy path can be considered as a two-point boundary value box solvers. The second paragraph of Section 1 is corrected. Because free energy is defined in terms

Skeel, Robert

119

A branch-and-cut algorithm for the minimum labeling Hamiltonian cycle problem and two variants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a mathematical model, valid inequalities and polyhedral results for the minimum labeling Hamiltonian cycle problem. This problem is defined on an unweighted graph in which each edge has a label. The aim is to determine a Hamiltonian ... Keywords: Branch-and-cut, Minimum labeling problem, Traveling salesman problem

Nicolas Jozefowiez; Gilbert Laporte; Frédéric Semet

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fast Algorithms for Specially Structured Minimum Cost Flow Problems with Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the classical minimum cost flow problem is to send units of a good that reside at one or more points in a network (sources or supply nodes) with arc capacities to one or more other points in the network (sinks or demand nodes), incurring ... Keywords: analysis of algorithms, applications, computational complexity, flow algorithms, minimum cost flow problem, networks

Balachandran Vaidyanathan; Ravindra K. Ahuja

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Minimum Energy Compensation Strategy and Characteristic Analysis for Dynamic Voltage Restorer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum energy compensation strategy and its characteristic for Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR) considering the equipment’s voltage limitation are discussed. The strategy when the injection voltage is under or especially above the voltage limitation ... Keywords: dynamic voltage restorer, minimum energy compensation, compensation strategy, compensation characteristic, voltage limitation

Yingying Liu; Xu Yonghai; Xiao Xiangning; Guo Chunlin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Emerging Technologies » Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently determining how pollution impacts the efficacy of cool roofs. The project specifically is focusing on the efficacy of white roofs in Northern India. The first phase of the project will take physical measurements to characterize the cooling and climate effects of white roofs. Results from this project will provide important guidance to policymakers and planners as they decide where cool roofs would have the greatest benefits. Project Description The project involves the development of advanced surfaces and next-generation materials to improve solar reflectance of roofs; the ability to reflect the visible, infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths of the

123

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

124

www.wine-economics.org Restaurant Prices and the Minimum Wage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the e¤ect of the minimum wage on restaurant prices. For that purpose, we estimate a price rigidity model by exploiting a unique dataset of individual price quotes used to calculate the Consumer Price Index in France. We …nd a positive and signi…cant impact of the minimum wage on prices. We obtain that the e¤ect of the minimum wage on prices is very protracted. The aggregate impact estimated with our model takes more than a year to fully pass through to retail prices.

Denis Fougère; Erwan Gautier; Hervé Le Bihan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Surface structure determination by a one-stop search method for the deepest minimum  

SciTech Connect

We report results of a one-stop automated search method for the deepest minimum in surface structure determination. Starting from known chemical bond lengths, the deepest minimization frozen low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) method locates the deepest minimum in a single run without any human intervention. This is achieved by using an approximation method, the frozen LEED, which has a radius of convergence of over 0.8 A, together with a simulated annealing algorithm that hops out of local minima until a deepest minimum is found. Demonstrations are presented using simulated and experimental results.

Yu, Z.X. [Department of Physics, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Tong, S.Y. [Department of Physics and Materials, City University of Hong Kong (China)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Towards the capability of providing power-area-delay trade-off at the register transfer level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new register-transfer level (RT-level) power estimation technique based on technology decomposition. Given the Boolean description of a circuit function, the power consumption of two typical circuit implementations, namely the minimum ...

Chun-hong Chen; Chi-ying Tsui

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Recent Trends of Minimum and Maximum Surface Temperatures over Eastern Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated recent trends in the mean surface minimum and maximum air temperatures over eastern Africa by use of both graphical and statistical techniques. Daily records for 71 stations for the period 1939–92 were used.

S. M. King’uyu; L. A. Ogallo; E. K. Anyamba

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Minimum Uncertainty, Coherence and Squeezing in Diffusion Processes, and Stochastic Quantization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that uncertainty relations, as well as minimum uncertainty coherent and squeezed states, are structural properties for diffusion processes. Through Nelson stochastic quantization we derive the stochastic image of the quantum mechanical coherent and squeezed states.

Salvatore De Martino; Silvio De Siena; Fabrizio Illuminati; Giuseppe Vitiello

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

MINIMUM UNCERTAINTY AND SQUEEZING IN DIFFUSION PROCESSES AND STOCHASTIC QUANTIZATION 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that uncertainty relations, as well as minimum uncertainty coherent and squeezed states, are structural properties for diffusion processes. Through Nelson stochastic quantization we derive the stochastic image of the quantum mechanical coherent and squeezed states. 1

S. De Martino; S. De Siena; F. Illuminati; G. Vitiello

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recent Trends in Maximum and Minimum Temperature Threshold Exceedences in the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the annual number of daily maximum and minimum temperature threshold exceedences between 1951 and 1993 are assessed at a network of 22 primarily rural sites in the northeastern United States. After adjusting the annual time series for ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Local Minimum Aliasing Method for Use in Nonlinear Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local spectral method is a minimum aliasing technique for the discretization and numerical integration of prognostic systems consisting of nonlinear partial differential equations. The technique embodies many features of both spectral ...

John R. Anderson

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Hallam, Steven

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

133

Systematic Biases in Manual Observations of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate that manual observations of daily maximum and minimum temperature are strongly biased toward temperatures ending in certain digits. The nature and severity of these biases are quantified using standard statistical methods. ...

Jon M. Nese

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimising maximum power output and minimum entropy generation of Atkinson cycle using mutable smart bees algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is optimising maximum power output (MPO) and minimum entropy generation (MEG) of an Atkinson cycle as a multi-objective constraint thermodynamic problem by a new improved artificial bee colony algorithm which utilises 'mutable ...

Mofid Gorji; Ahmad Mozaffari; Sina Mohammadrezaei Noudeh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Method to Estimate Missing Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to estimate missing daily maximum and minimum temperatures is presented. Temperature estimates are based on departures from daily temperature normals at the three closest stations with similar observation times. Although applied to ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Keith L. Eggleston; Warren W. Knapp

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Minimum bayes risk decoding with enlarged hypothesis space in system combination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new system combination strategy in Statistical Machine Translation. Tromble et al. (2008) introduced the evidence space into Minimum Bayes Risk decoding in order to quantify the relative performance within lattice or n-best output ...

Tsuyoshi Okita; Josef van Genabith

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Minimum Spanning Tree Histogram as a Verification Tool for Multidimensional Ensemble Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum spanning tree (MST) histogram is a multivariate extension of the ideas behind the conventional scalar rank histogram. It tabulates the frequencies, over n forecast occasions, of the rank of the MST length for each ensemble, within the ...

D. S. Wilks

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Reconstructed Annual Minimum Temperatures for the Gulf States, 1799–1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very long series of minimum winter temperatures for the United States Gulf Coast region was developed. A search was made through sources of archival data to locate early temperature records for the region. Records from a number of different ...

Robert D. Erhardt Jr.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Modeling a Sensor to Improve its Efficacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robots rely on sensors to provide them with information about their surroundings. However, high-quality sensors can be extremely expensive and cost-prohibitive. Thus many robotic systems must make due with lower-quality sensors. Here we demonstrate via a case study how modeling a sensor can improve its efficacy when employed within a Bayesian inferential framework. As a test bed we employ a robotic arm that is designed to autonomously take its own measurements using an inexpensive LEGO light sensor to estimate the position and radius of a white circle on a black field. The light sensor integrates the light arriving from a spatially distributed region within its field of view weighted by its Spatial Sensitivity Function (SSF). We demonstrate that by incorporating an accurate model of the light sensor SSF into the likelihood function of a Bayesian inference engine, an autonomous system can make improved inferences about its surroundings. The method presented here is data-based, fairly general, and made with plu...

Malakar, N K; Knuth, K H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

DiffServ node with join minimum cost queue policy and multiclass traffic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DiffServ, the vehicle for providing relative QoS in the Internet is also easily amenable to simple and effective pricing mechanisms. By pricing access to a relative QoS, we can model a DiffServ node as a 'Join Minimum Cost Queue' in which an arriving ... Keywords: diffServ, finite buffer queues, join minimum cost queue, join shortest queue, network pricing, quasi-birth--death processes, queue control

Rahul Tandra; N. Hemachandra; D. Manjunath

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

On-Off Minimum-Time Control With Limited Fuel Usage: Global Optima Via Linear Programming  

SciTech Connect

A method for finding a global optimum to the on-off minimum-time control problem with limited fuel usage is presented. Each control can take on only three possible values: maximum, zero, or minimum. The simplex method for linear systems naturally yields such a solution for the re-formulation presented herein because it always produces an extreme point solution to the linear program. Numerical examples for the benchmark linear flexible system are presented.

DRIESSEN,BRIAN

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Use of a Power Fluidic Low Level Mixer to Improve the Efficacy ...  

Remote operation. Power Fluidics . TM. 11. Typical System Configurations. Charge Vessel adjacent to or inside tank ... Leak Detection & Handling . ...

143

The Kinematic Structure of a Hurricane with Sea Level Pressure Less Than 900 mb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration aircraft recorded the first Doppler radar data in a tropical cyclone with a minimum sea level pressure (MSLP) <900 mb during a reconnaissance mission in Hurricane Gilbert on 14 September 1988, ...

Peter Dodge; Robert W. Burpee; Frank D. Marks Jr.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Estimating Noise Levels of Remotely Sensed Measurements from Satellites Using Spatial Structure Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is presented whereby the noise level of satellite measurements of the atmosphere and earth can be estimated. The technique analyzes a spatial array of data measured by a satellite instrument. A minimum of about 200 satellite ...

Donald W. Hillger; Thomas H. Vonder Haar

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

146

Testing minimum energy with powerful radio sources in clusters of galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze ROSAT data for cluster gas surrounding powerful radio galaxies, which is well fitted by a ``beta-model'' gas distribution, after allowing for a compact central source. The cluster thermal pressure at the distance of the radio lobes is typically an order of magnitude larger than the lobe minimum pressure. Since radio lobes are sharply-bounded, the missing pressure is not simply entrained intra-cluster gas. Thus the minimum energy in the lobes is a severe underestimate of the actual energy content. We argue that the extra energy is mostly in the form of particles, so that the magnetic field is below equipartition and thus not a major factor in the lobe dynamics. The large departure from minimum energy has far-reaching implications for the nature of AGN central engines and the supply of mechanical energy to the cluster gas.

J. P. Leahy; Nectaria A. B. Gizani

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Impact of CIR Storms on Thermosphere Density Variability during the Solar Minimum of 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar minimum of 2008 was exceptionally quiet, with sunspot numbers at their lowest in 75 years. During this unique solar minimum epoch, however, solar wind high - speed streams emanating from near-equatorial coronal holes occurred frequently and were the primary contributor to the recurrent geomagnetic activity at Earth. These conditions enabled the isolation of forcing by geomagnetic activity on the preconditioned solar minimum state of the upper atmosphere caused by Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs). Thermosphere density observations around 400 km from the CHAMP satellite are used to study the thermosphere density response to solar wind high - speed streams/CIRs. Superposed epoch results show that thermosphere density responds to high - speed streams globally, and the density at 400 km changes by 75% on average. The relative changes of neutral density are comparable at different latitudes, although its variability is largest at high latitudes. In addition, the response of thermosphere density to hi...

Lei, Jiuhou; Wang, Wenbin; McPherron, Robert L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A point-sensitive NMR imaging system (10) in which a main solenoid coil (11) produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils (PZ1 and PZ2) powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils (PX1, PX2; PY1, PY2) superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An RF generator (22) irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

Eberhard, Philippe H. (El Cerrito, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES AT THE MINIMUM OF THE 23rd SOLAR CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

Low- and mid-latitude coronal holes (CHs) observed on the Sun during the current solar activity minimum (from 2006 September 21, Carrington rotation (CR) 2048, to 2009 June 26, CR 2084) were analyzed using Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope and STEREO-A SECCHI EUVI data. From both the observations and Potential Field Source Surface modeling, we find that the area occupied by CHs inside a belt of +-40{sup 0} around the solar equator is larger in the current 2007 solar minimum relative to the similar phase of the previous 1996 solar minimum. The enhanced CH area is related to a recurrent appearance of five persistent CHs, which survived during 7-27 solar rotations. Three of the CHs are of positive magnetic polarity and two are negative. The most long-lived CH was being formed during 2 days and existed for 27 rotations. This CH was associated with fast solar wind at 1 AU of approximately 620 +- 40 km s{sup -1}. The three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modeling for this time period shows an open field structure above this CH. We conclude that the global magnetic field of the Sun possessed a multi-pole structure during this time period. Calculation of the harmonic power spectrum of the solar magnetic field demonstrates a greater prevalence of multi-pole components over the dipole component in the 2007 solar minimum compared to the 1996 solar minimum. The unusual large separation between the dipole and multi-pole components is due to the very low magnitude of the dipole component, which is three times lower than that in the previous 1996 solar minimum.

Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Linker, Jon; Mikic, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Luhmann, Janet; Lee, Christina O. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

How Will An Increase From $6.75 to $7.75 in the California Minimum Wage Impact the California Economy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of the 2001 California Minimum Wage Increase."Statistics and Research, California Industrial Relationsthe Minimum Wage in California," memorandum, Institute for

Vassalotti, Amy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Stochastic Modelling and 3D Minimum Variance RecursiveEstimation of Image Sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the 3D minimum variance filtering problem is considered. The proposed spatiotemporal filter is derived according to the assumption that the 3D signal can be modelled by an ensemble of smooth 3D gaussian random fields. The resulting ... Keywords: image processing, optimal filtering, stochastic modelling

L. Jetto

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A hierarchical application of the Minimum Current Corona C. Beveridge and D.W. Longcope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hierarchical application of the Minimum Current Corona C. Beveridge and D.W. Longcope Department. Beveridge, C.: 2003, Ph.D. Thesis, University of St. Andrews. Beveridge, C. and Longcope, D.W.: 2005, Solar.M.: 1990, Astrophys. J., 366, 577. Longcope, D.W.: 1996, Solar Phys, 169, 91. Longcope, D.W.: 2001, Phys

Longcope, Dana

153

Battery Sizing for Grid Connected PV Systems with Fixed Minimum Charging/Discharging Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery Sizing for Grid Connected PV Systems with Fixed Minimum Charging/Discharging Time Yu Ru, Jan Kleissl, and Sonia Martinez Abstract-- In this paper, we study a battery sizing problem for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems assuming that the battery charging/discharging limit scales linearly with its

Martínez, Sonia

154

Mobility-assisted minimum connected cover in a wireless sensor network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All properties of mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSNs) are inherited from static wireless sensor networks (WSNs) and meanwhile have their own uniqueness and node mobility. Sensor nodes in these networks monitor different regions of an area of interest ... Keywords: Energy-aware selection method, Minimum connected sensor cover set, Mobile wireless sensor networks, Redundant node, Relocation

Ahmed M. Khedr; Walid Osamy

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A robust forced dynamic sliding mode minimum energy position controller for permanent magnet synchronous motor drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a contribution towards improving the environment, a new position controller for vector controlled electric drives employing permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) is presented that achieves approximately 27% less frictional energy loss than a ... Keywords: forced dynamic control, minimum energy manoeuvres, sliding mode control, synchronous motor drives

Stephen J. Dodds; Gunaratnam. Sooriyakumar; Roy Perryman

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A stochastic minimum principle and an adaptive pathwise algorithm for stochastic optimal control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a numerical method for finite-horizon stochastic optimal control models. We derive a stochastic minimum principle (SMP) and then develop a numerical method based on the direct solution of the SMP. The method combines Monte Carlo pathwise simulation ... Keywords: Electric power systems, Monte Carlo simulation, Stochastic control

Panos Parpas, Mort Webster

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Statistical inference of minimum BD estimators and classifiers for varying-dimensional models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic modeling for large-scale datasets usually involves a varying-dimensional model space. This paper investigates the asymptotic properties, when the number of parameters grows with the available sample size, of the minimum-BD estimators and classifiers ... Keywords: A diverging number of parameters, Exponential family, Hemodynamic response function, Loss function, Optimal Bayes rule, primary, secondary

Chunming Zhang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A steady-state L-mode tokamak fusion reactor : large scale and minimum scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform extensive analysis on the physics of L-mode tokamak fusion reactors to identify (1) a favorable parameter space for a large scale steady-state reactor and (2) an operating point for a minimum scale steady-state ...

Reed, Mark W. (Mark Wilbert)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Analysis on Achieving a Minimum Bunch Length in LCLS Bunch Compressor One  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultra-short bunch is required by different applications in many aspects. In this paper, the condition to achieve a minimum bunch length at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) [1] bunch compressor one (BC1) is analyzed analytically and evaluated by simulation. The space charge, wake field and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects are not discussed here.

Sun, Yipeng

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

160

Externally Forced and Internal Variability in Ensemble Climate Simulations of the Maunder Minimum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the climate system to natural, external forcing during the Maunder Minimum (ca. a.d. 1645–1715) is investigated using a comprehensive climate model. An ensemble of six transient simulations is produced in order to examine the ...

Masakazu Yoshimori; Thomas F. Stocker; Christoph C. Raible; Manuel Renold

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optimal Control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles Based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles Based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle Namwook Kim. INTRODUCTION he optimal control of HEVs (Hybrid Electric Vehicles) is an important topic not only because, Sukwon Cha, Huei Peng Abstract - A number of strategies for the power management of HEVs (Hybrid Electric

Peng, Huei

162

GEOMAGNETIC EFFECTS OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM (1995-1996) AND SOLAR MAXIMUM (2000)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOMAGNETIC EFFECTS OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM (1995-1996) AND SOLAR on geomagnetic activity, quantified by the maximum hourly Dst and tri-hourly ap indices, in a period of 3 days after the shock, are evaluated. Correlations between shock parameters and Dst and ap geomagnetic indices

163

Improved Fixed-Parameter Algorithms for Minimum-Flip Consensus Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In computational phylogenetics, the problem of constructing a consensus tree for a given set of rooted input trees has frequently been addressed. In this article we study the Minimum-Flip Problem: the input trees are transformed into a binary ... Keywords: Phylogenetics, consensus tree, fixed-parameter algorithm

Sebastian Böcker; Quang Bao Anh Bui; Anke Truss

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Performance of the ATLAS Trigger Reconstruction for Minimum Bias Events, Missing Transverse Energy and Jets in pp-collisions at ?s = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the restart of the LHC, ATLAS has successfully recorded data at ?s = 0.9 and 7 TeV. The ATLAS trigger strategy realized a step-wise activation of the three level trigger system, starting with hardware-based first-level (L1) triggers and moving with increasing luminosities to the deployment of the software-based high-level triggers (HLT). We will present L1 and HLT triggers and their performance on 7 TeV collision data, whose use case range from the measurements of inelastic charged particle spectra to new physics searches. We will focus on triggers selecting inelastic pp-collisions (minimum bias), missing transverse energies (missing ET ) and jets. Different minimum bias triggers based of central tracking and forward detector components, their efficiencies as well as possible biases are presented. We highlight missing ET triggers, which require the magnitude of the vector sum of all transverse energies to exceed some threshold. While look-up-tables allow fast trigger decisions at L1, the full calorime...

Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Introduction to the Performance of the ATLAS Trigger Reconstruction for Minimum Bias Events, Missing Transverse Energy and Jets in pp-collisions at ?s = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the restart of the LHC, ATLAS has successfully recorded data at sqrt{s} = 0.9 and 7 TeV. The ATLAS trigger strategy realised a step-wise activation of the three level trigger system, starting with hardware-based first-level (L1) triggers and moving with increasing luminosities to the deployment of the software-based high-level triggers (HLT). We will present L1 and HLT triggers and their performance on 7 TeV collision data, whose use case range from the measuremens of inelastic charged particle spectra to new physics searches. We will focus on triggers selecting inelastic pp-collsions (minimum bias), missing transverse energies (missing E_{T}), jets and bjets. Different minimum bias triggers based of central tracking and forward detector components, their efficiencies as well as possible biases are presented. We highlight missing E_{T} triggers, which require the magnitude of the vector sum of all transverse energies to exceed some threshold. While look-up-tables allow fast trigger decisions at L1, the ...

Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

TriggerPerformance of the ATLAS Trigger Reconstruction for Minimum Bias Events, Missing Transverse Energy and Jets in pp-collisions at ?s = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the restart of the LHC, ATLAS has successfully recorded data at sqrt{s} = 0.9 and 7 TeV. The ATLAS trigger strategy realised a step-wise activation of the three level trigger system, starting with hardware-based first-level (L1) triggers and moving with increasing luminosities to the deployment of the software-based high-level triggers (HLT). We will present L1 and HLT triggers and their performance on 7 TeV collision data, whose use case range from the measuremens of inelastic charged particle spectra to new physics searches. We will focus on triggers selecting inelastic pp-collsions (minimum bias), missing transverse energies (missing E_{T}), jets and bjets. Different minimum bias triggers based of central tracking and forward detector components, their efficiencies as well as possible biases are presented. We highlight missing E_{T} triggers, which require the magnitude of the vector sum of all transverse energies to exceed some threshold. While look-up-tables allow fast trigger decisions at L1, the ...

Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sun Protection Intervention for Highway Workers: Long-Term Efficacy of UV Photography and Skin Cancer Information on Men’s Protective Cognitions and Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Background The risk for skin cancer is increased among older males and outdoor workers who have high levels of ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Purpose This study was designed to examine the long-term efficacy of UV photography interventions on male outdoor workers, the potential mediators of its impact, and the efficacy of UV photography and skin cancer vs. aging information with this population. Methods One hundred forty-eight male outdoor workers were randomly assigned to one of four intervention conditions or a control condition in a two by two plus one

Frederick X. Gibbons; Laura A. Walsh; James A. Kulik, Ph.D.; M. Gerrard; F. X. Gibbons; J. L. Dykstra; H. I. M. Mahler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Boulder, Colorados SmartRegs: Minimum Performance Standards for Residential Rental Housing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov March 20, 2012 Boulder, Colorado's SmartRegs: Minimum Performance Standards for Residential Rental Housing The Case for Performance Standards The City of Boulder's Climate Action Plan calls for greenhouse gas emissions reductions across all sectors of the community (e.g., buildings, transportation and industry). Energy conservation in new and existing buildings plays a key role in the plan's ambitious goals. In 2006, Boulder residents overwhelmingly approved a Climate Action Tax to fund Climate Action Plan efforts. For more than a decade the city has been incrementally strengthening minimum energy efficiency standards for residential

169

THE TURBULENT CASCADE AND PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND DURING SOLAR MINIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently protracted solar minimum provided years of interplanetary data that were largely absent in any association with observed large-scale transient behavior on the Sun. With large-scale shear at 1 AU generally isolated to corotating interaction regions, it is reasonable to ask whether the solar wind is significantly turbulent at this time. We perform a series of third-moment analyses using data from the Advanced Composition Explorer. We show that the solar wind at 1 AU is just as turbulent as at any other time in the solar cycle. Specifically, the turbulent cascade of energy scales in the same manner proportional to the product of wind speed and temperature. Energy cascade rates during solar minimum average a factor of 2-4 higher than during solar maximum, but we contend that this is likely the result of having a different admixture of high-latitude sources.

Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Stawarz, Joshua E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CA (United States); Forman, Miriam A., E-mail: jtu46@wildcats.unh.edu, E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu, E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu, E-mail: Joshua.Stawarz@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Miriam.Forman@sunysb.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Investigation of Catalyst Deactivation from Operation Below the Minimum Operating Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expanding use of alternative and renewable energy sources is forcing large coal-fired power plants to operate at low load more frequently and for longer periods. For units with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems and without economizer bypass capabilities, low-load operation requires the SCR system to operate at reduced flue gas temperatures. For units burning high-sulfur coal, these lower temperatures are often below the minimum operating temperature defined by SCR catalyst vendors. ...

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

171

THE EFFECT OF A MINIMUM WEIGHT RADIAL REFLECTOR ON SNAP SHIELDING REQUIREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

A model was derived for a minimum-weight radial reflector for SNAP reactors. The effect, which the use of this optimal reflector has on radiation shield weight requirements is investigated. Weights of systems employing conventional and optimal radial reflectors are compared using the FARSE and FARSER computer codes. It is found that for the configuration under study additional shield weight required when the optimal reflector is used is in excess of the reflector weight savings. (auth)

Bernick, R.L.

1963-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more insights into the flare process than the free energy above the potential field state.

S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more ...

Régnier, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Classical capacity of bosonic broadcast communication and a new minimum output entropy conjecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work on the classical information capacities of bosonic channels has established the capacity of the single-user pure-loss channel, bounded the capacity of the single-user thermal-noise channel, and bounded the capacity region of the multiple-access channel. The latter is a multi-user scenario in which several transmitters seek to simultaneously and independently communicate to a single receiver. We study the capacity region of the bosonic broadcast channel, in which a single transmitter seeks to simultaneously and independently communicate to two different receivers. It is known that the tightest available lower bound on the capacity of the single-user thermal-noise channel is that channel's capacity if, as conjectured, the minimum von Neumann entropy at the output of a bosonic channel with additive thermal noise occurs for coherent-state inputs. Evidence in support of this minimum output entropy conjecture has been accumulated, but a rigorous proof has not been obtained. In this paper, we propose a new minimum output entropy conjecture that, if proved to be correct, will establish that the capacity region of the bosonic broadcast channel equals the inner bound achieved using a coherent-state encoding and optimum detection. We provide some evidence that supports this new conjecture, but again a full proof is not available.

Saikat Guha; Jeffrey H. Shapiro; Baris I. Erkmen

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

THINNING OF THE SUN'S MAGNETIC LAYER: THE PECULIAR SOLAR MINIMUM COULD HAVE BEEN PREDICTED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar magnetic activity cycle causes changes in the Sun on timescales that are equivalent to human lifetimes. The minimum solar activity that preceded the current solar cycle (cycle 24) was deeper and quieter than any other recent minimum. Using data from the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON), we show that the structure of the solar sub-surface layers during the descending phase of the preceding cycle (cycle 23) was very different from that during cycle 22. This leads us to believe that a detailed examination of the data would have led to the prediction that the cycle 24 minimum would be out of the ordinary. The behavior of the oscillation frequencies allows us to infer that changes in the Sun that affected the oscillation frequencies in cycle 23 were localized mainly to layers above about 0.996 R{sub Sun }, depths shallower than about 3000 km. In cycle 22, on the other hand, the changes must have also occurred in the deeper-lying layers.

Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by shifting energy demand from gasoline to electricity. GHG benefits. HEVs are optimal or near-optimal for minimum cost in most scenarios. High gas prices and low

Michalek, Jeremy J.

177

The exact distribution of the maximum, minimum and the range of Multinomial/Dirichlet and Multivariate Hypergeometric frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exact distribution of the maximum and minimum frequencies of Multinomial/Dirichlet and Multivariate Hypergeometric distributions of n balls in m urns is compactly represented as a product of stochastic matrices. This representation ... Keywords: Dirichlet multinomial, Multinomial maximum, minimum, range, Multinomial outliers, inliers, Multivariate hypergeometric, Stochastic matrix

Charles J. Corrado

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

New and Underutilized Technology: Bi-level Stairwell Lighting | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stairwell Lighting Stairwell Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Bi-level Stairwell Lighting October 7, 2013 - 8:53am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for bi-level stairwell lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits Bi-level stairwell lighting uses integral occupancy sensor motion detectors to monitor the stairwell. When occupancy is detected, the lights go to full level. When the space has been vacated after a programmed period, the fixture goes to a minimum level. Application Bi-level stairwell lighting is applicable in most multi-story buildings. Key Factors for Deployment Bi-level stairwell lighting is a good technology to implement concurrently with an overall building lighting improvement project. Ranking Criteria Federal energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success are

179

FREQUENCY OF MAUNDER MINIMUM EVENTS IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS INFERRED FROM ACTIVITY AND METALLICITY OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the common proposition that the fraction of chromospherically very inactive stars in a solar-type sample is analogous to the fraction of the Sun's main-sequence lifetime spent in a grand minimum state. In a new approach to this proposition, we examine chromospheric activity log R'{sub HK} in a stellar sample having Hipparcos parallax measurements, and having spectroscopically determined metallicity close to solar (-0.1 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} 0.1). We evaluate height above the Hipparcos main sequence, and estimate age using isochrones, to identify the most Sun-like stars in this sample. As a threshold below which a star is labeled very inactive, we use the peak of the HK activity distribution mapped over the quiet Sun during the 1968 epoch. We estimate the fraction of Maunder Minimum (MM) analog candidates in our sample at 11.1%. Given the 70 yr duration of the historical MM, this suggests that in any given year there is a 1/630 chance of entering a similar grand minimum. There are three important cautions with this type of estimate. First, recent investigation using actual activity and photometric time series has suggested that very low activity may not be a necessary criterion for identifying a non-cycling MM analog candidate. Second, this type of estimate depends very strongly on the choice of very low activity threshold. Third, in instantaneous measurements of log R'{sub HK}, it is not always clear whether a star is a viable MM analog candidate or merely an older star nearing the end of its main-sequence lifetime.

Lubin, Dan [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0221 (United States); Tytler, David; Kirkman, David [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0424 (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

180

Performance of the ATLAS Minimum Bias Trigger in pp collisions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early physics program at the ATLAS experiment includes measuring the basic properties of proton proton collisions, such as charged particle multiplicities, in order to constrain phenomenological models of soft interactions in the LHC energy regime. An inclusive and well understood trigger is crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. The ATLAS experiment uses two complementary types of minimum bias triggers. A scintillator trigger sensitive to the forward regions of 2.1trigger based on counting hits in the inner tracking detector has provided a useful control sample. The performance and efficiency measurements of these triggers and detectors will be presented.

Lauren Tompkins

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Performance of the ATLAS Minimum Bias Trigger in pp collisions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early physics program at the ATLAS experiment includes measuring the basic properties of proton proton collisions, such as charged particle multiplicities, in order to constrain phenomenological models of soft interactions in the LHC energy regime. An inclusive and well understood trigger is crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. The ATLAS experiment uses two complementary types of minimum bias triggers. A scintillator trigger sensitive to the forward regions of 2.1trigger based on counting hits in the inner tracking detector has provided a useful control sample. The performance and efficiency measurements of these triggers and detectors will be presented.

Tompkins, Lauren

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Model Diagnosis of Nighttime Minimum Temperature Warming during Summer due to Irrigation in the California Central Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the mechanisms of nighttime minimum temperature warming in the California Central Valley during summer due to irrigation. The Scripps Experimental Climate Prediction Center (ECPC) Regional Spectral Model (RSM) was used to ...

Hideki Kanamaru; Masao Kanamitsu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A Comparative Study of Maximum and Minimum Temperatures over Argentina: NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis versus Station Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares surface-station temperature observations over Argentina with gridpoint analyses available in the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis dataset. The primary objective is to determine whether the maximum and minimum surface temperatures from the ...

Matilde M. Rusticucci; Vernon E. Kousky

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Spatial Interpolation of Daily Maximum and Minimum Air Temperature Based on Meteorological Model Analyses and Independent Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly meteorological forecast model initializations are used to guide the spatial interpolation of daily cooperative network station data in the northeastern United States. The hourly model data are transformed to daily maximum and minimum ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Brian N. Belcher

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Relative Importance of Solar and Anthropogenic Forcing of Climate Change between the Maunder Minimum and the Present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate during the Maunder Minimum is compared with current conditions in GCM simulations that include a full stratosphere and parameterized ozone response to solar spectral irradiance variability and trace gas changes. The Goddard Institute ...

David Rind; Drew Shindell; Judith Perlwitz; Jean Lerner; Patrick Lonergan; Judith Lean; Chris McLinden

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A Southeastern South American Daily Gridded Dataset of Observed Surface Minimum and Maximum Temperature for 1961–2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a southeastern South American gridded dataset of daily minimum and maximum surface temperatures for 1961–2000. The data used for the gridding are observed daily data from meteorological stations in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and ...

Bárbara Tencer; Matilde Rusticucci; Phil Jones; David Lister

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Multicasting in Large Wireless Networks: Bounds on the Minimum Energy per Bit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider scaling laws for maximal energy efficiency of communicating a message to all the nodes in a wireless network, as the number of nodes in the network becomes large. Two cases of large wireless networks are studied -- dense random networks and constant density (extended) random networks. In addition, we also study finite size regular networks in order to understand how regularity in node placement affects energy consumption. We first establish an information-theoretic lower bound on the minimum energy per bit for multicasting in arbitrary wireless networks when the channel state information is not available at the transmitters. Upper bounds are obtained by constructing a simple flooding scheme that requires no information at the receivers about the channel states or the locations and identities of the nodes. The gap between the upper and lower bounds is only a constant factor for dense random networks and regular networks, and differs by a poly-logarithmic factor for extended random networks. Further...

Jain, Aman; Verdu, Sergio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nonradiating and minimum energy sources and their fields: Generalized source inversion theory and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A new general framework for characterizing scalar and electromagnetic (EM) nonradiating (NR) and minimum energy (ME) sources and their fields is developed that is of interest for both radiation and source reconstruction problems. NR sources are characterized in connection with the concept of reciprocity as nonreceptors. Localized ME sources are shown to be free fields truncated within the source’s support. A new source analysis tool is developed that is based on the decomposition of a source and its field into their radiating and NR components. The individual radiating and reactive energy roles of the radiating and NR parts of a source are characterized. The general theory is illustrated with a time-harmonic EM example. Index Terms—Inverse problems.

Edwin A. Marengo; Richard W. Ziolkowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Image transmission over OFDM channel with rate allocation scheme and minimum peak-toaverage power ratio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes new scheme for efficient rate allocation in conjunction with reducing peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) in orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) systems. Modification of the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) image coder is proposed to generate four different groups of bit-stream relative to its significances. The significant bits, the sign bits, the set bits and the refinement bits are transmitted in four different groups. The proposed method for reducing the PAPR utilizes twice the unequal error protection (UEP), using the Read-Solomon codes (RS), in conjunction with bit-rate allocation and selective interleaving to provide minimum PAPR. The output bit-stream from the source code (SPIHT) will be started by the most significant types of bits (first group of bits). The optimal unequal error protection (UEP) of the four groups is proposed based on the channel destortion. The proposed structure provides significant improvement in bit error rate (BER) performance. Per...

Mohammed, Usama S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

C. Bouchiat

2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

Wang, Linghua [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: wanglhwang@gmail.com [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency in drilling is measured by Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE). MSE is the measure of the amount of energy input required to remove a unit volume of rock, expressed in units of energy input divided by volume removed. It can be expressed mathematically in terms of controllable parameters; Weight on Bit, Torque, Rate of Penetration, and RPM. It is well documented that minimizing MSE by optimizing controllable factors results in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to minimize MSE in the field only through a trial-and-error process. This work makes it possible to compute the optimum drilling parameters that result in minimum MSE. The parameters that have been traditionally used to compute MSE are interdependent. Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional MSE equation was rewritten in terms of a single parameter, Weight on Bit, establishing a form that can be minimized mathematically. Once the optimum Weight on Bit was determined, the interdependent relationship that Weight on Bit has with Torque and Penetration per Revolution was used to determine optimum values for those parameters for a given drilling situation. The improved method was validated through laboratory experimentation and analysis of published data. Two rock types were subjected to four treatments each, and drilled in a controlled laboratory environment. The method was applied in each case, and the optimum parameters for minimum MSE were computed. The method demonstrated an accurate means to determine optimum drilling parameters of Weight on Bit, Torque, and Penetration per Revolution. A unique application of micro-cracking is also presented, which demonstrates that rock failure ahead of the bit is related to axial force more than to rotation speed.

Hamrick, Todd

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

Company Level Imports Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Company Level Imports Company Level Imports Archives 2013 Imports by Month January XLS February XLS March XLS April XLS May XLS June XLS July XLS August XLS September XLS...

195

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, A.P.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the applicability of forecasting production from low permeability and layered tight gas wells using the Arps hyperbolic equation at earlier times and then switching to the exponential form of the equation at a predetermined minimum decline rate. This methodology is called the minimum terminal decline rate method. Two separate completion types have been analyzed. The first is horizontal completions with multi-stage hydraulic fractures while the second is vertical fractured wells in layered formations, completed with hydraulic fractures. For both completion types both simulated data and real world well performance histories have been evaluated using differing minimum terminal decline rates and the benefit of increasing portions of production history to make predictions. The application of the minimum terminal decline rate method to the simulated data in this study (3 percent minimum decline applied to multiple fractured horizontal wells MFHW- and 7 percent applied to vertical fractured layered wells) gave high errors for some simulations within the first two years. Once additional production data is considered in making predictions, the errors in estimated ultimate recovery and in remaining reserves is significantly reduced. This result provides a note of caution, when using the minimum decline rate method for forecasting using small quantities of production history. The evaluation of real world data using the minimum terminal decline rate method introduces other inaccuracies such as poor data quality, low data frequency, operational changes which affect the production profile and workovers / re-stimulations which require a restart of production forecasting process. Real well data for MFHW comes from the Barnett Shale completions of the type which have been widely utilized since 2004. There is insufficient production history from real wells to determine an appropriate minimum terminal decline rate. In the absence of suitable analogs for the determination of the minimum terminal decline rate it would be impossible to correctly apply this methodology. Real well data for vertical fractured layered wells from the Carthage Cotton Valley field indicate that for wells similar to Conoco operated Panola County wells a feasible decline rate is between 5 percent and 10 percent. Further if a consistent production trend and with more than 2 years of production history are used to forecast, the EUR can be predicted to within plus/minus 10 percent and remaining reserves to within plus/minus 15 percent.

McMillan, Marcia Donna

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Efficacy of Foundations & Frameworks on Elementary Students' Reading Achievement in Urban Christian Schools.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study was designed to assess the efficacy of Foundations & Frameworks (F&F), an instructional program emphasizing reading comprehension, on fourth and fifth grade students'… (more)

Blackmon, Cheryl McClure

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

An Analysis of the Efficacy of US Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper provides an analysis of the efficacy of United States (US) greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction policy implemented in the mid-1990s, specifically targeting the… (more)

Meyer, Russell

200

The Role of Self-Efficacy in Stock-Market Participation and Financial Information-Seeking .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study of self-efficacy's (Bandura, 1977) effects on an individual's likelihood to invest in the stock market and seek financial information attempts to uncover some… (more)

[No author

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Personal science teaching efficacy and the beliefs and practices of elementary teachers related to science instruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and women in mathematics, science, and technology careers.Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 45(9), 1036-1058.development of an elementary science teaching efficacy

Lardy, Corinne H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish  

SciTech Connect

Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods—2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Level: National Data;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy...

204

Liquid level detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses a method. It is for detecting presence of a liquid level at a first predetermined point along the depth of a borehole.

Fryer, C.D.; Stie, K.E.; Wedel, M.W.; Stamper, K.R.

1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

" Level: National Data;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" "...

206

" Level: National Data;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" "...

207

A variational level set method for the topology optimization of steady-state Navier-Stokes flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The smoothness of topological interfaces often largely affects the fluid optimization and sometimes makes the density-based approaches, though well established in structural designs, inadequate. This paper presents a level-set method for topology optimization ... Keywords: Level set method, Maximum permeability, Minimum energy dissipation, Navier-Stokes flow, Topology optimization, Variational method

Shiwei Zhou; Qing Li

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Development of High Efficacy, Low Cost Phosphorescent Oled Lightning Luminaire  

SciTech Connect

In this two year program, UDC together with Armstrong World Industries, Professor Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan) and Professor Mark Thompson (University of Southern California) planned to develop and deliver high efficiency OLED lighting luminaires as part of an integrated ceiling illumination system that exceed the Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 performance projections. Specifically the UDC team in 2010 delivered two prototype OLED ceiling illumination systems, each consisting of four individual OLED lighting panels on glass integrated into Armstrong's novel TechZone open architecture ceiling systems, at an overall system efficacy of 51 lm/W, a CRI = 85 and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 10,000 hours. This accomplishment represents a 50% increase in luminaire efficacy and a factor of two in lifetime over that outlined in the solicitation. In addition, the team has also delivered one 15cm x 15cm lighting panel fabricated on a flexible metal foil substrate, demonstrating the possibility using OLEDs in a range of form factors. During this program, our Team has pursued the commercialization of these OLED based ceiling luminaires, with a goal to launch commercial products within the next three years. We have proven that our team is ideally suited to develop these highly novel and efficient solid state lighting luminaires, having both the technical experience and commercial strategy to leverage work performed under this contract. Our calculations show that the success of our program could lead to energy savings of more than 0.5 quads or 8 MMTC (million metric tons of carbon) per year by 2016.

Michael Hack

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

The extended minimum of solar cycle 23 as seen by radial velocity (GOLF, GONG) and intensity (VIRGO) helioseismic instruments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the variability of the solar oscillation spectrum during solar cycle 23 and its extended minimum. We use simultaneous observations of the low-degree solar p modes collected by the space-based, Sun-as-a-star GOLF (radial velocity) and VIRGO (intensity) instruments, and by the ground-based, multi-site network GONG. We investigate in particular the response of the p-mode eigenfrequencies to the observed peculiar deep solar minimum of surface activity of 2007-2009 as compared with the previous solar cycle 23. We study the different temporal variations of the p-mode frequencies with individual angular degrees.

Salabert, D; Palle, P L; Jimenez-Reyes, S J; Jimenez, A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Exact and approximate solutions for the quantum minimum-Kullback-entropy estimation problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimum Kullback entropy principle (mKE) is a useful tool to estimate quantum states and operations from incomplete data and prior information. In general, the solution of a mKE problem is analytically challenging and an approximate solution has been proposed and employed in different context. Recently, the form and a way to compute the exact solution for finite dimensional systems has been found, and a question naturally arises on whether the approximate solution could be an effective substitute for the exact solution, and in which regimes this substitution can be performed. Here, we provide a systematic comparison between the exact and the approximate mKE solutions for a qubit system when average data from a single observable are available. We address both mKE estimation of states and weak Hamiltonians, and compare the two solutions in terms of state fidelity and operator distance. We find that the approximate solution is generally close to the exact one unless the initial state is near an eigenstate of the measured observable. Our results provide a rigorous justification for the use of the approximate solution whenever the above condition does not occur, and extend its range of application beyond those situations satisfying the assumptions used for its derivation.

Carlo Sparaciari; Stefano Olivares; Francesco Ticozzi; Matteo G. A. Paris

2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

Revised equipartition & minimum energy formula for magnetic field strength estimates from radio synchrotron observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The commonly used classical equipartition or minimum-energy estimate of total magnetic fields strengths from radio synchrotron intensities is of limited practical use because it is based on the hardly known ratio K of the total energies of cosmic ray protons and electrons and also has inherent problems. We present a revised formula, using the number density ratio K for which we give estimates. For particle acceleration in strong shocks K is about 40 and increases with decreasing shock strength. Our revised estimate for the field strength gives larger values than the classical estimate for flat radio spectra with spectral indices of about 0.5-0.6, but smaller values for steep spectra and total fields stronger than about 10 muG. In very young supernova remnants, for example, the classical estimate may be too large by up to 10x. On the other hand, if energy losses of cosmic ray electrons are important, K increases with particle energy and the equipartition field may be underestimated significantly. Our revised larger equipartition estimates in galaxy clusters and radio lobes are consistent with independent estimates from Faraday rotation measures, while estimates from the ratio between radio synchrotron and X-ray inverse Compton intensities generally give much weaker fields. This may be explained e.g. by a concentration of the field in filaments. Our revised field strengths may also lead to major revisions of electron lifetimes in jets and radio lobes estimated from the synchrotron break frequency in the radio spectrum.

Rainer Beck; Marita Krause

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

The effect of longitudinal spacer ribs on the minimum pressure drop in a heated annulus  

SciTech Connect

When evaluating a heated flow passage for vulnerability to static flow excursions, special note should be taken of flow restrictions which might allow premature vapor generation. In this study, measurements of steady state pressure drop were made for the downward flow of water in a vertical annulus. The outer wall was uniformly heated to allow subcooled boiling. Minima in the pressure drop characteristics were compared for test sections with and without longitudinal spacer ribs. For a given power and inlet temperature, the minimum occurred at a higher flow rate in the ribbed test section. This is attributed to vapor generation at the ribs. The work cited in this document show how a restriction in a heated channel can produce vapor which would not be observed in the absence of the restriction. In the present study, the effect of a flow restriction on the tendency to flow excursion is explored by finding demand curves for a heated annulus in subcooled boiling flow. The annulus is heated from the outside, and alternately equipped with and without longitudinal spacer ribs. These ribs separate the heated and unheated walls; in pressing against the heated wall they provide a means for premature vapor production.

Johnston, B.S.; Neff, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Minimum Energy Dwelling (MED) workbook: an investigation of techniques and materials for energy conscious design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workbook is based upon information gathered during the design phase of the Minimum Energy Dwelling. The objective of the project, sponsored by the Southern California Gas Co., Department of Energy, and Mission Viejo is to substantially reduce energy use by the incorporation of energy conservation and solar techniques in a single-family detached dwelling. The Project will demonstrate to builders, as well as to the general public, a number of technological innovations that can, at reasonable cost, be included in a dwelling design. The problem facing Southern California Gas Co., along with most other gas utilities, is ever-decreasing amounts of gas at increasing prices. The dwelling designed has approximately 1,150 ft/sup 2/, consistent with current home-building trends. Through the optimum use of energy-conserving appliances, insulation, window and wall shading, exterior coloring, and thermal mass, the yearly energy usage has been reduced by over 50%. Of the remaining 50% of the energy required for heating, cooling, and domestic hot water, the majority is supplied by the solar-energy system. Three hundred twenty square feet (270 effective) of evacuated tube collector are incorporated into the building structure. The hot water provided by the collectors is used to run an absorption chiller for cooling, the domestic hot water, and the heating system. The remaining energy requirements are met by an auxiliary natural gas energy system and a cool-air-economizer cycle.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Time-minimal control of dissipative two-level quantum systems: The Integrable case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this article is to apply recent developments in geometric optimal control to analyze the time minimum control problem of dissipative two-level quantum systems whose dynamics is governed by the Lindblad equation. We focus our analysis on the case where the extremal Hamiltonian is integrable.

B. Bonnard; D. Sugny

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Organizational Culture and Employees' Computer Self-Efficacy: An Empirical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IT-based business initiatives, such as ERP and BPR, require high computer self-efficacy among employees because these changes require a large-scale use of computers. Computer self-efficacy is affected by many internal and external factors, for instance, ...

YiHua P. Sheng; Michael Pearson; Leon Crosby

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

HIGH LATITUDE ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS OF THE H/HE INTENSITY RATIO UNDER SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We analyze measurements of the 0.5-1.0 MeV/nucleon H/He intensity ratio from the Ulysses spacecraft during its first (1992-94) and second (1999-2000) ascent to southern high latitude regions of the heliosphere. These cover a broad range of heliocentric distances (from 5.2 to 2.0 AU) and out-of-ecliptic latitudes (from 18{degree}S to 80{degree}S). During Ulysses' first southern pass, the HI-SCALE instrument measured a series of enhanced particle fluxes associated with the passage of a recurrent corotating interaction region (CIR). Low values ({approximately}6) of the H/He ratio were observed in these recurrent corotating events, with a clear minimum following the passage of the corotating reverse shock. When Ulysses reached high southern latitudes (>40{degree}S), the H/He ratio always remained below {approximately}10 except during two transient solar events that brought the ratio to high (>20) values. Ulysses' second southern pass was characterized by a higher average value of the H/He ratio. No recurrent pattern was observed in the energetic ion intensity which was dominated by the occurrence of transient events of solar origin. Numerous CIRs, many of which were bounded by forward and reverse shock pairs, were still observed in the solar wind and magnetic field data. The arrival of those CIRs at Ulysses did not always result in a decrease of the H/He ratio; on the contrary, many CIRs showed a higher H/He ratio than some transient events. Within a CIR, however, the H/He ratio usually increased around the forward shock and decreased towards the reverse shock. Throughout the second ascent to southern heliolatitudes, the H/He ratio seldom decreased below {approximately}10 even at high latitudes (>40{degree}S). We interpret these higher values of the H/He ratio in terms of the increasing level of solar activity together with the poor definition and short life that corotating solar wind structures have under solar maximum conditions. The global filling of the heliosphere by transient solar events and the fact that in 1999-2000 Ulysses observed only intermediate (<650 km s{sup {minus}1}) solar wind speed (whose contents in pick-up He is less energetic than in the fast solar wind streams observed in 1992-1994) favored the protons with respect to alpha particles. Hence the fact that the average values of the H/He ratio observed by Ulysses during the rising phase of the solar cycle (1999-2000) were higher than those observed during the declining phase (1992-1994).

J. GOSLING; D. LARIO; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion, such as the mechanism and the free-energy profile, remains an important challenge not only for enzyme catalysis1 of the reaction free-energy profile is very cumbersome with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) and umbrella

Nielsen, Steven O.

218

An exact solution for finding minimum recombinant haplotype configurations on pedigrees with missing data by integer linear programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of reconstructing haplotype configurations from genotypes on pedigree data with missing alleles under the Mendelian law of inheritance and the minimum recombination principle, which is important for the construction of haplotype ... Keywords: branch-and-bound algorithm, haplotyping, integer linear programming, missing data imputation, pedigree analysis, recombination

Jing Li; Tao Jiang

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An Investigation of the Effect of After-Action Reviews on Teams' Performance-Efficacy Relationships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance and efficacy are reciprocally causal; however, the effect of performance on subsequent perceptions of efficacy has received little attention, especially in the context of team training. In addition, the moderating effect of feedback accuracy on the relationship between team performance and team-efficacy is largely unexplored. As such, the objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between team performance and team-efficacy in the context of after-action reviews (AARs). Specifically, this study examined the conjoint influence of (a) the accuracy of performance feedback available to trainees during AARs, and (b) time on the predictive validity of team performance on team-efficacy. Data were obtained from 492 undergraduate students assigned to 123 teams in a 5 hr team training protocol using a 3 (training condition: non-AAR, versus subjective AAR, versus objective AAR) x 3 (sessions) repeated measures design. Contrary to the first set of hypotheses, the positive relationship between performance and efficacy was strongest for teams trained without AARs and weakest for teams trained using subjective AARs. Although team-efficacy was predicted more strongly by more proximal team performance than by more distal team performance, this pattern of results was found only for teams trained either without AARs or with objective AARs. The predictive validity of performance on efficacy decreased as performance episodes became more proximal among teams trained using subjective AARs. Finally, within-team agreement of team-efficacy ratings decreased over time for teams that engaged in AARs and remained constant over time for teams that did not engage in AARs. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. It is anticipated that this research will provide insight into the roles of feedback accuracy and time in the performance-efficacy relationship and provide guidance to researchers and practitioners in effectively integrating AAR design characteristics into team training environments.

Schurig, Ira

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Liquid level controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for maintaining two distinct sodium levels within the shell of a heat exchanger having a plurality of J-shaped modular tube bundles each enclosed in a separate shell which extends from a common base portion. A lower liquid level is maintained in the base portion and an upper liquid level is maintained in the shell enwrapping the long stem of the J-shaped tube bundles by utilizing standpipes with a notch at the lower end which decreases in open area the distance from the end of the stand pipe increases and a supply of inert gas fed at a constant rate to produce liquid levels, which will remain generally constant as the flow of liquid through the vessel varies. (auth)

Mangus, J.D.; Redding, A.H.

1975-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

OPTIMIZED FUEL INJECTOR DESIGN FOR MAXIMUM IN-FURNACE NOx REDUCTION AND MINIMUM UNBURNED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

Reaction Engineering International (REI) has established a project team of experts to develop a technology for combustion systems which will minimize NO x emissions and minimize carbon in the fly ash. This much need technology will allow users to meet environmental compliance and produce a saleable by-product. This study is concerned with the NO x control technology of choice for pulverized coal fired boilers, ?in-furnace NO x control,? which includes: staged low-NO x burners, reburning, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and hybrid approaches (e.g., reburning with SNCR). The program has two primary objectives: 1) To improve the performance of ?in-furnace? NO x control processes. 2) To devise new, or improve existing, approaches for maximum ?in-furnace? NO x control and minimum unburned carbon. The program involves: 1) fundamental studies at laboratory- and bench-scale to define NO reduction mechanisms in flames and reburning jets; 2) laboratory experiments and computer modeling to improve our two-phase mixing predictive capability; 3) evaluation of commercial low-NO x burner fuel injectors to develop improved designs, and 4) demonstration of coal injectors for reburning and low-NO x burners at commercial scale. The specific objectives of the two-phase program are to: 1 Conduct research to better understand the interaction of heterogeneous chemistry and two phase mixing on NO reduction processes in pulverized coal combustion. 2 Improve our ability to predict combusting coal jets by verifying two phase mixing models under conditions that simulate the near field of low-NO x burners. 3 Determine the limits on NO control by in-furnace NO x control technologies as a function of furnace design and coal type. 5 Develop and demonstrate improved coal injector designs for commercial low-NO x burners and coal reburning systems. 6 Modify the char burnout model in REI?s coal combustion code to take account of recently obtained fundamental data on char reactivity during the late stages of burnout. This will improve our ability to predict carbon burnout with low-NO x firing systems.

A.F. SAROFIM; BROWN UNIVERSITY. R.A. LISAUSKAS; D.B. RILEY, INC.; E.G. EDDINGS; J. BROUWER; J.P. KLEWICKI; K.A. DAVIS; M.J. BOCKELIE; M.P. HEAP; REACTION ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL. D.W. PERSHING; UNIVERSITY OF UTAH. R.H. HURT

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Efficacy of Single-Session Percutaneous Drainage and 50% Acetic Acid Sclerotherapy for Treatment of Simple Renal Cysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and long-term results of single-session 50% acetic acid sclerotherapy for the treatment of simple renal cysts, and to compare the therapeutic results of 5 and 20 min sclerosant dwell techniques. Methods. During the past 9 years, 50% acetic acid sclerotherapy was performed on 67 cysts in 66 patients. An acetic acid volume corresponding to a mean of 23% of the aspirated cyst volume was injected into the cysts. A 20 min dwell time with position changes was performed in 32 cysts (31 patients; group I) and 8% of volume for a 5 min dwell time in 35 cysts (35 patients; group II). Three- and 6-month sonographic or CT follow-up was performed for a minimum of 1 year. Complete regression was defined as no remaining cyst measurable on sonography with or without a scar at the renal cortex. Partial regression was defined as a decreased cyst volume compared with that before sclerotherapy. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the therapeutic results between the two groups. Results. For 67 simple renal cysts, complete regression on follow-up was observed in 21 of 32 cysts (66%; group I) and 22 of 35 cysts (63%; group II); the remaining 24 cysts all showed partial regression. The partial reduction rate of the cyst's volume was 97.4% (91.3-99.4%) in group I and 96.9% (90.8-99.5 %) in group II. There were no procedure-related major complications, and no statistically significant differences in the complete regression and partial volume reduction rates between the two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion. Fifty percent acetic acid is an effective and safe sclerosing agent for simple renal cysts. Fifty percent acetic acid sclerotherapy with a 5 min sclerosant dwell time, using a volume of about 10% of the aspirated volume, is sufficient for satisfactory results of simple renal cyst sclerotherapy.

Kwon, Se Hwan; Oh, Joo Hyeong [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ohjh6108@hanmail.net; Seo, Tae-Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ho Chul [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Efficacy of Consumer-Available Antimicrobials for the Disinfection of Pathogen Contaminated Green Bell Pepper and Efficacy of Consumer Cleaning Methods for the Decontamination of Knives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limited information exists regarding the efficacy of consumer-available antimicrobials for the use on produce surfaces. There is a strong focus on eliminating pathogens from produce at a commercial level, but consumers can achieve pathogen reduction in a domestic setting. The objectives were to determine the ability of consumer-available antimicrobials to disinfect waxed green bell peppers, determine the efficacy of knife cleaning methods, and assess the transfer of contamination. Peppers were inoculated via immersion in a cocktail of rifampicin-resistant Salmonella serovars and Escherichia coli O157:H7 to a final concentration of 5.6 ± 0.5 log CFU/cm2. In study 1, samples of 3 10-cm2 pieces of inoculated pepper were excised from smooth tissue and immersed in 3% (v/v) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), 2.5% (v/v) acetic acid, 70% (v/v) ethyl alcohol (EtOH), or sterile distilled water (SDW) for various lengths of time. Following treatment, samples were immersed for 30 s in a neutralizer solution. For study 2, inoculated peppers were chopped into 1-cm2 pieces. Knives were treated with one cleaning method: no treatment (control), towel wipe (TW), running hot water for 5 s (5SW), running hot water for 10 s (10SW) or 1% (v/v) detergent solution followed by hot running water for 10 s (ST). After treatments, knives were used to chop cucumbers. Surviving Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 for both studies were selectively enumerated on lactose-sulfite-phenol red-rifampicin agar following aerobic incubation of plates for 24 h at 35 °C. Hydrogen peroxide exposure for 5 min resulted in reductions of 1.3 ± 0.3 log CFU/cm2 for both pathogens. Following 1 min exposure to EtOH, pathogens were reduced by 1.3 ± 0.1 3 log CFU/cm2; exposure for >1 min did not result in additional reduction. Acetic acid exposure after 5 min resulted in a Salmonella reduction of 1.0 ± 0.7 log CFU/cm2, but for E. coli O157:H7, exposure resulted in no significant reduction (p<0.05) of pathogens compared to SDW at the various points. For study 2, 5SW, 10SW, and ST were equally effective for knife decontamination. No significant difference (p<0.05) was found between log CFU/cm2 on knife blade and log CFU/cm2 transferred to surface of cucumber; therefore, viable organisms remaining on the knife blade were transferred onto the surface of the cucumber. Findings suggest EtOH and H2O2 may be effective consumer-deployable antimicrobials for surface decontamination of smooth produce, and contaminated produce can contaminate other produce. Further research of antimicrobial exposure on produce sensorial characteristics is also advised in order to determine how various antimicrobial exposure times will affect the quality and sensorial characteristics of the produce commodity.

Perez, Keila Lizth

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Improved isolation of the p-p underlying event based on minimum-bias trigger-associated hadron correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some aspects of hadron production in p-p collisions remain unresolved, including the low-hadron-momentum structure of high-parton-energy dijets, separation of triggered dijets from the underlying event (UE), the systematics of multiple parton interactions and possible systematic underestimation of dijet contributions to high-energy nuclear collisions. In this study we apply a minimum-bias trigger-associated (TA) correlation analysis to p-p collisions. We extract a hard component from TA correlations that can be compared with measured jet fragment systematics derived from e-e collisions. The kinematic limits on jet fragment production may be determined. The same method may be extended to A-A collisions where the role of minimum-bias jets in spectra and correlations is strongly contested.

Thomas A. Trainor; Duncan J. Prindle

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

THE BEHAVIOR OF THE 17 GHz SOLAR RADIUS AND LIMB BRIGHTENING IN THE SPOTLESS MINIMUM XXIII/XXIV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current solar minimum has surprised the entire solar community because the spotless period is presently almost 2-3 years longer than the usual minima. To better understand this, we studied the variation of the solar radius and the polar limb brightening at 17 GHz, comparing the results from the minimum at the end of cycle XXIII with those of the previous one. Daily maps obtained by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) from 1992 through 2010 were analyzed. Whereas the variation of the solar radius at radio frequencies indicates the heating of the solar atmosphere due to solar activity, the limb brightening intensity depends on the organization of the polar magnetic field of the Sun, including the global dipole and the features formed around it. These features are more prominent during minima periods. As a common result, researchers have observed a decrease in both radius and limb brightness intensity at 17 GHz during the present minimum when compared with the previous one. The mean solar radius is 0.''9 {+-} 0.''6 smaller and the limb brightening reduced its intensity by around 20%. Both decrements are interpreted in terms of the weaker solar chromospheric activity of the present cycle. Measurement of the radius and limb brightening at 17 GHz can be used as an alternative solar activity index and should be included in the set of parameters used to predict future cycles.

Selhorst, C. L. [IP and D-Universidade do Vale do ParaIba-UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Gimenez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A. [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Costa, J. E. R. [CEA, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Shibasaki, K., E-mail: caius@univap.br [NoRH, Nobeyama Radioheliograph (Japan)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An estimate for the sum of a Dirichlet series in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a vertical line segment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behaviour of the sum of an entire Dirichlet series is analyzed in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a system of vertical line segments. Also a more general problem, connected with the Polya conjecture is posed and solved. It concerns the minimum modulus of an entire function with Fabri gaps and its growth along curves going to infinity. Bibliography: 33 titles.

Gaisin, Ahtyar M; Rakhmatullina, Zhanna G

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Predictors Of Java Programming Self Efficacy Among Engineering Students In A Nigerian University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study examined the relationship between Java programming self-efficacy and programming background of engineering students in a Nigerian University. One hundred and ninety two final year engineering students randomly selected from six engineering departments of the university participated in the study. Two research instruments: Programming Background Questionnaire and Java Programming Self-Efficacy Scale were used in collecting relevant information from the subjects. The resulting data were analyzed using Pearson product correlation and Multiple regression analysis. Findings revealed that Java Programming self-efficacy has no significant relationship with each of the computing and programming background factors. It was additionally obtained that the number of programming courses offered and programming courses weighed scores were the only predictors of Java self-efficacy.

Jegede, Philip Olu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 3 Safety and Efficacy of CLA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 3 Safety and Efficacy of CLA Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapt

230

An investigation of the effect of spacing of practice on the performance-efficacy relationship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the current study was to investigate the relationship between training performance and self–efficacy using a longitudinal design (approximately 11 weeks) in the context of massed and distributed practice. Limited attention in the training performance and efficacy literature has been paid to the spacing of practice (massed and distributed). However, it is conceivable that both the spacing of practice as well as the time frames over which it operates could influence the performance and efficacy relationship. Based on the practice schedule (massed versus distributed) and longitudinal study design, it was posited that the nature of the performance and efficacy relationship is likely to be quite different during two phases of learning (acquisition and reacquisition). Data were obtained from 198 undergraduate students over an 11–week training protocol using a 2 (distributed versus massed acquisition) × 2 (distributed versus massed reacquisition) × 16 (session) mixed design. Contrary to the first set of hypotheses, results indicated that the performance and efficacy relationship did not vary as a function of practice protocols (massed versus distributed) during acquisition and reacquisition. Also, no support was found for the hypothesis that the performance and efficacy relationship will vary as a function of whether the practice condition during acquisition is the same or different from the practice condition during reacquisition such that the relationships will be stronger when the practice condition is the same as opposed to when it is different. However, support was found for the hypothesis that when past performance is controlled the unique contribution of self–efficacy to subsequent task performance will be attenuated. Implications of these findings for research on the performance and efficacy relationship and training practice are discussed.

Bhupatkar, Alok Ashutosh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Exploiting level sensitive latches in wire pipelining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present research presents procedures for exploitation of level sensitive latches in wire pipelining. The user gives a Steiner tree, having a signal source and set of destination or sinks, and the location in rectangular plane, capacitive load and required arrival time at each of the destinations. The user also defines a library of non-clocked (buffer) elements and clocked elements (flip-flop and latch), also known as synchronous elements. The first procedure performs concurrent repeater and synchronous element insertion in a bottom-up manner to find the minimum latency that may be achieved between the source and the destinations. The second procedure takes additional input (required latency) for each destination, derived from previous procedure, and finds the repeater and synchronous element assignments for all internal nodes of the Steiner tree, which minimize overall area used. These procedures utilize the latency and area advantages of latch based pipelining over flip-flop based pipelining. The second procedure suggests two methods to tackle the challenges that exist in a latch based design. The deferred delay padding technique is introduced, which removes the short path violations for latches with minimal extra cost.

Seth, Vikram

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Determination of Coke Calcination Level and Anode Baking Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Coke Calcination Level and Anode Baking Level – Application and Reproducibility of Lc Based Methods. Author(s), Stein ...

233

Understanding the efficacy of deployed internet source address validation filtering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IP source address forgery, or "spoofing," is a long-recognized consequence of the Internet's lack of packet-level authenticity. Despite historical precedent and filtering and tracing efforts, attackers continue to utilize spoofing for anonymity, indirection, ... Keywords: filtering, ip spoofing, source address validation

Robert Beverly; Arthur Berger; Young Hyun; k claffy

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Company Level Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports All Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Company Level Imports With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 | XLS Previous Issues Month: September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 prior issues Go September 2013 Import Highlights Monthly data on the origins of crude oil imports in September 2013 has been released and it shows that two countries exported more than 1 million barrels per day to the United States (see table below). The top five exporting countries accounted for 75 percent of United States crude oil imports in September while the top ten sources accounted for approximately 92 percent of all U.S. crude oil imports. The top five sources of US crude

236

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

237

Real time cross-layer adaptation for minimum energy wireless image transport using bit error rate control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In wireless multimedia systems, significant power is consumed in processing image/video content This research looks specifically at the energy cost of wireless image/video transport focusing on image quality as an end metric. The quality of received ... Keywords: PSNR values, real-time cross-layer adaptation, minimum-energy wireless image transport, bit error rate control, wireless multimedia systems, wireless image-video content processing, communication channel, image-video data compression, received signal quality, minimal RF energy consumption, optimization procedure, varying channel conditions, baseband signal, RF power amplifier, RF PA, optimal transmission bit error rate value, closed loop feedback control

J. Natarajan; S. Sen; A. Chatterjee

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Implication of a covenant to diligently develop and mine in hard mineral leases that provide for minimum rents or royalties  

SciTech Connect

An examination of the status of the implied covenant to develop in hard mineral leases which contain minimum royalty provisions discusses the rationale for the implied development covenant, restrictions on its use, and scenarios under which mining delays occur. Later sections delineate the rules of construction and interpretative tests used in various mining jurisdictions. The author then analyzes the logic of these tests in light of the regulatory and economic climate of today's mining industry. He finds that this climate forces prudent mining companies to delay mine development in many instances. The substantial relation test considers all factors that are indicative of the original parties expectations; the demand for development rule does not.

Bender, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

TRANSIENT CONTROL LEVEL PHILOSOPHY AND ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. TRANSIENT CONTROL LEVEL PHILOSOPHY AND IMPLEMENTATION II. Techniques and Equipment for Making TCL Tests ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Comparison among Strategies for Interpolating Maximum and Minimum Daily Air Temperatures. Part II: The Interaction between Number of Guiding Variables and the Type of Interpolation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a comparative experiment, the sequence of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for 1976 was interpolated over England and Wales to a resolution of 1 km using partial thin plate splines, ordinary kriging, trend surface, and an automatic ...

Claire H. Jarvis; Neil Stuart

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Evaluation of the AR4 Climate Models’ Simulated Daily Maximum Temperature, Minimum Temperature, and Precipitation over Australia Using Probability Density Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coupled climate models used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are evaluated. The evaluation is focused on 12 regions of Australia for the daily simulation of precipitation, minimum temperature, ...

S. E. Perkins; A. J. Pitman; N. J. Holbrook; J. McAneney

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Comparison among Strategies for Interpolating Maximum and Minimum Daily Air Temperatures. Part I: The Selection of “Guiding” Topographic and Land Cover Variables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the derivation and selection of a comprehensive set of continuous topographic and land cover–related variables to guide the interpolation of daily maximum and minimum temperatures over England and Wales, for an entire annual ...

Claire H. Jarvis; Neil Stuart

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Effects of Data Gaps on the Calculated Monthly Mean Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in the Continental United States: A Spatial and Temporal Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaps in otherwise regularly scheduled observations are often referred to as missing data. This paper explores the spatial and temporal impacts that data gaps in the recorded daily maximum and minimum temperatures have on the calculated monthly ...

David E. Stooksbury; Craig D. Idso; Kenneth G. Hubbard

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Prediction of Summer Maximum and Minimum Temperature over the Central and Western United States: The Roles of Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical model based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was used to explore climatic associations and predictability of June–August (JJA) maximum and minimum surface air temperatures (Tmax and Tmin) as well as the frequency of Tmax ...

Eric J. Alfaro; Alexander Gershunov; Daniel Cayan

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development and Testing of Canada-Wide Interpolated Spatial Models of Daily Minimum–Maximum Temperature and Precipitation for 1961–2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of trivariate thin-plate smoothing splines to the interpolation of daily weather data is investigated. The method was used to develop spatial models of daily minimum and maximum temperature and daily precipitation for all of ...

Michael F. Hutchinson; Dan W. McKenney; Kevin Lawrence; John H. Pedlar; Ron F. Hopkinson; Ewa Milewska; Pia Papadopol

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

BMC Family Practice BioMed Central Study protocol The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project: An open-label pragmatic randomised control trial comparing the efficacy of differing therapeutic agents for primary care detoxification from either street heroin or methadone [ISRCTN07752728

Nicola S Oldham; Nat Mj Wright; Clive E Adams; Laura Sheard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Communication efficacy of South African arts festivals : the case of Klein Karoo National Arts Festival / J.A. Kriel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary objective of this study was to determine the communication efficacy at arts festivals with specific reference to the Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (KKNK).… (more)

Kriel, Jaun Antonie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Minimum-Mass Extrasolar Nebula: In-Situ Formation of Close-In Super-Earths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Close-in super-Earths, with radii R = 2-5 R_Earth and orbital periods P < 100 days, orbit more than half, and perhaps nearly all Sun-like stars in the universe. We use this omnipresent population to construct the minimum-mass extrasolar nebula (MMEN), the circumstellar disk of solar-composition solids and gas from which such planets formed, if they formed near their current locations and did not migrate. In a series of back-of-the-envelope calculations, we demonstrate how in-situ formation in the MMEN is fast, efficient, and can reproduce many of the observed properties of close-in super-Earths, including their gas-to-rock fractions. Testable predictions are discussed.

Chiang, E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A Measurement of the holographic minimum observable beam branching ratio in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber  

SciTech Connect

Holography has been used successfully in combination with conventional optics for the first time in a large cryogenic bubble chamber, the 15-Foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab, during a physics run. The innovative system combined the reference beam with the object beam, illuminating a conical volume of {approx} 1.4 m{sup 3}. Bubble tracks from neutrino interactions with a width of {approx} 120 {micro}m have been recorded with good contrast. The ratio of intensities of the object light to the reference light striking the film is called the Beam Branching Ratio. We obtained in our experiment an exceedingly small minimum-observable ratio of (0.54 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -7}. The technology has the potential for a wide range of applications.

Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Ballagh, H.C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J.P.; Bingham, H.H.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Brucker, E.B.; Burnstein, R.A.; Campbell, J.R.; Cence, R.J.; Chatterjee, T.K.; Clayton, E.F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; DeProspo, D.; Devanand,; De Wolf, E.A.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Brussels U., IIHE /CERN /Punjab U. /Fermilab /Hawaii U. /Imperial Coll., London /IIT, Chicago /Jammu U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Oxford U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stevens Tech. /Tufts U.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Polymeric Nanoparticles Containing Taxanes Enhance Chemoradiotherapeutic Efficacy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To reduce the side effects and improve the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy, taxanes were incorporated into polymeric nanoparticles (PNP), and their synergic effect on radiation therapy in non-small cell lung cancer was evaluated. Methods and Materials: The properties of PNP-taxanes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The chemoradiotherapeutic efficacy of PNP-taxanes was determined by clonogenic assay, cellular morphology, and flow cytometry in A549 cells. In mice bearing A549-derived tumors, the tumor growth delay was examined after the treatment of PNP-taxanes and/or ionizing radiation (IR). Results: The PNP-taxanes were found to be approximately 45 nm in average diameter and to have high solubility in water. They showed the properties of active internalization into cells and preserved the anticancer effect of free taxanes. The survival fraction of A549 cells by clonogenic assay was significantly reduced in the group receiving combined treatment of PNP-taxanes and IR. In addition, in vivo radiotherapeutic efficacy was markedly enhanced by the intravenous injection of PNP-taxanes into the xenograft mice. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of PNP-taxanes to enhance the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy. These results suggest PNP-taxanes can hold an invaluable and promising position in treating human cancers as a novel and effective chemoradiation therapy agent.

Jung, Joohee [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women's University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung-Jin [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Bioimaging Probe Development, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (Singapore); Chung, Hye Kyung [Center for Development and Commercialization of Anti-cancer Therapeutics, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Development and Commercialization of Anti-cancer Therapeutics, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hye-Won; Lee, Sa-Won; Seo, Min Hyo [Department of Parenteral Delivery Program, Samyang Pharmaceuticals R and D, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Parenteral Delivery Program, Samyang Pharmaceuticals R and D, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heon Joo [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Inha University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Inha University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Si Yeol [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seong-Yun, E-mail: syj@amc.seoul.kr [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Kyung, E-mail: ekchoi@amc.seoul.kr [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women's University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

On the increase of the isolation efficacy for the passive elastic devices by the structural configuration optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper present the main results obtained from the complex study intended for increasing the isolation efficacy on the passive elastic anti-vibrational devices, based on the rubber elements. At first, the author present the main theoretical aspects ... Keywords: isolation efficacy, passive elastic devices, rubber element

Silviu Nastac

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Title Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-63204 Year of Publication 2007 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 03/2007 Keywords India Air Conditioner Efficiency Standards Abstract The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency.

253

High-level waste tank farm set point document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

Anthony, J.A. III

1995-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Influence of dietary composition on coccidiosis vaccination efficacy in broilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research program included a series of experiments to investigate the effect of starter diet protein level on the performance of broilers vaccinated with Coccivac®-B and subsequently challenged with a mixed species Eimeria challenge compared to nonvaccinated broilers. Pre-challenge performance data indicates that vaccination may decrease body weights and increase feed conversion ratio (FCR) with vaccination. The time period associated with the observed effects is between 13 to 17 d of age. This reduction in performance of vaccinated broilers versus non-vaccinated broilers was eliminated by the conclusion of the experiments (27 d) in the higher protein diets. Vaccination was effective at generating protective immunity against the Eimeria challenge evidenced by significantly increased body weight gains, improved feed conversions, reduced post-challenge mortality, and reduced lesion development in vaccinated broilers compared to non-vaccinated. The final experiment included the comparison of Coccivac®-B to Bio-Cox® (salinomycin) for controlling field strain Eimeria in broilers reared on two different dietary rations varying in protein concentration. Diet A had a lower protein concentration than Diet B. On day 14, Eimeria collected from commercial broiler farms in Texas were spray applied to the litter in all pens. Broilers reared on Diet B were heavier at Day 40 while body weights at day 50 were similar for all groups. Broilers fed Diet B had lower FCR during the starter and finisher diets. Broilers fed salinomycin had lower FCR for the starter and grower diets while vaccinated broilers had lower FCR during the withdrawal period. Cumulative FCR for the entire grow out period were similar for all groups. These data indicate that vaccination can be utilized as an anticoccidial preventive and are suggestive that reduced protein concentration of starter diets can lead to significant losses in broiler performance when utilizing a vaccination program to prevent coccidiosis. Feeding an appropriately formulated diet while vaccinating broilers with Coccivac®-B as an alternative to the use of salinomycin yields at least equivalent if not elevated performance in the presence of field-strain Eimeria during grow-out with no effect on the cost of production.

Lee, Jason Thomas

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

sea level | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sea level sea level Dataset Summary Description This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), shows sea level rise for the period as early as 1834 through 2008 for the following UK sites: Aberdeen, Liverpool, Newlyn, North Shields, and Sheerness. Data is from the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory. Earliest year of available data varies by site, beginning between 1834 and 1916. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 12th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate change sea level UK Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 1 Excel file: Sea level rise (UK) (xls, 280.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment (Does not have "National Statistics" status)

256

" Level: National Data and Regional...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" "...

257

" Level: National Data and Regional...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;"...

258

" Level: National Data and Regional...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" "...

259

Negative ion rich plasmas in continuous and pulsed wave modes in a minimum-B magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generation of hydrogen negative ion rich plasmas is investigated in continuous wave (CW) and pulse modulated (PM) wave modes of 2.45 GHz in a minimum-B magnetic field. The waves are launched directly into the plasma device and utilize wave particle resonances for high density plasma generation. In CW operation, the chamber is divided into two sections, namely, the source and downstream region, separated by a transverse magnetic field that allows only cold electrons ({approx}1 eV) into the downstream region helpful for the generation of negative ions. The H{sup -} density is measured by the second derivative beat method and is compared with the values obtained from a steady state model and the extracted current density. In the pulsed mode, temporal filtering generates negative ion rich plasmas in the afterglow phase. The H{sup -} density in the afterglow is estimated using saturation current ratio method and the results are compared with a time dependent model using particle balance equations. The essential idea in both the filtering techniques is to assist generation of negative ions and prevent its destruction by hot electrons.

Sahu, Debaprasad; Pandey, Shail; Aneja, Jyoti; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Changes in quasi-periodic variations of solar photospheric fields: precursor to the deep solar minimum in the cycle 23?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using both wavelet and Fourier analysis, a study has been undertaken of the changes in the quasi-periodic variations in solar photospheric fields in the build-up to one of the deepest solar minima experienced in the past 100 years. This unusual and deep solar minimum occurred between solar cycles 23 and 24. The study, carried out using ground based synoptic magnetograms spanning the period 1975.14 to 2009.86, covered solar cycles 21, 22 and 23. A hemispheric asymmetry in periodicities of the photospheric fields was seen only at latitudes above $\\pm45{^{\\circ}}$ when the data was divided, based on a wavelet analysis, into two parts: one prior to 1996 and the other after 1996. Furthermore, the hemispheric asymmetry was observed to be confined to the latitude range 45${^{\\circ}}$ to 60${^{\\circ}}$. This can be attributed to the variations in polar surges that primarily depend on both the emergence of surface magnetic flux and varying solar surface flows. The observed asymmetry when coupled with the fact that bot...

Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Chakrabarty, D; Ananthakrishnan, S; Divekar, Ankur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Using a Family of Dividing Surfaces Normal to the Minimum EnergyPath for Quantum Instanton Rate Constants  

SciTech Connect

One of the outstanding issues in the quantum instanton (QI) theory (or any transition state-type theory) for thermal rate constants of chemical reactions is the choice of an appropriate ''dividing surface'' (DS) that separates reactants and products. (In the general version of the QI theory, there are actually two dividing surfaces involved.) This paper shows one simple and general way for choosing DS's for use in QI Theory, namely using the family of (hyper) planes normal to the minimum energy path (MEP) on the potential energy surface at various distances s along it. Here the reaction coordinate is not one of the dynamical coordinates of the system (which will in general be the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms), but rather simply a parameter which specifies the DS. It is also shown how this idea can be implemented for an N-atom system in 3d space in a way that preserves overall translational and rotational invariance. Numerical application to a simple system (the colliner H + H{sub 2} reaction) is presented to illustrate the procedure.

Li, Yimin; Miller, Wlliam H.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

Design patterns in FPS levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Level designers create gameplay through geometry, AI scripting, and item placement. There is little formal understanding of this process, but rather a large body of design lore and rules of thumb. As a result, there is no accepted common language for ... Keywords: design patterns, game design, level design

Kenneth Hullett; Jim Whitehead

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the fourth year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Johnson, Robert L.; Simmons, Mary Ann; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Study of the efficacy of aerosol versus nonaerosol laundry products. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The California Air Resources Board estimates that 6.6 tons of photochemically reactive organic compounds (PROC) are released into the environment in California every day because of the use of aerosol laundry products. The project studied the efficacy, ease of product use, and PROC content for three major brands of pre-wash stain removers in available product forms and for five starch products in their available product forms. Efficacy of pre-wash products was generally found to be limited. They were particularly useful for oil and ball point ink removal. Aerosols were found to be slightly superior. PROC content varied from 16-76% on aerosols; none was found in nonaerosols. Aerosols were found to be slightly easier to use by the laboratory investigator. For starches, on synthetic fabrics Faultless aerosol was found to be superior. For natural fabrics, results were mixed. Efficacy per unit cost was found to be high for bulk starches. PROC content for the two aerosols was 5.8% for Faultless and 8.5% for Niagra. Aerosols were easiest to use and bulk products rather difficult to use.

Boggs, R.R.; Belmont, B.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

THE EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS ON A CORONAL SOURCE SURFACE AT 2.3 R{sub Sun} DURING SOLAR MINIMUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory to produce global maps of coronal outflow velocities and densities in the regions where the solar wind is undergoing acceleration. The maps use UV and white light coronal data obtained from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer and the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, respectively, and a Doppler dimming analysis to determine the mean outflow velocities. The outflow velocities are defined on a sphere at 2.3 R{sub Sun} from Sun-center and are organized by Carrington Rotations during the solar minimum period at the start of solar cycle 23. We use the outflow velocity and density maps to show that while the solar minimum corona is relatively stable during its early stages, the shrinkage of the north polar hole in the later stages leads to changes in both the global areal expansion of the coronal hole and the derived internal flux tube expansion factors of the solar wind. The polar hole areal expansion factor and the flux tube expansion factors (between the coronal base and 2.3 R{sub Sun }) start out as super-radial but then they become more nearly radial as the corona progresses away from solar minimum. The results also support the idea that the largest flux tube expansion factors are located near the coronal hole/streamer interface, at least during the deepest part of the solar minimum period.

Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Kohl, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lamy, P., E-mail: lstrachan@cfa.harvard.edu [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS/Universite de Provence, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Initiative Life-cycle Cost Analysis Canada and Mexico –baseline energy consumption. Canada’s and Mexico’s marketsMexico minimum efficiency performance standard million tons (of CO 2 ) national equipment cost National Electric Manufacturers Association national energy

Letschert, Virginie E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Minimum bed parameters for in situ processing of oil shale. Second quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of quarterly reports on the Minimum Bed Parameters for In Situ Processing of Oil Shale Program (FE Control No. 4-79 ET 14165.000). It describes activities during the period January 1 to March 31, 1980, including modification of the laboratory retorting system to eliminate problems with the ignition and product collecttion systems and the successful retorting of a 16% void sample. The sample consisted of a 7.6 cm diameter by 23 cm competent core of oil shale with three 0.64 cm slices of material removed parallel to the axis of the cylinder. The 1.4 cm thick slabs constituted 70% of the sample volume, while oil shale rubble (-.32 + .16 cm) was used to occupy nearly half the remaining volume (14%), leaving 16% void. The sample was instrumented, sealed in an insulated retort vessel, ignited with hot (700/sup 0/C) air, and combustion-retorted with air. The observed retorting rate was 10 cm/hr, the local heating rate near the block surface in the retorting zone was 18/sup 0/C/min, and peak temperatures were about 825/sup 0/C. Temperature profiles across the retort cross-section indicated some limited heat loss. Oil yield was 92% of Fischer Assay. Results of block retort model calculations (without rubble in the fracture) are in good agreement with those observed, namely a retorting rate of 12 cm/hr, a local heating rate of 7/sup 0/C/min, peak temperatures around 900/sup 0/C, and a yield of 90% FA.

Tyner, C.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Connecting blackbody radiation and zero-point radiation within classical physics: A new minimum principle and a status review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new thermodynamic analysis is presented for the intimate connections between blackbody radiation and zero-point radiation within classical physics. First, using the thermodynamic behavior of an oscillator under an adiabatic change of frequency, we show that the thermodynamic functions can all be derived from a single function of w/T, analogous to Wien's displacement theorem. The high- and low-frequency limits allow asymptotic energy forms involving T alone or w alone, corresponding to energy equipartition and zero-point energy. It is then suggested that the actual thermodynamic behavior for a harmonic oscillator is given by the function satisfying the Wien displacement result which provides the smoothest possible interpolation between scale-decoupled energy equipartition at low frequency and scale-invariant zero-point energy at high frequency. This leads to the Planck spectrum. Second, we turn to radiation in a box with conducting walls and a conducting partition so that the discrete normal mode structure of the box becomes important. The contrasting Casimir energies are explored for the Rayleigh-Jeans and zero-point spectra. The Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum involves no change of energy with partition position, and the zero-point spectrum involves no change of entropy. It is suggested that the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation satisfies a natural minimum principle which corresponds to greatest independence of the system energy from the position of the partition for a fixed temperature. Numerical calculation is used for confirmation. Third, we review the previous derivations of the Planck radiation spectrum in classical physics, all of which involve zero-point radiation.

Timothy H. Boyer

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

STEADY-STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

HU TA

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes Notice: Ongoing analysis of imports data to the Energy Information Administration reveals that some imports are not correctly reported on Form EIA-814 "Monthly Imports Report". Contact with the companies provides sufficient information for EIA to include these imports in the data even though they have not provided complete reports on Form EIA-814. Estimates are included in aggregate data, but the estimates are not included in the file of Company-Level Imports. Therefore, summation of volumes for PAD Districts 1-5 from the Company-Level Imports will not equal aggregate import totals. Explanation of Codes Used in Imports Database Files SURVEY_ID EIA-814 Survey Form Number for Collecting Petroleum Import Statistics

272

Instrumented architectural level emulation technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of general purpose emulators as tools for computer architecture research and system development is briefly traced. The concepts of an architectural level emulation and of instrumenting an emulation are introduced. An operational emulation-based ...

Harrison R. Burris

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Teacher self-efficacy in Cape Town : a bottom up approach to enhancing the quality of education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personal teacher self-efficacy (PTE), or the belief in one's own ability to overcome a particular challenge, often acts as a catalyst for teachers to improve the effectiveness of their teaching. Gaining PTE can translate ...

Kim, YeSeul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Training Residents to Employ Self-efficacy-enhancing Interviewing Techniques: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Standardized Patient Intervention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a single SP instructor training visit and persisted withoutour findings suggest that training primary care physiciansJ, et al. Self-efficacy training for patients with end-stage

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Low Level Heat Recovery Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With today's high fuel prices, energy conservation projects to utilize low level waste heat have become more attractive. Exxon Chemical Company Central Engineering has been developing guidelines and assessing the potential for application of low level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various possibilities and some guidelines on when they should be considered will be presented.

O'Brien, W. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Level-3 Calorimetric Resolution available for the Level-1 and Level-2 CDF Triggers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the Tevatron luminosity increases sophisticated selections are required to be efficient in selecting rare events among a very huge background. To cope with this problem, CDF has pushed the offline calorimeter algorithm reconstruction resolution up to Level 2 and, when possible, even up to Level 1, increasing efficiency and, at the same time, keeping under control the rates. The CDF Run II Level 2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on a simple algorithm that was used in Run I. This system has worked well for Run II at low luminosity. As the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitation due to this simple algorithm starts to become clear: some of the most important jet and MET (Missing ET) related triggers have large growth terms in cross section at higher luminosity. In this paper, we present an upgrade of the Level 2 Calorimeter system which makes the calorimeter trigger tower information available directly to a CPU allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be implemented in software. Both Level 2 jets and MET can be made nearly equivalent to offline quality, thus significantly improving the performance and flexibility of the jet and MET related triggers. However in order to fully take advantage of the new L2 triggering capabilities having at Level 1 the same L2 MET resolution is necessary. The new Level-1 MET resolution is calculated by dedicated hardware. This paper describes the design, the hardware and software implementation and the performance of the upgraded calorimeter trigger system both at Level 2 and Level 1.

A. Canepa; M. Casarsa; T. Liu; G. Cortiana; G. Flanagan; H. Frisch; D. Krop; C. Pilcher; V. Rusu; V. Cavaliere; V. Greco; P. Giannetti; M. Piendibene; L. Sartori; M. Vidal

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Official Certificate List Level(s)* Academic Administrative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Educational Policy Studies EDUU S/295 Certificate in Energy Analysis and Policy at the Graduate Level IESG310&SU101 Certificate in Air Resources Management IESG104 Certificate in American Indian Studies L&SU S/110 Certificate in Archaeology L&SU S/120 Certificate in Asian American Studies L&SU201 Certificate

Sheridan, Jennifer

278

Neighborhood based heuristics for a Two-level Hierarchical ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the minimum cost set disjoint cycle is a difficult problem, improving ... neighborhood search framework The above describe neighborhoods are combined to.

279

High pressure liquid level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Understanding Superintendents' Self-Efficacy Influences on Instructional Leadership and Student Achievement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores public school superintendent self-efficacy influences on instructional and student achievement within three Texas public school districts. The purpose of this research study is to investigate superintendent self-efficacy and it’s perceived influence on instructional leadership in districts with persistent student achievement inequities for economically disadvantaged and students of color. This study specifically focused on three White male public school superintendents with varying numbers of student populations that have large percentages of economically disadvantaged students and students of color. Two research questions guided the inquiry process: 1. How do superintendents in school districts in which children of color and children from low-income homes persistently under-perform perceive their effectiveness in the area of instructional leadership? 2.What are superintendents’ perceptions about how their instructional leadership beliefs are influenced by the context of federal and state accountability in which they work? This study employed a qualitative method of investigation utilizing a case-study approach to examine the perceptions, beliefs, and views of participating superintendents. Two in-depth interviews with each school superintendent served as primary data collection sources, while field notes, personal observations, email, and phone conversations served as secondary and clarifying sources. Data were interpreted using a critical interpretivist lens. This inquiry contributes to the body of superintendent practice and limited research scholarship by assisting in the understanding of perceived superintendent self-efficacy influences on instructional leadership and student achievement. These understandings have additional implications for the intersection of power, privilege, and emancipatory critical constructs for superintendents with populations of economically disadvantaged students and students of color. Findings from this study serve to highlight needed calls to action and reforms in superintendent preparatory programs, research scholarship, professional organizations, and regional educational service centers.

Whitt, Kenneth Ray

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Therapeutic efficacy of dimercaptosuccinic acid and thiamine/ascorbic acid on lead intoxication in rats  

SciTech Connect

Thiamine, folic acid, pyridoxine and ascorbic acid either individually or in combination have been proven to be effective in reducing the toxic manifestations of lead and in enhancing the antidotal efficacy of CaNa{sub 2}EDTA. In a recent report from the authors' laboratory, it was observed that given combination of thiamine and ascorbic acid with thiol chelators improved the ability of the animals to excrete lead thereby reducing body lead burden. In view of the beneficial effect of these two vitamins, it was considered of interest to evaluate their potential to modify the prophylactic action of DMS in lead intoxication in rat after repeated administration.

Tandon, S.K.; Flora, S.J.S. (Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Lucknow (India))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Enterprise level IT risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing IT budget and over-dependence of business on IT infra-structure makes risk management a critical component of enterprise management. The creation and sustenance of an IT risk management framework is one of the crucial and challenging tasks ... Keywords: enterprise level, information technology, risk management

Nadhirah Azizi; Khairuddin Hashim

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

High temperature liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiproton discrimination: Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antiproton and antihydrogen trajectories in this magnetic geometry, and reconstruct the antihydrogen energy distribution from the measured annihilation time history.

C. Amole; G. B. Andresen; M. D. Ashkezari; M. Baquero-Ruiz; W. Bertsche; E. Butler; C. L. Cesar; S. Chapman; M. Charlton; A. Deller; S. Eriksson; J. Fajans; T. Friesen; M. C. Fujiwara; D. R. Gill; A. Gutierrez; J. S. Hangst; W. N. Hardy; M. E. Hayden; A. J. Humphries; R. Hydomako; L. Kurchaninov; S. Jonsell; N. Madsen; S. Menary; P. Nolan; K. Olchanski; A. Olin; A. Povilus; P. Pusa; F. Robicheaux; E. Sarid; D. M. Silveira; C. So; J. W. Storey; R. I. Thompson; D. P. van der Werf; J. S. Wurtele

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

285

Level-of-Detail Shaders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current graphics hardware can render objects using simple procedural shaders in real-time. However, detailed, highquality shaders will continue to stress the resources of hardware for some time to come. Shaders written for film production and software renderers may stretch to thousands of lines. The difficulty of rendering efficiently is compounded when there is not just one, but a scene full of shaded objects, surpassing the capability of any hardware to render. This problem has many similarities to the rendering of large models, a problem that has inspired extensive research in geometric level-of-detail and geometric simplification. We introduce an analogous process for shading, shader simplification. Starting from an initial detailed shader, shader simplification produces a new shader with extra level-of-detail parameters that control the shader execution. The resulting level-of-detail shader, can automatically adjust its rendered appearance based on measures of distance, size, or importance as well as physical limits such as rendering time budget or texture usage.

Marc Olano; Bob Kuehne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The effects of a summer science camp teaching experience on preservice elementary teachers' science teaching efficacy, science content knowledge, and understanding of the nature of science.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a summer science camp teaching experience on preservice elementary teachers’ science teaching efficacy,… (more)

Logerwell, Mollianne G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Effects of a Summer Science Camp Teaching Experience on Preservice Elementary Teachers’ Science Teaching Efficacy, Science Content Knowledge, and Understanding of the Nature of Science .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a summer science camp teaching experience on preservice elementary teachers’ science teaching efficacy, science… (more)

Logerwell, Mollianne G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

D. W. Nigg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8) 8) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and non-domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. All data in this set are classified as UK National Statistics. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

290

Cascading Failure Risk Variation with Generator Dispatch and System Load Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry reliability rules increasingly require utilities to study and mitigate cascading failure risk in their system. Motivated by this, this paper describes how cascading failure risk, in terms of expected blackout size, varies with power system load level and pre-contingency dispatch. We used Monte Carlo sampling of random branch outages to model contingencies, and a model of cascading failure to estimate blackout sizes. The risk associated with different blackout sizes is separately estimated in order to separate small, medium, and large blackout risk. Results from N-1 secure models of the IEEE RTS case and a 2383 bus case indicate that blackout risk does not always increase with load level, particularly for large blackout risk. The results also show that risk is highly dependent on the method used for generator dispatch. Minimum cost methods of dispatch can result in larger long distance power transfers, which can increase cascading failure risk.

Rezaei, Pooya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Method for selecting minimum width of leaf in multileaf adjustable collimator while inhibiting passage of particle beams of radiation through sawtooth joints between collimator leaves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for selecting the minimum width of individual leaves of a multileaf adjustable collimator having sawtooth top and bottom surfaces between adjacent leaves of a first stack of leaves and sawtooth end edges which are capable of intermeshing with the corresponding sawtooth end edges of leaves in a second stack of leaves of the collimator. The minimum width of individual leaves in the collimator, each having a sawtooth configuration in the surface facing another leaf in the same stack and a sawtooth end edge, is selected to comprise the sum of the penetration depth or range of the particular type of radiation comprising the beam in the particular material used for forming the leaf; plus the total path length across all the air gaps in the area of the joint at the edges between two leaves defined between lines drawn across the peaks of adjacent sawtooth edges; plus at least one half of the length or period of a single sawtooth. To accomplish this, in accordance with the method of the invention, the penetration depth of the particular type of radiation in the particular material to be used for the collimator leaf is first measured. Then the distance or gap between adjoining or abutting leaves is selected, and the ratio of this distance to the height of the sawteeth is selected. Finally the number of air gaps through which the radiation will pass between sawteeth is determined by selecting the number of sawteeth to be formed in the joint. The measurement and/or selection of these parameters will permit one to determine the minimum width of the leaf which is required to prevent passage of the beam through the sawtooth joint.

Ludewigt, Bernhard (Berkeley, CA); Bercovitz, John (Hayward, CA); Nyman, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Chu, William (Lafayette, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Disinfection Efficacy of Chlorine on Sulfate-reducing Bacteria and Iron Bacteria in Water Supply Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and iron reducing bacteria (IRB) that widely exist in water supply networks are the main microorganisms leading to metal corrosion in pipelines. Chlorine is widely used in drinking water supply systems for sterilization. ... Keywords: Chlorine, SRB, IRB, disinfection efficacy

Qi Beimenr; Wu Chenguang; Chen Xiaoju; Yuan Yixing

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and humid climate A. H. Fakra, H. Boyer, F. Miranville, D. Bigot Building Physics and Systems Laboratory illuminance 1. Introduction Daylighting is recognized as an important and useful strategy in the design. Literature review The luminous efficacy of daylight (in lm/W) is defined as the ratio of daylight illuminance

294

High level white noise generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

Borkowski, Casimer J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blalock, Theron V. (Knoxville, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Low-Level Waste Branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enclosed please find five copies of an application for ground water Alternate Concentration Limits (ACLs) for the Shirley Basin mill and tailings site. Pathfinder requests that the NRC amend the above referenced license to incorporate the proposed ACLs. Pathfinder has been endeavoring for over fifteen years to accomplish a ground water restoration at the site with overall favorable results. Of the thirteen constituents assigned ground water protection standards in the license, only two continue to exceed the site standard limits: uranium and thorium-230. While both of these parameters have been dramatically reduced in the ground water over the years, they remain at levels which have become very difficult to further reduce. Additionally, it is noteworthy that over the period of record these two constituents have routinely exceeded the site standards in the designated site background well. This would suggest that the site standards for uranium and thorium-230 originally were set unrealistically low. We have concluded that we have essentially reached the point of ALARA relative to ground water restoration at the Shirley Basin site, prompting this application for ACLs. The enclosed application discusses the attainment of ALARA, presents sound technical justification for the proposed ACLs, and ably demonstrates the minimal public health risk associated with the proposed ACLs.

Mr. Thomas; H. Essig

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Sunspot minimum between solar cycles No 23 and 24. Prediction of solar cycle No 24 magnitude on the base of "Waldmeier's rule"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study is the determination of solar minimum date of the new sunspot cycle No 24. It is provided by using of four types of mean daily data values for the period Jan 01. 2006 - Dec 31. 2009: (1) the solar radioindex F10.7; (2) the International sunspot number Ri; (3) the total solar irradiance index (TSI), and (4) the daily number of X-ray flares of classes from "B" to "X" from the soft X-ray GOES satellite channel (0.1 - 0.8 nm). It is found that the mean starting moment of the upward solar activity tendency (the mean solar minimum) is Nov. 06th, 2008. So, the solar cycle No 23 length is estimated to ~12.6 years. A conclusion for a relatively weak general magnitude of solar cycle No 24 is made. By using of relationship based on the "Waldmeier's rule" a near maximal mean yearly sunspot number value of 72 \\pm 27 has been determined.

Komitov, B; Stoychev, K; Dechev, M; Koleva, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Study of minimum-bias-trigger events at \\Sqrt s = 0.2-0.9 TeV with magnetic and calorimetric analysis at the CERN proton-antiproton collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of minimum-bias-trigger events at \\Sqrt s = 0.2-0.9 TeV with magnetic and calorimetric analysis at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

Ceradini, F

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments  

SciTech Connect

In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane’s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this process as a biofilter by studying the distribution of methane oxidation and disposition of methanotrophic populations in the Pacific Ocean. We investigated several environments including the basins offshore California, the continental margin off Central America, and the shallow waters around gas seeps. We succeeded in identifying the distributions of activity in these environments, identified potential physical and chemical controls on methanotrophic activity, we further revealed details about the methanotrophic communities active in these settings, and we developed new approaches to study methanotrophic communities. These findings should improve our capacity to predict the methanotrophic response in ocean waters, and further our ability to generate specific hypotheses as to the ecology and efficacy of pelagic methanotrophic communites. The discharge of methane and other hydrocarbons to Gulf of Mexico that followed the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon provided a unique opportunity to study the methanotorphic biofilter in the deep ocean environment. We set out to understand the consumption of methane and the bloom of methanotrophs resulting from this event, as a window into the regional scale release of gas hydrate under rapid warming scenarios. We found that other hydrocarbon gases, notably propane and ethane, were preferred for consumption over methane, but that methane consumption accelerated rapidly and drove the depletion of methane within a matter of months after initial release. These results revealed the identity of the responsible community, and point to the importance of the seed population in determining the rate at which a methanotrophic community is able to respond to an input of methane. Collectively, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the marine methanotrohic biofilter, and further provide direction and context for future investigations of this important phenomenon. This project has resulted in fourteen publications to date, with five more circulating in draft form, and several others planned.

Valentine, David

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Improvement of Stent Retriever Design and Efficacy of Mechanical Thrombectomy in a Flow Model  

SciTech Connect

In vitro experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical intracranial thrombectomy comparing the newly developed Aperio stent retriever and standard devices for stroke treatment. The Aperio (A), with an increased working length of 4 cm and a special cell design for capturing and withholding clots, was compared to three benchmark devices: the Solitaire retrievable stent (B), the Merci X6 (C), and the Merci L5 retriever (D). In a vascular glass model with pulsatile flow, reminiscent of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery, we repeatedly induced occlusion by generating thrombi via a modified Chandler loop system. The numbers of recanalization attempts, peripheral embolizations, and recanalizations at the site of occlusion were recorded during 10 retrieval experiments with each device. Eleven devices were able to remove the blood clots from the occluded branch. In 34 of 40 experiments, restoration of flow was obtained in 1-3 attempts. The main differences between the study devices were observed in terms of clot withholding and fragmentation during retrieval. Although there was only one fragmentation recorded for device A, disengagement of the whole clot or peripheral embolization of fragments occurred more frequently (5-7 times) with devices B, C, and D. In a vascular model, the design of device A was best at capturing and withholding thrombi during retrieval. Further study will be necessary to see whether this holds true in clinical applications.

Wenger, Katharina, E-mail: kwenger@stud.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt am Main (Germany)] [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Nagl, Frank, E-mail: fnagl@acandis.com [Acandis GmbH and Co KG (Germany)] [Acandis GmbH and Co KG (Germany); Wagner, Marlies, E-mail: Marlies.Wagner@kgu.de; Berkefeld, Joachim, E-mail: berkefeld@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt am Main (Germany)] [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Design Method for the Heating/Cooling Coil in the AHU Based on Fuzzy Logic - Part Two: Design of the Minimum Heat-Exchanging Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considering a heating/cooling coil with adjustable heat-exchange area, an unequal type is put forward in this paper. Aiming at the application of such heat exchanger in an air-handling unit, restriction conditions are given for the minimum heat-exchanging unit in accordance with the requirement of control precision of indoor temperature and humidity. The structure adjustable heat exchanger improved the hydraulic adjusting characteristics of existing air handling units in the respective structure, and overcame the problems of existing air-handling units such as a narrow hydraulic adjusting range due to the rapid-opening performance of the continuous motor-driven value. As a result, such kind of heat exchanger is extremely suitable to fuzzy control.

Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Liang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microsoft Word - CERTIFICATION LEVEL REQUIREMENTS.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTIFICATION LEVEL CERTIFICATION LEVEL The CEG is intended to provide program secretarial officers and field element managers (including operations offices, site offices, area offices, project offices, and service centers) with the requirements and guidelines for evaluating PMCDP candidate competencies and requests for equivalencies at all four certification levels and continuing education. Persons planning to be certified under the PMCDP may attain certification levels with the following total project cost (TPC) limits: * Certification Level 4: TPC exceeding $400 million (M) * Certification Level 3: TPC greater than $100M and equal to or less than $400M * Certification Level 2: TPC greater than $20M and equal to or less than $100M * Certification Level 1: TPC greater than $5M and equal to or less than $20M

302

Vibrational and Electronic Energy Level Searches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... options based on vibrational and electronic energies are available: ... the tabulated vibrational and electronic energy level data ... All rights reserved. ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Wavelengths, Transition Probabilities, and Energy Levels for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Energy level values, with designations and uncertainties, have ... In addition, ground states, ionization energies, and hyperfine ... All rights reserved. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

Energy Levels of Neutral Uranium ( U I )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Data, Uranium (U) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. ... Version Energy Levels of Neutral Uranium ( U I ). ...

305

NIST - Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra Bibliographic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in this database are from Bibliography on Atomic Energy Levels and ... references to atomic transition probabilities, line intensities, or broadening. ...

306

An indicator energy of two close levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a concept of an indicator energy of two close levels in the perturbation.

Alexander V. Shamanin

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy Levels of Neutral Thorium ( Th I )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Data, Thorium (Th) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. ... Version Energy Levels of Neutral Thorium ( Th I ). ...

308

Wavelengths, Transition Probabilities, and Energy Levels for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Wavelengths, Transition Probabilities, and Energy Levels for the Spectra of Sodium „Na I–Na XI… JE Sansonettia ...

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

309

A switch level fault simulation environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fault simulation environment which accepts pure switch level or mixed switch/RT level descriptions of the design under test. Switch level fault injection strategies for the stuck-at, transition and logic bridge models are presented. ...

V. Krishnaswamy; J. Casas; T. Tetzlaff

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

From here to human-level AI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human-level AI will be achieved, but new ideas are almost certainly needed, so a date cannot be reliably predicted-maybe five years, maybe five hundred years. I'd be inclined to bet on this 21st century. It is not surprising that human-level AI has proved ... Keywords: Elaboration tolerance, Human-level AI

John McCarthy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Designing ontologies for higher level fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of higher level fusion is to produce contextual understanding of the states of the environment and prediction of their impact in relation to specific goals of decision makers. One of the main challenges of designing higher level fusion processes ... Keywords: Basic formal ontology (BFO), Higher level fusion, Mereotopology, Ontology, Postdisaster environment, Relations

Eric G. Little; Galina L. Rogova

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Dental radiography: efficacy in the assessment of intraosseous lesions of the face and jaws in asymptomatic patients  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation the efficacy of dental radiography for the detection of occult intraosseous lesions of the face and jaws was evaluated. An analysis of 30 million health insurance records indicated that the period prevalence of malignant lesions was less than 5 cases/million/year, and for benign lesions approximately 100 cases/million/year. Data from a controlled observer-performance study showed that radiographic sensitivities ranged between 50% and 80%. The cost per true-positive finding was estimated to be +8.6 million per malignant case and +430,000 per benign case. An assessment of the dosimetric literature indicated that the benefits of radiographic screening as a means for early detection of a malignancy appear to be counterbalanced by the risk of causing a radiation-induced malignancy. Taken together, these data demonstrate that dental radiography is not efficacious for the purpose of detecting occult lesions.

Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Test methods for selection of materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste vitrification. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate materials of construction were evaluated for a facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant to vitrify high-level radioactive waste. Limited operating experience was available under the corrosive conditions of the complex vitrification process. The objective of the testing program was to provide a high degree of assurance that equipment will meet or exceed design lifetimes. To meet this objective in reasonable time and minimum cost, a program was designed consisting of a combination of coupon immersion and electrochemical laboratory tests and pilot-scale tests. Stainless steels and nickel-based alloys were tested. Alloys that were most resistant to general and local attack contained nickel, molybdenum (>9%), and chromium (where Cr + Mo > 30%). Alloy C-276 was selected as the reference material for process equipment. Stellite 6 was selected for abrasive service in the presence of formic acid. Alloy 690 and ALLCORR were selected for specific applications.

Bickford, D F; Corbett, R A; Morrison, W S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

CIM Equipment List (by Level of Reservation Access) LEVEL 1. General Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CIM Equipment List (by Level of Reservation Access) LEVEL 1. General Inventory All CIM Adapter (5) Glidetrack DSLR slider (1) AVC Analog-Digital Converter (1) LEVEL 2. Advanced Inventory CIM

Schaefer, Marcus

315

Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 Multiplication-Sign 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner's isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at {>=}150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r{sup 2} = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Sedlmair, Martin [Siemens, Healthcare Sector (Germany); Ritter, Christine [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens, Healthcare Sector (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Randomized Clinical Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Radiotherapy in Primary Mediastinal Large B-Lymphoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We developed a controlled clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant-involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) in patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma that achieved complete response after the patients were treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab (R-CHOP-14). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and June 2004, 124 consecutive patients who were in complete remission after dose dense chemotherapy and rituximab administration (R-CHOP14) were randomly assigned to received IFRT (30 Gy). Sixty-three patients received IFR, and 61 patients did not (control group). Results: The study aimed to include 182 patients in each arm but was closed prematurely because in a security analysis (June 2004), progression and early relapse were more frequent in patients that did not received IFRT. Patients were followed until March 2009, at which point actuarial curves at 10 years showed that progression free-survival was 72% in patients who received IFR and 20% in the control group (p < 0.001), overall survival was 72% and 31%, respectively (p < 0.001). Acute toxicity was mild and well tolerated. Discussion: Adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of bulky disease was the only difference to have an improvement in outcome in our patients; the use of rituximab during induction did not improve complete response rates and did affect overall survival; patients who received rituximab but not IFRT had a worse prognosis. Conclusions: The use of IFRT in patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma who achieved complete response remain as the best treatment available, even in patients that received rituximab during induction.

Aviles, Agustin, E-mail: agustin.aviles@imss.gob.mx [Oncology Research Unit, Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center, IMSS, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Neri, Natividad [Department of Hematology, Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center, IMSS, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Fernandez, Raul [Department of Radiation Therapy, Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center, IMSS, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Huerta-Guzman, Judith; Nambo, Maria J. [Department of Hematology, Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center, IMSS, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

MINIMUM DISSATISFACTION PERSONNEL SCHEDULING D ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clean up the front of dq0 while (dq0.size()>1) and (dq0.getSecond().tearly

318

Analytical Thresholds: Determination of Minimum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Different color channels behave differently – if possible, determine ATs for each color • ATs derived from methods based ...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

319

Minimum Requirements for NIST Webcast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some organizations have firewalls preventing streaming flash content from ... Windows XP (Internet Explorer or Firefox) • Windows Vista (Internet ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

Finding minimum representative pattern sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequent pattern mining often produces an enormous number of frequent patterns, which imposes a great challenge on understanding and further analysis of the generated patterns. This calls for finding a small number of representative patterns to best ... Keywords: frequent pattern summarization, representative patterns

Guimei Liu; Haojun Zhang; Limsoon Wong

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd EditionChapter 15 Efficacy and Safety of the Combined Use of Diacylglycerol Oil with Other Cholesterol-Lowering Agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 15 Efficacy and Safety of the Combined Use of Diacylglycerol Oil with Other Cholesterol-Lowering Agents Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nut

322

Radiation Level Changes at RAM Package Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will explore design considerations required to meet the regulations that limit radiation level variations at external surfaces of radioactive material (RAM) packages. The radiation level requirements at package surfaces (e.g. TS-R-1 paragraphs 531 and 646) invoke not only maximum radiation levels, but also strict limits on the allowable increase in the radiation level during transport. This paper will explore the regulatory requirements by quantifying the amount of near surface movement and/or payload shifting that results in a 20% increase in the radiation level at the package surface. Typical IP-2, IP-3, Type A and Type B packaging and source geometries will be illustrated. Variations in surface radiation levels are typically the result of changes in the geometry of the surface due to an impact, puncture or crush event, or shifting and settling of radioactive contents.

Opperman, Erich [Washington Savannah River Company; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Kapoor, Ashok [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Packaging and Transportation; Natali, Ronald [R. B. Natali Consulting, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Greenhouse effect, sea level and drought  

SciTech Connect

Four parts of this book relate successively to greenhouse effects, sea level, drought and water deficiency, and management techniques and case studies.

Paepe, R.; Fairbridge, R.W.; Jelgersma, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ultrasonic Liquid Level Monitor - Available Technologies - PNNL  

The ultrasonic liquid level monitor is a single transducer mounted to the outside surface of a tank and an estimation algorithm that relies on the ...

325

NIST Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

326

Average Stock Levels: Crude Market & Propane  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This graph shows that propane was not alone in experiencing excess supply in 1998 and extraordinary stock builds. Note that the graph shows average stock levels ...

327

NIST: Atomic Spectros. - Eigenvector Composition of Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ?SL terms in the composition of the ? J level are conveniently expressed as percentages, whose sum is 100 %. Thus the percentage contributed by ...

328

Wavelengths, Transition Probabilities, and Energy Levels for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... energy levels, wavelengths, and ionization energies reported here ... the integer part of the energy is listed ... 61FOX/SER Fox, WN, and Series, GW, Proc ...

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

NIST: Hydrocarcons - Molec. Param. and Energy Level ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The rotational energy levels are characterized by the three quantum numbers J ... axis one must also examine the nuclear spin statistics that influence ...

330

Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Adjuvant Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and multiagent systemic therapies were reviewed to determine the effects of patient- and treatment-related factors on survival and toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with salvage SRS from September 2002 to March 2010. All patients had experienced progression after treatment with temozolomide and radiotherapy. Salvage SRS was typically administered only after multiple postchemoradiation salvage systemic therapies had failed. Results: 63 patients were treated with SRS for recurrent high-grade glioma; 49 patients had World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 4 disease. Median follow-up was 31 months from primary diagnosis and 7 months from SRS. Median overall survival from primary diagnosis was 41 months for all patients. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival from SRS (OS-SRS) were 6 and 10 months for all patients, respectively. The 1-year OS-SRS for patients with Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant (concurrent with or after SRS) bevacizumab was 50% vs. 22% for patients not receiving adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.005). Median PFS for patients with a WHO Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant bevacizumab was 5.2 months vs. 2.1 months for patients who did not receive adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.014). Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and age were not significantly different between treatment groups. Treatment-related Grade 3/4 toxicity for patients receiving and not receiving adjuvant BVZ was 10% and 14%, respectively (p = 0.58).On multivariate analysis, the relative risk of death and progression with adjuvant bevacizumab was 0.37 (confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.82) and 0.45 (CI 0.21-0.97). KPS >70 and age <50 years were significantly associated with improved survival. Conclusions: The combination of salvage radiosurgery and bevacizumab to treat recurrent malignant gliomas is well tolerated and seems to be associated with improved outcomes. Prospective multiinstitutional studies are required to determine efficacy and long-term toxicity with this approach.

Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Vredenburgh, James J.; Sampson, John H.; Reardon, David A.; Desjardins, Annick; Peters, Katherine B.; Friedman, Henry S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kirkpatrick, John P., E-mail: john.kirkpatrick@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Charged Jets in Minimum Bias p-Pb Collisions at sqrt(s) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly energetic jets are sensitive probes for the kinematics and the topology of nuclear collisions. Jets are produced in an early stage of the collision from hard-scattered partons, which fragment into a spray of charged and neutral particles. The measurement of jet spectra in p-Pb collisions provides an important way to quantify the effects of cold nuclear matter on jet production, fragmentation and hadronization. This is possible because the hot, dense medium produced in Pb-Pb collisions is not expected to form. Proton-Lead collisions also provide an important constraint for the nuclear parton density functions. The exact evaluation of the background from the underlying event is an important ingredient to correct the measured jet spectra. The system size in p-Pb collisions is much smaller than in Pb-Pb so that the methods for background estimation need to be refined. The analysis reported here is performed on p-Pb data taken at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.02 TeV by the ALICE detector at the LHC in the beginning of 2013. The focus of our analysis lies on the minimum bias charged jet spectra and their comparison to the spectra from pp collisions. For this analysis various estimates for the background and its fluctuations have been tested in p-Pb and PYTHIA simulations.

Rüdiger Haake; for the ALICE collaboration

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Property:DIA/Level | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:DIA/Level Jump to: navigation, search Property Name DIA/Level Property Type String Description Development Impacts Assessment Toolkit property to help filter pages Used in Form/Template Tool Allows Values Global;National;Sectoral;Regional;Local;Project;Policy Pages using the property "DIA/Level" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool + Project + Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model + National +, Regional +, Local +, ... Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) + Regional + Assessing Green Jobs Potential in Developing Countries: A Practitioner's Guide + National +

333

Thermostat having simple battery level detection  

SciTech Connect

In a thermostat for controlling HVAC equipment having a battery, the battery having a power level, battery testing means is described, comprising: a time base generator producing a first signal having a frequency substantially independent of the power level; an oscillator producing a second signal having a frequency substantially dependent upon the power level: a comparator connected to the time base generator and the oscillator, the comparator shutting off the HVAC equipment if the first and second signals are not in a pre-determined relationship.

Adams, J.T.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Process Design Concepts for Stabilization of High Level Waste Calcine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current baseline assumption is that packaging ¡§as is¡¨ and direct disposal of high level waste (HLW) calcine in a Monitored Geologic Repository will be allowed. The fall back position is to develop a stabilized waste form for the HLW calcine, that will meet repository waste acceptance criteria currently in place, in case regulatory initiatives are unsuccessful. A decision between direct disposal or a stabilization alternative is anticipated by June 2006. The purposes of this Engineering Design File (EDF) are to provide a pre-conceptual design on three low temperature processes under development for stabilization of high level waste calcine (i.e., the grout, hydroceramic grout, and iron phosphate ceramic processes) and to support a down selection among the three candidates. The key assumptions for the pre-conceptual design assessment are that a) a waste treatment plant would operate over eight years for 200 days a year, b) a design processing rate of 3.67 m3/day or 4670 kg/day of HLW calcine would be needed, and c) the performance of waste form would remove the HLW calcine from the hazardous waste category, and d) the waste form loadings would range from about 21-25 wt% calcine. The conclusions of this EDF study are that: (a) To date, the grout formulation appears to be the best candidate stabilizer among the three being tested for HLW calcine and appears to be the easiest to mix, pour, and cure. (b) Only minor differences would exist between the process steps of the grout and hydroceramic grout stabilization processes. If temperature control of the mixer at about 80„aC is required, it would add a major level of complexity to the iron phosphate stabilization process. (c) It is too early in the development program to determine which stabilizer will produce the minimum amount of stabilized waste form for the entire HLW inventory, but the volume is assumed to be within the range of 12,250 to 14,470 m3. (d) The stacked vessel height of the hot process vessels in the hydroceramic grout process (i.e., 21 m) appears to be about the same as that estimated by the Direct Cementitious Waste Process in 1998, for which a conceptual design was developed. Some of the conceptual design efforts in the 1998 study may be applicable to the stabilizer processes addressed in this EDF. (e) The gamma radiation fields near the process vessels handling HLW calcine would vary from a range of about 300-350 R/hr at a distance of 2.5 cm from the side of the vessels to a range of about 50-170 R/hr at a distance of 100 cm from the side of the vessels. The calculations were made for combined calcine, which was defined as the total HLW calcine inventory uniformly mixed. (f) The gamma radiation fields near the stabilized waste in canisters would range from about 25-170 R/hr at 2.5 cm from the side of the canister and 5-35 R/hr at 100 cm from the side of the canister, depending on the which bin set was the source of calcine.

T. R. Thomas; A. K. Herbst

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Field Comparison of the Sampling Efficacy of Two Smear Media: Cotton Fiber and Kraft Paper  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two materials were compared in field tests at the Defense Waste Processing Facility: kraft paper (a strong, brown paper made from wood pulp prepared with a sodium sulfate solution) and cotton fiber. Based on a sampling of forty-six pairs of smears, the cotton fiber smears provide a greater sensitivity. The cotton fiber smears collected an average of forty-four percent more beta activity than the kraft paper smears and twenty-nine percent more alpha activity. Results show a greater sensitivity with cotton fiber over kraft paper at the 95 percent confidence level. Regulatory requirements for smear materials are vague. The data demonstrate that the difference in sensitivity of smear materials could lead to a large difference in reported results that are subsequently used for meeting shipping regulations or evaluating workplace contamination levels.

Hogue, M.G.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Interdecadal Sea Level Fluctuations at Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past century, tide gauges in Hawaii have recorded interdecadal sea level variations that are coherent along the island chain. The generation of this signal and its relationship to other interdecadal variability are investigated, with a ...

Yvonne L. Firing; Mark A. Merrifield; Thomas A. Schroeder; Bo Qiu

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Statistical Timing Analysis using Levelized Covariance Propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability in process parameters is making accurate timing analysis of nano-scale integrated circuits an extremely challenging task. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for statistical timing analysis using Levelized Covariance Propagation (LCP). ...

Kunhyuk Kang; Bipul C. Paul; Kaushik Roy

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A variation aware high level synthesis framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worst-case delay/power of function units has been used in traditional high level synthesis to facilitate design space exploration. As technology scales to nanometer regime, the impact of process variations increases. The degree of variability encountered ...

Feng Wang; Guangyu Sun; Yuan Xie

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD Testing and Inspection Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD Testing and Inspection Levels for Hot-Mix Asphaltic Concrete Overlays, Editorial AssistantCHRISTOPHER HEDGES, Senior Program Officer TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 2000 OFFICERS Chair: Martin Wachs, Director, Institute of Transportation Studies, University

Sheridan, Jennifer

340

Geometry-aware framebuffer level of detail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a framebuffer level of detail algorithm for controlling the pixel workload in an interactive rendering application. Our basic strategy is to evaluate the shading in a low resolution buffer and, in a second rendering pass, resample ...

Lei Yang; Pedro V. Sander; Jason Lawrence

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sea Level Rise Tool For Sandy Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and related professional communities (e.g., local chapters of associations such as ASCE, ASFPM, APA, etc.) 4. What counties are include in this sea level rise tool? Answer In...

342

Balanced and Unbalanced Upper-Level Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of frontogenesis at upper levels are investigated using a hierarchy of three numerical models. They are, in order of decreasing sophistication, the anelastic (AN), the geostrophic momentum (GM), and the quasi-geostrophic (QG) ...

Michael J. Reeder; Daniel Keyser

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Carbon - 14 In Low-Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes EPRI's collective efforts to understand and model the behavior of long-lived radionuclide Carbon-14 ((14)C) in low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

344

Analysis of Shared Memory Priority Queues with Two Discard Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shavitt School of Electrical Engineering Tel Aviv University Abstract-- Two rate SLAs become increasingly and a much lower price for additional traffic which is not guaranteed. These type of SLAs are suggested the customer a minimum or expected bandwidth for its usage and may allow additional bandwidth to be used based

Shavitt, Yuval

345

Proceedings: Radioactive Low Level Waste Management Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop on low level waste management. The workshop was the fifth in a series to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of low level waste management as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. Workshop information will help utilities assess benefits of waste management, select technologies for their individual projects, and reduce decommissioning costs.

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

Features, Events, and Processes: system Level  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

D. McGregor

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluation of the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation technology: Direct and indirect remediation of uranium under alkaline conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field-scale technology demonstration has been conducted to optimize polyphosphate remediation technology for enhanced monitored natural attenuation of the uranium plume within the 300 Area aquifer at the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of polyphosphate to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. Focused application of polyphosphate was conducted in a source or 'hot spot' area to reduce the inventory of available uranium contributing to the groundwater plume through direct precipitation of uranyl-phosphate solids and secondary containment via precipitation of apatite which can serve as a long-term sorbent for uranium. The test site consisted of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. The results indicated sequestration of uranium as insoluble phosphate phases appears to be a promising alternative for treating the uranium- contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site 300 Area. However, the formation of the apatite during the test was limited due to two separate overarching issues: (1) formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology, and (2) efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Richards, Emily L.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Edge, Ellen

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2005 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 - 5 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The domestic electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. These data are classified as UK National Statistics. Note about spreadsheets: separate tabs exist for each local authority (LA), but the tabs are hidden. To view data, simply 'unhide' the appropriate tab(s). You do not need to "enable macros" to view the data. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

349

Concerns with low-level ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

Populations have been studied in geographic areas of increased natural radiation, in radiation-exposed workers, in patients medically exposed, and in accidental exposures. No reproducible evidence exists of harmful effects from increases in background radiation three to ten times the usual levels. There is no increase in leukemia or other cancers among American military participants in nuclear testing, no increase in leukemia or thyroid cancer among medical patients receiving {sup 131}I for diagnosis or treatment of hypothyroidism, and no increase in lung cancer among nonsmokers exposed to increased radon in the home. The association of radiation with the atomic bomb and with excessive regulatory and health physics as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) radiation levels practices has created a climate of fear about the dangers of radiation at any level. However, there is no evidence that radiation exposures at the levels equivalent to medical usage are harmful. The unjustified excessive concern with radiation at any level, however, precludes beneficial uses of radiation and radioactivity in medicine, science, and industry.

Yalow, R.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

PSA Bounce and Biochemical Failure After Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Study of 820 Patients With a Minimum of 3 Years of Follow-Up  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine clinical or dosimetric factors associated with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, as well as an association between a PSA bounce and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), in patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A variety of clinical and treatment factors were examined in 820 patients who had a minimum of 3 years of PSA follow-up with T1-T2cN0M0 prostate cancer. Four different PSA threshold values were used for defining a PSA bounce: a PSA rise of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL. Results: A PSA bounce of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL was noted in 247 patients (30.1%), 161 (19.6%), 105 (12.8%), and 78 (9.5%), respectively. The median time to the first PSA rise was 17.4, 16.25, 16.23, and 15.71 months, respectively, vs. 34.35 months for a biochemical failure (p < 0.0001). A PSA rise of {>=}0.2 ng/mL was the only definition for which there was a significant difference in bRFS between bounce and non-bounce patients. The 5-year bRFS rate of patients having a PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 was 97.7% vs. 91% for those who did not have a PSA bounce (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis for biochemical failure, age, risk group, and PSAs per year had a statistically significant correlation with PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 ng/mL. On multivariate analysis, age and PSAs per year remained statistically significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0456, respectively). Conclusions: A bounce definition of a rise {>=}0.2 ng/mL is a reliable definition among several other definitions. The time to first PSA rise is the most valuable factor for distinguishing between a bounce and biochemical failure.

Caloglu, Murat, E-mail: caloglumurat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne (Turkey); Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente-Ohio, Parma, OH (United States); Magi-Galuzzi, Christina [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation NREL, Ren Anderson Building America Technical Update Meeting July 25 th , 2012 Issue 5 - How Much Insulation is Too Much? How do we define the cost-effective limit for improvements in enclosure efficiency? Key Factors to Consider: -Cost of savings vs. cost of grid-supplied energy -Cost of efficiency savings vs. cost of savings from renewable generation. -Savings from envelope improvements vs. other efficiency options Context * It is widely believed that code-specified insulation levels also represent cost-effective limits. * However, the cost-effective insulation levels exceed IECC values in many climates. * The homeowner-driven value of modest increases in enclosure performance can create economies of scale that will reduce

352

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/ak213e/ak213e00.pdf‎ Cost: Free Related Tools CDM Sustainable Development Tool Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS The Socio-economic and Gender Analysis (SEAGA) handbook of concepts, tools and guidelines for mainstreaming gender into development planning and policy implementation. Approach SEAGA, for Socio-economic and Gender Analysis, is an approach to

353

sea level rise | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sea level rise sea level rise Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures Syndicate content

354

Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system  

SciTech Connect

A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

State Level Analysis of Industrial Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most analyses of industrial energy use have been conducted at the national level, in part because of the difficulties in dealing with state level data. Unfortunately, this provides a distorted view of the industrial sector for state and regional policymakers. ACEEE has completed analyses on eight states drawing upon data from a diverse set of sources to characterize the industries at a relatively high level of disaggregation. These analyses demonstrate how different state and regional mixes are from the national mix and the importance of a regionally specific approach to industrial energy policy. In addition, the data suggest that significant shifts are occurring in industry mix in some of these states that will have important ramifications on future industrial policies for these states. This paper will provide an overview of our analytical approach, the data sources that are available, and provide examples of the analysis results to demonstrate the regional diversity of industrial electricity use.

Elliott, R. N.; Shipley, A. M.; Brown, E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A Software Architecture for High Level Applications  

SciTech Connect

A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

Shen,G.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

357

Doppler cooling three-electronic-level molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analogous to the extension of laser cooling techniques from two-level to three-level atoms, Doppler cooling of molecules with an intermediate electronic state is considered. In particular, we use a rate-equation approach to simulate cooling of SiO+, in which population buildup in the intermediate state is prevented by its short lifetime. We determine that Doppler cooling of SiO+ can be accomplished without optically repumping from the intermediate state, at the cost of causing undesirable parity flips and rotational diffusion. Since the necessary repumping would require a large number of continuous-wave lasers, optical pulse shaping of a femtosecond laser is proposed as an attractive alternative. Other candidate three-electron-level molecules are also discussed.

Nguyen, J H V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Performance of the CMS Level-1 Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first level trigger of the CMS experiment is comprised of custom electronics that process data from the electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters and three technologies of muon detectors in order to select the most interesting events from LHC collisions, such as those consistent with the production and decay of the Higgs boson. The rate of events selected by this Level-1 trigger must be reduced from the beam crossing frequency to no more than 100 kHz further processing can occur, a major challenge since the LHC instantaneous luminosity has increased by six orders of magnitude since the start of operations to more than 6E33 cm-2s-1 today. The performance of the Level-1 trigger, in terms of rates and efficiencies of the main objects and trigger algorithms, as measured from LHC proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies is presented here.

J. Brooke; on behalf of the CMS Collaboration

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

Performance of the CMS Level-1 Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first level trigger of the CMS experiment is comprised of custom electronics that process data from the electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters and three technologies of muon detectors in order to select the most interesting events from LHC collisions, such as those consistent with the production and decay of the Higgs boson. The rate of events selected by this Level-1 trigger must be reduced from the beam crossing frequency to no more than 100 kHz further processing can occur, a major challenge since the LHC instantaneous luminosity has increased by six orders of magnitude since the start of operations to more than 6E33 cm-2s-1 today. The performance of the Level-1 trigger, in terms of rates and efficiencies of the main objects and trigger algorithms, as measured from LHC proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies is presented here.

Brooke, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Making Use of Low-Level Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immense amounts of energy are being thrown away every day in petroleum refineries, chemical plants, and throughout all types of industrial operations. Much of this energy is at temperature levels below 350OF and is typically rejected to the atmosphere through cooling towers and air fin coolers. We will designate this as "low-level heat". Between 20 to 30% of all the energy that enters a plant is lost as low-level heat. In a 100,000 BPD refinery, this is the equivalent of about 2,500 BPD of oil, or 15 billion Btu's per day. If any improvement can be made in the recovery and reuse of this heat, the energy efficiency of our plants would be significantly increased.

Plaster, W. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Category:Top level | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

View form View form View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Top level Jump to: navigation, search This page has been deleted. The deletion and move log for the page are provided below for reference. 16:11, 16 August 2012 Rmckeel (Talk | contribs) deleted page Category:Top level (Mass removal of pages added by Fceeh) There is currently no text in this page. You can search for this page title in other pages, or search the related logs, but you do not have permission to create this page. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. H [×] Help‎ 68 pages Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/wiki/Category:Top_level"

362

Typical Clothing Ensemble Insulation Levels for Sixteen Body Parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Comfort.1994 CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen Bodya mesh arm chair whose insulation level was measured. FigureExperimental Conditions. CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen

Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The CMS High-Level Trigger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the startup of the LHC, the CMS data acquisition is expected to be able to sustain an event readout rate of up to 100 kHz from the Level-1 trigger. These events will be read into a large processor farm which will run the 'High-Level Trigger'(HLT) selection algorithms and will output a rate of about 150 Hz for permanent data storage. In this report HLT performances are shown for selections based on muons, electrons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, {tau} leptons and b quarks: expected efficiencies, background rates and CPU time consumption are reported as well as relaxation criteria foreseen for a LHC startup instantaneous luminosity.

Covarelli, R. [CERN, Geneva 1211 (Switzerland)

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

How dangerous is low level radiation?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems in the threshold basis for the linear-no threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis are reviewed, and it is shown that they very strongly suggest that the theory greatly overestimates the risk of low level radiation. A direct test of the theory, based on the radon-lung cancer relationship is described; it strongly reinforces that conclusion. However, it is shown that even if the linear-no threshold theory is valid; the public`s fear of low level radiation, at least in some contexts, is grossly exaggerated. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Cohen, B.L. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

High-Level Real-Time Concurrency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of all real-time systems is predictability. Achieving this goal requires all levels of the system to be well de ned and have a xed worst-case execution time. These needs have resulted in the creation of overly restrictive commercial real-time systems providing only ad-hoc scheduling facilities and basic concurrent functionality. Ad-hoc scheduling makes developing, verifying, and maintaining a real-time system extremely dicult and time consuming. Basic concurrent functionality forces programmers to develop complex concurrent programs without the aid of high-level concurrency features.

Ashif S. Harji; C Ashif S. Harji

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Greenhouse effect, sea level and drought  

SciTech Connect

This book contains the proceedings of a NATO sponsored symposium in 1989. The book is divided into five parts: (1) Greenhouse Effects (6 papers); (2) Sea Level (4 papers); (3) Drought and Water Deficiency (10 papers); (4) Management, Techniques, and Case Studies (20 papers); and (5) Conclusions (1 paper).

Paepe, R.; Fairbridge, R.; Jelgersma, S. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Crowdsourcing service-level network event monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The user experience for networked applications is becoming a key benchmark for customers and network providers. Perceived user experience is largely determined by the frequency, duration and severity of network events that impact a service. While today's ... Keywords: P2P, anomaly detection, crowdsourcing, service-level network events

David R. Choffnes; Fabián E. Bustamante; Zihui Ge

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Low-level waste forum meeting reports  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

McLaren, L.H. (ed.) [ed.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

ZIP. Economic Insulation Levels for Houses  

SciTech Connect

ZIP was developed to support the calculations and database used to estimate the economic levels of insulation published in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Insulation Fact Sheet. The program allows the user to estimate economic levels of insulation for attics, exterior walls, floors over unheated areas, slab floors, and basement and crawlspace walls for new and existing houses in any 3-digit zip code location in the U.S., based on local climate data, local prices for energy and insulation, and the type and estimated efficiency of its heating and cooling system. ZIP recognizes five different heating systems: natural gas, oil furnaces, electric furnaces, electric baseboard, and electric heat pump and two cooling systems: central and window electric air conditioners. An evaporative cooling system can also be specified, but this is not treated as a true air-conditioning system. In addition, the user can specify the approximate operating efficiency of the heating and cooling systems (low, medium, high, or very high). ZIP can be run for a single zip code and specified heating and cooling system or in a batch mode for any number of consecutive zip codes to provide a table of economic insulation levels for use at the state or national level.

McElroy, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ZIP. Economic Insulation Levels for Houses  

SciTech Connect

ZIP was developed to support the calculations and database used to estimate the economic levels of insulation published in the U.S. Department of Energy's Insulation Fact Sheet. The program allows the user to estimate economic levels of insulation for attics, exterior walls, floors over unheated areas, slab floors, and basement and crawlspace walls for new and existing houses in any 3-digit zip code location in the U.S., based on local climate data, local prices for energy and insulation, and the type and estimated efficiency of its heating and cooling system. ZIP recognizes five different heating systems: natural gas, oil furnaces, electric furnaces, electric baseboard, and electric heat pump and two cooling systems: central and window electric air conditioners. An evaporative cooling system can also be specified, but this is not treated as a true air-conditioning system. In addition, the user can specify the approximate operating efficiency of the heating and cooling systems (low, medium, high, or very high). ZIP can be run for a single zip code and specified heating and cooling system or in a batch mode for any number of consecutive zip codes to provide a table of economic insulation levels for use at the state or national level.

McElroy, D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium at Three Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present coordinated formulations of local thermodynamical equilibrium conditions at three levels, namely the macroscopic one of classical thermodynamics, the mesoscopic one of hydrodynamical fluctuations and the microscopic one of quantum statistical mechanics. These conditions are all expressed in terms of the hydrodynamical variables of the macroscopic picture, and the quantum statistical ones are shown to imply a local version of the zeroth law.

Geoffrey L. Sewell

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

Bosnia and Herzegovina Local Level Institutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bosnia and Herzegovina Local Level Institutions and Social Capital Study Vol. 1 World Bank, ECSSD World Bank Work on Bosnia-Herzegovina 3 Study's Operational Definition of Social Capital 3 Specific Capital 17 B. Social Cleavages and Population Movements 18 Main Social Cleavages in Bosnia-Herzegovina 18

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

375

Block-level RAID is dead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common storage stack as found in most operating systems has remained unchanged for several decades. In this stack, the RAID layer operates under the file system layer, at the block abstraction level. We argue that this arrangement of layers has fatal ...

Raja Appuswamy; David C. van Moolenbroek; Andrew S. Tanenbaum

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Application-level prediction of battery dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile, battery-powered devices such as personal digital assistants and web-enabled mobile phones have successfully emerged as new access points to the world's digital infrastructure. However, the growing gap between device capabilities and battery technology ... Keywords: application-level prediction, battery life estimation, resource-restricted devices

Chandra Krintz; Ye Wen; Rich Wolski

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evaluating service level agreements using observational probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on our use of quantitative modelling in predicting the success of systems and services in achieving Service Level Agreements (SLAs). We construct models of the systems in the stochastic process algebra PEPA[1], and queries in the language of ...

Allan Clark; Stephen Gilmore

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

Agostino, L.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Bauer, G.; /MIT, LNS; Beccati, B.; /CERN; Behrens, U.; /DESY; Berryhil, J.; Biery, K.; /Fermilab; Bose, T.; /Boston U.; Brett, A.; /Fermilab; Branson, J.; /UC, San Diego; Cano, E.; /CERN; Cheung, H.; /Fermilab /CERN /LLNL, Livermore /Minnesota U.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

High-level radioactive waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

A summary of a comprehensive overview study of potential alternatives for long-term management of high-level radioactive waste is presented. The concepts studied included disposal in geologic formations, disposal in seabeds, disposal in ice caps, disposal into space, and elimination by transmutation. (TFD)

1974-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Mixed-Technology System-Level Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a computationally efficient method to simulate mixed-domain systems under the requirements of a system-level framework. The approach is the combined use of Modified Nodal Analysis (MNA) for the representation of a mixed-technology ... Keywords: MEM simulation, microsystem modeling and simulation, modified nodal analysis (MNA), optical MEM CAD tool, optoelectronic simulation, piecewise linear simulation (PWL)

J. A. Martinez; T. P. Kurzweg; S. P. Levitan; P. J. Marchand; D. M. Chiarulli

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis—A Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included.

Leena Rivina; Robert Schiestl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Do teachers differ by certification route? novice teachers' sense of self-efficacy, commitment to teaching, and preparedness to teach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative teacher certification (ATC) programs are one method created to help alleviate teacher shortages (Cox, Matthews, & Assoc, 2001; Hallinan & Khmelkov, 2001). While much debate has arisen over ATC programs, very few have empirically examined their impact on the teaching pool (Darling-Hammond, Berry, & Thoreson, 2001; Darling-Hammond, Chung, & Frelow, 2002; Goldhaber, 2000; Ingersoll, 1999; Shen, 1997, 1999). The present study was designed to explore differences by certification type and program characteristics based on novice teachers' demographics, educational attainment, sense of self-efficacy, and sense of preparedness to enter the classroom. Results from the present study suggest ATC programs are somewhat diversifying the teaching population by bringing in more minorities and science majors, but do not appear to be bringing in more experienced scientists and mathematicians nor do they appear to be alleviating the teacher shortage. In this sample, traditionally certified teachers felt better prepared than ATC teachers with the biggest differences on Promoting Student Learning. Regardless of certification route, prior classroom experience was a strong predictor of Overall Preparedness and a teacher's perception of his or her ability to be an effective teacher. For ATC teachers, a positive mentoring experience was a strong predictor of Overall Preparedness. The discussion of whether or not ATC programs should exist should now be replaced with a discussion of how to ensure that these programs produce better teachers and improve student learning. The underlying theme from the present study was that, in order to feel prepared and have high self-efficacy, novice teachers needed instruction in the majority of the components identified by research and by the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (1996), including positive mentoring experiences, field based experiences, and curriculum based on child development, learning theory, cognition, motivation, and subject matter pedagogy. Results from the present study support the assertion that teacher preparation programs, program components, mentoring experiences, and field-based experiences do impact teacher effectiveness in the classroom.

Zientek, Linda Reichwein

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on 24 July 2008 1 on 24 July 2008 1 Office of Environmental Management High-Level Waste Corporate Board Charter Purpose This Charter establishes the High- Level Waste (HLW) Corporate Board, (hereinafter referred to as the 'Board') within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The Board will serve as a consensus building body to integrate the Department of Energy (DOE) HLW management and disposition activities across the EM program and, with the coordination and cooperation of other program offices, across the DOE complex. The Board will identify the need for and develop policies, planning, standards and guidance and provide the integration necessary to implement an effective and efficient national HLW program. The Board will also evaluate the implications of HLW issues and their

385

Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels OSWER Directive 9285.7-55 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This Page Intentionally Left Blank EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This document describes the process used to derive a set of risk-based ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSLs) for many of the soil contaminants that are frequently of ecological concern for plants and animals at hazardous waste sites and provides guidance for their use. The Eco-SSL derivation process represents the group effort of a multi-stakeholder workgroup consisting of federal, state, consulting, industry, and academic participants led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). The

386

Future scientists advance to national level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future scientists advance to national level Future scientists advance to national level Future scientists advance to DOE national competition A team from Los Alamos bested 39 other teams from around New Mexico in the 10-hour New Mexico Regional Science Bowl. April 3, 2012 Members of the Los Alamos High School Science Bowl Team Members of the Los Alamos High School Science Bowl Team were in Washington DC after their regional win, representing New Mexico in the 22nd Annual Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl. Contact Kurt Steinhaus (505) 665-7370 Email "These kids are very well-versed in math and science, Science Bowl winners represent NM in Washington, D.C. A team from Los Alamos bested 39 other teams from around New Mexico in the 10-hour New Mexico Regional Science Bowl, held recently at Albuquerque

387

Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level Retrofit Legislation at the Urban Level In March, the city of Berkeley, California, passed new legislation that should serve as a model for local policies intended to keep energy dollars within the community while protecting the environment. The Commercial Energy Conservation Ordinance (CECO) is based on a similar ordinance that has been law since 1989 in San Francisco, Berkeley's neighbor across the Bay. San Francisco is currently the only other city in the world to have this type of legislation. As part of the Berkeley Municipal Code, CECO requires commercial buildings to undergo energy conservation retrofits when they are sold or substantially renovated. CECO was designed with the participation of LBL's Kristin Heinemeier, who also works with the Berkeley

388

Risk Group and Biosafety Level Definitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group and Biosafety Level Definitions Group and Biosafety Level Definitions European Economic Community (DIRECTIVE 93/88/EEC, Oct. 1993) (1) Group 1 biological agent means one that is unlikely to cause human disease; (2) Group 2 biological agent means one that can cause human disease and might be a hazard to workers; it is unlikely to spread to the community; there is usually effective prophylaxis or treatment available; (3) Group 3 biological agent means one that can cause severe human disease and present a serious hazard to workers; it may present a risk of spreading to the community, but there is usually effective prophylaxis or treatment available; (4) Group 4 biological agent means one that causes severe human disease and is a serious hazard to workers; it may present a high risk of spreading to the community; there is usually no effective prophylaxis or treatment

389

EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Site Level  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Level Site Level July, 2013 Site Performance Measure Unit Lifecycle Total Estimate Pre-2013 Lifecycle Values 2013 Target 2014 Target Ames Laboratory Geographic Sites Eliminated Number completed 1 1 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory-East TRU-RH Cubic Meters 22 22 22 22 Argonne National Laboratory-East TRU-CH Cubic Meters 21.4 21.4 21 21 Argonne National Laboratory-East Radioactive Facility Completions Number of Facilities 80 80 80 80 Argonne National Laboratory-East Geographic Sites Eliminated Number completed 1 1 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory-East Remediation Complete Number of Release Sites 443 443 443 443 Brookhaven National Laboratory eU packaged for disposition Number of Containers 0 0 0 0 Brookhaven National Laboratory Nuclear Facility Completions Number of Facilities 2 2 2 2

390

Hydro static water level systems at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several Hydrostatic Water Leveling systems (HLS) are in use at Fermilab. Three systems are used to monitor quadrupoles in the Tevatron and two systems are used to monitor ground motion for potential sites for the International Linear Collider (ILC). All systems use capacitive sensors to determine the water level of water in a pool. These pools are connected with tubing so that relative vertical shifts between sensors can be determined. There are low beta quadrupoles at the B0 and D0 interaction regions of Tevatron accelerator. These quadrupoles use BINP designed and built sensors and have a resolution of 1 micron. All regular lattice superconducting quadrupoles (a total of 204) in the Tevatron use a Fermilab designed system and have a resolution of 6 microns. Data on quadrupole motion due to quenches, changes in temperature will be presented. In addition data for ground motion for ILC studies caused by natural and cultural factors will be presented.

Volk, J.T.; Guerra, J.A.; Hansen, S.U.; Kiper, T.E.; Jostlein, H.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Chupyra, A.; Kondaurov, M.; Singatulin, S.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Mixed low-level waste form evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scoping level evaluation of polyethylene encapsulation and vitreous waste forms for safe storage of mixed low-level waste was performed. Maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations were estimated for 15 indicator radionuclides disposed of at the Hanford and Savannah River sites with respect to protection of the groundwater and inadvertent intruder pathways. Nominal performance improvements of polyethylene and glass waste forms relative to grout are reported. These improvements in maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations depend strongly on the radionuclide of concern and pathway. Recommendations for future research include improving the current understanding of the performance of polymer waste forms, particularly macroencapsulation. To provide context to these estimates, the concentrations of radionuclides in treated DOE waste should be compared with the results of this study to determine required performance.

Pohl, P.I.; Cheng, Wu-Ching; Wheeler, T.; Waters, R.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Background compensation for a radiation level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

Keefe, D.J.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

High-Level Waste Melter Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with a massive cleanup task in resolving the legacy of environmental problems from years of manufacturing nuclear weapons. One of the major activities within this task is the treatment and disposal of the extremely large amount of high-level radioactive (HLW) waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The current planning for the method of choice for accomplishing this task is to vitrify (glassify) this waste for disposal in a geologic repository. This paper describes the results of the DOE-chartered independent review of alternatives for solidification of Hanford HLW that could achieve major cost reductions with reasonable long-term risks, including recommendations on a path forward for advanced melter and waste form material research and development. The potential for improved cost performance was considered to depend largely on increased waste loading (fewer high-level waste canisters for disposal), higher throughput, or decreased vitrification facility size.

Ahearne, J.; Gentilucci, J.; Pye, L. D.; Weber, T.; Woolley, F.; Machara, N. P.; Gerdes, K.; Cooley, C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

396

High-Level Waste Melter Study Report  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

397

Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

Lehner, J.R.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, W. T.

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

Mesoscopic Superposition States in Relativistic Landau Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that a linear superposition of mesoscopic states in relativistic Landau levels can be built when an external magnetic field couples to a relativistic spin 1/2 charged particle. Under suitable initial conditions, the associated Dirac equation produces unitarily superpositions of coherent states involving the particle orbital quanta in a well-defined mesoscopic regime. We demonstrate that these mesoscopic superpositions have a purely relativistic origin and disappear in the nonrelativistic limit.

Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Solano, E. [Physics Department, ASC, and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima (Peru)

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Final High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement You are here: DOE-ID Home > Environmental Management > Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) Table of Contents Documents are in the Adobe® PDF format and require the Adobe® Reader to access them. If you do not currently have the Acrobat Reader, you can download the Free Adobe Reader at http://get.adobe.com/reader/ Icon link to Free Adobe Acrobat Reader software * Large chapters broken down into sections Summary* Cover [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.48 MB] Section, 1.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 612 KB] Section, 2.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 251 KB] Sections, 3.0 - 3.2.1a [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.4 MB] Section, 3.2.1b [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 2.0 MB] Sections, 3.2.2 - 4.0 [ Adobe Acrobat File Size 1.4 MB]

400

Low level waste shipment accident lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

On October 1, 1994 a shipment of low-level waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, was involved in an accident near Rolla, Missouri. The accident did not result in the release of any radioactive material. The accident did generate important lessons learned primarily in the areas of driver and emergency response communications. The shipment was comprised of an International Standards Organization (ISO) container on a standard flatbed trailer. The accident caused the low-level waste package to separate from the trailer and come to rest on its top in the median. The impact of the container with the pavement and median inflicted relatively minor damage to the container. The damage was not substantial enough to cause failure of container integrity. The success of the package is attributable to the container design and the packaging procedures used at the Fernald Environmental Management Project for low-level waste shipments. Although the container survived the initial wreck, is was nearly breached when the first responders attempted to open the ISO container. Even though the container was clearly marked and the shipment documentation was technically correct, this information did not identify that the ISO container was the primary containment for the waste. The lessons learned from this accident have DOE complex wide applicability. This paper is intended to describe the accident, subsequent emergency response operations, and the lessons learned from this incident.

Rast, D.M.; Rowe, J.G.; Reichel, C.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter high level triggers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector yields a huge sample of data from different sub-detectors. On-line data processing is applied to select and reduce the volume of the stored data. ALICE applies a multi-level hardware trigger scheme where fast detectors are used to feed a three-level (L0, L1, and L2) deep chain. The High-Level Trigger (HLT) is a fourth filtering stage sitting logically between the L2 trigger and the data acquisition event building. The EMCal detector comprises a large area electromagnetic calorimeter that extends the momentum measurement of photons and neutral mesons up to $p_T=250$ GeV/c, which improves the ALICE capability to perform jet reconstruction with measurement of the neutral energy component of jets. An online reconstruction and trigger chain has been developed within the HLT framework to sharpen the EMCal hardware triggers, by combining the central barrel tracking information with the shower reconstruction (clusters) in the calorimeter. In the present report the status and the functionality of the software components developed for the EMCal HLT online reconstruction and trigger chain will be discussed, as well as preliminary results from their commissioning performed during the 2011 LHC running period.

F. Ronchetti; F. Blanco; M. Figueredo; A. G. Knospe; L. Xaplanteris for the ALICE HLT Collaboration

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Longitudinal study to assess the safety and efficacy of a live-attenuated SHIV vaccine in long term immunized rhesus macaques  

SciTech Connect

Live-attenuated viruses derived from SIV and SHIV have provided the most consistent protection against challenge with pathogenic viruses, but concerns regarding their long-term safety and efficacy have hampered their clinical usefulness. We report a longitudinal study in which we evaluated the long-term safety and efficacy of {delta}vpuSHIV{sub PPC}, a live virus vaccine derived from SHIV{sub PPC}. Macaques were administered two inoculations of {delta}vpuSHIV{sub PPC}, three years apart, and followed for eight years. None of the five vaccinated macaques developed an AIDS-like disease from the vaccine. At eight years, macaques were challenged with pathogenic SIV and SHIV. None of the four macaques with detectable cellular-mediated immunity prior to challenge had detectable viral RNA in the plasma. This study demonstrates that multiple inoculations of a live vaccine virus can be used safely and can significantly extend the efficacy of the vaccine, as compared to a single inoculation, which is efficacious for approximately three years.

Yankee, Thomas M. [Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3025 WHW - MS 3029, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)], E-mail: tyankee@kumc.edu; Sheffer, Darlene; Liu Zhengian; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Jia Fenglan; Chebloune, Yahia [Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3025 WHW - MS 3029, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Stephens, Edward B. [Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3025 WHW - MS 3029, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Narayan, Opendra [Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3025 WHW - MS 3029, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

A virtual reality system for the treatment of stress-related disorders: A preliminary analysis of efficacy compared to a standard cognitive behavioral program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary efficacy data in a controlled study of the use of a virtual reality (VR) system for treating stress-related disorders (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD; Pathological Grief, or PG; and Adjustment Disorders, or AD). ... Keywords: Adjustment Disorder, Pathological Grief, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Psychological treatments, Stress-related disorders, Virtual reality

R. M. Baños; V. Guillen; S. Quero; A. García-Palacios; M. Alcaniz; C. Botella

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

SYSPLAN. Load Leveling Battery System Costs  

SciTech Connect

SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer`s monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer`s peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer`s side of the meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer`s load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.

Hostick, C.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

River Protection Project (RPP) Level 0 Logic  

SciTech Connect

The following modifications were made to the River Protection Project Level-0 logic in going from Rev. I to Rev. 2. The first change was the change to the heading at the top of the drawing: ''TWRS Program Logic'' to ''River Protection Project Mission Logic''. Note that purely format changes (e.g., fonts, location of boxes, date format, addition of numbers to ''ghost'' boxes) are not discussed. However, the major format change was to show DOE-BNFL Inc. Interface Control Documents (ICDs) on the logic.

SEEMAN, S.E.

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2004 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2004 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey's (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during August through November of 2004 by personnel from the WashingtonTRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2004, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2005 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2005 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey’s (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during September through November of 2005 by personnel from the Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering Department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2005, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Service Oriented Architecture for High Level Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standalone high level applications often suffer from poor performance and reliability due to lengthy initialization, heavy computation and rapid graphical update. Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is trying to separate the initialization and computation from applications and to distribute such work to various service providers. Heavy computation such as beam tracking will be done periodically on a dedicated server and data will be available to client applications at all time. Industrial standard service architecture can help to improve the performance, reliability and maintainability of the service. Robustness will also be improved by reducing the complexity of individual client applications.

Chu, Chungming; Chevtsov, Sergei; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

409

Liquid low level waste management expert system  

SciTech Connect

An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs.

Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Jackson, J.R. (Southwest Baptist Univ., Bolivar, MO (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Update of the management strategy for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strategy for management of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) radioactively contaminated liquid waste was reviewed in 1991. The latest information available through the end of 1990 on waste characterization, regulations, US Department of Energy (DOE) budget guidance, and research and development programs was evaluated to determine how the strategy should be revised. Few changes are needed to update the strategy to reflect new waste characterization, research, and regulatory information. However, recent budget guidance from DOE indicates that minimum funding will not be sufficient to accomplish original objectives to upgrade the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system to comply with the Federal Facilities Agreement, provide long-term LLLW treatment capability, and minimize environmental, safety, and health risks. Options are presented that might allow the ORNL LLLW system to continue operations temporarily, but they would significantly reduce its capabilities to handle emergency situations, provide treatment for new waste streams, and accommodate waste from the Environmental Restoration Program and from decontamination and decommissioning of surplus facilities. These options are also likely to increase worker radiation exposure, risk of environmental insult, and generation of solid waste for on-site and off-site disposal/storage beyond existing facility capacities. The strategy will be fully developed after receipt of additional guidance. The proposed budget limitations are too severe to allow ORNL to meet regulatory requirements or continue operations long term.

Robinson, S.M.; Abraham, T.J.; DePaoli, S.M.; Walker, A.B.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Complete Update of Ultrasonic (UT) Level I and Level II Training Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the final steps in the technology transfer process is training of personnel who will use the technology. The training course materials must be periodically updated to address the regulatory, Code, and technological changes. The report describes the process for updating the Ultrasonic Testing (UT) Level I and Level II training course materials developed to support the electric utilities and their service providers. These materials have been updated to incorporate the later regulatory, Code and tech...

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

412

EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complex Level Complex Level July, 2013 Performance Measure Unit Lifecycle Total Estimate Pre-2013 Lifecycle Values 2013 Target 2014 Target Pu packaged for long-term disposition Number of Containers 5,089 5,089 5,089 5,089 eU packaged for disposition Number of Containers 8,198 8,016 8,016 8,016 Pu/U residues packaged for disposition Kilograms of Bulk 107,828 107,828 107,828 107,828 DU & U packaged for disposition Metric Tons 736,801 32,452 45,317 76,817 Liquid Waste eliminated Thousands of Gallons 91,907 5,340 6,260 6,812 Liquid Waste Tanks closed Number of Tanks 239 11 11 13 HLW packaged for disposition Number of Containers 24,183 3,802 4,077 4,283 SNF packaged for disposition Metric Tons of Heavy Metal 2,450 2,128 2,128 2,128

413

High accuracy electronic material level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: 1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, 2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, 3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or "ghost" reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Low level tank waste disposal study  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

Mullally, J.A.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

State-Level Benefits of Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This report describes benefits attributable to state-level energy efficiency programs. Nationwide, state-level energy efficiency programs have targeted all sectors of the economy and have employed a wide range of methods to promote energy efficiency. Standard residential and industrial programs typically identify between 20 to 30% energy savings in homes and plants, respectively. Over a 20 year period of time, an average state that aggressively pursues even a limited array of energy efficiency programs can potentially reduce total state energy use by as much as 20%. Benefit-cost ratios of effective energy efficiency programs typically exceed 3 to 1 and are much higher when non-energy and macroeconomic benefits are included. Indeed, energy efficiency and associated programs and investments can create significant numbers of new jobs and enhance state tax revenues. Several states have incorporated energy efficiency into their economic development programs. It should also be noted that increasing amounts of venture capital are being invested in the energy sector in general and in specific technologies like solar power in particular. Well-designed energy efficiency programs can be expected to help overcome numerous barriers to the market penetration of energy efficient technologies and accelerate the market penetration of the technologies.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC), utilizing spectral summing of spectra from groups of drums of similar waste type, is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposal (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no place to go unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs two High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confinned TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radio nuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have too high a MDA to be classified as LLW enter a radioactive waste characterization indetenninate status that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced ganuna spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discernable in the individual spectra can become quantifiable in the summed spectrum and the MDA for group sum is reduced. The group of waste items can then be properly classified as LLW based on the summed spectrum and valid assay values can be assigned for disposal. This technique has been successfully applied to a set of 52 debris drums - with individual MDA > 100 nCi/g - with a resulting group total TRU alpha activity concentration below 40nCi/g. Further application of the technique at LANL to other waste drums that are measured on a WIPP certified HENC system is planned and good candidate drum sets are being evaluated as indeterminate situations develop.

Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veilleux, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucero, Randy P [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORAPTION; Seamans, Jr., James V [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION; Clapham, Martin J [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

417

Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral summing technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC) is a unique modeling technique that is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposition (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no disposal path unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confirmed TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radionuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have TRU MDAs > 100nCi/g enter a radioactive waste characterization indeterminate state that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced gamma spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discemable in the individual spectra become quantifiable in the summed spectrum and the MDA for the group sum is reduced. The group of waste items can then be properly classified as LLW waste on the summed spectrum and valid assay values can be assigned for disposal. This technique has been successfully applied to a set of 52 debris drums - with individual MDA > 100nCi/g - with a resulting group total TRU alpha activity concentration below 40nCi/g. Further application of the technique at LANL to other debris drums and sludge drums that were measured on a WIPP certified HENe is planned and good candidate drum sets are being evaluated.

Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veilleux, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucero, Randy P [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION; Seamans, Jr, J. V. [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPATION; Clapham, M. J. [PAJARITO SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

418

Investigating Indoor Radon Levels and Influencing Factors in Primary Schools of Zulfi City, Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect

Measurement of indoor Concentrations were performed in Zulfi city of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 track etch detectors. This investigation focused on the influence of different parameters, namely different locations, school categories, school building types, and room type as well as on the existence of differences in radon concentration at floor levels. We divided the Zulfi city into five regions, keeping in mind their geographical locations between Tuwaiq Mountains and Al-Thuwayrat sands. The measured average radon concentrations for regions 1-5 respectively are: 87.0{+-}14.2 Bq/m{sup 3}, 83.4{+-}6.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 61.6{+-}6.4 Bq/m{sup 3}, 63.7{+-}5.4 Bq/m{sup 3} and 87.5{+-}6.Bq/m{sup 3} and the minimum concentrations are 28.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 5.5 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.1 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.0 Bq/m{sup 3} and 24 Bq/m{sup 3} respectively. These results are still within normal limits and below the action level of 148 Bqm{sup -3} set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A test of significance using Minitab program was applied to investigate if radon levels in regions are significantly different from each other. We tried all combinations, and found the following results. The ''within regions''(different location) test yielded, region 2 is not significant versus region ''1''(p = 0.783) and versus region ''5''(P = 0.646), whereas it is significant versus region ''3''(P = 0.0160) and also versus region ''4''(p = 0.018). We investigated government and rented school's building also and none was found significantly different (p = 0.052). Floors of the same building were tested in order to examine the radon concentration as a function of storey level. No significant difference was observed at floor levels (p = 0.009). When girl's schools versus Boys and kindergartens schools were tested they were found significantly different. It is believed that this significant difference is due to geographical nature of the area, since most of the girl's schools were selected from regions 2 and 3, these regions are relatively close to the Tuwaiq mountains whereas other regions are near to the Al-Thuwayrat sands.

Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Al-Garawi, M. S.; Al-Mosa, Tahani M.; Baig, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P. O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

A VERY HIGH LEVEL NEUTRAL BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level Neutial Beam Control System we have elucidated theseHigh Level Neutral Beam Control System 8!. References 1. V.High-Level Neutral-Beam Control System Victor Elischer Van

Elischer, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Interannual Sea Level in the Northern and Eastern Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly Indian and Pakistani sea level records, adjusted for the effect of atmospheric pressure, were used to examine interannual sea level variability in the northern Indian Ocean. The interannual sea level is correlated along the boundary. The ...

Allan J. Clarke; X. Liu

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights * EIA projects the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price to average about $88 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil to average $93 per barrel, both about $7 per barrel lower than last month's Outlook. EIA expects WTI and RAC crude oil prices to remain roughly at these second half levels in 2013. Beginning in this month's Outlook, EIA is also providing a forecast of Brent crude oil spot prices (see Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Added to Forecast), which are expected to average $106 per barrel for 2012 and $98 per barrel in 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product

422

R&D ERL: Low level RF  

SciTech Connect

A superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently under development at the Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The major components from an RF perspective are (a) a 5-cell SRF ERL cavity, (b) an SRF photocathode electron gun, and (c) a drive laser for the photocathode gun. Each of these RF subsystems has its own set of RF performance requirements, as well as common requirements for ensuring correct synchronism between them. A low level RF (LLRF) control system is currently under development, which seeks to leverage both technology and experience gained from the recently commissioned RHIC LLRF system upgrade. This note will review the LLRF system requirements and describe the system to be installed at the ERL.

Smith, K.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Umbra's High Level Architecture (HLA) Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Umbra's High Level Architecture HLA library. This library serves as an interface to the Defense Simulation and Modeling Office's (DMSO) Run Time Infrastructure Next Generation Version 1.3 (RTI NG1.3) software library and enables Umbra-based models to be federated into HLA environments. The Umbra library was built to enable the modeling of robots for military and security system concept evaluation. A first application provides component technologies that ideally fit the US Army JPSD's Joint Virtual Battlespace (JVB) simulation framework for Objective Force concept analysis. In addition to describing the Umbra HLA library, the report describes general issues of integrating Umbra with RTI code and outlines ways of building models to support particular HLA simulation frameworks like the JVB.

GOTTLIEB, ERIC JOSEPH; MCDONALD, MICHAEL J.; OPPEL III, FRED J.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Universal single point liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector comprises a thermistor and circuitry for determining electrically if the thermistor is wet or dry and additionally, and continuously, if the thermistor is open or shorted. The voltage across the thermistor is filtered to remove low frequency electrical noise, then compared with a reference low voltage to determine if shorted and to a transition voltage chosen to be between the thermistor's normal wet and dry voltages to determine if the thermistor is wet or dry. The voltage is also compared to the supply voltage using a CMOS gate circuit element to determine if the thermistor is open. The gate passes both faults on to an LED to signal that a fault condition exists or indicates by another LED the wet or dry condition of the thermistor. A pump may be activated through a relay if the thermistor tests wet or dry, as desired.

Kronberg, James W. (353 Church Rd., Beech Island, SC 29842)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Universal single point liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector comprises a thermistor and circuitry for determining electrically if the thermistor is wet or dry and additionally, and continuously, if the thermistor is open or shorted. The voltage across the thermistor is filtered to remove low frequency electrical noise, then compared with a reference low voltage to determine if shorted and to a transition voltage chosen to be between the thermistor's nominal wet and dry voltages to determine if the thermistor is wet or dry. The voltage is also compared to the supply voltage using a CMOS gate circuit element to determine if the thermistor is open. The gate passes both faults on to an LED to signal that a fault condition exists or indicates by another LED the wet or dry condition of the thermistor. A pump may be activated through a relay if the thermistor tests wet or dry, as desired. 1 fig.

Kronberg, J.W.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

426

Universal single point liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector comprises a thermistor and circuitry for determining electrically if the thermistor is wet or dry and additionally, and continuously, if the thermistor is open or shorted. The voltage across the thermistor is filtered to remove low frequency electrical noise, then compared with a reference low voltage to determine if shorted and to a transition voltage chosen to be between the thermistor's normal wet and dry voltages to determine if the thermistor is wet or dry. The voltage is also compared to the supply voltage using a CMOS gate circuit element to determine if the thermistor is open. The gate passes both faults on to an LED to signal that a fault condition exists or indicates by another LED the wet or dry condition of the thermistor. A pump may be activated through a relay if the thermistor tests wet or dry, as desired. 1 figure.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end uses at various levels of geography, by housing unit type, or other tabulations of interest. Why are end-use models needed? Information regarding how total energy is distributed across various end uses is critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. Using submeters

428

Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this dissertation is threefold: to determine the differences in apparent prevalence and the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. between antimicrobial-free and conventional swine farms; secondly, to introduce an appropriate statistical model to compare the minimum inhibitory concentration distributions of Escherichia coli and Campylobacter spp. isolated from both farm types; and thirdly, to examine the potential herd level risk factors that may be associated with antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter spp. and E. coli isolates from finishers on antimicrobial-free and conventional farming systems. In addition, a critical review of studies that have compared the levels and patterns of antimicrobial resistance among animals from antimicrobial-free and conventional farming practices was performed. Fecal samples from 15 pigs were collected from each of 35 antimicrobial-free and 60 conventional farms in the Midwestern U.S. Campylobacter spp. was isolated from 464 of 1,422 fecal samples, and each isolate was tested for susceptibility to 6 antimicrobials. The apparent prevalence of Campylobacter spp. isolates was approximately 33 percent on both conventional and antimicrobial-free farms. The proportion of antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter was higher for three antimicrobials within conventional compared to antimicrobial-free farms. The susceptibilities of populations of bacteria to antimicrobial drugs were summarized as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) frequency distributions. The use of MIC values removed the subjectivity associated with the choice of breakpoints which define an isolate as susceptible or resistant. A discrete-time survival analysis model was introduced as the recommended statistical model when MICs are the outcome. A questionnaire was completed by each farm manager on biosecurity, preventive medication, vaccines, disease history, and production management. Multivariable population-averaged statistical models were used to determine the relationships among antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and potential herd-level risk factors. Controlling for herd type (antimicrobial-free versus conventional), each antimicrobial-bacterial species combination yielded unique combinations of risk factors; however, housing type, history of rhinitis, farm ventilation, and history of swine flu were significant in more than one model. A variety of herd-level practices were associated with the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance on swine farms. Further studies are encouraged when considering interventions for antimicrobial resistance on both antimicrobial-free and conventional farms.

Rollo, Susan Noble

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

EA-0843: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste Processing, Idaho Falls, Idaho EA-0843: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste...

430

Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Cheryl Burrell Loma Linda University Abstract Our study proposes that the level of...

431

Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

432

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state) Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state) Eligibility...

433

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States) Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States)...

434

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Eligibility...

435

North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update:...

436

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for RoomAir Conditioners  

SciTech Connect

The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency. In support of BEE's refrigerator program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produced an analysis of national impacts of standards in collaboration with the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP). That analysis drew on LBNL's experience with standards programs in the United States, as well as many other countries. Subsequently, as part of the process for setting optimal levels for air conditioner regulations, CLASP commissioned LBNL to provide support to BEE in the form of a techno-economic evaluation of air conditioner efficiency technologies. This report describes the methodology and results of this techno-economic evaluation. The analysis consists of three components: (1) Cost effectiveness to consumers of efficiency technologies relative to current baseline. (2) Impacts on the current market from efficiency regulations. (3) National energy and financial impacts. The analysis relied on detailed and up-to-date technical data made available by BEE and industry representatives. Technical parameters were used in conjunction with knowledge about air conditioner use patterns in the residential and commercial sectors, and prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give an estimate of per-unit financial impacts. In addition, the overall impact of the program was evaluated by combining unit savings with market forecasts in order to yield national impacts. LBNL presented preliminary results of these analyses in May 2006, at a meeting of BEEs Technical Committee for Air Conditioners. This meeting was attended by a wide array of stakeholder, including industry representatives, engineers and consumer advocates. Comments made by stakeholders at this meeting are incorporated into the final analysis presented in this report. The current analysis begins with the Rating Plan drafted by BEE in 2006, along with an evaluation of the market baseline according to test data submitted by manufacturers. MEPS, label rating levels, and baseline efficiencies are presented in Section 2. First, we compare Indian MEPS with current standards in other countries, and assess their relative stringency. Baseline efficiencies are then used to estimate the fraction of models likely to remain on the market at each phase of the program, and the impact on market-weighted efficiency levels. Section 3 deals with cost-effectiveness of higher efficiency design options. The cost-benefit analysis is grounded in technical parameters provided by industry representatives in India. This data allows for an assessment of financial costs and benefits to consumers as a result of the standards and labeling program. A Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation is used to evaluate the impacts of the program at the unit level, thus providing some insight into the appropriateness of the levels chosen, and additional opportunities for further ratcheting. In addition to LCC, we also calculate payback periods, cost of conserved energy (CCE), and return on investment (ROI). Finally, Section 4 covers national impacts. This is an extension of unit level estimates in the two previous sections. Extrapolation to the national level depends on a forecast of air conditioner purchases (shipments), which we describe here. Following the cost-benefit analysis, we construct several efficiency scenarios including the BEE plan, but also considering further potential for efficiency improvement. These are combined with shipments through a stock accounting model in order to forecast air conditioner energy consumption

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Disposal of low-level and low-level mixed waste: audit report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (Department) is faced with the legacy of thousands of contaminated areas and buildings and large volumes of `backlog` waste requiring disposal. Waste management and environmental restoration activities have become central to the Department`s mission. One of the Department`s priorities is to clean up former nuclear weapons sites and find more effective and timely methods for disposing of nuclear waste. This audit focused on determining if the Department was disposing of low-level and low-level mixed waste in the most cost-effective manner.

NONE

1998-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

438

Quantitative Herd-level Evaluation of a Commercially Available Vaccine for Control of Salmonella in Dairy Cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salmonella continues to threaten public health as well as negatively impact dairy producers on multiple levels. Efficacious solutions to control Salmonella among dairy cattle have long been sought to alleviate these problems. A novel vaccine technology has been developed based on purified siderophore receptors and porin proteins (SRP®) derived from Salmonella Newport. When vaccinated with these SRP® cattle are stimulated to produce antibodies which act in concert with host defenses to disrupt iron acquisition of pathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of this technology, a prospective cohort study was designed utilizing herds (n = 11) that practiced whole herd vaccination with the SRP® vaccine (vaccinated cohort) and herds (n = 11) that had not used the SRP® vaccine. Samples were collected during four rounds at approximately six week intervals from June through October 2009. Samples were transported to the laboratory at West Texas A&M University and cultured for the prevalence of Salmonella using selective enrichment methods. Salmonella isolates were evaluated for antimicrobial susceptibility and serotype. Data was analyzed using commercially available software to evaluate the herd-level effects of vaccination. Salmonella was ubiquitous throughout the Texas Panhandle and Eastern New Mexico, within-herd animal level estimates of prevalence ranged from 0.0 – 92%, over the length of the study period. Overall all rounds vaccinated herds had decreased (P = 0.012) Salmonella prevalence (15.3 vs. 27.5%). Vaccinated herds had numerically fewer Salmonella isolates belonging to the Newport serotype. Salmonella Typhimurium isolates were recovered approximately equally from vaccinated and non-vaccinated herds. Isolates from vaccinated herds were resistant to fewer antimicrobials throughout the study period. The ACSSuT(resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulphisoxazole, and tetracycline) and MDR-AmpC (ACSSuT resistance plus resistance to ceftiofur and amoxicillin/clavulanate) resistant phenotypes were more frequently observed among non-vaccinated herds and none of the isolates from vaccinated or non-vaccinated herds were resistant to nalidixic acid, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, or amikacin. These findings indicate vaccine efficacy for the reduction of Salmonella prevalence. Dairy operators along with herd veterinarians are encouraged to utilize this data with other herd specific factors in determining whether to use this specific vaccine.

Farrow, Russell Lee

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Recent Trends in Crude Oil Stock Levels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J 0 280 300 320 340 360 380 400 420 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Average Range: 1993-1995 Recent Trends in Crude Oil Stock Levels by Aileen A. Bohn Energy Information Administration (EIA) data for March 1996 primary inventories of crude oil were the lowest recorded in almost 20 years. Crude oil inventories, which were generally on a downward trend since the beginning of 1995, fell below the average range in July 1995 and have yet to recover (Figure FE1). On September 27, 1996, crude oil stocks registered 303 million barrels, compared to a normal range of nearly 311 to 332 million barrels for September. 1 Low crude oil inventories can cause price volatility in crude oil markets. 2 When inventories are low, refiners resort to

440

Decontamination of high-level waste canisters  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations of several methods for the in-process decontamination of metallic canisters containing any one of a number of solidified high-level waste (HLW) forms. The use of steam-water, steam, abrasive blasting, electropolishing, liquid honing, vibratory finishing and soaking have been tested or evaluated as potential techniques to decontaminate the outer surfaces of HLW canisters. Either these techniques have been tested or available literature has been examined to assess their applicability to the decontamination of HLW canisters. Electropolishing has been found to be the most thorough method to remove radionuclides and other foreign material that may be deposited on or in the outer surface of a canister during any of the HLW processes. Steam or steam-water spraying techniques may be adequate for some applications but fail to remove all contaminated forms that could be present in some of the HLW processes. Liquid honing and abrasive blasting remove contamination and foreign material very quickly and effectively from small areas and components although these blasting techniques tend to disperse the material removed from the cleaned surfaces. Vibratory finishing is very capable of removing the bulk of contamination and foreign matter from a variety of materials. However, special vibratory finishing equipment would have to be designed and adapted for a remote process. Soaking techniques take long periods of time and may not remove all of the smearable contamination. If soaking involves pickling baths that use corrosive agents, these agents may cause erosion of grain boundaries that results in rough surfaces.

Nesbitt, J.F.; Slate, S.C.; Fetrow, L.K.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

BLENDING OF LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide the Commission with the results of the staff’s analysis of issues associated with the blending of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), as directed in Chairman Jaczko’s October 8, 2009, memorandum to the staff. The closure of the Barnwell waste disposal facility to most U.S. generators of Class B and C LLRW has caused industry to examine methods for reducing the amount of these wastes, including the blending of some types of Class B and C waste with similar Class A wastes to produce a Class A mixture that can be disposed of at a currently licensed facility. This paper identifies policy, safety, and regulatory issues associated with LLRW blending, provides options for a U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) blending position, and makes a recommendation for a future blending policy. This paper does not address any new commitments. SUMMARY: In this paper, the staff examines the blending or mixing of LLRW with higher concentrations of radionuclides with LLRW with lower concentrations of radionuclides to form a final homogeneous mixture. While recognizing that some mixing of waste is unavoidable, and may even be necessary and appropriate for efficiency or dose reduction purposes, NRC has historically discouraged mixing LLRW to lower the classification of waste in other circumstances.

R. W. Borchardt; Contacts James; E. Kennedy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Factors influencing county level household fuelwood use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explains household fuelwood consumption behavior at the county level by linking it to economic and demographic conditions in counties. Using this link, counties are identified where potential fuelwood use problems and benefits are greatest. A probit equation estimates household probability of wood use (percent woodburners in a county heating degree days, household income, nonwood fuel price, fuelwood price, percent forest land, population density, and fraction of households using various types of heating equipment. A linear-in-parameters equation estimates average wood consumed by a woodburner based on county heating degree days, household income, percent forest land, and price of nonwood fuel divided by fuelwood price. Parameters are estimated using fuelwood use data for individual households from a 1908-81 nationwide survey. The probit equation predicts percentage of wood burns well over a wide range of county conditions. The wood consumption equation overpredicts for counties with high income and high population density (over 6000 persons per square mile). The model shows average woodburning per household over all households decreases with increasing population density, and the influence of county economic characteristics varies with density.

Skog, K.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The High Level Vibration Test Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of cooperative agreements between the United States and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was designed by modifying the 1/2.5 scale model of the PWR primary coolant loop. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. This paper describes the overall plan, input motion development, test procedure, test results and comparisons with pre-test analysis. 4 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Kawakami, S. (Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center, Tokyo (Japan))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Fermilab Tevatron high level rf accelerating systems  

SciTech Connect

Eight tuned rf cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an rf signal representing the amplitude and phase as ''seen by the beam,'' separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer.

Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Tawser, S.; Reid, J.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Steric Sea Level Trends in the Northeast Pacific Ocean: Possible Evidence of Global Sea Level Rise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-year time series of hydrographic observations from Ocean Station PAPA and Line ‘P’ are used to estimate secular trends in monthly mean steric sea level heights relative to depths of 100 and 1000 decibars in the northeast Pacific Ocean. ...

Richard E. Thomson; Susumu Tabata

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Rain noise level measurements in a performing arts center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Noise level measurements made in a performance hall and in related spaces with subjectively described light

Robert C. Coffeen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

NIST Quantifies Low Levels of 'Heart Attack Risk' Protein  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Quantifies Low Levels of 'Heart Attack Risk' Protein. For Immediate Release: November 3, 2009. ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

448

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

449

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

450

The Efficacy of Profile Matching as a Means of Controlling for the Effects of Response Distortion on Personality Measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Researchers and practitioners continue to be concerned about the magnitude, extent, and effects of response distortion when self-report personality measures are used in high-stakes testing. One method for mitigating response distortion that has not received much empirical attention is profile matching. Profile matching assesses the fit between test-takers’ predictor profiles and a standard profile which represents an ideal or high performing employee’s profile. Since profile matching assesses fit, it can capture nonlinear effects. Furthermore, high predictor scores are not necessarily associated with higher criterion scores. Test–takers who distort their responses by choosing inaccurately extreme response options may improve their chances of being hired if a linear model is used, but this approach is unlikely to be effective if a profile matching strategy is used as long as the standard profile is unknown to the test-takers. As such, the primary objective of the present study was to examine the extent to which profile matching may alleviate concerns about response distortion. A secondary objective was to examine characteristics of the standard profile that are associated with the efficacy of this approach. The present study compared the effects of response distortion on personality test scores, and their criterion-related validity in predicting tenure, based on a linear composite and a profile fit score. The present study used data from 996 applicants who completed a personality test in a high-stakes testing context. Missing data were imputed for a subset of applicants who did not complete two response distortion scales. As such, the results provided an initial proof-of-concept of the effectiveness of profile matching as a personnel decision-making strategy using a blend of real and simulated data. The results suggest that profile fit scores are less related to response distortion and display higher criterion-related validity than linear composite scores. However, the difference in criterion-related validity could not be attributed to response distortion. The results further suggest that the amount of scatter in the standard profile is negatively associated with the profile fit score’s susceptibility to response distortion and positively related to criterion-related validity.

Glaze, Ryan 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A Bayesian Method for Identifying Contaminated Detectors in Low-Level Alpha Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

Analyses used for radiobioassay and other radiochemical tests are normally designed to meet specified quality objectives, such relative bias, precision, and minimum detectable activity (MDA). In the case of radiobioassay analyses for alpha emitting radionuclides, a major determiner of the process MDA is the instrument background. Alpha spectrometry detectors are often restricted to only a few counts over multi-day periods in order to meet required MDAs for nuclides such as plutonium-239 and americium-241. A detector background criterion is often set empirically based on experience, or frequentist or classical statistics are applied to the calculated background count necessary to meet a required MDA. An acceptance criterion for the detector background is set at the multiple of the estimated background standard deviation above the assumed mean that provides an acceptably small probability of observation if the mean and standard deviation estimate are correct. The major problem with this method is that the observed background counts used to estimate the mean, and thereby the standard deviation when a Poisson distribution is assumed, are often in the range of zero to three counts. At those expected count levels it is impossible to obtain a good estimate of the true mean from a single measurement. As an alternative, Bayesian statistical methods allow calculation of the expected detector background count distribution based on historical counts from new, uncontaminated detectors. This distribution can then be used to identify detectors showing an increased probability of contamination. The effect of varying the assumed range of background counts (i.e., the prior probability distribution) from new, uncontaminated detectors will be is discussed.

Maclellan, Jay A.; Strom, Daniel J.; Joyce, Kevin E.

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

452

Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building-Level Energy Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy

453

Developing a Performance Measure for Snow-Level Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The snow level, or altitude in the atmosphere where snow melts to rain, is an important variable for hydrometeorological prediction in mountainous watersheds; yet, there is no operational performance measure associated with snow-level forecasts ...

Allen B. White; Daniel J. Gottas; Arthur F. Henkel; Paul J. Neiman; F. Martin Ralph; Seth I. Gutman

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Issue briefs on low-level radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains 4 Issue Briefs on low-level radioactive wastes. They are entitled: Handling, Packaging, and Transportation, Economics of LLW Management, Public Participation and Siting, and Low Level Waste Management.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

CSP transactors for asynchronous transaction level modeling and IP reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In synchronous circuit design, new levels of abstraction above RTL allow the designer to model, simulate, debug and explore various architectures more efficiently than before. These are known as transaction level modeling. The translation between signals ...

Lilian Janin; Doug Edwards

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

SEM supports CMM-SW Level 2 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

supports CMM-SW Level 2 More Documents & Publications SEM Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Systems Engineering Methodology (SEM) Planning for a Software Process Assessment Energy.gov...

457

Level set and PDE methods for computer graphics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Level set methods, an important class of partial differential equation (PDE) methods, define dynamic surfaces implicitly as the level set (iso-surface) of a sampled, evolving nD function. The course begins with preparatory material that introduces the ...

David Breen; Ron Fedkiw; Ken Museth; Stanley Osher; Guillermo Sapiro; Ross Whitaker

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Surrogate Ensemble Study of Sea Level Reconstructions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the possibility of reconstructing past global mean sea levels. Reconstruction methods rely on historical measurements from tide gauges combined with knowledge about the spatial covariance structure of the sea level field ...

Bo Christiansen; T. Schmith; P. Thejll

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Shipping source level estimation for ambient noise forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to accurately estimate shipping source levels from ambient noise data is an essential step towards creating a forecast model of the ocean soundscape. Source level estimates can be obtained by solving the system of linear equations

Jeffrey S. Rogers; Steven L. Means; Stephen C. Wales

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Return Levels of Northern Great Plains Snow Water Equivalents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper estimates return levels of extreme snow water equivalents (SWE) in the northern Great Plains region, containing North and South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska. The return levels are estimated from extreme-value methods using a ...

Andrew J. Grundstein; Qi Qi Lu; Robert Lund

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "minimum efficacy levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting March 13, 2006 - 11:48am Addthis...

462

Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

Sugiyama, Masahiro.

463

Brazoria County Re-Leveling Pleasant Bayou Geopressured Well Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose is to conduct first order leveling surveys as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program for geopressured-geothermal test wells. The scope is to Conduct First Order, Class I, leveling to monitor subsidence of previously installed and leveled bench marks, established by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Vernon F. Meyer and Associates, Inc., in the area of the Pleasant Bayou geopressured test well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.

None

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal  Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

465

LANL Biosafety Level 3 Facility Environmental Impact Statement...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Biosafety Level 3 Facility Environmental Impact Statement | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

466

ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL II PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FA Level II UPD 102012 1 FA Level II UPD 102012 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL II PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

467

Multi-Level TESLA: Broadcast Authentication for Distributed Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Level µTESLA: Broadcast Authentication for Distributed Sensor Networks DONGGANG LIU and PENG named multi-level µTESLA based on µTESLA, a broadcast authentication protocol whose scalability is limited by its unicast-based initial parameter distribution. Multi-level µTESLA satisfies several nice

Ning, Peng

468

Capturing Actor-level Dynamics of Longitudinal Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Study of the dynamics of longitudinal networks has already attracted enormous research interest. Although dynamics of networks can be captured both at network-level and node / actor-level, the latter has gained less attention in current literature. By ... Keywords: actor-level dynamics, static toopology, dynamic topology, topological analysis, longitudinal networks

Shahadat Uddin; Kon Shing Kenneth Chung; Mahendra Piraveenan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

An extended level set method for shape and topology optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the conventional level set methods are extended as an effective approach for shape and topology optimization by the introduction of the radial basis functions (RBFs). The RBF multiquadric splines are used to construct the implicit level ... Keywords: Extension velocity, Gradient-based optimization, Level set method, Radial basis functions, Shape optimization, Topology optimization

S. Y. Wang; K. M. Lim; B. C. Khoo; M. Y. Wang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Implementation of a fuzzy-based level control using SCADA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) control via PLC (programmable logic controller) for a fluid level control system with fuzzy controller. For this purpose, a liquid level control set and PLC have been assembled together. ... Keywords: Fuzzy logic, Level control, Programmable logic controller, SCADA

Zafer Aydogmus

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Analysis of level design 'push & pull' within 21 games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the differences between 3D level designs in 21 popular games. We have developed a framework to analyze 3D level designs based on patterns extracted from level designers and game play sessions. We then use these patterns to analyze ... Keywords: 3D games, design pattern, player movement

David Milam; Magy Seif El Nasr

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A System Level Boundary Scan Controller Board for VME Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article an application of boundary scan test at system level is analyzed. The objective is met through the description of the design and implementation options of a VME boundary scan controller board prototype and the corresponding software. ... Keywords: ATPG, IEEE 1149.1 boundary scan test, board level test and system level test

Nuno Cardoso; Carlos Beltrán Almeida; José Carlos Da Silva

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assistance Level III 1 Financial Assistance Level III 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL III PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

474

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project -- Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted during the first year of a long-term study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system in eliciting a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The strobe light system is being evaluated as a means to prevent entrainment (and subsequent loss) of fish at the entrance to the forebay adjacent to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Colville Confederated Tribes are collaborating on the three-year study being conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council.

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Anglea, Steven M.; Simmons, Carver S.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Lecaire, R; Francis, S

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

475

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and storage of low-level radioactive waste. Commercial incineration of radioactive wastes is prohibited. Licenses are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities not licensed to accept low-level radioactive waste. Disposal at

476

Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Joint quantum measurements with minimum uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum physics constrains the accuracy of joint measurements of incompatible observables. Here we test tight measurement-uncertainty relations using single photons. We implement two independent, idealized uncertainty-estimation methods, the 3-state method and the weak-measurement method, and adapt them to realistic experimental conditions. Exceptional quantum state fidelities of up to 0.99998(6) allow us to verge upon the fundamental limits of measurement uncertainty.

Martin Ringbauer; Devon N. Biggerstaff; Matthew A. Broome; Alessandro Fedrizzi; Cyril Branciard; Andrew G. White

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z