National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for minimum efficacy levels

  1. Level of Repair Analysis and Minimum Cost Homomorphisms of Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutin, Gregory

    of Lillian Barros Abstract. Level of Repair Analysis (LORA) is a prescribed procedure for defence logistics, LORA seeks to determine an optimal provision of repair and maintenance facilities to minimize overall on bipartite graphs is polynomial time solvable. Keywords: Computational Logistics; Level of Repair Analysis

  2. Minimum time control of a pair of two-level quantum systems with opposite drifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffaele Romano; Domenico D'Alessandro

    2015-04-27

    In this paper we solve two equivalent time optimal control problems. On one hand, we design the control field to implement in minimum time the SWAP (or equivalent) operator on a two-level system, assuming that it interacts with an additional, uncontrollable, two-level system. On the other hand, we synthesize the SWAP operator simultaneously, in minimum time, on a pair of two-level systems subject to opposite drifts. We assume that it is possible to perform three independent control actions, and that the total control strength is bounded. These controls either affect the dynamics of the target system, under the first perspective, or, simultaneously, the dynamics of both systems, in the second view. We obtain our results by using techniques of geometric control theory on Lie groups. In particular, we apply the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, and provide a complete characterization of singular and non-singular extremals. Our analysis shows that the problem can be formulated as the motion of a material point in a central force, a well known system in classical mechanics. Although we focus on obtaining the SWAP operator, many of the ideas and techniques developed in this work apply to the time optimal implementation of an arbitrary unitary operator.

  3. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  4. Calculated in-air leakage spectra and power levels for the ANSI standard minimum accident of concern. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    This document represents Phase I of a two-phase project. The entire project consists of determining a series of minimum accidents of concern and their associated neutron and photon leakage spectra that may be used to determine Criticality Accident Alarm compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3. The inadvertent assembly of a critical mass of material presents a multitude of unknown quantities. Depending on the particular process, one can make an educated guess as to fissile material. In a gaseous diffusion cascade, this material is assumed to be uranyl fluoride. However, educated assumptions cannot be readily made for the other variables. Phase I of this project is determining a bounding minimum accident of concern and its associated neutron and photon leakage spectra. To determine the composition of the bounding minimum accident of concern, work was done to determine the effects of geometry, moderation level, and enrichment on the leakage spectra of a critical assembly. The minimum accident of concern is defined as the accident that may be assumed to deliver the equivalent of an absorbed dose in free air of 20 rad at a distance of 2 meters from the reacting material within 60 seconds. To determine this dose, an analyst makes an assumption and choose an appropriate flux to dose response function. The power level required of a critical assembly to constitute a minimum accident of concern depends heavily on the response function chosen. The first step in determining the leakage spectra was to attempt to isolate the effects of geometry, after which all calculations were conducted on critical spheres. The moderation level and enrichment of the spheres were varied and their leakage spectra calculated. These spectra were then multiplied by three different response functions: the Henderson Flux to Dose conversion factors, the ICRU 44 Kerma in Air, and the MCNP Heating Detector. The power level required to produce a minimum accident of concern was then calculated for each combination.

  5. Level and length of cyclic solar activity during the Maunder minimum as deduced from the active day statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaquero, J M; Usoskin, I G; Carrasco, V M S; Gallego, M C

    2015-01-01

    The Maunder minimum (MM) of greatly reduced solar activity took place in 1645-1715, but the exact level of sunspot activity is uncertain as based, to a large extent, on historical generic statements of the absence of spots on the Sun. Here we aim, using a conservative approach, to assess the level and length of solar cycle during the Maunder minimum, on the basis of direct historical records by astronomers of that time. A database of the active and inactive days (days with and without recorded sunspots on the solar disc respectively) is constructed for three models of different levels of conservatism (loose ML, optimum MO and strict MS models) regarding generic no-spot records. We have used the active day fraction to estimate the group sunspot number during the MM. A clear cyclic variability is found throughout the MM with peaks at around 1655--1657, 1675, 1684 and 1705, and possibly 1666, with the active day fraction not exceeding 0.2, 0.3 or 0.4 during the core MM, for the three models. Estimated sunspot nu...

  6. This is a preprint of the following article, which is available from http://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    ://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published article.A.M. van Kuik. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines for Minimum Levelized Cost of Energy. Renewable Energy (In press), 2014 Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines

  7. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  8. Qualifying entry grades/scores for the Heriot-Watt Academic Scholarship This list sets out the minimum A-Level grades / UCAS Tariff Points for award of Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Qualifying entry grades/scores for the Heriot-Watt Academic Scholarship This list sets out the minimum A-Level grades / UCAS Tariff Points for award of Scholarship: School of Engineering & Physical Sciences · Chemistry: AAA or A*AB (360 points) Contact: Jim Cameron, 0131 451 3104 · Chemical Engineering

  9. The Minimum Price Contract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Welch, Mark; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

    2008-10-17

    A minimum price contract is one of many tools a marketer may use to better manage price and production risk while trying to achieve financial goals and objectives. This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages involved...

  10. Minimum Spanning Tree What is a Minimum Spanning Tree.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razak, Saquib

    Algorithm(Graph g, Vertex start){ int n = g.getNumberOfVertices(); Entry table[] = new Entry[n]; for(int v = 0; v new Entry(); table[g.getIndex(start)].distance = 0; PriorityQueue queue = new. · What is a Minimum-Cost Spanning Tree. · Applications of Minimum Cost Spanning Trees. · Prim's Algorithm

  11. Maximum output at minimum cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Gamesa G90-2.0 MW #12;Maximum output at minimum cost per kWh for low wind sites Class IIIA mast and the electrical substation. This innovative modular design based on TCP/IP architecture has

  12. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

  13. Minimum Time/Minimum Fuel Control of an Axisymmetric Rigid Body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Jonathan Farina

    2014-05-19

    Many times it is necessary to reorient an aerial vehicle during flight in a minimum time or minimum fuel fashion. This thesis will present a minimum time/fuel control solution to reorienting an axisymmetric rigid body using ...

  14. Storage Begins with Purchasing purchase minimum needed for experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Storage Begins with Purchasing purchase minimum needed for experiment do not "buy in bulk://www.ehs.washington.edu/forms/epo/peroxideguidelines.pdf #12;Chemical Storage Basics https://web.mit.edu/environment/pdf/sop/sop_0023.pdf http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/chsp/html/storage level do not store chemicals in fume hoods flammable storage refrigerator needed for flammable

  15. Approximating Minimum-Power Degree and Connectivity Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortsarz, Guy

    . The power con- sumption of a station determines its transmission range, and thus also the stations it can. Assigning power levels to the stations (nodes) determines the resulting communi- cation network. ConverselyApproximating Minimum-Power Degree and Connectivity Problems Guy Kortsarz Vahab S. Mirrokni Zeev

  16. Energy Consumption of Minimum Energy Coding in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Energy Consumption of Minimum Energy Coding in CDMA Wireless Sensor Networks Benigno Zurita Ares://www.ee.kth.se/control Abstract. A theoretical framework is proposed for accurate perfor- mance analysis of minimum energy coding energy consumption is analyzed for two coding schemes proposed in the literature: Minimum Energy coding

  17. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulloa, Osvaldo

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

  18. Modified Theoretical Minimum Emittance Lattice for an Electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modified Theoretical Minimum Emittance Lattice for an Electron Storage Ring with Extreme-Low Emittance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modified Theoretical Minimum...

  19. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Faizal; Mohammed M. Khalil; Saurya Das

    2014-12-29

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  20. Achieving 360 Angle Coverage with Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Vincent W. L.

    , and the sensors surrounding it are responsible for capturing the images of it. We aim at finding the minimum cost monitoring, target tracking, disaster management, etc [1], [2]. Each sensor is powered by battery which moving around the network and the nodes around the object are responsible to capture the images of it

  1. Minimum-Flip Supertrees: Complexity and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanderson, Michael J.

    Minimum-Flip Supertrees: Complexity and Algorithms Duhong Chen, Oliver Eulenstein, David Ferna that it is fixed-parameter tractable and give approximation algorithms for special cases. Index Terms assembled from all species in the study. Because the conventional algorithms to solve these problems

  2. LED Record Efficacy and Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Designed for general lighting applications such as street, industrial, and parking garage lighting, the Cree XLamp power LED sets new records for LED brightness and efficacy, up to 85 lm/W at 350 mA. The XLamp utilizes Cree's performance breakthrough EZBright LED chip; both products include technology that was developed in part with R&D funding support from DOE.

  3. Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    *Efficacy refers to the overall energy efficiency of light and is measured in lumens (measure of light output) per watt (measure of power input). The efficacy of a typical incandescent light bulb...

  4. Minimum-Cost Tolerance Allocation ADCATS Report No. 99-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minimum-Cost Tolerance Allocation ADCATS Report No. 99-5 Kenneth W. Chase Department of Mechanical-all cost of production, while meeting target levels for quality. Using allocation tools, a designer may re and loosening tolerances on costly processes, for a net reduction in cost. Several algorithms are described

  5. Minimum Energy Source Coding for Asymmetric Modulation with Application to RFID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Sumit

    , Minimum En- ergy, Source Coding, Energy Harvesting, EPC Global. I. INTRODUCTION Energy constrained consumption and extend operation lifetime. Such energy effi- ciency may be obtained at multiple levels - from coding, but with a focus on energy consumption. For example, channel coding schemes Contact Author

  6. Distributed Minimum Energy Data Gathering and Aggregation in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Ben

    Distributed Minimum Energy Data Gathering and Aggregation in Sensor Networks Kevin Yuen, Baochun Li-- In this paper, we propose an effective distributed algorithm to solve the minimum energy data gathering (MEDG input packets into a single output packet. To achieve minimum energy data gathering, the optimal trans

  7. Welfare Effects of Minimum Wage and Other Government Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    measures. #12;Do government programs such as minimum wage laws, Aid to the Families with De- pendent effects of the minimum wage. Most of the enormous 1 Dalton (1920) suggested that all common welfare government policies and market conditions when evaluating the effects of the minimum wage laws. As Freeman

  8. Influence of dietary composition on coccidiosis vaccination efficacy in broilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason Thomas

    2007-04-25

    -1 INFLUENCE OF DIETARY COMPOSITION ON COCCIDIOSIS VACCINATION EFFICACY IN BROILERS A Dissertation by JASON THOMAS LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...&M University; M.S. Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David J. Caldwell This research program included a series of experiments to investigate the effect of starter diet protein level on the performance of broilers vaccinated...

  9. Minimum wear tube support hole design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

    1986-01-01

    A minimum-wear through-bore (16) is defined within a heat exchanger tube support plate (14) so as to have an hourglass configuration as determined by means of a constant radiused surface curvature (18) as defined by means of an external radius (R3), wherein the surface (18) extends between the upper surface (20) and lower surface (22) of the tube support plate (14). When a heat exchange tube (12) is disposed within the tube support plate (14) so as to pass through the through-bore (16), the heat exchange tube (12) is always in contact with a smoothly curved or radiused portion of the through-bore surface (16) whereby unacceptably excessive wear upon the heat exchange tube (12), as normally developed by means of sharp edges, lands, ridges, or the like conventionally part of the tube support plates, is eliminated or substantially reduced.

  10. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOGRAPHY The Bachelor of Science Geography Major consists of a minimum of 36 units taken from the course offerings of the School of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOGRAPHY The Bachelor of Science Geography Major consists of a minimum of 36 units taken from the course offerings of the School of Geography and Development, including a minimum of 21 units at the upper division level. Best Introductory Courses INDV 102 Human Geography

  11. IMPLICATIONS OF THE RECENT LOW SOLAR MINIMUM FOR THE SOLAR WIND DURING THE MAUNDER MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J., E-mail: m.lockwood@reading.ac.uk [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    The behavior of the Sun and near-Earth space during grand solar minima is not understood; however, the recent long and low minimum of the decadal-scale solar cycle gives some important clues, with implications for understanding the solar dynamo and predicting space weather conditions. The speed of the near-Earth solar wind and the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded within it can be reliably reconstructed for before the advent of spacecraft monitoring using observations of geomagnetic activity that extend back to the mid-19th century. We show that during the solar cycle minima around 1879 and 1901 the average solar wind speed was exceptionally low, implying the Earth remained within the streamer belt of slow solar wind flow for extended periods. This is consistent with a broader streamer belt, which was also a feature of the recent low minimum (2009), and yields a prediction that the low near-Earth IMF during the Maunder minimum (1640-1700), as derived from models and deduced from cosmogenic isotopes, was accompanied by a persistent and relatively constant solar wind of speed roughly half the average for the modern era.

  12. Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency...

  13. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 theoreticalminimumenergies.pdf More Documents & Publications Ironmaking Process Alternatives Screening Study...

  14. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energyspin-flip density functional theory approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  15. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  16. THE MINIMUM FREE ENERGY FOR CONTINUOUS SPECTRUM MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deseri, Luca

    THE MINIMUM FREE ENERGY FOR CONTINUOUS SPECTRUM MATERIALS L. DESERI AND J.M. GOLDEN Abstract. A general closed expression is given for the isothermal minimum free energy of a linear viscoelastic states [6] are uniquely related to histories and the work function is the maximum free energy

  17. Transmission resonance spectroscopy in the third minimum of 232Pa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Csige; M. Csatlos; T. Faestermann; J. Gulyas; D. Habs; R. Hertenberger; M. Hunyadi; A. Krasznahorkay; H. J. Maier; P. G. Thirolf; H. -F. Wirth

    2012-04-04

    The fission probability of 232Pa was measured as a function of the excitation energy in order to search for hyperdeformed (HD) transmission resonances using the (d,pf) transfer reaction on a radioactive 231Pa target. The experiment was performed at the Tandem accelerator of the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory (MLL) at Garching using the 231Pa(d,pf) reaction at a bombarding energy of E=12 MeV and with an energy resolution of dE=5.5 keV. Two groups of transmission resonances have been observed at excitation energies of E=5.7 and 5.9 MeV. The fine structure of the resonance group at E=5.7 MeV could be interpreted as overlapping rotational bands with a rotational parameter characteristic to a HD nuclear shape. The fission barrier parameters of 232Pa have been determined by fitting TALYS 1.2 nuclear reaction code calculations to the overall structure of the fission probability. From the average level spacing of the J=4 states, the excitation energy of the ground state of the 3rd minimum has been deduced to be E(III)=5.05 MeV.

  18. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping STD-1128-2013levelGUIDE TO|Gustave

  19. Minimum Distance between Bent and 1-resilient Boolean Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    , INDIA. soumen@iitg.ernet.in 2 Applied Statistics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203, B T Road, Kolkata 700 108, INDIA subho@isical.ac.in Abstract. In this paper we study the minimum distance between

  20. Ninety - Two Percent Minimum Heater Efficiency By 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieth, H. C.; Hardie, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Technology is now available to increase heater efficiencies to 92 percent and more. By 1980, this technology will be field proven and corrosion and reliability problems identified and resolved. Recent studies have shown that a minimum efficiency...

  1. Minimum Purchase Price Regulations (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minimum Purchase Price Regulations establish the price which utilities must pay for power produced by large-scale renewable energy generators that is those capable of producing more than 100...

  2. TOWARD THE MINIMUM INNER EDGE DISTANCE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zsom, Andras

    We explore the minimum distance from a host star where an exoplanet could potentially be habitable in order not to discard close-in rocky exoplanets for follow-up observations. We find that the inner edge of the Habitable ...

  3. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  4. The minimum information for a qualified BioBrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Mubing

    2012-10-11

    Since the information of many existing BioBricks is incomplete, thus the usage of the BioBricks will be affected. It is necessary to standardize the minimum information required for a qualified BioBrick. Furthermore this ...

  5. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  6. Theoretical Minimum Energy Use of a Building HVAC System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanskyi, O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the theoretical minimum energy use required by the HVAC system in a particular code compliant office building. This limit might be viewed as the "Carnot Efficiency" for HVAC system. It assumes that all ventilation and air...

  7. Minimum Chaperone to Student Ratio and Costs Reserved Tours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SH 7/08 Minimum Chaperone to Student Ratio and Costs Reserved Tours Use the table below Costs Preschool 1 adult/4 students Ages 3 and under: free, Students ages 4 and up: $4 each, Adults: $6

  8. Task Allocation for Minimum System Power in a Homogenous Multi-core Processor Yang Ge, Qinru Qiu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    . At micro- architecture level, increased power density has set up a "Power Wall" which blocks the microTask Allocation for Minimum System Power in a Homogenous Multi-core Processor Yang Ge, Qinru Qiu power consumption of a homogenous multi-core processor with a main focus on its impact on the leakage

  9. Minimum carbon tax level needed to prompt a widespread shift to nuclear power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Katherine C. (Katherine Claire)

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is suspected to be a major contributor to global warming. In the United States, nearly 70% of electricity is produced using coal or natural gas, both of which emit carbon dioxide into the environment. Nuclear ...

  10. A soft circuit curriculum to promote technological self-efficacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovell, Emily Marie

    2011-01-01

    The development of technological self-efficacy in young people can have a dramatic impact on diversity in the field of computing. Students'self-efficacy and scientific understanding can benefit from engaging in hands-on ...

  11. Apparatus and method for closed-loop control of reactor power in minimum time

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Jr., John A. (72 Paul Revere Rd., Needham Heights, MA 02194)

    1988-11-01

    Closed-loop control law for altering the power level of nuclear reactors in a safe manner and without overshoot and in minimum time. Apparatus is provided for moving a fast-acting control element such as a control rod or a control drum for altering the nuclear reactor power level. A computer computes at short time intervals either the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e '.rho.-.SIGMA..beta..sub.i (.lambda..sub.i -.lambda..sub.e ')+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e '.omega.] or the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e .rho.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e)(.beta.-.rho.)+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e .omega.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e).omega.] These functions each specify the rate of change of reactivity that is necessary to achieve a specified rate of change of reactor power. The direction and speed of motion of the control element is altered so as to provide the rate of reactivity change calculated using either or both of these functions thereby resulting in the attainment of a new power level without overshoot and in minimum time. These functions are computed at intervals of approximately 0.01-1.0 seconds depending on the specific application.

  12. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  13. Optimal Allocation of Bandwidth for Minimum Battery Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosman, Pamela C.

    properties of the battery under bursty discharge conditions are exploited. In this paper, we exploitOptimal Allocation of Bandwidth for Minimum Battery Consumption Qinghua Zhao, Pamela C. Cosman, a power amplifier utilizes battery energy more efficiently with a higher transmission power. For a given

  14. Optimizing rotational acceleration curves for minimum energy use in electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    the four different methods for calculating the minimum energy value and its corresponding accelerations instance we will calculate the energy using a summation of very small acceleration piecewise "steps to simulate the energy cost of spinning a hypothetical wheel on a motor. We chose the specific motor related

  15. What is Minimum Impact Research? John R. Spear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    minimum impact Yellowstone National Park 2 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL.735.1808 Fax: 303.492.7744 Email: spearj@colorado.edu 1 #12;Key Words conservation geothermal leave no trace Yellowstone National Park, for example. Other impacts--grazing, logging, mining, drilling and loss

  16. arXiv:condmat/0310072 Minimum dissipation principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrielli, Davide

    uctuation principle which generalizes the well known Boltzmann{Einstein formula for the probability have opposite transformation properties under time reversal, the non dissipative part being in this respect akin to a magnetic term. We emphasize that the minimum dissipation principle is of general

  17. Structure of minimum-error quantum state discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joonwoo Bae

    2013-07-19

    Distinguishing different quantum states is a fundamental task having practical applications for information processing. Despite the efforts devoted so far, however, strategies for optimal discrimination are known only for specific examples. We here consider the problem of minimum-error quantum state discrimination where the average error is attempted to be minimized. We show the general structure of minimum-error state discrimination as well as useful properties to derive analytic solutions. Based on the general structure, we present a geometric formulation of the problem, which can be applied to cases where quantum state geometry is clear. We also introduce equivalent classes of sets of quantum states in terms of minimum-error discrimination: sets of quantum states in an equivalence class share the same guessing probability. In particular, for qubit states where the state geometry is found with the Bloch sphere, we illustrate that for an arbitrary set of qubit states, the minimum-error state discrimination with equal prior probabilities can be analytically solved, that is, optimal measurement and the guessing probability are explicitly obtained.

  18. A minimum problem with free boundary for a degenerate quasilinear ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-03-04

    Feb 8, 2005 ... By the strong minimum principle, w0 = 0 in B5/8, since w0 ? 0 and w0(0) ..... 4.7 in [2] and pp. 1920 in [3]; see also our proof of Theorem 5.1.

  19. Minimum Energy Coding for Wireless NanoSensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Minimum Energy Coding for Wireless NanoSensor Networks Murat Kocaoglu Ozgur B. Akan Next-generation nodes. With their extremely small size, nanosensor nodes can only provide limited energy. Hence, power for their realization. Authors in [1] provide a detailed survey on the state-of-the-art in nanosensors and emphasize

  20. Network Coding for Joint Storage and Transmission with Minimum Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Anxiao "Andrew"

    transmission and data storage in networks. Its power comes from the improved flexibility that codeword symbolsNetwork Coding for Joint Storage and Transmission with Minimum Cost Anxiao (Andrew) Jiang@cs.tamu.edu. Abstract-- Network coding provides elegant solutions to many data transmission problems. The usage

  1. Delay Constrained Minimum Energy Broadcast in Cooperative Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    Delay Constrained Minimum Energy Broadcast in Cooperative Wireless Networks Marjan Baghaie--We formulate the problem of delay constrained energy-efficient broadcast in cooperative multihop wireless net algorithm that combines dynamic programming and linear programming to yield the min- imum energy broadcast

  2. Approximate Minimum-Energy Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    Approximate Minimum-Energy Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa Liang, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--A wireless ad hoc network consists of mobile nodes that are equipped with energy on energy conservation in wireless ad hoc networks have been conducted. For example, energy efficient

  3. Information Delivery in Large Wireless Networks with Minimum Energy Expense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenye

    Information Delivery in Large Wireless Networks with Minimum Energy Expense Yi Xu and Wenye Wang in large-scale multihop wireless networks because of the limited energy supplies from batteries. We and strategies that reduce energy consumption in wireless net- works to extend network lifetimes. Examples

  4. Minimum Flow Requirements for Southern Steelhead Passage on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ed

    that a minimum flow of 800 cfs would be required to maintain a 0.6 ft. depth from the SCR estuary to Santa Paula Creek, while 500 cfs is needed to maintain this depth from Santa Paula to Sespe Creek, and 700 cfs would was greater than 400-700 cfs. These results indicate that passage flows are likely to exist throughout

  5. Minimum Delay Communication in Energy Harvesting Systems over Fading Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laneman, J. Nicholas

    by the data where the average is taken over all the random processes in our system, i.e, data arrival, energyMinimum Delay Communication in Energy Harvesting Systems over Fading Channels Mostafa Khoshnevisan, Indiana 46556 Email:{mkhoshne, jnl}@nd.edu Abstract--We consider an energy harvesting wireless system

  6. "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    lack of Waste-to-Energy capacity. #12;9 Austria As Germany, but Ban in force already in 2002. Landfill1 "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling" "A Sustainable Solution" Hkan in "Recycling". "Waste-to-Energy" is now defined as Recycling, when energy efficiency is > 0,65 Prevention Reuse

  7. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  8. Optimal Allocation of Bandwidth for Minimum Battery Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosman, Pamela C.

    Optimal Allocation of Bandwidth for Minimum Battery Consumption Qinghua Zhao, Pamela C. Cosman, a power amplifier utilizes battery energy more efficiently with a higher transmission power. For a given of the bandwidth among source coding, channel coding and mod- ulation result in different amounts of battery usage

  9. THE SOLAR CYCLE AT THE MAUNDER MINIMUM EPOCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    THE SOLAR CYCLE AT THE MAUNDER MINIMUM EPOCH HIROKO MIYAHARA, DMITRY SOKOLOFF and ILYA G. USOSKIN Solar-Terrestrial Environmental Laboratory, Nagoya University Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601, Japan Department minima, when the solar dynamo was in a special mode. We review available sets of direct and indirect data

  10. BIOENGINEERING GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM ADVISING SHEET (minimum 15 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    BIOENGINEERING GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM ADVISING SHEET (minimum 15 credits) Name: Z Number to Bioengineering 3 BME 5742 BioSystems Modeling & Control 3 BME 6572 Nanotechnology 3 BME 6762 Bioinformatics: Bioengineering Perspectives (prev EEL 6935 Bioinformatics) 3 CET 5888 Automatic Biometrics 3 EEL 5661 Robotic

  11. Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1061/ ASCE 0733-9437 2003 129:4 256 CE Database subject headings: Radiation; Solar radiationPredicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1 S. Irmak, M.ASCE2 ; A. Irmak3 ; J Abstract: Net radiation (Rn) is a key variable for computing reference evapotranspiration and is a driving

  12. Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Minimum Standard Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Minimum Standard (April 2015) Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Resources Approved and commenced April 2015 Review by April, 2018 Relevant Legislation, Ordinance, Rule and Regulations 2012 Work Health and Safety Policy Responsible Organisational Unit Work Health and Safety Unit Minimum Standard (April 2015) Page 2 1 Executive Summary The University of Tasmania is committed

  13. Commercial HVAC and Water-Heating Equipment Minimum Efficiency Standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasseri, Cyrus H.; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2001-08-01

    ABSTRACT In 1992, Federal legislation mandated that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) set the efficiency levels in the then-current ASHRAE Standard 90.1 as mandatory minimums for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and service water-heating (SWH) equipment sold in the U.S. market, as well as a process for revising the minimum equipment efficiency standards to comply with requirements in an updated Standard 90.1. Because Standard 90.1 was updated in October 1999 (Standard 90.1-1999), DOE is now undertaking a rulemaking process for these equipment categories. In January 2001, DOE published a final rule adopting Standard 90.1-1999 levels as uniform national standards for 18 product categories of commercial HVAC and SWH equipment. For 11 other categories of commercial products, DOE has signaled its intention to consider more stringent standards than those adopted by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE). DOE has now initiated a formal rulemaking process to further analyze these equipment categories.

  14. Observation of the Density Minimum in Deeply Supercooled Confined Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dazhi Liu; Yang Zhang; Chia-Cheng Chen; Chung-Yuan Mou; Peter H Poole; Sow-Hsin Chen

    2007-04-17

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is used to measure the density of heavy water contained in 1-D cylindrical pores of mesoporous silica material MCM-41-S-15, with pores of diameter of 15+-1 A. In these pores the homogenous nucleation process of bulk water at 235 K does not occur and the liquid can be supercooled down to at least 160 K. The analysis of SANS data allows us to determine the absolute value of the density of D2O as a function of temperature. We observe a density minimum at 210+-5 K with a value of 1.041+-0.003 g/cm3. We show that the results are consistent with the predictions of molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled bulk water. This is the first experimental report of the existence of the density minimum in supercooled water.

  15. Dangerous implications of a minimum length in quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosimo Bambi; Katherine Freese

    2008-07-17

    The existence of a minimum length and a generalization of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle seem to be two fundamental ingredients required in any consistent theory of quantum gravity. In this letter we show that they would predict dangerous processes which are phenomenologically unacceptable. For example, long--lived virtual super--Planck mass black holes may lead to rapid proton decay. Possible solutions of this puzzle are briefly discussed.

  16. Improved initial guess for minimum energy path calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidstrup, Sren; Pedersen, Andreas; Stokbro, Kurt

    2014-06-07

    A method is presented for generating a good initial guess of a transition path between given initial and final states of a system without evaluation of the energy. An objective function surface is constructed using an interpolation of pairwise distances at each discretization point along the path and the nudged elastic band method then used to find an optimal path on this image dependent pair potential (IDPP) surface. This provides an initial path for the more computationally intensive calculations of a minimum energy path on an energy surface obtained, for example, by ab initio or density functional theory. The optimal path on the IDPP surface is significantly closer to a minimum energy path than a linear interpolation of the Cartesian coordinates and, therefore, reduces the number of iterations needed to reach convergence and averts divergence in the electronic structure calculations when atoms are brought too close to each other in the initial path. The method is illustrated with three examples: (1) rotation of a methyl group in an ethane molecule, (2) an exchange of atoms in an island on a crystal surface, and (3) an exchange of two Si-atoms in amorphous silicon. In all three cases, the computational effort in finding the minimum energy path with DFT was reduced by a factor ranging from 50% to an order of magnitude by using an IDPP path as the initial path. The time required for parallel computations was reduced even more because of load imbalance when linear interpolation of Cartesian coordinates was used.

  17. Study of Cosmic-Ray Modulation during the Recent Unusual Minimum and Mini Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslam, O P M

    2015-01-01

    After a prolonged and deep solar minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the current Solar Cycle 24 is one of the lowest cycles. These two periods of deep minimum and mini maximum are separated by a period of increasing solar activity. We study the cosmic-ray intensity variation in relation with the solar activity, heliospheric plasma and field parameters, including the heliospheric current sheet, during these three periods (phases) of different activity level and nature: (a) a deep minimum, (b) an increasing activity period and (c) a mini maximum. We use neutron monitor data from stations located around the globe to study the rigidity dependence on modulation during the two extremes, i.e., minimum and maximum. We also study the time lag between the cosmic-ray intensity and various solar and interplanetary parameters separately during the three activity phases. We also analyze the role of various parameters, including the current sheet tilt, in modulating the cosmic-ray intensity during the three different phases. Th...

  18. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J. R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J. A.

    2011-05-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences - the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The 'environmental packages' apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we present the minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS). Adoption of MIxS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  19. EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS). A human health risk assessment conducted by Peterson et al. (2006) for truck-mounted ultra-low volume (ULV to epidemic levels and dispersed to all 58 counties in the state, and was associated with low

  20. The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

  1. When Crime Pays: Measuring Judicial Efficacy against Corruption in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro de Alencar, Carlos Higino; Gico, Ivo Jr.

    2010-01-01

    for now - crime pays in Brazil. Paginal5de27 ReferencesEfficacy against Corruption in Brazil Carlos Higino Ribeiroa widespread perception in Brazil that civil servants caught

  2. Minimum pressure envelope cavitation analysis using two-dimensional panel method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Christopher J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    An analysis tool for calculating minimum pressure envelopes was developed using XFOIL. This thesis presents MATLAB executables that interface with a modified version of XFOIL for determining the minimum pressure of a foil ...

  3. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r?0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  4. Fermion Masses and Mixings from a Minimum Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Alonso

    2014-05-22

    We analyze the structure of quark and lepton mass matrices under the hypothesis that they are determined from a minimum principle applied to a generic potential invariant under the $\\left[U(3)\\right]^5\\otimes {\\mathcal O}(3)$ flavor symmetry, acting on Standard Model fermions and right-handed neutrinos. Unlike the quark case, we show that hierarchical masses for charged leptons are naturally accompanied by degenerate Majorana neutrinos with one mixing angle close to maximal, a second potentially large, a third one necessarily small, and one maximal relative Majorana phase. The scheme presented here could be tested in the near future via neutrino-less double beta decay and cosmological measurements.

  5. Do Frictions Matter in the Labor Market? Accessions, Separations, and Minimum Wage Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dube, Arindrajit; Lester, T. William; Reich, Michael

    2011-01-01

    churn ing. B y altering the wage distribution, the minimum wage policy can affect equilibrium separation rates.

  6. Reaction Products with Internal Energy beyond the Kinematic Limit Result from Trajectories Far from the Minimum Energy Path: An Example from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Reaction Products with Internal Energy beyond the Kinematic Limit Result from Trajectories Far from the minimum energy path are, in general, responsible for production of highly internally excited products-7 For this collision energy and product vibrational level, rotational states j e 18 are energetically allowed, but only

  7. Laminar-Turbulent Transition: Calculation of Minimum Critical Reynolds Number in Channel Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laminar-Turbulent Transition: Calculation of Minimum Critical Reynolds Number in Channel Flow) for laminar-turbulent transition in pipe and channel flows. For pipe flow, the minimum critical Reynolds laminar to turbulent flow Rc2 Rc from turbulent to laminar flow Rc(min) minimum Rc Re Reynolds number = UH

  8. Minimum Energy Per Bit for Secret Key Acquisition Over Multipath Wireless Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayeed, Akbar M.

    Minimum Energy Per Bit for Secret Key Acquisition Over Multipath Wireless Channels Tzu-Han Chou the secret key capacity. We analyze the low-SNR regime to quantify the minimum energy per secret key bit of conventional channel capacity, there is a non-zero SNR that achieves the minimum energy per key bit. A time

  9. Guidelines for Minimum Standards for Learning Management System (LMS) Unit Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Guidelines for Minimum Standards for Learning Management System (LMS) Unit Design Overview Ensuring a minimum standard for design of an LMS unit for teaching, learning and assessment purposes at UWA supports for their units. A demonstration minimum standards LMS unit is viewable at: http

  10. Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings C. R. Sullivan J. D. Mc the IEEE. #12;Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings Charles R. Sullivan://engineering.dartmouth.edu/inductor Abstract--Litz-wire windings for gapped inductors are optimized for minimum cost within a loss constraint

  11. Capacity Region, Minimum Energy and Delay for a Mobile Ad-Hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

    Capacity Region, Minimum Energy and Delay for a Mobile Ad-Hoc Network Rahul Urgaonkar, Michael J in a mobile ad-hoc network: the capacity region and the minimum energy function of the network. The capacity limits of a mobile ad-hoc network are the capacity region and the minimum energy function of the network

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 8, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2009 985 Minimum Energy Coding in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 8, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2009 985 Minimum Energy for accurate comparison of minimum energy coding in Coded Division Mul- tiple Access (CDMA) Wireless Sensor efficient than ME only for short codewords. Index Terms--Wireless sensor network (WSNs), minimum energy

  13. GEOMAGNETIC EFFECTS OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM (1995-1996) AND SOLAR MAXIMUM (2000)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    GEOMAGNETIC EFFECTS OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES DURING SOLAR MINIMUM (1995-1996) AND SOLAR during solar minimum (1995-1996) and solar maximum (2000) periods are obtained. It is observed that solar significant correlations during both solar maximum and solar minimum. The dynamic pressure variation, however

  14. Sampling-Based Direct Trajectory Generation Using the Minimum Time Cost Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Emmanuel

    Sampling-Based Direct Trajectory Generation Using the Minimum Time Cost Function Oscar Chuy for computationally efficient, direct trajectory generation using sampling with the minimum time cost function, where" (i.e, a rigorous lower bound on the chosen cost) based on the solution of a minimum time control

  15. LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

  16. The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A.

    2013-06-13

    Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

  17. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-03-21

    Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

  18. Neutrino Mixing and Masses from a Minimum Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alonso; M. B. Gavela; G. Isidori; L. Maiani

    2013-10-24

    We analyze the structure of quark and lepton mass matrices under the hypothesis that they are determined from a minimum principle applied to a generic potential invariant under the $\\left[SU(3)\\right]^5\\otimes \\mathcal O(3)$ flavor symmetry, acting on Standard Model fermions and right-handed neutrinos. Unlike the quark case, we show that hierarchical masses for charged leptons are naturally accompanied by degenerate Majorana neutrinos with one mixing angle close to maximal, a second potentially large, a third one necessarily small, and one maximal relative Majorana phase. Adding small perturbations the predicted structure for the neutrino mass matrix is in excellent agreement with present observations and could be tested in the near future via neutrino-less double beta decay and cosmological measurements. The generalization of these results to arbitrary sew-saw models is also discussed.

  19. R Coronae Borealis Stars at Minimum Light -- UW Cen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kameswara Rao; B. E. Reddy; D. L. Lambert

    2004-09-09

    Two high-resolution optical spectra of the R Coronae Borealis star UW Cen in decline are discussed. A spectrum from mid-1992 when the star had faded by three magnitudes shows just a few differences with the spectrum at maximum light. The ubiquitous sharp emission lines seen in R CrB at a similar drop below maximum light are absent. In contrast, a spectrum from mid-2002 when the star was five magnitudes below maximum light shows an array of sharp emission lines and a collection of broad emission lines. Comparisons are made with spectra of R CrB obtained during the deep 1995-1996 minimum. The many common features are discussed in terms of a torus-jet geometry.

  20. Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

  1. Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

  2. Interference in Cellular Networks: The Minimum Membership Set Cover Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interference reduction by suitable assignment of transmission power levels to base stations. This task stations (hollow points) are assigned identical transmission power levels (dashed circles), client c, or mountains, and the base station transmis- sion power. Since due to legal or architectural constraints

  3. The Minimum of Solar Cycle 23: As Deep as It Could Be?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muoz-Jaramillo, Andrs; Longcope, Dana W; Tlatov, Andrey G; Pevtsov, Alexei A; Balmaceda, Laura A; DeLuca, Edward E; Martens, Petrus C H

    2015-01-01

    In this work we introduce a new way of binning sunspot group data with the purpose of better understanding the impact of the solar cycle on sunspot properties and how this defined the characteristics of the extended minimum of cycle 23. Our approach assumes that the statistical properties of sunspots are completely determined by the strength of the underlying large-scale field and have no additional time dependencies. We use the amplitude of the cycle at any given moment (something we refer to as activity level) as a proxy for the strength of this deep-seated magnetic field. We find that the sunspot size distribution is composed of two populations: one population of groups and active regions and a second population of pores and ephemeral regions. When fits are performed at periods of different activity level, only the statistical properties of the former population, the active regions, is found to vary. Finally, we study the relative contribution of each component (small-scale versus large-scale) to solar mag...

  4. Microneedle delivery for improved efficacy of antiretroviral and antibiotic drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stauber, Zachary Jason

    2012-01-01

    Two classes of drugs, antiretrovirals and antibiotics, could benefit greatly from delivery through microneedles. Microneedles (MN) offer an increase in efficacy for these drugs by providing delivery to the lymphatic system ...

  5. Efficacy of 45 lm/W Achieved in White OLED

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) successfully demonstrated an all phosphorescent white organic light emitting diode (WOLED) with a power efficacy of 45 lm/W at 1,000 cd/m2. This high-efficacy device was enabled by lowering the device operating voltage, increasing the outcoupling efficiency to ~40% from ~20%, and by incorporating highly efficient phosphorescent emitters that are capable of converting nearly all current passing through a WOLED into light.

  6. Efficacy of geoengineering to limit 21st century sea-level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    ; b Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, PL122, 96100 Rovaniemi, Finland; c Thule Institute, University of Oulu, PL3000, 90014 Oulun Yliopisto, Finland; d National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman aerosol injection into the strato- sphere, mirrors in space, afforestation, biochar, and bioenergy

  7. The Process of Fixing the British National Minimum Wage, 1997-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, William

    Minimum Wage, 1997-2007 William Brown Abstract The British National Minimum Wage was introduced in 1999 under the guidance of a Low Pay Commission constructed on a basis of social partnership. The paper analyses its conduct over its first... in The British Journal of Industrial Relations during 2009 All enquiries to William Brown, (william.brown@econ.cam.ac.uk), Faculty of Economics, Cambridge University 2 The Process of Fixing the British National Minimum Wage, 1997...

  8. Ion composition of the topside equatorial ionosphere during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, S.A.; Fejer, B.G. (Utah State Univ., Logan (United States)); Heelis, R.A.; Hanson, W.B. (Univ. of Texas, Richardson (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The authors have used observations from both the Bennett ion mass spectrometer and the retarding potential analyzer on board the Atmosphere Explorer E satellite to study the longitudinally averaged O{sup +}, H{sup +}, and He{sup +} concentrations from 150 to 1,100 km in the equatorial ionosphere during the 1975-1976 solar minimum. The results suggest that the ion mass spectrometer measurements need to be increased by a factor of 2.15 to agree with the densities from the retarding potential analyzer and with ground-based measurements. The peak H{sup +} concentrations are about 2.5 {times} 10{sup 4} cm{sup {minus}3} during the day and 10{sup 4} cm{sup {minus}3} at night and vary little with season. The O{sup +}/H{sup +} transition altitude lies between 750 and 825 km during the day and between 550 and 600 km at night. He{sup +} is a minor species at all altitudes; its concentration is highly variable with a maximum value of about 10{sup 3} cm{sup {minus}3} during equinox daytime.

  9. Optimal Design and Allocation of Electrified Vehicles and Dedicated Charging Infrastructure for Minimum Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    for Minimum Greenhouse Gas Emissions Submitted for Presentation at the 2011 Annual Meeting to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from personal transportation by shifting energy demand from

  10. IDAPA 37.03.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction and Use of Injection Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  11. Minimum Energy per Bit for Gaussian Broadcast Channels with Common Message and Cooperating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verd, Sergio

    by the Office of Naval Research under contract numbers W911NF-07-1-0185 and N00014-07-1-0555. The minimum energy

  12. Neuropharmacology and analgesia Comparative efficacy of 3 soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    efficacious than celecoxib in reducing both diabetic neuropathic pain and lipopolysaccharide induced

  13. Efficacy of oral altrenogest for postponing ovulation in the mare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murrell, Sandra Lee

    2004-09-30

    Reproductive Systems, Chino, CA). Each insemination dose contained a minimum of 500 million motile sperm cells extended at a 1:1 ratio with E-Z Mixin-?OF? or E-Z Mixin-?CST? (Animal...

  14. Quantitative Herd-level Evaluation of a Commercially Available Vaccine for Control of Salmonella in Dairy Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrow, Russell Lee

    2012-02-14

    Salmonella continues to threaten public health as well as negatively impact dairy producers on multiple levels. Efficacious solutions to control Salmonella among dairy cattle have long been sought to alleviate these ...

  15. Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Jun Li, Baochun--Distributed storage systems store redundant data to tolerate failures of storage nodes and lost data should be repaired when storage nodes fail. A class of MDS codes, called minimum- storage regenerating (MSR) codes

  16. Minimum Duration Outages in Rayleigh Fading Channels Jie Lai and Narayan B. Mandayam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandayam, Narayan

    Minimum Duration Outages in Rayleigh Fading Channels Jie Lai and Narayan B. Mandayam WINLAB@winlab.rutgers.edu Abstract Minimum duration outages have been introduced in [1, 2] for lognormal shadow fading where the durations of signal fades were considered in evaluating outages. In this pa per we develop and analyze

  17. A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unger, Ron

    in a simple model of protein folding. Results: Three possible evolutionary processes are explored. First can be achieved. The assumption that proteins fold to a conformation which is in the global minimum sequences that can find the global minimum [5]. In computer science terms this means that `protein folding

  18. Auroral Ionosphere During Solar Minimum in Very High Time Resolution , T. Turunen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulich, Thomas

    Auroral Ionosphere During Solar Minimum in Very High Time Resolution Th.Ulich1 , T. Turunen1 , E modes of typically one sounding per 15 minutes. Due to the ever-decreasing costs of digital storage deep solar activity minimum provided us with the very rare opportunity to observe the ionosphere in its

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS 1 Enforcing Minimum-Cost Multicast Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zongpeng

    . Index Terms-- Communication/Networking, Multicast, Graph Algorithms. I. INTRODUCTION THE classic min-costIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS 1 Enforcing Minimum-Cost Multicast Routing point incurring minimum total edge cost, through appropriate cost allocation and other economic measures

  20. Minimum-Energy Cooperative Routing in Wireless Networks with Channel Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaderi, Majid

    Minimum-Energy Cooperative Routing in Wireless Networks with Channel Variations Mostafa Dehghan as well. Index Terms Cooperative communication, minimum energy routing, variable wireless channels@ucalgary.ca #12;1 I. INTRODUCTION Energy efficient communication is a fundamental problem in wireless networks

  1. Reduction of Ultrametric Minimum Cost Spanning Tree Games to Cost Allocation Games on Rooted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIMS-1674 Reduction of Ultrametric Minimum Cost Spanning Tree Games to Cost Allocation Games Allocation Games on Rooted Trees Kazutoshi Ando and Shinji Kato June 2009 Abstract A minimum cost spanning tree game is called ultrametric if the cost function on the edges of the underlying network

  2. Reduction of Ultrametric Minimum Cost Spanning Tree Games to Cost Allocation Games on Rooted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIMS1674 Reduction of Ultrametric Minimum Cost Spanning Tree Games to Cost Allocation Games Allocation Games on Rooted Trees Kazutoshi Ando # and Shinji Kato + June 2009 Abstract A minimum cost spanning tree game is called ultrametric if the cost function on the edges of the underlying network

  3. Dynamic On-the-Fly Minimum Cost Benchmarking for Storing Generated Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    IEEEProof Dynamic On-the-Fly Minimum Cost Benchmarking for Storing Generated Scientific Datasets some generated datasets to save the storage cost but more computation cost is incurred for regeneration with efficient algorithms for dynamic yet practical on-the-fly minimum cost benchmarking of storing generated

  4. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The absolute theoretical minimum energies to produce liquid steel from idealized scrap (100% Fe) and ore (100% Fe2O3) are much lower than consumed in practice, as are the theoretical minimum energies to roll the steel into its final shape.

  5. Two-Point Boundary Value Problems for Curves: The Case of Minimum Free Energy Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skeel, Robert

    Two-Point Boundary Value Problems for Curves: The Case of Minimum Free Energy Paths corrected.S.A. Abstract The calculation of a minimum free energy path can be considered as a two-point boundary value box solvers. The second paragraph of Section 1 is corrected. Because free energy is defined in terms

  6. MATH MINOR REQUIREMENTS Minimum units required: 18 (2012-2014 catalogs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatkullin, Ibrahim

    MATH MINOR REQUIREMENTS Minimum units required: 18 (2012-2014 catalogs) (at least 3 units must be completed at UA) Minimum minor GPA: 2.00 Course Work Requirements: Complete both: o MATH 122A/B or 125: Calculus I o MATH 129: Calculus II Choose two courses from: o MATH 313: Introduction to Linear Algebra

  7. A Mathematical Theory for Vibrational Levels Associated with Hydrogen Bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the nuclear variables near a local minimum. In this paper and in a future one [4], we propose an alternative propose an alternative to the usual timeindependent BornOppenheimer ap- proximation that is specifically, the electron energy level surface is also assumed to behave asymptotically like a quadratic function

  8. Solar wind turbulence at 0.72 AU and solar minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Munteanu, Costel; Zhang, Tielong; Bruno, Roberto; Kovacs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We investigate Venus Express (VEX) observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of the solar cycle 24. The Power Spectral Densities (PSD) of the magnetic field components have been computed for the time intervals that satisfy data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow defined for speeds larger and respectively smaller than 450 km/s. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast than for the slow wind. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005-0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is -1.60 for fast solar wind and -1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is ...

  9. Adaptable Chip-Level Microfluidic Packaging for a Micro-Scale Gas Chromatograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Adaptable Chip-Level Microfluidic Packaging for a Micro-Scale Gas Chromatograph Nathan Ward1 the microfluidic package with non-sorbent epoxy. The stability and efficacy of the integrated detector cell. Keywords-microfluidics; chip-level packaging; GC; chemiresistor array I. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATIONS

  10. Quantifying the impact of decay in bed-net efficacy on malaria transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Zhao, Ruijun; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal

    2014-08-23

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are at the forefront of malaria control programs and even though the percentage of households in sub-Saharan Africa that owned nets increased from 3% in 2000 to 53% in 2012, many children continue to die from malaria. The potential impact of ITNs on reducing malaria transmission is limited due to inconsistent or improper use, as well as physical decay in effectiveness. Most mathematical models for malaria transmission have assumed a fixed effectiveness rate for bed-nets, which can overestimate the impact of nets on malaria control. We develop a model for malaria spread that captures the decrease in ITN effectiveness due to physical and chemical decay, as well as human behavior as a function of time. We perform uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to identify and rank parameters that play a critical role in malaria transmission. These analyses show that the basic reproduction number R0, and the infectious human population are most sensitive to bed-net coverage and the biting rate of mosquitoes. Our results show the existence of a backward bifurcation for the case in which ITN efficacy is constant over time, which occurs for some range of parameters and is characterized by high malaria mortality in humans. This result implies that bringing R0 to less than one is not enough for malaria elimination but rather additional efforts will be necessary to control the disease. For the case in which ITN efficacy decays over time, we determine coverage levels required to control malaria for different ITN efficacies and demonstrate that ITNs with longer useful lifespans perform better in malaria control. We conclude that malaria control programs should focus on increasing bed-net coverage, which can be achieved by enhancing malaria education and increasing bed-net distribution in malaria endemic regions.

  11. Quantifying the impact of decay in bed-net efficacy on malaria transmission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Zhao, Ruijun; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal

    2014-08-23

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are at the forefront of malaria control programs and even though the percentage of households in sub-Saharan Africa that owned nets increased from 3% in 2000 to 53% in 2012, many children continue to die from malaria. The potential impact of ITNs on reducing malaria transmission is limited due to inconsistent or improper use, as well as physical decay in effectiveness. Most mathematical models for malaria transmission have assumed a fixed effectiveness rate for bed-nets, which can overestimate the impact of nets on malaria control. We develop a model for malaria spread that captures the decrease inmoreITN effectiveness due to physical and chemical decay, as well as human behavior as a function of time. We perform uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to identify and rank parameters that play a critical role in malaria transmission. These analyses show that the basic reproduction number R0, and the infectious human population are most sensitive to bed-net coverage and the biting rate of mosquitoes. Our results show the existence of a backward bifurcation for the case in which ITN efficacy is constant over time, which occurs for some range of parameters and is characterized by high malaria mortality in humans. This result implies that bringing R0 to less than one is not enough for malaria elimination but rather additional efforts will be necessary to control the disease. For the case in which ITN efficacy decays over time, we determine coverage levels required to control malaria for different ITN efficacies and demonstrate that ITNs with longer useful lifespans perform better in malaria control. We conclude that malaria control programs should focus on increasing bed-net coverage, which can be achieved by enhancing malaria education and increasing bed-net distribution in malaria endemic regions.less

  12. Oscillations above sunspots from the temperature minimum to the corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobanov, N I; Kolobov, D Y

    2013-01-01

    Context. An analysis of the oscillations above sunspots was carried out using simultaneous ground-based and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations (SiI 10827A, HeI 10830A, FeI 6173A, 1700A, HeII 304A, FeIX 171A). Aims. Investigation of the spatial distribution of oscillation power in the frequency range 1-8 mHz for the different height levels of the solar atmosphere. Measuring the time lags between the oscillations at the different layers. Methods. We used frequency filtration of the intensity and Doppler velocity variations with Morlet wavelet to trace the wave propagation from the photosphere to the chromosphere and the corona. Results. The 15 min oscillations are concentrated near the outer penumbra in the upper photosphere (1700 A), forming a ring, that expands in the transition zone. These oscillations propagate upward and reach the corona level, where their spatial distribution resembles a fan structure. The spatial distribution of the 5 min oscillation power looks like a circle-shape structure m...

  13. Formalizing Concepts for Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universitt

    Formalizing Concepts for Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred.lohrmann,manfred.reichert}@uni-ulm.de Abstract. In business process design, business objective models can ful- fill the role of formal business process management concepts yet. Moreover, process models are currently not sufficiently

  14. Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jinkyu

    2013-01-01

    Comparison of energy efficiency, luminous efficacy (lumen/Comparison of energy efficiency, luminous efficacy (lumen/sources [4, 5]. Energy efficiency Luminous efficacy (Lumen/

  15. A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen Computer Graphics Lab, Stanford University {jedavis, xcchen}@graphics.stanford.edu Abstract Laser range scanners reduce the costs associated with calibration. 1 Introduction Laser triangulation scanners

  16. Distinguishing mixed quantum states: Minimum-error discrimination versus optimum unambiguous discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distinguishing mixed quantum states: Minimum-error discrimination versus optimum unambiguous discrimination Ulrike Herzog1, * and Jnos A. Bergou2 1 Institut fr Physik, Humboldt-Universitt zu Berlin 2004) We consider two different optimized measurement strategies for the discrimination

  17. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hallam, Steven

    2011-04-26

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  18. Fast Algorithms for Regularized Minimum Norm Solutions to Inverse Problems Irina F. Gorodnitsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorodnitsky, Irina

    Fast Algorithms for Regularized Minimum Norm Solutions to Inverse Problems Irina F. Gorodnitsky- tional algorithms for solving regularized inverse problems. The computationaladvantages are obtained. The algorithms imple- ment two common regularizationprocedures, Tikhonov reg- ularization and Truncated Singular

  19. Minimum Cost Path Problem for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feb 4, 2014 ... Minimum Cost Path Problem for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles. Okan Arslan ( okan.arslan ***at*** bilkent.edu.tr) Baris Yildiz (baris.yildiz...

  20. Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 2. Three-Product Petlyuk Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway We show that the minimum energy requirement algebraic procedure, via expressions for pinch zone compositions at the connection points as functions

  1. Shape-Memory Transformations of NiTi: Minimum-Energy Pathways...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on December 24, 2015 Title: Shape-Memory Transformations of NiTi: Minimum-Energy Pathways between Austenite,...

  2. r-shrink: A Heuristic for Improving Minimum Power Broadcast Trees in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arabshahi, Payman

    network with an identified source node, the minimum power broad- cast (MPB) problem in wireless networks to better accommodate the nodes, which have been disconnected from the tree as a result of the shrinkage

  3. Energy Conservation and the Environment - Designing for Cost Savings and Minimum Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnnie, D. H., Jr.; Klooster, H. J.; Nagy, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    AND THE ENVIRONMENT DESIGNING FOR COST SAVINGS AND MINIMUM EMISSIONS Daniel H. Johnnie, Jr. H. J. Klooster John F. Nagy Fluor Engineers, Inc. Advanced Tec'hnology Division Irvine, California ABSTRACT Upgrading existing facilities for is offering technical...

  4. Modifed Minimum Classification Error Learning and Its Application to Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimodaira, Hiroshi; Rokui, Jun; Nakai, Mitsuru

    A novel method to improve the generalization performance of the Minimum Classification Error (MCE) / Generalized Probabilistic Descent (GPD) learning is proposed. The MCE/GPD learning proposed by Juang and Katagiri in 1992 ...

  5. 322 / JOURNAL OF IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2000 COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN OF MINIMUM COST IRRIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    OF MINIMUM COST IRRIGATION CANAL SECTIONS By Prabhata K. Swamee,1 Govinda C. Mishra,2 and Bhagu R. Chahar3

  6. Introducing Minimum Fisher Regularisation Tomography to Bolometric and Soft X-ray Diagnostic Systems of the COMPASS Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introducing Minimum Fisher Regularisation Tomography to Bolometric and Soft X-ray Diagnostic Systems of the COMPASS Tokamak

  7. A study of the minimum meniscus radius as a function of vapor temperature using heat pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonnier, Ronald James

    1973-01-01

    A STUDY OF THE MINIMUM MENISCUS RADIUS AS A FUNCTION OF VAPOR TEMPERATURE USING HEAT PIPES A Thesis by RONALD JAMES SONNIER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A STUDY OF THE MINIMUM MENISCUS RADIUS AS A FUNCTION OF VAPOR TEMPERATURE USING HEAT PIPES A Thesis by RONALD JAMES SONNIER Approved as to style and content by: Chairman C ittee...

  8. An Investigation of the Effect of After-Action Reviews on Teams' Performance-Efficacy Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schurig, Ira

    2012-07-16

    Performance and efficacy are reciprocally causal; however, the effect of performance on subsequent perceptions of efficacy has received little attention, especially in the context of team training. In addition, the moderating effect of feedback...

  9. Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LED's for Efficacious Generation of White Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-09-30

    1) We studied phosphors for near-UV (nUV) LED application as an alternative to blue LEDs currently being used in SSL systems. We have shown that nUV light sources could be very efficient at high current and will have significantly less binning at both the chip and phosphor levels. We identified phosphor blends that could yield 4100K lamps with a CRI of approximately 80 and LPWnUV,opt equal to 179 for the best performing phosphor blend. Considering the fact that the lamps were not optimized for light coupling, the results are quite impressive. The main bottleneck is an optimum blue phosphor with a peak near 440 nm with a full width half maximum of about 25 nm and a quantum efficiency of >95%. Unfortunately, that may be a very difficult task when we want to excite a phosphor at ~400 nm with a very small margin for Stokes shift. Another way is to have all the phosphors in the blend having the excitation peak at 400 nm or slightly shorter wavelength. This could lead to a white light source with no body color and optimum efficacy due to no self-absorption effects by phosphors in the blend. This is even harder than finding an ideal blue phosphor, but not necessarily impossible. 2) With the phosphor blends identified, light sources using nUV LEDs at high current could be designed with comparable efficacy to those using blue LEDs. It will allow us to design light sources with multiple wattages using the same chips and phosphor blends simply by varying the input current. In the case of blue LEDs, this is not currently possible because varying the current will lower the efficacy at high current and alter the color point. With improvement of phosphor blends, control over CRI could improve. Less binning at the chip level and also at the phosphor blend level could reduce the cost of SSL light sources. 3) This study provided a deeper understanding of phosphor characteristics needed for LEDs in general and nUV LEDs in particular. Two students received Ph.D. degrees and three undergraduates participated in this work. Two of the undergraduate students are now in graduate school. The results were widely disseminated 20 archival journal publications (published, accepted or in preparation) and three conference proceedings resulted. The students presented their work at 11 different national/international conferences (32 oral or poster presentations) and the PIs delivered 12 invited, keynote or plenary lectures.

  10. On-the-fly string method for minimum free energy paths calculation Luca Maragliano *, Eric Vanden-Eijnden 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    On-the-fly string method for minimum free energy paths calculation Luca Maragliano *, Eric Vanden and simplified version of the string method in collective variables for computing minimum free energy paths) the minimum free energy path (MFEP) plays an important role. Given a set of collective variables to describe

  11. Neutronics Analyses of the Minimum Original HEU TREAT Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontogeorgakos, D.; Connaway, H.; Yesilyurt, G.; Wright, A.

    2014-04-01

    This work was performed to support the feasibility study on the potential conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory from the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by the GTRI Reactor Conversion staff at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of this study was to validate the MCNP model of the TREAT reactor with the well-documented measurements which were taken during the start-up and early operation of TREAT. Furthermore, the effect of carbon graphitization was also addressed. The graphitization level was assumed to be 100% (ANL/GTRI/TM-13/4). For this purpose, a set of experiments was chosen to validate the TREAT MCNP model, involving the approach to criticality procedure, in-core neutron flux measurements with foils, and isothermal temperature coefficient and temperature distribution measurements. The results of this study extended the knowledge base for the TREAT MCNP calculations and established the credibility of the MCNP model to be used in the core conversion feasibility analysis.

  12. SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2013-10-01

    An LED lamp or luminaire can generally be found that matches or exceeds the efficacy of benchmark technologies in a given product category, and LED products continue to expand into ever-higher lumen output niches. However, the price premium for LED continues to pose a barrier to adoption in many applications, in spite of expected savings from reduced energy use and maintenance. Other factorssuch as dimmability and quality of lightcan also present challenges. The appropriate type, timing, and magnitude of energy efficiency activities will vary from organization to organization based on local variables and the method of evaluation. A number of factors merit consideration when prioritizing activities for development. Category-specific projections for pricing and efficacy are provided herein to assist in efficiency program planning efforts.

  13. Low-level waste feed staging plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Certa, P.J.; Grams, W.H.; McConville, C.M.; L. W. Shelton, L.W.; Slaathaug, E.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    The `Preliminary Low-Level Waste Feed Staging Plan` was updated to reflect the latest requirement in the Tank Waste Remediation Privatization Request for Proposals (RFP) and amendments. The updated plan develops the sequence and transfer schedule for retrieval of DST supernate by the management and integration contractor and delivery of the staged supernate to the private low-activity waste contractors for treatment. Two DSTs are allocated as intermediate staging tanks. A transfer system conflict analysis provides part of the basis for determining transfer system upgrade requirements to support both low-activity and high-level waste feed delivery. The intermediate staging tank architecture and retrieval system equipment are provided as a planning basis until design requirements documents are prepared. The actions needed to successfully implement the plan are identified. These include resolution of safety issues and changes to the feed envelope limits, minimum order quantities, and desired batch sizes.

  14. Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-07-01

    This study analyzes the financial impacts on consumers of minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances that could be implemented in 13 major economies around the world. We use the Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), to analyze various appliance efficiency target levels to estimate the net present value (NPV) of policies designed to provide maximum energy savings while not penalizing consumers financially. These policies constitute what we call the cost-effective potential (CEP) scenario. The CEP scenario is designed to answer the question: How high can we raise the efficiency bar in mandatory programs while still saving consumers money?

  15. CLIMATICALLY-ACTIVE GASES IN THE EASTERN BOUNDARY UPWELLING AND OXYGEN MINIMUM ZONE (OMZ) SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    . In this contribution we introduce Index Terms-- Air-Sea Interactions, Fluxes, Green House Gases, Satellite Retrieval) contribute very significantly to the gas exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, notably with respect (Oxygen Minimum Zone) contribute very significantly to the gas exchange between the ocean

  16. Minimum Movement Matters: Impact of Robot-Mounted Cameras on Social Telepresence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakanishi, Hideyuki

    Minimum Movement Matters: Impact of Robot-Mounted Cameras on Social Telepresence Hideyuki Nakanishi-backward movement of the camera significantly contributed to social telepresence, while rotation did not. We also commercially available. This paper shows that movement of these robots enhances distant people's presence

  17. Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial Chang Woo Kang to derive sizing rules for buffered chains, which optimize the overall energy-delay product. Categories result in a poor solution in terms of the energy-delay product. The focus of this work is on multi

  18. A steady-state L-mode tokamak fusion reactor : large scale and minimum scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark W. (Mark Wilbert)

    2010-01-01

    We perform extensive analysis on the physics of L-mode tokamak fusion reactors to identify (1) a favorable parameter space for a large scale steady-state reactor and (2) an operating point for a minimum scale steady-state ...

  19. Requirements for the MINOR in Environmental Science Five courses required. Total credits = minimum of 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Urban Geography GEO-SCI 372 Urban Issues GEO-SCI 380 Political Geography GEO-SCI 420 Political Ecology Environmental Policy REGIONPL 558 Issues in Environmental Mgt RESECON 471Benefit-Cost Analysis RESECON 472Requirements for the MINOR in Environmental Science Five courses required. Total credits = minimum

  20. Nonparametric Assessment of Contamination in Multivariate Data Using Minimum Volume Sets and FDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Clayton

    Nonparametric Assessment of Contamination in Multivariate Data Using Minimum Volume Sets and FDR `contaminated' instances. However, often the nature of even the nominal patterns in the data are unknown with false discovery rate prin- ciples, in the context of contaminated data, is new. Moreover, estimation

  1. The persistence of solar activity indicators and the descent of the Sun into Maunder Minimum conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    as the Maunder Minimum (MM). This raises questions about the persistence and predictability of solar activity. We study the autocorrelation functions and predictability R2 L(t) of solar indices, particularly group prediction by Svalgaard et al. [2005] from the solar polar fields but is significantly lower than NOAA's most

  2. eVADER: A Perceptual Approach to Finding Minimum Warning Sound Requirements for Quiet Cars.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    , such as hybrid and electric vehicles, to pedestrians has become an important issue for public policy [1], car a localization paradigm to test the detectability of hybrid and internal combustion cars by measuring listenereVADER: A Perceptual Approach to Finding Minimum Warning Sound Requirements for Quiet Cars. Ryan

  3. Boundaries of the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone shaped by coherent mesoscale dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettencourt, Joo H; Garca, Emilio Hernndez; Montes, Ivonne; Sudre, Jol; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurlien; Garon, Vronique

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen in sea water is a major factor affecting marine habitats and biogeochemical cycles. Oceanic zones with oxygen deficits represent significant portions of the area and volume of the oceans and are thought to be expanding. The Peruvian oxygen minimum zone is one of the most pronounced and lies in a region of strong mesoscale activity in the form of vortices and frontal regions, whose effect in the dynamics of the oxygen minimum zone is largely unknown. Here, we study this issue from a modeling approach and a Lagrangian point of view, using a coupled physical-biogeochemical simulation of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone and finite-size Lyapunov exponent fields to understand the link between mesoscale dynamics and oxygen variations. Our results show that, at depths between 380 and 600 meters, mesoscale structures have a relevant dual role. First, their mean positions and paths delimit and maintain the oxygen minimum zone boundaries. Second, their high frequency fluctuations entrain oxygen across t...

  4. Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fazel, Maryam

    Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization Benjamin theory and practice. A recent heuristic introduced in [9] minimizes the nuclear norm over the affine subset. For an m n matrix X, the nuclear norm is equal to the sum of the singular values of X X := r i

  5. String method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    York University, New York, New York 10012 Giovanni Ciccottid INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica in the free energy. Provided that the number of collective variables is large enough, the new techniqueString method in collective variables: Minimum free energy paths and isocommittor surfaces Luca

  6. Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Maleq

    1 Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc Networks and energy efficient for being practical. Motivated by these considerations, we study the performance of a class of simple and local algorithms called Nearest Neighbor Tree (NNT) algorithms for energy

  7. A MEASUREMENT OF THE PROTON SPECTRUM AT 1 AU NEAR SOLAR MINIMUM WITH THE CAPRICE EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    OG 5.2.1 A MEASUREMENT OF THE PROTON SPECTRUM AT 1 AU NEAR SOLAR MINIMUM WITH THE CAPRICELaboratori Nazionali INFN, Frascati, Italy 5NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, USA 6New Mexico the production and acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays, as well as the solar modulation effect

  8. Approximating Minimum-Power Edge-Covers and 2, 3-Connectivity Guy Kortsarz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortsarz, Guy

    than edge-connectivity, as it models stations failures. Such power minimization problems were vastlyApproximating Minimum-Power Edge-Covers and 2, 3-Connectivity Guy Kortsarz Rutgers University a graph with edge costs, the power of a node is the maximum cost of an edge leaving it, and the power

  9. MINIMUM COST STRATEGIES FOR SEQUESTERING CARBON IN FORESTS Darius M. Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    MINIMUM COST STRATEGIES FOR SEQUESTERING CARBON IN FORESTS Darius M. Adams Ralph J. Alig Bruce A the costs of meeting explicit targets for increments of carbon sequestered in forests when both forest management decisions and the area of forests can be varied. Costs are estimated as welfare losses in markets

  10. A minimum-reaction-flux solution to master-equation models of protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    A minimum-reaction-flux solution to master-equation models of protein folding Huan-Xiang Zhoua; published online 20 May 2008 Master equations are widely used for modeling protein folding. Here- ceptual and quantitative models for protein folding.115 In such models, the conformational space

  11. Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodny, Avinoam

    Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints Yoni in a fast circuit by the same factor does not yield an energy-efficient design, and we characterize efficient. A design implementation is considered to be energy efficient when it has the highest performance

  12. Approximating the minimum clique cover and other hard problems in subtree filament graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Lorna

    Approximating the minimum clique cover and other hard problems in subtree filament graphs J. Mark Keil Lorna Stewart March 20, 2006 Abstract Subtree filament graphs are the intersection graphs of subtree filaments in a tree. This class of graphs contains subtree overlap graphs, interval filament

  13. Design methodology for tracking certain and uncertain non-minimum phase systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVoucalla, George David

    1997-01-01

    A design methodology is developed for obtaining tracking controllers for non-minimum phase systems. The discussion centers around a solution for the error equation E(s) = [1- H(s)] Yd(S)'Tracking error is eliminated by making [1-H(s)] orthogonal...

  14. SOHO-23: Understanding a Peculiar Solar Minimum ASP Conference Series, Vol. 428, c 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . Cranmer, J. Todd Hoeksema, and John L. Kohl, eds. The Solar Microwave Flux and the Sunspot Number L, it has been showing unusual behavior in the Cycle 23/24 minimum. The origins of the solar microwave flux), straddling the F10.7 frequency (2.8 GHz) and encompassing the gyroresonance signature in the solar microwave

  15. Jet Interaction and the Influence of a Minimum Phase Speed Bound on the Propagation of Eddies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    Jet Interaction and the Influence of a Minimum Phase Speed Bound on the Propagation of Eddies and analogs of the midlatitude eddy-driven jet and the subtropical jet is investigated in a barotropic b-plane model. In the model the subtropical jet is generated by a relaxation process and the eddy-driven jet

  16. Bachelor of Arts with Major in Geology: Earth and Space Science (Minimum of 120 credits required)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Bachelor of Arts with Major in Geology: Earth and Space Science (Minimum of 120 credits required) The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Geology (Earth Science) is designed for students planning professional 2053 & 2048L 5 College Algebra MAC 1105 3 Introductory Statistics STA 2023 3 Total 19 Geology (Earth

  17. ASHRAE Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product categories. Download the tables below to incorporate FEMP and ENERGY STAR purchasing requirements into federal product acquisition documents.

  18. Rules Establishing Minimum Standards Relating to Location, Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules is to protect public health and the environment by establishing minimum standards for the proper location, design, construction and maintenance of onsite wastewater...

  19. Teaching Efficacy and Context: Integrating Social Justice Content into Social Work Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funge, Simon

    2012-01-01

    and (c) efficacy in classroom management (e.g. , controllingtechnology usage, classroom management, interpersonalitems related to classroom management, and one of eight

  20. The Enterprise Level Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lean Advancement Initiative

    2000-01-01

    The Enterprise Level Roadmap is part of a Transition-To-Lean Guide, a three volume set of materials designed to help a user navigate through the Roadmap at increasingly deeper levels of detail.

  1. A critical concern for embedded sys-tems is the need to deliver high levels of per-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    proces- sor utilization and allows a corresponding reduction in supply voltage. Because dynam- ic energy voltage scaling (DVS).1 Lowering clock frequency to the minimum required level exploits periods of low to run at multiple fre- quency and voltage levels is challenging and requires characterizing

  2. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  3. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  4. Invasive interactions of Monomorium minimum (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) infected with Thelohania solenopsae (Microsporida: Thelohaniidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keck, Molly Elizabeth

    2006-08-16

    minimum (Buckley), and S. invicta colonies infected with T. solenopsae and S. invicta colonies free of parasites. This study utilized S. invicta colonies of 100, 300, 600, 800, and 1000 workers to determine the ability of 1000 M. minimum workers to invade...

  5. Minimum-Risk Path Finding by an Adaptive Amoebal Network Toshiyuki Nakagaki,1,2,* Makoto Iima,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Showalter, Kenneth

    Minimum-Risk Path Finding by an Adaptive Amoebal Network Toshiyuki Nakagaki,1,2,* Makoto Iima,1 is formed that connects the food sources through the shortest route. When the light- avoiding organism risk as the experimentally measurable rate of light-avoiding movement, the minimum-risk path

  6. Design Considerations for an On-Demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Timothy X.

    1 Design Considerations for an On-Demand Minimum Energy Routing Protocol for a Wireless Ad Hoc at Boulder Boulder, CO-80309 Abstract--A minimum energy routing protocol reduces the energy con- sumption of energy to get the packets to their destination. This paper identifies the necessary features of an on

  7. How Much Is Our Fairness Worth? The Effect of Raising Stakes on Offers by Proposers and Minimum Acceptable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flegr, Jaroslav

    How Much Is Our Fairness Worth? The Effect of Raising Stakes on Offers by Proposers and Minimum Acceptable Offers in Dictator and Ultimatum Games Julie Novakova*, Jaroslav Flegr Biology Department the amount at stake and the minimum acceptable offer in the Ultimatum Game and the proposed shares in both

  8. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Possible impacts of a future Grand Solar Minimum1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maycock, Amanda

    climate system. It follows that changes in solar activity have the potential to27 influence global surface century known as the Maunder min-8 imum. The impact of returning to such a `grand solar minimum' on global Solar Minimum1 on surface climate2 A. C. Maycock 1 , S. Ineson 2 , L. J. Gray 34 , A. A. Scaife 2 and M

  9. The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-02-28

    Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

  10. THE TURBULENT CASCADE AND PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Joshua.Stawarz@Colorado.edu

    2012-08-01

    The recently protracted solar minimum provided years of interplanetary data that were largely absent in any association with observed large-scale transient behavior on the Sun. With large-scale shear at 1 AU generally isolated to corotating interaction regions, it is reasonable to ask whether the solar wind is significantly turbulent at this time. We perform a series of third-moment analyses using data from the Advanced Composition Explorer. We show that the solar wind at 1 AU is just as turbulent as at any other time in the solar cycle. Specifically, the turbulent cascade of energy scales in the same manner proportional to the product of wind speed and temperature. Energy cascade rates during solar minimum average a factor of 2-4 higher than during solar maximum, but we contend that this is likely the result of having a different admixture of high-latitude sources.

  11. Communication: Minimum in the thermal conductivity of supercooled water: A computer simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresme, F., E-mail: f.bresme@imperial.ac.uk [Chemical Physics Section, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom and Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Biddle, J. W.; Sengers, J. V.; Anisimov, M. A. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    We report the results of a computer simulation study of the thermodynamic properties and the thermal conductivity of supercooled water as a function of pressure and temperature using the TIP4P-2005 water model. The thermodynamic properties can be represented by a two-structure equation of state consistent with the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the supercooled region. Our simulations confirm the presence of a minimum in the thermal conductivity, not only at atmospheric pressure, as previously found for the TIP5P water model, but also at elevated pressures. This anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity of supercooled water appears to be related to the maximum of the isothermal compressibility or the minimum of the speed of sound. However, the magnitudes of the simulated thermal conductivities are sensitive to the water model adopted and appear to be significantly larger than the experimental thermal conductivities of real water at low temperatures.

  12. An algebraic approach to the minimum-cost multi-impulse orbit transfer problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Avendano; Vernica Martn-Molina; Jorge Martn-Morales; Jorge Ortigas-Galindo

    2015-08-10

    We present a purely algebraic formulation (i.e. polynomial equations only) of the minimum-cost multi-impulse orbit transfer problem without time constraints, while keeping all the variables with a precise physical meaning. We apply general algebraic techniques to solve these equations (resultants, Gr\\"obner bases, etc.) in several situations of practical interest of different degrees of generality. For instance, we provide a proof of the optimality of the Hohmann transfer for the minimum fuel 2-impulse circular to circular orbit transfer problem, and we provide a general formula for the optimal 2-impulse in-plane transfer between two rotated elliptical orbits under a mild symmetry assumption on the two points where the impulses are applied (which we conjecture that can be removed).

  13. Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael

    2012-07-01

    As part of the ongoing effort to estimate the foreseeable impacts of aggressive minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) programs in the worlds major economies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a scenario to analyze the technical potential of MEPS in 13 major economies around the world1 . The best available technology (BAT) scenario seeks to determine the maximum potential savings that would result from diffusion of the most efficient available technologies in these major economies.

  14. A methodology for predicting minimum travel paths using real-time traffic network data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chang

    1991-01-01

    A METHODOLOGY FOR PREDICTING MINIMUM TRAVEL PATHS USING REAL-TIME TRAFFIC NETWORK DATA A Thesis by Chang Liu Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillrnent of the requirements for the degree... operations. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express special thanks to Dr. Daniel B. Fambro for his guidance, assistance, and patience from the initial stage of my graduate career at Texas A&M University through the final stage of the research documented...

  15. LIGHT SUBGRAPHS IN PLANAR GRAPHS OF MINIMUM DEGREE 4 AND EDGE-DEGREE 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohar, Bojan

    LIGHT SUBGRAPHS IN PLANAR GRAPHS OF MINIMUM DEGREE 4 AND EDGE-DEGREE 9 B. MOHAR , R. SKREKOVSKI vertices of degree 4 are adjacent. A graph H is light in G if there is a constant w such that every graph is w. Then we also write w(H) w. It is proved that the cycle Cs is light if and only if 3 s 6, where

  16. A critical concern for embedded sys tems is the need to deliver high levels of per

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudge, Trevor

    power through dynamic voltage scaling (DVS). 1 Lowering clock frequency to the minimum required level exploits periods of low proces sor utilization and allows a corresponding reduction in supply voltage. Because dynam ic energy scales quadratically with supply volt age, DVS can significantly reduce

  17. Solid phase stability of a double-minimum interaction potential system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suematsu, Ayumi; Yoshimori, Akira, E-mail: a.yoshimori@cmt.phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Saiki, Masafumi; Matsui, Jun [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Odagaki, Takashi [School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan)

    2014-06-28

    We study phase stability of a system with double-minimum interaction potential in a wide range of parameters by a thermodynamic perturbation theory. The present double-minimum potential is the Lennard-Jones-Gauss potential, which has a Gaussian pocket as well as a standard Lennard-Jones minimum. As a function of the depth and position of the Gaussian pocket in the potential, we determine the coexistence pressure of crystals (fcc and bcc). We show that the fcc crystallizes even at zero pressure when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the first or third nearest neighbor site of the fcc crystal. The bcc crystal is more stable than the fcc crystal when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the second nearest neighbor sites of the bcc crystal. The stable crystal structure is determined by the position of the Gaussian pocket. These results show that we can control the stability of the solid phase by tuning the potential function.

  18. Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

    2008-05-12

    To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more insights into the flare process than the free energy above the potential field state.

  19. Development of High Efficacy, Low Cost Phosphorescent Oled Lightning Luminaire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Hack

    2010-07-09

    In this two year program, UDC together with Armstrong World Industries, Professor Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan) and Professor Mark Thompson (University of Southern California) planned to develop and deliver high efficiency OLED lighting luminaires as part of an integrated ceiling illumination system that exceed the Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 performance projections. Specifically the UDC team in 2010 delivered two prototype OLED ceiling illumination systems, each consisting of four individual OLED lighting panels on glass integrated into Armstrong's novel TechZone open architecture ceiling systems, at an overall system efficacy of 51 lm/W, a CRI = 85 and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 10,000 hours. This accomplishment represents a 50% increase in luminaire efficacy and a factor of two in lifetime over that outlined in the solicitation. In addition, the team has also delivered one 15cm x 15cm lighting panel fabricated on a flexible metal foil substrate, demonstrating the possibility using OLEDs in a range of form factors. During this program, our Team has pursued the commercialization of these OLED based ceiling luminaires, with a goal to launch commercial products within the next three years. We have proven that our team is ideally suited to develop these highly novel and efficient solid state lighting luminaires, having both the technical experience and commercial strategy to leverage work performed under this contract. Our calculations show that the success of our program could lead to energy savings of more than 0.5 quads or 8 MMTC (million metric tons of carbon) per year by 2016.

  20. 1 Evaluating Efficacy of an Environmental Policy to Prevent Biological 2 Invasions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    1 Evaluating Efficacy of an Environmental Policy to Prevent Biological 2 Invasions 3 Sarah A-6 Evaluating the efficacy of 39 any environmental policy, such as regulations aimed at preventing 40 regulatory environment and 42 inadequate funding.5,7 Measuring the success of an environmental 43 policy

  1. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  2. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  3. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  4. Measuring the Efficacy of Leaders to Assess Information and Make Decisions in a Crisis: The C-LEAD Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittinsky, Todd L.

    2009-07-01

    Based on literature and expert interviews, we developed the Crisis Leader Efficacy in Assessing and Deciding scale (C-LEAD) to capture the efficacy of leaders to assess information and make decisions in a public health and ...

  5. A Mandated Minimum Competency Testing Program and Its Impact on Learning Disabled Students: Curricular Validity and Comparative Performances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyen, Edward L.; Alley, Gordon R.; Scannell, Dale P.; Harnden, G. Mack; Miller, Kelly F.

    1982-06-01

    In this study, LD specialists, regular class teachers, and parents of LD students judged that the objectives of the Kansas Minimum Competency Specifications prescribed for nonhandicapped students were applicable to LD ...

  6. Metrika, Volume 27, 1980, page 43-70. 9 Vienna. The Minimum Distance Method of Testing 1 )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, David

    on leavefrom Yale University,at the Ruhr-UniversitiitBochum. 2) David Pollard, YaleUniversity, Department of Statistics Box 2179 YaleStation, New Haven, Conneticut 06520, U.S.A. #12;44 D. Pollard minimum distance

  7. IEEETRANSACITONSON INFORMATIONTHEORY,VOL. 1~426,NO. 3, MAY 1980 305 Ternary Codes of Minimum Weight 6 and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane, Neil J. A.

    , Inc., Room 2C-363, Murray Hill, NJ 07974. H. N. Ward is with the Mathematics Department, University. SLOANE, FELLOW, IEEE, AND HAROLD N. WARD Abstmct-Self-orthogonal ternary codes of minimum weight 3 may

  8. The effect of sand grain size distribution on the minimum oil saturation necessary to support in-situ combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, William Marvin

    1973-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF SAND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON THE MINIMUM OIL SATURATION NECESSARY TO SUPPORT IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by WILLIAM MARVIN DANIEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Petroleum. Engineering THE EFFECT OF SAND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON THE MINIMUM OIL SATURATION NECESSARY TO SUPPORT IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by WILLIAM MARVIN DANIEL Approved...

  9. MULTI-FLUID MODEL OF A STREAMER AT SOLAR MINIMUM AND COMPARISON WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, Leon [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Abbo, Lucia; Giordano, Silvio, E-mail: Leon.Ofman@nasa.gov [INAF Astronomical Observatory of Turin (Italy)

    2011-06-10

    We present the results of a time-dependent 2.5-dimensional three-fluid magnetohydrodynamic model of the coronal streamer belt, which is compared with the slow solar wind plasma parameters obtained in the extended corona by the UV spectroscopic data from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board SOHO during the past minimum of solar activity (Carrington Rotation 1913). Our previous three-fluid streamer model has been improved by considering the solar magnetic field configuration relevant for solar minimum conditions, and preferential heating for O{sup 5+} ions. The model was run until a fully self-consistent streamer solution was obtained in the quasi-steady state. The plasma parameters from the multi-fluid model were used to compute the expected UV observables from H I Ly{alpha} 1216 A and O VI 1032 A spectral lines, and the results were compared in detail with the UVCS measurements. A good agreement between the model and the data was found. The results of the study provide insight into the acceleration and heating of the multi-ion slow solar wind.

  10. Minimum separation distances for natural gas pipeline and boilers in the 300 area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Graham, T.M.

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing actions to reduce energy expenditures and improve energy system reliability at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. These actions include replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing a new natural gas distribution system to provide a fuel source for many of these units, and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. The individual heating units will include steam boilers that are to be housed in individual annex buildings located at some distance away from nearby 300 Area nuclear facilities. This analysis develops the basis for siting the package boilers and natural gas distribution systems to be used to supply steam to 300 Area nuclear facilities. The effects of four potential fire and explosion scenarios involving the boiler and natural gas pipeline were quantified to determine minimum separation distances that would reduce the risks to nearby nuclear facilities. The resulting minimum separation distances are shown in Table ES.1.

  11. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

  12. Influence of Agricultural Dual Credit on Student College Readiness Self-Efficacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Alanna L.

    2013-07-12

    The purpose of this correlational and descriptive study was to examine the influence of an agricultural dual credit course curriculum on student self-efficacy of college readiness as students matriculate to post-secondary education. To evaluate...

  13. An investigation of the effect of spacing of practice on the performance-efficacy relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhupatkar, Alok Ashutosh

    2009-05-15

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the relationship between training performance and selfefficacy using a longitudinal design (approximately 11 weeks) in the context of massed and distributed practice. Limited attention...

  14. Efficacy of DVD Technology in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Self- Management Education of Rural Patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stellefson, Michael L.

    2010-01-14

    Despite the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation programs which assist patients in managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the high costs and lack of availability of such programs pose considerable barriers ...

  15. Intergenerational parallelism of self-efficacy: moderating variables, mediating variables, and common antecedents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Cheng-Hsien

    2004-11-15

    A number of theories and studies in sociology and psychology have asserted that self-efficacy is both the consequence and cause of our everyday life experiences. However, there is little empirical evidence to support the ...

  16. Comparison of the Efficacy of Popular Weight Loss Programs in Sedentary Overweight Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baetge, Claire

    2014-08-06

    This study compared the efficacy of the Curves Complete 90-day Challenge (CC), Weight Watchers Points Plus (WW), Jenny Craig At Home (JC), and Nutrisystem Advance Select (NS) on weight loss, body composition and/or ...

  17. Efficacy of Typhula phacorrhiza as a biocontrol agent of grey snow mould of creeping bentgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    Efficacy of Typhula phacorrhiza as a biocontrol agent of grey snow mould of creeping bentgrass C to a fungicide treatment. Key words: biocontrol, turfgrass disease, fungi. Rsum : Au cours d

  18. Inves&ga&ng the Trade-Off between Luminous Efficacy of Radia&on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Inves&ga&ng the Trade-Off between Luminous Efficacy of Radia&on and Color, Canada Lorne Whitehead, Canada #12;Inves&ga&ng the Trade-Off between Luminous

  19. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  20. Language and Math Requirements for Academic Majors These majors require two years (six courses) of college-level study in a second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Language and Math Requirements for Academic Majors Key Language These majors require two years (six academic credit. Math These majors require a minimum of one college-level math course and many of them require up to one year of college-level math or the equivalent. Either These majors allow you to choose

  1. Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bouchiat

    2003-04-27

    After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

  2. Probability density functions for the variable solar wind near the solar cycle minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrs,; Leitner, M; Narita, Y; Consolini, G; Kovcs, P; Tth, A; Lichtenberger, J

    2015-01-01

    Unconditional and conditional statistics is used for studying the histograms of magnetic field multi-scale fluctuations in the solar wind near the solar cycle minimum in 2008. The unconditional statistics involves the magnetic data during the whole year 2008. The conditional statistics involves the magnetic field time series splitted into concatenated subsets of data according to a threshold in dynamic pressure. The threshold separates fast stream leading edge compressional and trailing edge uncompressional fluctuations. The histograms obtained from these data sets are associated with both large-scale (B) and small-scale ({\\delta}B) magnetic fluctuations, the latter corresponding to time-delayed differences. It is shown here that, by keeping flexibility but avoiding the unnecessary redundancy in modeling, the histograms can be effectively described by a limited set of theoretical probability distribution functions (PDFs), such as the normal, log-normal, kappa and logkappa functions. In a statistical sense the...

  3. Automatic track recognition for large-angle minimum ionizing particles in nuclear emulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Fukuda; S. Fukunaga; H. Ishida; T. Matsumoto; T. Matsuo; S. Mikado; S. Nishimura; S. Ogawa; H. Shibuya; J. Sudou; A. Ariga; S. Tufanli

    2014-12-19

    We previously developed an automatic track scanning system which enables the detection of large-angle nuclear fragments in the nuclear emulsion films of the OPERA experiment. As a next step, we have investigated this system's track recognition capability for large-angle minimum ionizing particles $(1.0 \\leq |tan \\theta| \\leq 3.5)$. This paper shows that, for such tracks, the system has a detection efficiency of 95$\\%$ or higher and reports the achieved angular accuracy of the automatically recognized tracks. This technology is of general purpose and will likely contribute not only to various analyses in the OPERA experiment, but also to future experiments, e.g. on low-energy neutrino and hadron interactions, or to future research on cosmic rays using nuclear emulsions carried by balloons.

  4. On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it

    2013-07-01

    We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

  5. LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY WESTERN FLOOR PLAN SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING Level 2 Lower building Rm.2350 1393 WESTERN ROAD N6G -1G9 UPDATE DRAWN #12;LEVEL 02 FLOOR LEVEL 2 / SECOND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY

  6. Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrick, Todd

    2011-05-25

    Efficiency in drilling is measured by Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE). MSE is the measure of the amount of energy input required to remove a unit volume of rock, expressed in units of energy input divided by volume removed. It can be expressed mathematically in terms of controllable parameters; Weight on Bit, Torque, Rate of Penetration, and RPM. It is well documented that minimizing MSE by optimizing controllable factors results in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to minimize MSE in the field only through a trial-and-error process. This work makes it possible to compute the optimum drilling parameters that result in minimum MSE. The parameters that have been traditionally used to compute MSE are interdependent. Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional MSE equation was rewritten in terms of a single parameter, Weight on Bit, establishing a form that can be minimized mathematically. Once the optimum Weight on Bit was determined, the interdependent relationship that Weight on Bit has with Torque and Penetration per Revolution was used to determine optimum values for those parameters for a given drilling situation. The improved method was validated through laboratory experimentation and analysis of published data. Two rock types were subjected to four treatments each, and drilled in a controlled laboratory environment. The method was applied in each case, and the optimum parameters for minimum MSE were computed. The method demonstrated an accurate means to determine optimum drilling parameters of Weight on Bit, Torque, and Penetration per Revolution. A unique application of micro-cracking is also presented, which demonstrates that rock failure ahead of the bit is related to axial force more than to rotation speed.

  7. NEWLY DISCOVERED GLOBAL TEMPERATURE STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Zhenguang; Frazin, Richard A.; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward B.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Vasquez, Alberto M.

    2012-08-20

    Magnetic loops are building blocks of the closed-field corona. While active region loops are readily seen in images taken at EUV and X-ray wavelengths, quiet-Sun (QS) loops are seldom identifiable and are therefore difficult to study on an individual basis. The first analysis of solar minimum (Carrington Rotation 2077) QS coronal loops utilizing a novel technique called the Michigan Loop Diagnostic Technique (MLDT) is presented. This technique combines Differential Emission Measure Tomography and a potential field source surface (PFSS) model, and consists of tracing PFSS field lines through the tomographic grid on which the local differential emission measure is determined. As a result, the electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} at each point along each individual field line can be obtained. Using data from STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/MDI, the MLDT identifies two types of QS loops in the corona: so-called up loops in which the temperature increases with height and so-called down loops in which the temperature decreases with height. Up loops are expected, however, down loops are a surprise, and furthermore, they are ubiquitous in the low-latitude corona. Up loops dominate the QS at higher latitudes. The MLDT allows independent determination of the empirical pressure and density scale heights, and the differences between the two remain to be explained. The down loops appear to be a newly discovered property of the solar minimum corona that may shed light on the physics of coronal heating. The results are shown to be robust to the calibration uncertainties of the EUVI instrument.

  8. Efficacy of dichlorvos in the control of murine acariasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, Clara Jane

    1971-01-01

    80 60 40 20 DAYS 15 22 Fig. 2 23 Figure 3. Cholinesterase Levels in Treatment Group III. This group was exposed to 2 tsp. (8. 0 gm. ) of dichlorvos for 14 days. Average (closed circles), approximate standard error (vertical linea). 24 140...

  9. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  10. Minimum Analytical Chemistry Requirements for Pit Manufacturing at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moy, Ming M.; Leasure, Craig S.

    1998-08-01

    Analytical chemistry is one of several capabilities necessary for executing the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Analytical chemistry capabilities reside in the Chemistry Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility and Plutonium Facility (TA-55). These analytical capabilities support plutonium recovery operations, plutonium metallurgy, and waste management. Analytical chemistry capabilities at both nuclear facilities are currently being configured to support pit manufacturing. This document summarizes the minimum analytical chemistry capabilities required to sustain pit manufacturing at LANL. By the year 2004, approximately $16 million will be required to procure analytical instrumentation to support pit manufacturing. In addition, $8.5 million will be required to procure glovebox enclosures. An estimated 50% increase in costs has been included for installation of analytical instruments and glovebox enclosures. However, no general and administrative (G and A) taxes have been included. If an additional 42.5/0 G and A tax were to be incurred, approximately $35 million would be required over the next five years to prepare analytical chemistry to support a 50-pit-per-year manufacturing capability by the year 2004.

  11. Quiescent and Eruptive Prominences at Solar Minimum: A Statistical Study via an Automated Tracking System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loboda, I P

    2015-01-01

    We employ an automated detection algorithm to perform a global study of solar prominence characteristics. We process four months of TESIS observations in the He II 304 A line taken close to the solar minimum of 2008-2009 and focus mainly on quiescent and quiescent-eruptive prominences. We detect a total of 389 individual features ranging from 25x25 to 150x500 Mm in size and obtain distributions of many their spatial characteristics, such as latitudinal position, height, size and shape. To study their dynamics, we classify prominences as either stable or eruptive and calculate their average centroid velocities, which are found to be rarely exceeding 3 km/s. Besides, we give rough estimates of mass and gravitational energy for every detected prominence and use these values to evaluate the total mass and gravitational energy of all simultaneously existing prominences (10e12-10e14 kg and 10e29-10e31 erg, respectively). Finally, we investigate the form of the gravitational energy spectrum of prominences and derive...

  12. Use of finite volume radiation for predicting the Knudsen minimum in 2D channel flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, Chetan P.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2014-12-09

    In an earlier paper we employed an analogy between surface-to-surface radiation and free-molecular flow to model Knudsen flow through tubes and onto planes. In the current paper we extend the analogy between thermal radiation and molecular flow to model the flow of a gas in a 2D channel across all regimes of rarefaction. To accomplish this, we break down the problem of gaseous flow into three sub-problems (self-diffusion, mass-motion and generation of pressure gradient) and use the finite volume method for modeling radiation through participating media to model the transport in each sub-problem as a radiation problem. We first model molecular self-diffusion in the stationary gas by modeling the transport of the molecular number density through the gas starting from the analytical asymptote for free-molecular flow to the kinetic theory limit of gaseous self-diffusion. We then model the transport of momentum through the gas at unit pressure gradient to predict Poiseuille flow and slip flow in the 2D gas. Lastly, we predict the generation of pressure gradient within the gas due to molecular collisions by modeling the transport of the forces generated due to collisions per unit volume of gas. We then proceed to combine the three radiation problems to predict flow of the gas over the entire Knudsen number regime from free-molecular to transition to continuum flow and successfully capture the Knudsen minimum at Kn ? 1.

  13. Approaching the Minimum Thermal Conductivity in Rhenium-Substituted Higher Manganese Silicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Girard, S. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Meng, F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jin, S [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Goodenough, J. B. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Zhou, J. S. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Shi, L [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-01-01

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) made of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are regarded as promising p-type thermoelectric materials because their complex crystal structure results in low lattice thermal conductivity. It is shown here that the already low thermal conductivity of HMS can be reduced further to approach the minimum thermal conductivity via partial substitu- tion of Mn with heavier rhenium (Re) to increase point defect scattering. The solubility limit of Re in the obtained RexMn1 xSi1.8 is determined to be about x = 0.18. Elemental inhomogeneity and the formation of ReSi1.75 inclusions with 50 200 nm size are found within the HMS matrix. It is found that the power factor does not change markedly at low Re content of x 0.04 before it drops considerably at higher Re contents. Compared to pure HMS, the reduced lattice thermal conductivity in RexMn1 xSi1.8 results in a 25% increase of the peak figure of merit ZT to reach 0.57 0.08 at 800 K for x = 0.04. The suppressed thermal conductivity in the pure RexMn1 xSi1.8 can enable further investigations of the ZT limit of this system by exploring different impurity doping strategies to optimize the carrier concentration and power factor.

  14. Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-08-05

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified marine waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change. This expansion alters marine ecosystem function and the productivity of fisheries due to habitat compression and changes in biogeochemical cycling leading to fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally anoxic fjord, Saanich Inlet to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification and inorganic carbon fixation predominantly co-varied with abundance and distribution patterns of Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Within these groups, pathways mediating inorganic carbon fixation and nitrogen and sulfur transformations were differentially expressed across the redoxcline. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters and denitrification, sulfur-oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with SUP05 dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrite-oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nitrospina and Planctomycetes respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The differential expression of these pathways under changing water column redox conditions has quantitative implications for coupled biogeochemical cycling linking different modes of inorganic carbon fixation with distributed nitrogen and sulfur-based energy metabolism extensible to coastal and open ocean OMZs.

  15. The Minimum Bandwidth of Narrowband Spikes in Solar Flare Decimetric Radio Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Messmer; Arnold O. Benz

    1999-12-23

    The minimum and the mean bandwidth of individual narrowband spikes in two events in decimetric radio waves is determined by means of multi-resolution analysis. Spikes of a few tens of millisecond duration occur at decimetric/microwave wavelength in the particle acceleration phase of solar flares. A first method determines the dominant spike bandwidth scale based on their scalegram, the mean squared wavelet coefficient at each frequency scale. This allows to measure the scale bandwidth independently of heuristic spike selection criteria, e.g. manual selection. The major drawback is a low resolution in the bandwidth. To overcome this uncertainty, a feature detection algorithm and a criterion for spike shape in the time-frequency plane is applied to locate the spikes. In that case, the bandwidth is measured by fitting an assumed spike profile into the denoised data. The smallest FWHM bandwidth of spikes was found at 0.17 % and 0.41 % of the center frequency in the two events. Knowing the shortest relevant bandwidth of spikes, the slope of the Fourier power spectrum of this two events was determined and no resemblance to a Kolmogorov spectrum detected. Additionally the correlation between spike peak flux and bandwidth was examined.

  16. Electric Power Network Security Analysis via Minimum Cut Relaxation Kin Cheong Sou, Henrik Sandberg and Karl Henrik Johansson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    ) and ma directed arcs (i.e., transmission lines) on which power flows. The flow can The authorsElectric Power Network Security Analysis via Minimum Cut Relaxation Kin Cheong Sou, Henrik Sandberg the security of power transmission networks is presented. In order to strategically allocate protection devices

  17. 3172 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 8, NO. 6, JUNE 2009 On Multicast Beamforming for Minimum Outage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidiropoulos, Nikolaos D.

    Beamforming for Minimum Outage Vassilis Ntranos, Nicholas D. Sidiropoulos, and Leandros Tassiulas Abstract--The multicast beamforming problem is considered from the viewpoint of minimizing outage probability subject (locations) and variances (spreads). It is shown that minimizing outage probability subject to a transmit

  18. JOURNAL OF LATEX CLASS FILES, VOL. 6, NO. 1, JANUARY 2007 1 An Approximation Algorithm for the Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xin

    thus formulated in the framework of genome rearrangement. As an important one among them, the minimum breakpoint linearization (MBL) problem is to find the total order of a partially-ordered genome that minimizes its breakpoint distance to a reference genome whose genes are already totally ordered

  19. Asymmetric response of maximum and minimum temperatures to soil emissivity change over the Northern African Sahel in a GCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    Asymmetric response of maximum and minimum temperatures to soil emissivity change over the Northern in the Sahel could lead to reduced land surface emissivity and thus might have an asymmetric impact on daytime balance to changes in soil emissivity over the Sahel using the recently developed Community Land Model

  20. An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum Creditable Coverage Standards for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum, as part of the Massachusetts Health Care Reform Law. HMO Blue New EnglandSM Summary of Benefits Williams College #12;Your Care Your Primary Care Provider. When you enroll in HMO Blue New England, you must choose

  1. Survey of Quiescent Filament Channels at the Current Solar Minimum Yingna Su, Adriaan van Ballegooijen, Leon Golub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Yingna

    Survey of Quiescent Filament Channels at the Current Solar Minimum Yingna Su, Adriaan van Ballegooijen, Leon Golub Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Abstract Type I Filament Channels Type II Filament Channels Summary We present preliminary results of an investigation on filament channels

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 54, NO. 6, JUNE 2006 2155 A Minimum Squared-Error Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldar, Yonina

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 54, NO. 6, JUNE 2006 2155 A Minimum Squared processing entails representing a signal by a set of coefficients and relies on the existence of methods kernel. In practice, however, the input signal is never perfectly bandlimited, and the sampling process

  3. Doctoral Program in Biomedical Engineering Admission to this program is contingent upon admission to the Graduate School. The minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Doctoral Program in Biomedical Engineering Admission to this program is contingent upon admission to the Graduate School. The minimum requirements for admission into the Doctoral Program in Biomedical Engineering in Biomedical Engineering, or other closely related field from an accredited institution. A GPA of at least 3

  4. A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion, such as the mechanism and the free-energy profile, remains an important challenge not only for enzyme catalysis1 of the reaction free-energy profile is very cumbersome with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) and umbrella

  5. Evaluation Of Shielding Efficacy Of A Ferrite Containing Ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verst, C.

    2015-10-12

    The shielding evaluation of the ferrite based Mitsuishi ceramic material has produced for several radiation sources and possible shielding sizes comparative dose attenuation measurements and simulated projections. High resolution gamma spectroscopy provided uncollided and scattered photon spectra at three energies, confirming theoretical estimates of the ceramics mass attenuation coefficient, ?/?. High level irradiation experiments were performed using Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources to measure penetrating dose rates through steel, lead, concrete, and the provided ceramic slabs. The results were used to validate the radiation transport code MCNP6 which was then used to generate dose rate attenuation curves as a function of shielding material, thickness, and mass for photons and neutrons ranging in energy from 200 keV to 2 MeV.

  6. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a ``Berty`` autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  7. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a Berty'' autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  8. Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Hepasphere 3060?m. Safety and Efficacy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malagari, Katerina; Pomoni, Maria; Moschouris, Hippokratis; Kelekis, Alexios; Charokopakis, Angelos Bouma, Evanthia Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis; Chatziioannou, Achilles; Sotirchos, Vlasios; Karampelas, Theodoros Tamvakopoulos, Constantin; Filippiadis, Dimitrios; Karagiannis, Enangelos; Marinis, Athanasios; Koskinas, John; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2013-11-22

    Background: This study examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a newly developed size of a superabsorbent polymer drug-eluting embolic material.MethodsForty-five patients with documented HCC (ChildPugh score A/B: 55.5%/44.5%) were embolized with HepaSphere microspheres 3060?m with escalation of lesion, dose, and frequency of re-embolization. Local response was evaluated with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Plasma levels of doxorubicin were measured in 24 patients at baseline and at 5, 20, 40, 60, and 120min, at 6, 24, and 48h, and at 7days, respectively, to determine doxorubicin in plasma (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC). Measurements of three patients who underwent lipiodol-based conventional chemoembolization (c-TACE) were also performed.ResultsTACE with HepaSphere was well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile and no 30-day mortality. Response rates were calculated on intention-to-treat basis with complete response (CR) in 17.8% reaching 22.2% for the target lesion. Overall partial response (PR) was seen in 51.1%, stable disease in 20%, and progressive disease in 11.1% of patients. Overall objective response (CR+PR), including patients treated at all dosages of doxorubicin, was seen in 68.9% of cases. After a median follow-up of 15.6months, 1-year survival is 100%. Doxorubicin AUC was significantly lower in patients with HepaSphere 3060?m (35,19527,873ngנmin/ml) than in patients with conventional TACE (103,96016,652ngנmin/ml; p=0.009). Cmax was also significantly lower with HepaSphere 3060?m (83.932.1ng/ml) compared with c-TACE (761.358.8ng/ml; p=0.002).ConclusionHepaSphere 3060?m is an effective drug-eluting embolic material with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile.

  9. A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -years-old database for solar irradiance (W.m-2 ). So it is important to determine Luminous Efficacy in order to find illuminance from solar irradiance (or luminance from solar radiance). The measured data. Keywords Global and diffuse luminous efficacy, different sky conditions, solar irradiance, solar

  10. Impact of Environmental Factors on Efficacy of Upper-Room Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    Impact of Environmental Factors on Efficacy of Upper-Room Air Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation of an upper-room air ultravioletgermicidalirradiation(UVGI)system for inactivating airborne bacteria, which was skewed to one side compared to being evenly dispersed, and the room air temperature was stratified from

  11. Efficacy of florfenicol, copper sulfate and potassium permanganate in controlling a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    1 Efficacy of florfenicol, copper sulfate and potassium permanganate in controlling a natural waterborne exposures to KMnO4 a) 2 mg/L above the KMnO4 demand (PPD) for 24 h, or b) 10 mg/L, above the PPD

  12. REAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    REAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS Gurdas Sandhu H 0121 NOx(g/gal) Truck Number Highway Arterial Comparison of Trucks: Fuel-Based NO Emission Rates NOx emissions are substantially lower than Truck 5715. 1999 2005 2007 2009 2010 Fuel-Based Emission

  13. Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds Michael A. Mallin the natureand outflowing water nutrient concentrations. There were substantial suburban runoff inputs entering-circuited pollutant removal contact time. The golf course pond geometry of the system. showed significant increases

  14. Efficacy of techniques for responsiveness in a wide-area publish/subscribe system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Minkyong

    Efficacy of techniques for responsiveness in a wide-area publish/subscribe system Minkyong Kim IBM Watson Research minkyong@us.ibm.com Kyriakos Karenos Microsoft U.K. kyriak@microsoft.com Fan Ye IBM Watson Research fanye@us.ibm.com Johnathan Reason IBM Watson Research reason@us.ibm.com Hui Lei IBM

  15. Enhanced Therapeutic Efficacy for Ovarian Cancer with a Serotype 3 Receptor-Targeted Oncolytic Adenovirus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    Enhanced Therapeutic Efficacy for Ovarian Cancer with a Serotype 3 Receptor-Targeted Oncolytic replicating adenovirus that does not bind CAR but facilitates entry into and killing of ovarian cancer cells interventions for ovarian cancer patients. Key Words: gene therapy, ovarian neoplasms, adenovirus, virus

  16. Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universitt

    Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert Ulm University. In business process design, business objective models can ful- fill the role of formal requirement definitions for progressive appli- cations like automated process optimization. Key words: Business Process Modeling

  17. An estimate for the sum of a Dirichlet series in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a vertical line segment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaisin, Ahtyar M; Rakhmatullina, Zhanna G

    2011-12-31

    The behaviour of the sum of an entire Dirichlet series is analyzed in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a system of vertical line segments. Also a more general problem, connected with the Polya conjecture is posed and solved. It concerns the minimum modulus of an entire function with Fabri gaps and its growth along curves going to infinity. Bibliography: 33 titles.

  18. Technical/Support Job Level Technical/Support Level I Technical/Support Level II Technical/Support Level III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical/Support Job Level Technical/Support Level I Technical/Support Level II Technical supervision Problem Solving Refers to procedures, technical aids, co-workers, or supervisors to solve routine are varied and non-routine Uses knowledge of standardized rules, procedures, and operations to resolve

  19. High-level waste tank farm set point document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, J.A. III

    1995-01-15

    Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

  20. Minimum of $?/s$ and the phase transition of the Linear Sigma Model in the large-N limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Dobado; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres-Rincon

    2009-12-03

    We reexamine the possibility of employing the viscosity over entropy density ratio as a diagnostic tool to identify a phase transition in hadron physics to the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma and other circumstances where direct measurement of the order parameter or the free energy may be difficult. It has been conjectured that the minimum of eta/s does indeed occur at the phase transition. We now make a careful assessment in a controled theoretical framework, the Linear Sigma Model at large-N, and indeed find that the minimum of eta/s occurs near the second order phase transition of the model due to the rapid variation of the order parameter (here the sigma vacuum expectation value) at a temperature slightly smaller than the critical one.

  1. Ultra-clean underground counting facility for low-level environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn, W.G.; Bowman, W.W.; Boni, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    An underground counting facility with cleanroom environment has been designed and constructed to improve detection of low-level radioisotopes in the environment. The 3.0 m x 4.3 m x 2.4 m counting chamber is placed 14.3 m below ground, has 10.2-cm thick walls of pre-WWII naval armor plate, and is further shielded by a minimum of 1.2 m of specular hematite. The total overburden of shielding is equivalent to 31.7 m of water. Careful selection of building materials and a special air filtering system maintain a cleanroom environment with minimum contamination potential. Background improvements are noted relative to an earlier ground-level counting chamber with 30.5-cm-thick walls of pre-WWII naval armor plate. The gamma background continuum is reduced by a factor of 3 to 4 in the region of 0 to 10 MeV. A minimum of 10.2 cm of low-background lead around the detector optimizes this factor at 4 to 6. Discrete gammas from airborne natural radon daughters are eliminated by controlling the air near the detectors. Detectors constructed with low-level materials will further realize the improvements in background. A constant background is required for long counts of low-level samples, and the underground detectors are well shielded against surface operations. Performance appraisals of facility detectors include a large dual NaI(Tl) coincidence system, three smaller NaI(Tl) detectors, an HPGe well detector, and gas proportional and geiger counters. Major electronics for the detectors are located at a ground level control center to eliminate any associated backgrounds. Because an individual sample may be counted several days, uninterruptable power is used. An IBM PC/XT computer processes spectra from multichannel analyzers using custom-developed software.

  2. Electrostatic Field and Partial Fermi Level Pinning at the Pentacene-SiO2 Interface Liwei Chen,, R. Ludeke, Xiaodong Cui, Alejandro G. Schrott, Cherie R. Kagan, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    band maximum and electron traps at 0.69 eV below the conduction band minimum were observed. To further of pentacene thin films. When a thin oxide layer is used on the substrate, electron tunneling through-thin oxides, tunneling across the oxides allows Fermi level equilibration with pentacene associated states

  3. High Efficacy Green LEDs by Polarization Controlled MOVPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, Christian

    2013-03-31

    Amazing performance in GaInN/GaN based LEDs has become possible by advanced epitaxial growth on a wide variety of substrates over the last decade. An immediate push towards product development and worldwide competition for market share have effectively reduced production cost and generated substantial primary energy savings on a worldwide scale. At all times of the development, this economic pressure forced very fundamental decisions that would shape huge industrial investment. One of those major aspects is the choice of epitaxial growth substrate. The natural questions are to what extend a decision for a certain substrate will limit the ultimate performance and to what extent, the choice of a currently more expensive substrate such as native GaN could overcome any of the remaining performance limitations. Therefore, this project has set out to explore what performance characteristic could be achieved under the utilization of bulk GaN substrate. Our work was guided by the hypotheses that line defects such as threading dislocations in the active region should be avoided and the huge piezoelectric polarization needs to be attenuated if not turned off for higher performing LEDs, particularly in the longer wavelength green and deep green portions of the visible spectrum. At their relatively lower performance level, deep green LEDs are a stronger indicator of relative performance improvements and seem particular sensitive to the challenges at hand. The project therefore made use of recently developed non-polar and semipolar bulk GaN substrates that were made available at Kyma Technologies by crystallographic cuts from thick polar growth of GaN. This approach naturally leads to rather small pieces of substrates, cm along the long side while mm along the short one. Small size and limited volume of sample material therefore set the limits of the ensuing development work. During the course of the project we achieved green and deep green LEDs in all those crystal growth orientations: polar c-plane, non- polar a-plane, non-polar m-plane, and semipolar planes. The active region in those structures shows dramatically reduced densities of threading dislocations unless the wavelength was extended as far as 510 nm and beyond. With the appearance of such defects, the light output power dropped precipitously supporting the necessity to avoid any and all of such defects to reach the active region. Further aspects of the non-polar growth orientation proved extremely promising for the development of such structures. Chief among them is our success to achieve extremely uniform quantum wells in these various crystal orientations that prove devoid of any alloy fluctuation beyond the theoretical limit of a binominal distribution. This became very Rensselaer Wetzel DE?EE0000627 3 directly apparent in highly advanced atom probe tomography performed in collaboration at Northwestern University. Furthermore, under reduced or absence of piezoelectric polarization, green emitters in those growth geometries exhibit an unsurpassed wavelength stability over very wide excitation and drive current ranges. Such a performance had not been possible in any polar c-plane growth and now places green LEDs in terms of wavelength stability up par with typical 450 nm blue emitters. The project also incorporated enabling opportunities in the development of micro and nano- patterned substrate technologies. Originally developped as a means to enhance generated light extraction we have demonstrated that the method of nano-patterning, in contrast to micro- patterning also results in a substantial reduction of threading dislocation generation. In green LEDs, we thereby see equal contributions of enhanced light extraction and reduced defect generation to a threefold enhancement of the green light output power. These results have opened entirely new approaches for future rapid and low cost epitaxial material development by avoidance of thick defect accommodation layers. All methods developed within this project have meanwhile widely been publicized by the members o

  4. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  5. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  6. Efficacy of Feeding Treatments and Litter Formulations Against Shedding of Salmonella in Broilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larrison, Eryn Linnae

    2010-07-14

    OF FEEDING TREATMENTS AND LITTER FORMULATIONS AGAINST SHEDDING OF SALMONELLA IN BROILERS A Thesis by ERYN LINNAE LARRISON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2009 Major Subject: Poultry Science EFFICACY OF FEEDING TREATMENTS AND LITTER FORMULATIONS AGAINST SHEDDING OF SALMONELLA IN BROILERS A Thesis by ERYN LINNAE LARRISON Submitted to the Office...

  7. Service Level Agreement/Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Service Level Agreement/Specification For Maintenance and Associated Risk Management Services Team c. Contract Labour 4. REACTIVE MAINTENANCE 5. ESTATE DATA REQUIREMENTS 6. ESTATE EMERGENCY. RISK MANAGEMENT a. General b. Scope of Service c. Statement of Intent Service Level Agreement 2007 Vers

  8. ALIGNMENT, LEVELING AND DEPLOYMENT CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Crew Deployment Description Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) Crew Deployment Description Leveling and Alignment Solar Wind Spectrometer (SWS) Crew Deployment Description Leveling to deplo~nent. Design of ALSEP allows deployment when sun angle is from 5 to 45 degrees. 2 #12;CENTRAL

  9. STEADY-STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HU TA

    2007-10-26

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

  10. Teacher self-efficacy in Cape Town : a bottom up approach to enhancing the quality of education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, YeSeul

    2011-01-01

    Personal teacher self-efficacy (PTE), or the belief in one's own ability to overcome a particular challenge, often acts as a catalyst for teachers to improve the effectiveness of their teaching. Gaining PTE can translate ...

  11. THE RELATIONSHIP OF READING STRATEGIES AND SELF-EFFICACY WITH THE READING COMPREHENSION OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN INDONESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobing, Irene Rebecca Angela

    2013-08-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of reading strategies and self-efficacy with the reading comprehension of high school students in Indonesia. A convenience sample of 138 high school students from a state high school...

  12. A longitudinal investigation of change in teacher efficacy and perceptions of leadership following participation in a technology integration program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rackley, Robin Ann

    2006-04-12

    A longitudinal study was conducted to investigate the relationship between teachers? perceptions of leadership capabilities and teachers? efficacy beliefs in the context of their participation in a technology integration ...

  13. Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

    1994-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

  14. Collective efficacy as identified by teachers at Heritage Middle School, East Central Independent School District, San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naumann, Luisa Maria

    2008-10-10

    the 10 years that the Heritage Middle School has been in operation, there have been six different principals resulting in six different approaches to the management of the school. No research was found that explains how a schools collective efficacy... Based on Ethnicity ............................................................................................. 64 10 Independent Samples t-test of the White and Hispanic Teachers From Heritage Middle School in the Perceived Collective Efficacy Survey...

  15. HUD (Housing and Urban Development) Intermediate Minimum Property Standards Supplement 4930. 2 (1989 edition). Solar heating and domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The Minimum Property Standards for Housing 4910.1 were developed to provide a sound technical basis for housing under numerous programs of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). These Intermediate Minimum Property Standards for Solar Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems are intended to provide a companion technical basis for the planning and design of solar heating and domestic hot water systems. These standards have been prepared as a supplement to the Minimum Property Standards (MPS) and deal only with aspects of planning and design that are different from conventional housing by reason of the solar systems under consideration. The document contains requirements and standards applicable to one- and two-family dwellings, multifamily housing, and nursing homes and intermediate care facilities references made in the text to the MPS refer to the same section in the Minimum Property Standards for Housing 4910.1.

  16. Research Library Service Level Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Research Library Service Level Agreement 2015-2016 Contents THE SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY PURPOSE.................................................................................................3 DESCRIPTION OF SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY COLLECTIONS AND SERVICES......4 Electronic Resources Access.......................................................................................9 APPENDIX: SLAC RESEARCH LIBRARY RULES...................................................10 #12

  17. Low Level Heat Recovery Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    With today's high fuel prices, energy conservation projects to utilize low level waste heat have become more attractive. Exxon Chemical Company Central Engineering has been developing guidelines and assessing the potential for application of low...

  18. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  19. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  20. DECLINE AND RECOVERY OF THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD DURING THE PROTRACTED SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Charles W.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; DeForest, Craig E. E-mail: N.Schwadron@unh.edu

    2013-09-20

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is determined by the amount of solar magnetic flux that passes through the top of the solar corona into the heliosphere, and by the dynamical evolution of that flux. Recently, it has been argued that the total flux of the IMF evolves over the solar cycle due to a combination of flux that extends well outside of 1 AU and is associated with the solar wind, and additionally, transient flux associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In addition to the CME eruption rate, there are three fundamental processes involving conversion of magnetic flux (from transient to wind-associated), disconnection, and interchange reconnection that control the levels of each form of magnetic flux in the interplanetary medium. This is distinct from some earlier models in which the wind-associated component remains steady across the solar cycle. We apply the model of Schwadron et al. that quantifies the sources, interchange, and losses of magnetic flux to 50 yr of interplanetary data as represented by the Omni2 data set using the sunspot number as a proxy for the CME eruption rate. We do justify the use of that proxy substitution. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed interplanetary magnetic flux. In the absence of sufficient CME eruptions, the IMF falls on the timescale of ?6 yr. A key result is that rising toroidal flux resulting from CME eruption predates the increase in wind-associated IMF.

  1. Ultra-clean underground counting facility for low-level environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn, W.G.; Bowman, W.W.; Boni, A.L.

    1987-09-01

    An underground counting facility has been designed and constructed to improve detection of low-level radionuclides. The 3.0 x 4.3 x 2.4 m counting chamber is placed 14.3 m below ground, has 10.2-cm thick walls of pre-WWII naval armor plate, and is further shielded by a minimum of 1.2 m of specular hematite. The total overburden of shielding is equivalent to 31.7 m of water. Careful selection of building materials and a special air filtering system maintain a cleanroom environment with minimum contamination potential. Background improvements are noted relative to an earlier ground-level counting chamber with 30.5-cm-thick walls of pre-WWII naval armor plate. Performance appraisals of facility detectors include a large dual NaI(Tl) coincidence system, three smaller NaI(Tl) detectors, and HPGe well detecotr, and gas proportional and Geiger counters. Major electronics for the detectors are located at a ground level control center to eliminate any associated backgrounds. Because an individual sample may be counted several days, uninterruptable power is used. An IBM PC/XT computer processes spectra from multi-channel analyzers using custom-developed software. 25 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  3. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  4. A Measurement of the holographic minimum observable beam branching ratio in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Ballagh, H.C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J.P.; Bingham, H.H.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Brucker, E.B.; Burnstein,; Campbell, J.R.; Cence, R.J.; Chatterjee, T.K.; Clayton, E.F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; DeProspo, D.; Devanand,; De Wolf, E.A.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Brussels U.,

    1997-01-01

    Holography has been used successfully in combination with conventional optics for the first time in a large cryogenic bubble chamber, the 15-Foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab, during a physics run. The innovative system combined the reference beam with the object beam, illuminating a conical volume of {approx} 1.4 m{sup 3}. Bubble tracks from neutrino interactions with a width of {approx} 120 {micro}m have been recorded with good contrast. The ratio of intensities of the object light to the reference light striking the film is called the Beam Branching Ratio. We obtained in our experiment an exceedingly small minimum-observable ratio of (0.54 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -7}. The technology has the potential for a wide range of applications.

  5. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Davidson, Carolyn; McLaren, Joyce; Miller, John

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  6. A simple Chain-of-States method in acceleration space for the efficient location of Minimum Energy Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, E R; Soler, J M

    2015-01-01

    We describe a robust and efficient chain-of-states method for computing Minimum Energy Paths~(MEPs) associated to barrier-crossing events in poly-atomic systems. The path is parametrized in terms of a continuous variable $t \\in [0,1]$ that plays the role of time. In contrast to previous chain-of-states algorithms such as the Nudged Elastic Band or String methods, where the positions of the states in the chain are taken as variational parameters in the search for the MEP, our strategy is to formulate the problem in terms of the second derivatives of the coordinates with respect to $t$, {\\em i.e.\\/} the state {\\em accelerations\\/}. We show this to result in a very transparent and efficient method for determining the MEP. We describe the application of the method in a series of test cases, including two low-dimensional problems and the Stone-Wales transformation in $\\mbox{C}_{60}$.

  7. ECE Teaching Staff, Level 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ECE Teaching Staff, Level 4, Von Haast Building ECE Labs Electrical & Computer Engineering #12;ELEC Electronics Lab & Randy Hampton Control Lab Machines Lab & Ken Smart Mech. Workshop & Dave Healy Power Building Student Workshop The Shed Caf Kim Rutter 441 & Philipp Hof Yonghe Liu Seminar Room 457 Von Haast

  8. Chronomodulation of topotecan or X-radiation treatment increases treatment efficacy without enhancing acute toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, Dana; Proulx, Denise; Saoudi, A.; Ng, Cheng E. . E-mail: cng@ohri.ca

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Topotecan (TPT), a camptothecin analog, is currently used to treat human ovarian and small-cell lung cancer and is in clinical trials for other tumor sites. However, it is unknown whether chronomodulation of TPT treatment is beneficial. We examined the effects of administering TPT or X-radiation (XR) alone at different times of the day or night. Methods: We treated mice bearing human colorectal tumor xenografts at four different times representing the early rest period (9 AM or 3 HALO [hours after light onset]), late rest period (3 PM or 9 HALO), early active period (9 PM or 15 HALO), and late active period (3 AM or 21 HALO) of the mice. We gave either TPT (12 mg/kg, injected i.p.) or XR (4 Gy, directed to the tumor) twice weekly on Days 0, 4, 7, 10 within 2 weeks. Results: Treatment with either TPT or XR at 3 AM demonstrated the greatest efficacy (measured by a tumor regrowth assay) without significantly increasing acute toxicity (assessed by a decrease in leukocyte counts or body weight). Conversely, treatment at 3 PM, in particular, showed increased toxicity without any enhanced efficacy. Conclusions: Our study provided the first evidence that chronomodulation of TPT treatments, consistent with the findings of other camptothecin analogs, is potentially clinically beneficial. Additionally, our findings suggest that chronomodulation of fractionated XR treatments is also potentially clinically beneficial.

  9. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVthe next generationEffect of Sea Level

  10. Zone Level Occupant-Responsive Building Energy Systems at the GSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Alastair

    2014-03-01

    The General Services Administration (GSA) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement building energy system retrofits, aiming to reduce energy consumption of at least two building systems by a total of 30 percent or more, as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program, working with the GSA and a team of consultants. This case study reports expected energy savings from appropriate energy efficient design and operations modifications to lighting and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at the selected study sites. These retrofits comprised installation of new lighting systems with dimming capability and occupancy-sensor control at the individual light fixture level, and utilized lighting system occupancy sensor signals to continually readjust zone-level ventilation airflow according to the number of people present, down to minimum rates when vacant.

  11. Minimal time trajectories for two-level quantum systems with two bounded controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boscain, Ugo; Grnberg, Fredrik; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-06-15

    In this paper we consider the minimum time population transfer problem for a two level quantum system driven by two external fields with bounded amplitude. The controls are modeled as real functions and we do not use the Rotating Wave Approximation. After projection on the Bloch sphere, we treat the time-optimal control problem with techniques of optimal synthesis on 2D manifolds. Based on the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, we characterize a restricted set of candidate optimal trajectories. Properties on this set, crucial for complete optimal synthesis, are illustrated by numerical simulations. Furthermore, when the two controls have the same bound and this bound is small with respect to the difference of the two energy levels, we get a complete optimal synthesis up to a small neighborhood of the antipodal point of the initial condition.

  12. Cascading Failure Risk Variation with Generator Dispatch and System Load Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezaei, Pooya

    2013-01-01

    Industry reliability rules increasingly require utilities to study and mitigate cascading failure risk in their system. Motivated by this, this paper describes how cascading failure risk, in terms of expected blackout size, varies with power system load level and pre-contingency dispatch. We used Monte Carlo sampling of random branch outages to model contingencies, and a model of cascading failure to estimate blackout sizes. The risk associated with different blackout sizes is separately estimated in order to separate small, medium, and large blackout risk. Results from N-1 secure models of the IEEE RTS case and a 2383 bus case indicate that blackout risk does not always increase with load level, particularly for large blackout risk. The results also show that risk is highly dependent on the method used for generator dispatch. Minimum cost methods of dispatch can result in larger long distance power transfers, which can increase cascading failure risk.

  13. Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101Company Level Imports Explanatory Notes

  14. Sources and levels of ambient ocean sound near the antarctic peninsula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dziak, Robert P.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi; Park, Minkyu; Lee, Won Sang; Fowler, Matt J.; Lau, Tai-Kwan; Haxel, Joseph H.; Mellinger, David K.; et al

    2015-04-14

    Arrays of hydrophones were deployed within the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea (Antarctic Peninsula region) from 2005 to 2009 to record ambient ocean sound at frequencies of up to 125 and 500 Hz. Icequakes, which are broadband, short duration signals derived from fracturing of large free-floating icebergs, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Icequake activity peaks during austral summer and is minimum during winter, likely following freeze-thaw cycles. Iceberg grounding and rapid disintegration also releases significant acoustic energy, equivalent to large-scale geophysical events. Overall ambient sound levels can be as much as ~1020 dB higher in the open,moredeep ocean of the Scotia Sea compared to the relatively shallow Bransfield Strait. Noise levels become lowest during the austral winter, as sea-ice cover suppresses wind and wave noise. Ambient noise levels are highest during austral spring and summer, as surface noise, ice cracking and biological activity intensifies. Vocalizations of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also dominate the long-term spectra records in the 1528 and 89 Hz bands. Blue whale call energy is a maximum during austral summer-fall in the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait when ambient noise levels are a maximum and sea-ice cover is a minimum. Fin whale vocalizations were also most common during austral summer-early fall months in both the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea. The hydrophone data overall do not show sustained anthropogenic sources (ships and airguns), likely due to low coastal traffic and the typically rough weather and sea conditions of the Southern Ocean.less

  15. Sources and levels of ambient ocean sound near the antarctic peninsula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dziak, Robert P. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences.; Stafford, Kathleen M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Park, Minkyu [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Polar Environmental Research Div.; Lee, Won Sang [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Polar Environmental Research Div.; Fowler, Matt J. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Lau, Tai-Kwan [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Haxel, Joseph H. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Mellinger, David K. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Fine, Michael L [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Arrays of hydrophones were deployed within the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea (Antarctic Peninsula region) from 2005 to 2009 to record ambient ocean sound at frequencies of up to 125 and 500 Hz. Icequakes, which are broadband, short duration signals derived from fracturing of large free-floating icebergs, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Icequake activity peaks during austral summer and is minimum during winter, likely following freeze-thaw cycles. Iceberg grounding and rapid disintegration also releases significant acoustic energy, equivalent to large-scale geophysical events. Overall ambient sound levels can be as much as ~1020 dB higher in the open, deep ocean of the Scotia Sea compared to the relatively shallow Bransfield Strait. Noise levels become lowest during the austral winter, as sea-ice cover suppresses wind and wave noise. Ambient noise levels are highest during austral spring and summer, as surface noise, ice cracking and biological activity intensifies. Vocalizations of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also dominate the long-term spectra records in the 1528 and 89 Hz bands. Blue whale call energy is a maximum during austral summer-fall in the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait when ambient noise levels are a maximum and sea-ice cover is a minimum. Fin whale vocalizations were also most common during austral summer-early fall months in both the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea. The hydrophone data overall do not show sustained anthropogenic sources (ships and airguns), likely due to low coastal traffic and the typically rough weather and sea conditions of the Southern Ocean.

  16. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Isfort, Peter, E-mail: isfort@hia.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Braunschweig, Till, E-mail: tbraunschweig@ukaachen.de; Westphal, Saskia, E-mail: swestphal@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Pathology, Aachen University Hospital (Germany); Woitok, Anna, E-mail: awoitok@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Laboratory Animal Science (Germany); Penzkofer, Tobias, E-mail: penzkofer@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Bruners, Philipp, E-mail: bruners@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Kichikawa, Kimihiko, E-mail: kkichika@naramed-u.ac.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas, E-mail: smiro@hia.rwth-aachen.de; Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean {+-} standard deviation, 3.19 {+-} 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 {+-} 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 {+-} 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 {+-} 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 {+-} 0.55 cm; P < 0.001). The greatest volume of ablation was achieved by performing embolization with 40-{mu}m particles before RFA (group 1a; 20.97 {+-} 9.65 cm{sup 3}). At histology, 40-{mu}m microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-{mu}m microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-{mu}m microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  17. Runtime deadlock analysis for system level design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Eric; Chen, Xi; Hsieh, Harry; Davare, Abhijit; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto; Watanabe, Yosinori

    2009-01-01

    workshop on high level design validation and test, Nov. 2001Metropolis, and two real world design examples, which aredetection System-level design SystemC Metropolis E.

  18. A NEW SUB-PERIOD-MINIMUM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE WITH PARTIAL HYDROGEN DEPLETION AND EVIDENCE OF SPIRAL DISK STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlefield, C.; Garnavich, P.; Magno, K.; Applegate, A.; Pogge, R.; Irwin, J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R.; Vinko, J.

    2013-06-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (=SBS 1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55 minute orbital period is well below the cataclysmic variable (CV) period minimum of {approx}78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long-period CVs-but still at least 10 times higher than that in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in CSS 120422 began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that this CV is a strong candidate progenitor of an AM CVn system as described by Podsiadlowski et al. Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the H{alpha} line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.

  19. DMSP F8 observations of the mid-latitude and low-latitude topside ionosphere near solar minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenspan, M.E.; Hughes, W.J. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)] [Boston Univ., MA (United States); [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Burke, W.J.; Rich, F.J. [Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, MA (United States)] [Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, MA (United States); Heelis, R.A. [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The retarding potential analyzer on the DMSP F8 satellite measured ion density, composition, temperature, and ram flow velocity at 840-km altitude near the dawn and dusk meridians close to solar minimum. Nine days of data were selected for study to represent the summer and winter solstices and the autumnal equinox under quiet, moderately active, and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. The observations revealed extensive regions of light-ion dominance along both the dawn and dusk legs of the DMSP F8 orbit. These regions showed seasonal, longitudinal, and geomagnetic control, with light ions commonly predominating in places where the subsatellite ionosphere was relatively cold. Field-aligned plasma flows also were detected. In the morning, ions flowed toward the equator from both sides. In the evening, DMSP F8 detected flows that either diverged away from the equator or were directed toward the northern hemisphere. The effects of diurnal variations in plasma pressure gradients in the ionosphere and plasmasphere, momentum coupling between neutral winds and ions at the feet of field lines, and E {times} B drifts qualitatively explain most features of these composition and velocity measurements. 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. A study of the minimum wetting rate of isothermal films flowing down on outer surface of vertical pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Ueda, Tatsuhiro

    1999-07-01

    The minimum wetting rate (MWR) was investigated experimentally with an isothermal water film flowing down on the outer surface of test pipes arranged vertically. A dry patch was generated by blowing a small air jet onto the film temporally, and observation was made to discriminate whether the dry patch was rewetted or not. The contact angle of the film at the top edge of the dry patch and the amplitude, length and velocity of large waves on the film were measured. The MWR decreased rapidly as the film flowed down and reached a nearly constant value at a position around 0.6 m down from the film inlet. There were large waves on the film. The tendency of the variation of MWR with the distance coincided well with the growth of the amplitude of large waves with the distance. The contact angle at the top edge of the dry patch varied periodically in a range synchronizing with the arrival of the waves. When the contact angle exceeded the maximum advancing contact angle, the rewetting of the dry patch was initiated. The existing correlations where the smooth surface film was assumed considerably over-predicted the MWR. The MWR was properly given by supposing that the dry patch is rewetted when the maximum of the fluctuating dynamic pressure of the film exceeds the upward component of the surface tension corresponding to the maximum advancing contact angle at the top edge of the dry patch.

  1. Further evaluation of the efficacy of contamination removal from bone Jodi Lynn Barta a,b,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Further evaluation of the efficacy of contamination removal from bone surfaces Jodi Lynn Barta a, it simultaneously represents a system that is hypersen- sitive to amplifying contaminant DNA [79]. Tempering) and degraded DNA are prone to contamination from exogenous DNA sources that in some cases can out

  2. Unpublished manuscript, INPE, Brazil, Last update: December 2004 Efficacious sustainability of GIS Development within a low income country: the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Unpublished manuscript, INPE, Brazil, Last update: December 2004 Efficacious sustainability of GIS (GIS) software and technological approaches in Brazil and their application. Issues encountered not possess the complex technical and human resources required by GIS technology. After a review of earlier

  3. Materials Science Minor (Draft 3/26/12) This minor is intended for students who have chosen to take a minimum of 16 credits of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    Materials Science Minor (Draft 3/26/12) This minor is intended for students who have chosen to take a minimum of 16 credits of materials science coursework in any appropriate department. Required: 1) ME 280 or MSC 202 Introduction to Materials Science Prerequisites below or with permission of instructor: MTH

  4. Mathematics Requirements A minimum of six credit hours of Mathematics is required for both the M.S. and Ph.D. Plans of Study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathematics Requirements A minimum of six credit hours of Mathematics is required for both the M.S. and Ph.D. Plans of Study. The following courses are approved: MATH 4013, Engineering Mathematics Mathematics; Intermediate Differential Equations (prerequisites: MATH 2233, 3013) MATH 4263, Introduction

  5. for Senior Signature (minimum gift to Senior Signature required to be included on Class of 2015 Plaque) Additional gift for School/College/Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    for Senior Signature (minimum gift to Senior Signature required to be included on Class of 2015 is required to be included on the Class of 2015 plaque) I am proud to support the Georgia Fund SENIOR myID Email Name as it should appear on Senior Signature Class Plaque (maximum 25 spaces) VISA

  6. Recommended Student Laptop/Desktop Configurations for the Social Sciences The chart below provides general minimum guidelines for new computer acquisitions as of February 2014.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    general minimum guidelines for new computer acquisitions as of February 2014. Laptop Processor i3, i5 or i Premium or latest MS Windows Platform Other Software Anti-Virus, any product (Trend Micro Internet Security or AVG can be purchased at Campus Computer Store.) Microsoft Office (Optional) Standard Desktop

  7. There exist graphs with super-exponential Ramsey multiplicity The Ramsey multiplicity M(G; n) of a graph G is the minimum number of monochromatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jacob

    There exist graphs with super-exponential Ramsey multiplicity constant Jacob Fox Abstract The Ramsey multiplicity M(G; n) of a graph G is the minimum number of monochromatic copies of G over all 2, it is natural to define the Ramsey multiplicity constant C(G) to be limn M(G;n)a v!(n v) , which is the limit

  8. THE EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS ON A CORONAL SOURCE SURFACE AT 2.3 R{sub Sun} DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Kohl, J. L.; Lamy, P.

    2012-01-20

    We analyze data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory to produce global maps of coronal outflow velocities and densities in the regions where the solar wind is undergoing acceleration. The maps use UV and white light coronal data obtained from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer and the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, respectively, and a Doppler dimming analysis to determine the mean outflow velocities. The outflow velocities are defined on a sphere at 2.3 R{sub Sun} from Sun-center and are organized by Carrington Rotations during the solar minimum period at the start of solar cycle 23. We use the outflow velocity and density maps to show that while the solar minimum corona is relatively stable during its early stages, the shrinkage of the north polar hole in the later stages leads to changes in both the global areal expansion of the coronal hole and the derived internal flux tube expansion factors of the solar wind. The polar hole areal expansion factor and the flux tube expansion factors (between the coronal base and 2.3 R{sub Sun }) start out as super-radial but then they become more nearly radial as the corona progresses away from solar minimum. The results also support the idea that the largest flux tube expansion factors are located near the coronal hole/streamer interface, at least during the deepest part of the solar minimum period.

  9. [10] K. Mehlhorn and C. Uhrig. The Minimum Cut Algorithm of Stoer and Wagner. Unpublished manuscript, Max Planck Institute for Computer Science. Available at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fegaras, Leonidas

    [10] K. Mehlhorn and C. Uhrig. The Minimum Cut Algorithm of Stoer and Wagner. Unpublished manuscript, Max Planck Institute for Computer Science. Available at http://www.mpisb.mpg.de/guide/staff/uhrig, pp 238--248, May 1997. [15] P. Selinger, M. Astrahan, D. Chamberlin, R. Lorie, and T. Price. Access

  10. Design Method for the Heating/Cooling Coil in the AHU Based on Fuzzy Logic - Part Two: Design of the Minimum Heat-Exchanging Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Liang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Considering a heating/cooling coil with adjustable heat-exchange area, an unequal type is put forward in this paper. Aiming at the application of such heat exchanger in an air-handling unit, restriction conditions are given for the minimum heat...

  11. CONSTRAINTS ON THE MINIMUM ELECTRON LORENTZ FACTOR AND MATTER CONTENT OF JETS FOR A SAMPLE OF BRIGHT FERMI BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shi-Ju; Wu, Qingwen; Chen, Liang

    2014-11-01

    We fit (quasi-)simultaneous multi-waveband spectral energy distributions for a sample of low-synchrotron-peaked (LSP) blazars with a one-zone leptonic model. The seed photons that predominantly come from the broad line region (BLR) and infrared (IR) molecular torus are considered in the context of an external Compton process. We find that modeling with IR seed photons is systematically better than that with BLR photons based on a ?{sup 2} test, which suggests that ?-ray-emitting regions are most likely found outside the BLR. The minimum electron Lorentz factor, ?{sub min}, is constrained from the modeling of these LSP blazars with good soft X-ray data (ranging from 5 to 160 with a median value of 55), which plays a key role in jet power estimation. Assuming a one-to-one ratio of protons to electrons, we find that the jet power for LSP blazars is systematically higher than that of FR II radio galaxies at a 151 MHz radio luminosity, L {sub 151} {sub MHz} even though FR IIs are regarded as the same as LSP blazars in a unification scheme except at the jet viewing angle. A possible reason for this is that there are some e {sup } pairs in the jets of these blazars. If this is the case, we find that the number density of e {sup } pairs should be several times higher than that of e {sup }-p pairs by assuming the jet power is the same for LSP blazars and FR IIs at the given L {sub 151} {sub MHz}.

  12. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this process as a biofilter by studying the distribution of methane oxidation and disposition of methanotrophic populations in the Pacific Ocean. We investigated several environments including the basins offshore California, the continental margin off Central America, and the shallow waters around gas seeps. We succeeded in identifying the distributions of activity in these environments, identified potential physical and chemical controls on methanotrophic activity, we further revealed details about the methanotrophic communities active in these settings, and we developed new approaches to study methanotrophic communities. These findings should improve our capacity to predict the methanotrophic response in ocean waters, and further our ability to generate specific hypotheses as to the ecology and efficacy of pelagic methanotrophic communites. The discharge of methane and other hydrocarbons to Gulf of Mexico that followed the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon provided a unique opportunity to study the methanotorphic biofilter in the deep ocean environment. We set out to understand the consumption of methane and the bloom of methanotrophs resulting from this event, as a window into the regional scale release of gas hydrate under rapid warming scenarios. We found that other hydrocarbon gases, notably propane and ethane, were preferred for consumption over methane, but that methane consumption accelerated rapidly and drove the depletion of methane within a matter of months after initial release. These results revealed the identity of the responsible community, and point to the importance of the seed population in determining the rate at which a methanotrophic community is able to respond to an input of methane. Collectively, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the marine methanotrohic biofilter, and further provide direction and context for future investigations of this important phenomenon. This project has resulted in fourteen publications to date, with five more circulating in draft form, and several others planned.

  13. Personal science teaching efficacy and the beliefs and practices of elementary teachers related to science instruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lardy, Corinne H.

    2011-01-01

    levels are focused more on the goal of student learning thanlevels are focused more on the goal of student learning than

  14. The LHC Low Level RF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  15. Fermi-level shifts in graphene transistors with dual-cut channels scraped by atomic force microscope tips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Meng-Yu [Institute of Electronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Hao [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Su, Chen-Fung [College of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Tainan 71150, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shu-Wei [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lee, Si-Chen [Institute of Electronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shih-Yen, E-mail: shihyen@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Electronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-13

    We investigate the electronic properties of p-type graphene transistors on silicon dioxide with dual-cut channels that were scraped using atomic force microscope tips. In these devices, the current is forced to squeeze into the path between the two cuts rather than flow directly through the graphene sheet. We observe that the gate voltages with minimum current shift toward zero bias as the sizes of the dual-cut regions increase. These phenomena suggest that the Fermi levels in the dual-cut regions are shifted toward the Dirac points after the mechanical scraping process.

  16. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES AT THE MINIMUM OF THE 23rd SOLAR CYCLE This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the harmonic power spectrum of the solar magnetic field demonstrates a greater prevalence of multiLOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES AT THE MINIMUM OF THE 23rd SOLAR CYCLE This article has been downloaded reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES AT THE MINIMUM OF THE 23rd SOLAR CYCLE Valentyna

  17. Improvement of Stent Retriever Design and Efficacy of Mechanical Thrombectomy in a Flow Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenger, Katharina; Nagl, Frank; Wagner, Marlies Berkefeld, Joachim

    2013-02-15

    In vitro experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical intracranial thrombectomy comparing the newly developed Aperio stent retriever and standard devices for stroke treatment. The Aperio (A), with an increased working length of 4 cm and a special cell design for capturing and withholding clots, was compared to three benchmark devices: the Solitaire retrievable stent (B), the Merci X6 (C), and the Merci L5 retriever (D). In a vascular glass model with pulsatile flow, reminiscent of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery, we repeatedly induced occlusion by generating thrombi via a modified Chandler loop system. The numbers of recanalization attempts, peripheral embolizations, and recanalizations at the site of occlusion were recorded during 10 retrieval experiments with each device. Eleven devices were able to remove the blood clots from the occluded branch. In 34 of 40 experiments, restoration of flow was obtained in 1-3 attempts. The main differences between the study devices were observed in terms of clot withholding and fragmentation during retrieval. Although there was only one fragmentation recorded for device A, disengagement of the whole clot or peripheral embolization of fragments occurred more frequently (5-7 times) with devices B, C, and D. In a vascular model, the design of device A was best at capturing and withholding thrombi during retrieval. Further study will be necessary to see whether this holds true in clinical applications.

  18. Studies of basal metabolic rate, the minimum metabolic rate of inactive, postabsorptive endotherms while in their rest phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    desert, basal metabolic rate, total evaporative water loss, energy demand. Summary Introduction of animal energetics (King and Farner, 1961; Aschoff and Pohl, 1970; Calder and King, 1974; Hayssen and Lacy, 1985; Reynolds and Lee, 1996). Although animals in nature may function only rarely at basal levels

  19. Glass blowing on a wafer level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eklund, E. Jesper; Shkel, Andrei M.

    2007-01-01

    Wafer-Level Micro-Glass-Blowing UCI Of?ce of Technology176, 2005. [3] , Glass Blowing on a Wafer Scale (Expandedmodels. EKLUND AND SHKEL: GLASS BLOWING ON A WAFER LEVEL [5

  20. High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

    1998-04-01

    Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

  1. An indicator energy of two close levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander V. Shamanin

    2013-09-17

    In this paper, we introduce a concept of an indicator energy of two close levels in the perturbation.

  2. Short Papers___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mining Multiple-Level Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xindong

    ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mining Multiple-Level Association Rules in Large Databases Jiawei Han, Member, IEEE Computer Society for efficient mining of multiple-level association rules from large transaction databases based on the Apriori. Index TermsData mining, knowledge discovery in databases, association rules, multiple-level association

  3. Hurricane jeanne Preliminary Water Levels Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane jeanne Preliminary Water Levels Report Tide Gauges within the Path of Hurricane Jeanne-OPS Hurricane JEANNE Preliminary Report #12;SUMMARY CO-OPS Tide Gauge Data for Hurricane Jeanne NOAA's Center://tidesonline.nos.noaa.gov). Storm surge is the observed water level minus the predicted water level referred to MLLW. Hurricane

  4. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Transarterial Radioembolization Versus Chemoembolization in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno-Luna, Laura E., E-mail: morenoluna.laura@gmail.com; Yang, Ju Dong; Sanchez, William [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Harnois, Denise M.; Mettler, Teresa A. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Gansen, Denise N. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Groen, Piet C. de; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Narayanan Menon, K. V.; LaRusso, Nicholas F. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Alberts, Steven R. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Department of Oncology (United States); Gores, Gregory J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Fleming, Chad J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Slettedahl, Seth W.; Harmsen, William S.; Therneau, Terry M. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Health Sciences Research (United States); Wiseman, Gregory A.; Andrews, James C. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Roberts, Lewis R., E-mail: roberts.lewis@mayo.edu [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually treated with locoregional therapy using transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Transarterial radioembolization (TARE) using {beta}-emitting yttrium-90 integral to the glass matrix of the microspheres is an alternative to TACE. This retrospective case-control study compared the outcomes and safety of TARE versus TACE in patients with unresectable HCC. Materials and Methods. Patients with unresectable HCC without portal vein thrombosis treated with TARE between 2005 and 2008 (n = 61) were retrospectively frequency-matched by age, sex, and liver dysfunction with TACE-treated patients (n = 55) in the Mayo Clinic Hepatobiliary Neoplasia Registry. Imaging studies were reviewed, and clinical and safety outcomes were abstracted from the medical records. Results. Complete tumor response was more common after TARE (12 %) than after TACE (4 %) (p = 0.17). When complete response was combined with partial response and stable disease, there was no difference between TARE and TACE. Median survival did not differ between the two groups (15.0 months for TARE and 14.4 months for TACE; p = 0.47). Two-year survival rates were 30 % for TARE and 24 % for TACE. TARE patients received fewer treatments (p < 0.001). Fifty-nine (97 %) TARE patients received outpatient treatment. In contrast, 53 (98 %) TACE patients were hospitalized for {>=}1 day (p < 0.001). Compared with TACE, TARE was more likely to induce fatigue (p = 0.003) but less likely to cause fever (p = 0.02). Conclusion. There was no significant difference in efficacy between TARE and TACE. TARE patients reported more fatigue but had less fever than TACE patients. Treatment with TARE required less hospitalization than treatment with TACE. These findings require confirmation in randomized trials.

  6. Resonant nature of intrinsic defect energy levels in PbTe revealed by infrared photoreflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bingpo; Cai, Chunfeng; Jin, Shuqiang; Ye, Zhenyu; Wu, Huizhen, E-mail: hzwu@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Qi, Zhen [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2014-07-14

    Step-scan Fourier-transform infrared photoreflectance and modulated photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the optical transitions of the epitaxial PbTe thin film grown by molecular beam epitaxy on BaF{sub 2} (111) substrate in the vicinity of energy gap of lead telluride at 77?K. It is found that the intrinsic defect energy levels in the electronic structure are of resonant nature. The Te-vacancy energy level is located above the conduction band minimum by 29.1?meV. Another defect (V{sub X}) energy level situated below valance band maximum by 18.1?meV is also revealed. Whether it is associated with the Pb vacancy is still not clear. It might also be related to the misfit dislocations stemming from the lattice mismatch between PbTe and BaF{sub 2} substrate. The experimental results support the theory prediction (N. J. Parada and G. W. Pratt, Jr., Phys. Rev. Lett. 22, 180 (1969), N. J. Parada, Phys. Rev. B 3, 2042 (1971)) and are consistent with the reported Hall experimental results (G. Bauer, H. Burkhard, H. Heinrich, and A. Lopez-Otero, J. Appl. Phys. 47, 1721 (1976)).

  7. Service Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 -No Service will be provided.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Level 0 Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: Hazardous Material, mechanical, storage, issue, stockService Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 - No Service will be provided. Service Level 1- Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: offices, copy, file, mail, hallways, vestibules

  8. Chinese and Japanese Word Segmentation Using Word-Level and Character-Level Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinese and Japanese Word Segmentation Using Word-Level and Character-Level Information Tetsuji and Japanese word segmentation. Word-level information is useful for analysis of known words, while character-level informa- tion is useful for analysis of unknown words, and the method utilizes both these two types

  9. Operating Experience Level 3: Radiologically Contaminated Respirators...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Experience Level 3 provides information on a safety concern related to radiological contamination of launderedreconditioned respirators and parts that have been certified as...

  10. Action and Inaction Levels in Pest Management.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Winfield

    1984-01-01

    to this problem be to use the term "action level" as a replacement term "economic threshold" and the term "inac level" for the critical natural enemy densities (134). terms are more fitting because economic and factors are both important in pest manage dec... component of level model. If the plant has reserves of n sufficient time remaining during the growing replace damaged fruit , then a higher action level be set. The effect of leaf damage as related phenological stage of cotton plant growth is ill...

  11. Low-level waste program technical strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, K.W.

    1994-10-01

    The Low-Level Waste Technical Strategy document describes the mechanisms which the Low-Level Waste Program Office plans to implement to achieve its mission. The mission is to manage the receipt, immobilization, packaging, storage/disposal and RCRA closure (of the site) of the low-level Hanford waste (pretreated tank wastes) in an environmentally sound, safe and cost-effective manner. The primary objective of the TWRS Low-level waste Program office is to vitrify the LLW fraction of the tank waste and dispose of it onsite.

  12. Extra-dimensional generalization of minimum-length deformed QM/QFT and some of its phenomenological consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Maziashvili

    2015-02-26

    In contrast to the 3D case, different approaches for deriving the gravitational corrections to the Heisenberg uncertainty relation do not lead to the unique result whereas additional spatial dimensions are present in the theory. We suggest to take logarithmic corrections to the black hole entropy, which has recently been proved both in string theory and loop quantum gravity to persist in presence of additional spatial dimensions, as a point of entry for identifying the modified Heisenberg-Weyl algebra. We then use a particular Hilbert space representation for such a quantum mechanics to construct the correspondingly modified field theory and address some phenomenological issues following from it. Some subtleties arising at the second quantization level are clearly pointed out. Solving the field operator to the first order in deformation parameter and defining the modified wave function for a free particle, we discuss the possible phenomenological implications for the black hole evaporation. Putting aside modifications arising at the second quantization level, we address the corrections to the gravitational potential due to modified propagator (back reaction on gravity) and see that correspondingly modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time shows up the disappearance of the horizon and vanishing of surface gravity when black hole mass approaches the quantum gravity scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants.

  13. Housing standards: change to HUD 4930. 2 Intermediate Minimum Property Standard (IMPS) supplement for solar heating and domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-17

    This rule is made to provide an updating, clarification, and improvement of requirements contained in HUD Handbook 4930.2, Intermediate Minimum Property Standards (IMPS) Supplement concerning solar heating and domestic hot water systems. Changes pertain to fire protection, penetration, roof covering, conditions of use, thermal stability, rain resistance, ultraviolet stability, and compatibility with transfer medium. Additional changes cover applicable standards, labeling, flash point, chemical and physical commpatibility, flame spread classification, lightening protection, and parts of a solar energy system. Altogether, there are over 50 changes, some of which apply to tables and worksheets. Footnotes are included.

  14. Extra-dimensional generalization of minimum-length deformed QM/QFT and some of its phenomenological consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the 3D case, different approaches for deriving the gravitational corrections to the Heisenberg uncertainty relation do not lead to the unique result whereas additional spatial dimensions are present in the theory. We suggest to take logarithmic corrections to the black hole entropy, which has recently been proved both in string theory and loop quantum gravity to persist in presence of additional spatial dimensions, as a point of entry for identifying the modified Heisenberg-Weyl algebra. We then use a particular Hilbert space representation for such a quantum mechanics to construct the correspondingly modified field theory and address some phenomenological issues following from it. Some subtleties arising at the second quantization level are clearly pointed out. Solving the field operator to the first order in deformation parameter and defining the modified wave function for a free particle, we discuss the possible phenomenological implications for the black hole evaporation. Putting aside modi...

  15. TECHNOLOGY READINESS LEVELS A White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    028 TECHNOLOGY READINESS LEVELS A White Paper April 6, 1995 John C. Mankins Advanced Concepts Office Office of Space Access and Technology NASA Introduction Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) are a systematic metric/measurement system that supports assessments of the maturity of a particular technology

  16. Division of Research FACULTY-LEVEL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 Division of Research SUBJECT: FACULTY-LEVEL RESEARCH APPOINTMENTS Effective Date: 02/01/13 Policy Number 10.1.3 Supersedes: 08/01/08 Page Of 1 3 Responsible Authority: Vice President for Research I. BACKGROUND Faculty-level research appointments, identified by the titles of Research Assistant Professor

  17. Seminar -4. letnik Landau Levels in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsak, Anton

    Seminar - 4. letnik Landau Levels in Graphene Author: Zala Lenarcic Mentor: prof. Anton Ramsak Ljubljana, December 2010 Abstract In this seminar I present graphene, a new material with promising to graphene's unusual energy dispersion. I will derive Landau levels for standard electrons, for electrons

  18. IT Services' Service Level Agreement TECHNICAL SUPPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    IT Services' Service Level Agreement TECHNICAL SUPPORT and HARDWARE/SOFTWARE/NETWORK MAINTENANCE This service level agreement (SLA) describes the computer services provided by Walb Union Operations into the university services card system's database by Union Operations. Walb Union Operations creates university

  19. An Integrated Low Level Heat Recovery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, A. V., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A large amount of low level thermal energy is lost to air or water in a typical petroleum refinery. This paper discusses a complex integrated low level heat recovery system that is being engineered for installation in a large petroleum refinery...

  20. Hurricane IVAN Preliminary Water Levels Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane IVAN Preliminary Water Levels Report *For the purpose of timely release, data contained and Services #12;CO-OPS Water Level Data for Hurricane IVAN NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic and in the Gulf of Mexico. During the hurricane season (June through November) CO-OPS personnel actively maintain

  1. A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

    2011-03-01

    Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

  2. Fathead minnow steroidogenesis: in silico analyses reveals tradeoffs between nominal target efficacy and robustness to cross-talk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    mediating effects of bisphenol A at levels of humanindustrial chemical bisphenol A (BPA), used to manufacture

  3. Level shift operators for open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Merkli

    2006-01-07

    Level shift operators describe the second order displacement of eigenvalues under perturbation. They play a central role in resonance theory and ergodic theory of open quantum systems at positive temperatures. We exhibit intrinsic properties of level shift operators, properties which stem from the structure of open quantum systems at positive temperatures and which are common to all such systems. They determine the geometry of resonances bifurcating from eigenvalues of positive temperature Hamiltonians and they relate the Gibbs state, the kernel of level shift operators, and zero energy resonances. We show that degeneracy of energy levels of the small part of the open quantum system causes the Fermi Golden Rule Condition to be violated and we analyze ergodic properties of such systems.

  4. Low Level Radiation SEAB Ltr. to Moniz

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on how DOE should pursue research on the question of a 'linear' or 'threshold' low-level radiation exposure model. Should DOE continue its efforts on this subject or...

  5. Making Use of Low-Level Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaster, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Immense amounts of energy are being thrown away every day in petroleum refineries, chemical plants, and throughout all types of industrial operations. Much of this energy is at temperature levels below 350OF and is typically rejected...

  6. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01

    analysis, and a brief discussion of variable frequency drive design considerations. Energy savings figures are based upon actual electricity costs at the plant involved. Process duty cycle and energy requirement levels were verified by a wattmeter...

  7. Tank farms compacted low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetzer, D.C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the process of Low-Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report.

  8. Tank farms compacted low level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the process of Low Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report.

  9. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage.

  10. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  11. LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 1 Level Set Method for Positron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 1 Level Set Method for Positron Emission for integrated Petroleum Research). #12;LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 2 Abstract In positron emission tomography (PET) a radioactive compound is injected into the body to promote a tissue

  12. Exploiting level sensitive latches in wire pipelining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Vikram

    2005-02-17

    margin for setup time and clock skew, i.e. in the interval of [T -Tp,T -Tsetup-Tskew], as shown by the yellow shaded interval in Figure 3 for positive level sensitive latches. Here Tp is the duration of positive clock signal level... occupy certain region and disallow repeater or synchronous element insertions. In this scenario, the timing flexibility of latches can facilitate further TCLK TP Tn Tsetup 8 improvement on latency compared with flip-flop based wire...

  13. Features, Events, and Processes: system Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. McGregor

    2004-10-15

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

  14. Development and implementation of attractiveness Level E criteria and the plutonium disposition methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.C.; Robinson, M.A.

    1998-03-01

    Historically, the Department of Energy used the Economic Discard Limits (EDLs), those Special Nuclear Material (SNM) concentrations in residue matrices below which production of new SNM was more economic than SNM recovery, as a basis for discard decisions. In 1994, a joint team from DOE Defense Programs (DP) and Environmental Management (EM) determined that the EDLs were no longer a valid discriminator and directed that SNM disposition consider instead 12 specific criteria, foremost of which are waste minimization, environmental impacts, safety, proliferation concerns, and cost. In response, the Los Alamos National Laboratory developed a technical basis for determining SNM bearing materials unattractive for proliferation purposes and a quantitative method for predicting materials disposition consequences as a basis for decision making called the plutonium disposition methodology. The objective of attractiveness Level E criteria is to insure that waste is unattractive for proliferation or terrorist purposes. Level E criteria is about 0.17 kg Pu per 208 liter drum (requiring diversion of a minimum of 54 drums, assuming 100% recovery efficiency).

  15. Seasonal sand level changes on southern california beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Marissa L.

    2009-01-01

    2.3 Sand level measurements . . . . . .2.4 Sand level changes . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 Wave4.3.2 Sand level observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  16. Seasonal Sand Level Changes on Southern California Beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Marissa L

    2009-01-01

    2.3 Sand level measurements . . . . . .2.4 Sand level changes . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 Wave4.3.2 Sand level observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  17. Investigating the relationship between urban first and second grade classroom teachers' sense of efficacy for literacy instruction and the reading achievement of their highly mobile students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valadez, Corinne Montalvo

    2006-10-30

    INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN URBAN FIRST A N D S E C O N D G R A D E C L A S S R O O M T E A C H E R S ? S E N S E O F EFFICACY FOR LITERACY INSTRUCTION AND THE READING ACHIEVEMENT OF THEIR HIGHLY MOBILE STUDENTS A Dissertation... ? 2006 CORINNE MONTALVO VALADEZ ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN URBAN FIRST AND SEC O N D G R A D E C L A S S R O O M T E A C H E R S ? S E N S E O F EFFICACY FOR LITERACY INSTRUCTION AND THE READING...

  18. A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2012-01-01

    motors, industrial boilers, and transformers. Mandatory minimum energyIndustrial Technologies Program provides many software tools, such as MotorMaster, for assessing energy efficiency of motors,

  19. A liquid-helium-free superconducting coil system forming a flat minimum-magnetic-field distribution of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi, E-mail: yoshida.kennichi71@jaea.go.jp; Nara, Takayuki; Saitoh, Yuichi; Yokota, Watalu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A flat distribution of the minimum magnetic field (flat-B{sub min}) of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is expected to perform better in highly charged ion production than classical B{sub min}. To form a flat-B{sub min} structure with a liquid helium-free superconducting device, a coil system of seven coils with four current leads has been designed. The lead number was reduced by connecting the plural coils in series to maintain the flat-B{sub min} structure even when the coil currents are changed for adjustment. This coil system can be operated with a helium-free cryostat, since the estimation of heat from the leads to the coils is nearly equivalent to the existing superconducting ECRIS of a similar type.

  20. System and method employing a minimum distance and a load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A

    2014-12-23

    A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types, each of the different electric load types including a first load feature vector having at least four different load features; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the different electric loads; determining a second load feature vector comprising at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the different electric loads; and identifying by a processor one of the different electric load types by determining a minimum distance of the second load feature vector to the first load feature vector of the different electric load types of the load feature database.

  1. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  2. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2014-10-15

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  3. Influence of growth temperature and temperature ramps on deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, A. M.; Kelchner, K.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 ; Speck, J. S.

    2013-12-02

    The dependence of deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on bulk m-plane GaN substrates as a function of growth temperature (T{sub g}) and T{sub g} ramping method was investigated using deep level optical spectroscopy. Understanding the influence of T{sub g} on GaN deep level incorporation is important for InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) because GaN quantum barrier (QB) layers are grown much colder than thin film GaN to accommodate InGaN QW growth. Deep level spectra of low T{sub g} (800?C) GaN films grown under QB conditions were compared to deep level spectra of high T{sub g} (1150?C) GaN. Reducing T{sub g}, increased the defect density significantly (>50) through introduction of emergent deep level defects at 2.09?eV and 2.9?eV below the conduction band minimum. However, optimizing growth conditions during the temperature ramp when transitioning from high to low T{sub g} substantially reduced the density of these emergent deep levels by approximately 40%. The results suggest that it is important to consider the potential for non-radiative recombination in QBs of LED or LD active regions, and tailoring the transition from high T{sub g} GaN growth to active layer growth can mitigate such non-radiative channels.

  4. Fault-tolerant three-level inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, John; Xu, Longya; Bhargava, Brij B.

    2006-12-05

    A method for driving a neutral point clamped three-level inverter is provided. In one exemplary embodiment, DC current is received at a neutral point-clamped three-level inverter. The inverter has a plurality of nodes including first, second and third output nodes. The inverter also has a plurality of switches. Faults are checked for in the inverter and predetermined switches are automatically activated responsive to a detected fault such that three-phase electrical power is provided at the output nodes.

  5. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

  6. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

  7. High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

  8. Expectations of two-level telegraph noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesse Fern

    2006-11-02

    We find expectation values of functions of time integrated two-level telegraph noise. Expectation values of this noise are evaluated under simple control pulses. Both the Gaussian limit and $1/f$ noise are considered. We apply the results to a specific superconducting quantum computing example, which illustrates the use of this technique for calculating error probabilities.

  9. The Science of Level Design Kenneth Hullett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    elements and gameplay. The next step is to validate this theory with a series of experiments that test]: Human factors, K.8.0 [Personal Computing]: Games General Terms Design, Human Factors Keywords level propose to conduct a series of experiments. A combination of qualitative and quantitative assessments

  10. Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation for Spacecraft Rendezvous Functions of automation than previous NASA vehicles, due to program requirements for automation, including Automated Ren authority between humans and computers (i.e. automation) as a prime driver for cost, safety, and mission

  11. Complexity Management in System-level Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , and work with a range of constraints and optimization criteria. This design process is quite complex1 of 22 Complexity Management in System-level Design Asawaree Kalavade Edward A. Lee Keywords design space exploration, hardware-software codesign, design methodology management, design flow

  12. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues.

  13. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report.

  14. BIOSAFETY LEVELS AND RISK ASSESSMENT POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    BIOSAFETY LEVELS AND RISK ASSESSMENT POLICY Procedure: 2.2 Created: 3/7/2014 Version: 1.0 A risk assessment to account for the characteristics of the agent being used, the procedures of infection, a risk assessment is required in all cases to initially establish the appropriate biocontainment

  15. County Level Wind Erosion Estimation Using National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Fuller (1987), Rao (2003). 11 #12;Model searching for Wind Erosion In NRI, wind erosion WEQCounty Level Wind Erosion Estimation Using National Resources Inventory Survey Taps Maiti. Approx. 3 points/PSU; 800,000 points in 1997 NRI 4 #12; Data on Urban land, small water etc

  16. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  17. Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasareanu, Corina

    Combining Unit-level Symbolic Execution and System-level Concrete Execution for Testing NASA Software Corina S. Pasareanu, Peter C. Mehlitz, David H. Bushnell, Karen Gundy-Burlet, Michael Lowry NASA.h.bushnell, karen.gundy-burlet, michael.r.lowry}@nasa.gov Suzette Person Department of Computer Science

  18. INTRODUCTION Fish routinely exhibit a level of agility that far surpasses the level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    4043 INTRODUCTION Fish routinely exhibit a level of agility that far surpasses the level that human-engineered underwater vehicles have been able to achieve (Bandyopadhyay, 2002). Fish such as sunfish, perch and goldfish in both quiescent and turbulent flows (Lauder et al., 2006). There are many reasons why fish are more

  19. Relative Sea-Level Chanhes in Iceland 25 3. Relative Sea-Level Changes in Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inglfsson, lafur

    Relative Sea-Level Chanhes in Iceland 25 3. Relative Sea-Level Changes in Iceland: new Aspects of the Weichselian Deglaciation of Iceland Hreggviur Nordahl1 and Halldr G. Ptursson2 1 University of Iceland, Science Institute, Dunhagi 3, IS-107 Reykjavik 2 Icelandic Institute of Natural History, IS-600 Akureyri 3

  20. HighHigh--LevelSynthesisforLevelSynthesisfor LowPowerLowPower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    ;4 DesignQualityMeasuresDesignQualityMeasures Area Performance Power Testability1 HighHigh--LevelSynthesisforLevelSynthesisfor LowPowerLowPower SarajuP.Mohanty smohanty.Dynamicpowerdissipationdetails 3.Howtoreducedynamicpower? 4.EffectofFrequencyonEnergy/Power 5.Fewlow-powerresearchworks #12

  1. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke; Kajikawa, Shu-hei [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Uesato, Shin-ichi [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Engineering, Kansai University, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)] [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Engineering, Kansai University, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazushi [Proubase Technology Inc., Kanagawa 211-0063 (Japan)] [Proubase Technology Inc., Kanagawa 211-0063 (Japan); Tanimura, Susumu [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Koji, Takehiko [Department of Histology and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)] [Department of Histology and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kohno, Michiaki, E-mail: kohnom@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan) [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Proubase Technology Inc., Kanagawa 211-0063 (Japan); Kyoto University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the anticancer efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. MEK inhibitors sensitize human tumor xenografts to HDAC inhibitor cytotoxicity. Such the enhanced efficacy is achieved by a transient blockade of the ERK pathway. This drug combination provides a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. -- Abstract: The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showed that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients.

  2. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2001-07-13

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  3. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  4. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  5. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehner, J.R.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, W. T.

    2012-02-17

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  6. Circuit level modeling of inductive elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muyshondt, G.P.; Portnoy, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Design and analysis of spacecraft power systems have been difficult to perform because of the lack of circuit level models for nonlinear inductive elements. This paper reviews some of the models which have been proposed, their limitations, and applications. An improved saturation dependent model will be described. The model has been implemented in SPICE and with a commercial circuit program and demonstrated to be satisfactory in both implementations. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  7. SU-E-T-552: Minimum Monitor Unit Effects On Plan Quality for Multi-Field Optimized Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, M; Beltran, C; Herman, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the minimum monitor unit (MU) on the quality of clinical treatment plans for scanned proton therapy. Methods: Delivery system characteristics limit the minimum number of protons that can be delivered per spot, resulting in a min-MU limit. Plan quality can be impacted by the min-MU limit. Two sites were used to investigate the impact of min-MU on treatment plans: pediatric brain tumor at a depth of 5-10 cm; a head and neck tumor at a depth of 1-20 cm. Three field intensity modulated spot scanning proton plans were created for each site with the following parameter variations: min-MU limit range of 0.0000-0.0060; and spot spacing range of 0.5-2.0? of the nominal spot size at isocenter in water (?=4mm in this work). Comparisons were based on target homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. Results: The increase of the min-MU with a fixed spot spacing decreases plan quality both in homogeneous target coverage and in the avoidance of critical structures. Both head and neck and pediatric brain plans show a 20% increase in relative dose for the hot spot in the CTV and 10% increase in key critical structures when comparing min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0060 with a fixed spot spacing of 1?. The DVHs of CTVs show min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0010 produce similar plan quality and quality decreases as the min-MU limit increases beyond 0.0020. As spot spacing approaches 2?, degradation in plan quality is observed when no min-MU limit is imposed. Conclusion: Given a fixed spot spacing of ? 1? of the spot size in water, plan quality decreases as min- MU increases greater than 0.0020. The effect of min-MU should be taken into consideration while planning spot scanning proton therapy treatments to realize its full potential.

  8. Analysis of spatial correlations in a model 2D liquid through eigenvalues and eigenvectors of atomic level stress matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Levashov; M. G. Stepanov

    2015-07-27

    Considerations of local atomic level stresses associated with each atom represent a particular approach to address structures of disordered materials at the atomic level. We studied structural correlations in a two-dimensional model liquid using molecular dynamics simulations in the following way. We diagonalized the atomic level stress tensors of every atom and investigated correlations between the eigenvalues and orientations of the eigenvectors of different atoms as a function of distance between them. It is demonstrated that the suggested approach can be used to characterize structural correlations in disordered materials. In particular, we found that changes in the stress correlation functions on decrease of temperature are the most pronounced for the pairs of atoms with separation distance that corresponds to the first minimum in the pair density function. We also show that the angular dependencies of the stress correlation functions previously reported in [Phys. Rev. E v.91, 032301 (2015)] related not to the alleged anisotropies of the Eshelby's stress fields, but to the rotational properties of the stress tensors.

  9. Fermi level stabilization and band edge energies in Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detert, Douglas M.; Tom, Kyle B.; Dubon, Oscar D. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Battaglia, Corsin; Javey, Ali [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Denlinger, Jonathan D. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lim, Sunnie H. N. [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Anders, Andr [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Yu, Kin M.; Walukiewicz, Wladek [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    We have measured the band edge energies of Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O thin films as a function of composition by three independent techniques: we determine the Fermi level stabilization energy by pinning the Fermi level with ion irradiation, measure the binding energy of valence band states and core levels by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and probe shifts in the conduction band and valence band density of states using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, respectively. The three techniques find consensus in explaining the origin of compositional trends in the optical-bandgap narrowing upon Cd incorporation in wurtzite ZnO and widening upon Zn incorporation in rocksalt CdO. The conduction band minimum is found to be stationary for both wurtzite and rocksalt alloys, and a significant upward rise of the valence band maximum accounts for the majority of these observed bandgap changes. Given these band alignments, alloy disorder scattering is found to play a negligible role in decreasing the electron mobility for all alloys. These band alignment details, combined with the unique optical and electrical properties of the two phase regimes, make CdZnO alloys attractive candidates for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  10. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic levels in eggs, feathers, and tissues of Canada geese of the New Jersey Meadowlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsipoura, Nellie; Burger, Joanna; Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 ; Newhouse, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 ; Gochfeld, Michael; Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 ; Mizrahi, David

    2011-08-15

    The New Jersey Meadowlands are located within the heavily urbanized New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary and have been subject to contamination due to effluent and runoff from industry, traffic, and homes along the Hackensack River and nearby waterways. These extensive wetlands, though heavily impacted by development and pollution, support a wide array of bird and other wildlife species. Persistent contaminants may pose threats to birds in these habitats, affecting reproduction, egg hatchability, nestling survival, and neurobehavioral development. Metals of concern in the Meadowlands include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury. These metals were analyzed in eggs, feathers, muscle, and liver of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) breeding in four wetland sites. We sampled geese collected during control culling (n=26) and collected eggs from goose nests (n=34). Levels of arsenic were below the minimum quantification level (MQL) in most samples, and cadmium and mercury were low in all tissues sampled. Chromium levels were high in feather samples. Mercury levels in eggs of Canada geese, an almost exclusively herbivorous species, were lower (mean {+-}SE 4.29{+-}0.30 {mu}g/g wet weight) than in eggs of omnivorous mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and insectivorous red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) from the Meadowlands, consistent with trophic level differences. However, lead levels were higher in the goose eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) than in the other species. Geese also had higher levels of lead in feathers (1910{+-}386 ng/g) than those seen in Meadowlands passerines. By contrast, muscle and liver lead levels were within the range reported in waterfowl elsewhere, possibly a reflection of metal sequestration in eggs and feathers. Elevated lead levels may be the result of sediment ingestion or ingestion of lead shot and sinkers. Finally, lead levels in goose liver (249{+-}44.7 ng/g) and eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) may pose a risk if consumed frequently by humans. Mill Creek, the site with the most documented prior contamination, had significantly elevated cadmium, chromium, mercury, and lead in goose tissues. - Highlights: {yields} The NJ Meadowlands include extensive wetlands in the urban NYC metropolitan area. {yields} We analyzed eggs, feathers, muscle, and liver of Canada geese at 4 Meadowlands sites. {yields} As, Cd, and Hg were low in all tissues sampled, while Cr was high in feathers. {yields} Pb was higher in goose eggs and feathers than in other Meadowlands bird species. {yields} Pb in muscle and liver was lower and within the range seen in waterfowl elsewhere.

  11. Planar Bichromatic Minimum Spanning Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Merrick3 Rodrigo I. Silveira2 Mostafa Vahedi2 1 European Centre for Soft Computing Mieres, Asturias, Spain

  12. Maximum output at minimum cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    working life of the turbine. Gamesa WindNet The new generation SCADA System (a wind farm control system

  13. A thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (time-GCM): Equinox solar cycle minimum simulations (30-500 km)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C.

    1994-03-15

    A new simulation model of the mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere with coupled electrodynamics has been developed and used to calculate the global circulation, temperature and compositional structure between 30-500 km for equinox, solar cycle minimum, geomagnetic quiet conditions. The model incorporates all of the features of the NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIE-GCM) but the lower boundary has been extended downward from 97 to 30 km (10 mb) and it includes the physical and chemical processes appropriate for the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The first simulation used Rayleigh friction to represent gravity wave drag in the middle atmosphere and although it was able to close the mesospheric jets it severely damped the diurnal tide. Reduced Rayleigh friction allowed the tide to penetrate to thermospheric heights but did not close the jets. A gravity wave parameterization developed by Fritts and Lu allows both features to exist simultaneously with the structure of tides and mean flow dependent upon the strength of the gravity wave source. The model calculates a changing dynamic structure with the mean flow and diurnal tide dominant in the mesosphere, the in-situ generated semi-diurnal tide dominating the lower thermosphere and an in-situ generated diurnal tide in the upper thermosphere. The results also show considerable interaction between dynamics and composition, especially atomic oxygen between 85 and 120 km. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Effects of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Allison, David Post [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhoea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  15. The effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin concentrations on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Trevino-Dopatka, Sonia [ORNL; Maggart, Michael J [ORNL; Boisen, Nadia [University of Virginia School of Medicine; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Nataro, James [University of Virginia School of Medicine; Allison, David P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  16. Revisions included in HUD Intermediate Minimum Property Standards Supplement 4930. 2, 1977 edition: solar heating and domestic hot-water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This addendum to a 1977 HUD publication contains revisions and additions to the existing intermediate minimum property standards supplment for solar heating and cooling systems. Building design revisions cover fire protection, penetrations, and roof coverings. Changes to guidelines for materials, such as those for thermal and ultraviolet stability and moisture resistance, are detailed. Flash points of toxic and combustive fluids, chemical and physical compatibility, and flame spread and resistance of insulation materials are also explained. Construction standards were revised for hail loads; waterproofing insulated exterior storage containers, pipes, and ducts; and for passive systems. Standards also were revised for power-operated protection, dust and dirt prevention, and chimney and vent heights. Radiation temperature, draft control, and thermal energy storage and loss standards were deleted. Other standards for insulation values for thermal devices, lighting protection, and sealing and testing air distribution systems were added. Appended materials contain revisions to calculation procedures for determining the thermal performance of active, solar space heating, and domestic hot water systems. A revised materials list for properties of typical cover materials, absorptive coatings, thermal storage unit containers, and heat-transfer liquids is provided. Revisions to acceptable engineering practice standards are also included.

  17. THE ROCHE LIMIT FOR CLOSE-ORBITING PLANETS: MINIMUM DENSITY, COMPOSITION CONSTRAINTS, AND APPLICATION TO THE 4.2 hr PLANET KOI 1843.03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappaport, Saul; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Levine, Alan E-mail: sar@mit.edu E-mail: larogers@caltech.edu

    2013-08-10

    The requirement that a planet must orbit outside of its Roche limit gives a lower limit on the planet's mean density. The minimum density depends almost entirely on the orbital period and is immune to systematic errors in the stellar properties. We consider the implications of this density constraint for the newly identified class of small planets with periods shorter than half a day. When the planet's radius is accurately known, this lower limit to the density can be used to restrict the possible combinations of iron and rock within the planet. Applied to KOI 1843.03, a 0.6 R{sub Circled-Plus} planet with the shortest known orbital period of 4.245 hr, the planet's mean density must be {approx}> 7 g cm{sup -3}. By modeling the planetary interior subject to this constraint, we find that the composition of the planet must be mostly iron, with at most a modest fraction of silicates ({approx}< 30% by mass)

  18. Charged Jets in Minimum Bias p-Pb Collisions at sqrt(s) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rdiger Haake; for the ALICE collaboration

    2013-10-14

    Highly energetic jets are sensitive probes for the kinematics and the topology of nuclear collisions. Jets are produced in an early stage of the collision from hard-scattered partons, which fragment into a spray of charged and neutral particles. The measurement of jet spectra in p-Pb collisions provides an important way to quantify the effects of cold nuclear matter on jet production, fragmentation and hadronization. This is possible because the hot, dense medium produced in Pb-Pb collisions is not expected to form. Proton-Lead collisions also provide an important constraint for the nuclear parton density functions. The exact evaluation of the background from the underlying event is an important ingredient to correct the measured jet spectra. The system size in p-Pb collisions is much smaller than in Pb-Pb so that the methods for background estimation need to be refined. The analysis reported here is performed on p-Pb data taken at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.02 TeV by the ALICE detector at the LHC in the beginning of 2013. The focus of our analysis lies on the minimum bias charged jet spectra and their comparison to the spectra from pp collisions. For this analysis various estimates for the background and its fluctuations have been tested in p-Pb and PYTHIA simulations.

  19. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energy/spin-flip density functional theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minezawa, Noriyuki

    2014-10-28

    Examining photochemical processes in solution requires understanding the solvent effects on the potential energy profiles near conical intersections (CIs). For that purpose, the CI point in solution is determined as the crossing between nonequilibrium free energy surfaces. In this work, the nonequilibrium free energy is described using the combined method of linear-response free energy and collinear spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory. The proposed approach reveals the solvent effects on the CI geometries of stilbene in an acetonitrile solution and those of thymine in water. Polar acetonitrile decreases the energy difference between the twisted minimum and twisted-pyramidalized CI of stilbene. For thymine in water, the hydrogen bond formation stabilizes significantly the CI puckered at the carbonyl carbon atom. The result is consistent with the recent simulation showing that the reaction path via this geometry is open in water. Therefore, the present method is a promising way of identifying the free-energy crossing points that play an essential role in photochemistry of solvated molecules.

  20. The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have the following courses for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    4841 - Systems Design One of: Management 3380 - Technological Change and Organizational DevelopmentThe Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses competency in writing skills) before applying to the Faculty of Management for Year Two.This requirement can

  1. The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Change and Organizational Development Management 3820 - Object-Oriented Programming Techniques ManagementThe Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses be obtained on Economics 1001, Economics 2000 and Statistics 1770. Admission to Management programs

  2. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, R.H.; Keener, W.E.

    1995-02-28

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame. 6 figs.

  3. Simulation levels of detail for plant motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaudoin, Jacob Michael

    2013-02-22

    that motion interactive [PCOI, DCFOI, EMF03]. A comparison of our method with some of these other methods is provided in section 7. 1. SLODs have come into prominence only in the last few years [Ber97, CF97]. They have sometimes taken other names ? Endo et... al. refer to them as levels of motion detail, or LOmDs [EMF03]. There have been a wide variety of applications for SLODs. These include rigid body dynamics and motion [CIF99, DO01, CAF01], simple collision detection and response [CH97, ODG*03...

  4. EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel TravelChallengesOhio andTechnologiesLandEnergy BeginsComplex Level July,

  5. EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Site Level

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProvedTravel TravelChallengesOhio andTechnologiesLandEnergy BeginsComplex Level July,Site

  6. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility SGPScienceScienceLevel and

  7. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility SGPScienceScienceLevel

  8. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimatePast Sea Level Data

  9. Property:DIA/Level | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergyReportNumberCoolingTowerWaterUseWinterGrossCurrentLevel Jump

  10. Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title:Highlights LANS invests inHigh-Level Waste

  11. AVTA Voltec AC Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Systems Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing done on the Voltec Level 1 and Level 2 charging systems for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  12. HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL IONIZING RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Jacob I.

    2012-01-01

    any exposure to radiation at low levels of dose carries some1 as the dose of radiation increases above very low levels,any exposure to radiation at low levels of dose carries some

  13. Development of aircraft fuel burn modeling techniques with applications to global emissions modeling and assessment of the benefits of reduced vertical separation minimums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Tim (Tim Alan)

    2007-01-01

    Given the current level of concern over anthropogenic climate change and the role of commercial aviation in this process, the ability to adequately model and quantify fuel burn and emissions on a system wide scale is of ...

  14. High Level Waste Disposal System Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirk Gombert; M. Connolly; J. Roach; W. Holtzscheiter

    2005-02-01

    The high level waste (HLW) disposal system consists of the Yucca Mountain Facility (YMF) and waste product (e.g. glass) generation facilities. Responsibility for management is shared between the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) and Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The DOE-RW license application and the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD), as well as the DOE-EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification for Vitrified High Level Waste Forms (WAPS) govern the overall performance of the system. This basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider waste form and process technology research and development (R&D), which have been conducted by DOE-EM, international agencies (i.e. ANSTO, CEA), and the private sector; as well as the technical bases for including additional waste forms in the final license application. This will yield a more optimized HLW disposal system to accelerate HLW disposition, more efficient utilization of the YMF, and overall system cost reduction.

  15. Low level tank waste disposal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  16. MESERAN Calibration for Low Level Organic Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovich, M.G.

    2004-04-08

    Precision cleaning studies done at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), the Kansas City Plant (KCP), and at other locations within the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons complex over the last 30 years have depended upon results from MESERAN Evaporative Rate Analysis for detecting low levels of organic contamination. The characterization of the surface being analyzed is carried out by depositing a Carbon-14 tagged radiochemical onto the test surface and monitoring the rate at which the radiochemical disappears from the surface with a Geiger-Mueller counter. In the past, the total number of counts over a 2-minute span have been used to judge whether a surface is contaminated or not and semi-quantitatively to what extent. This technique is very sensitive but has not enjoyed the broad acceptance of a purely quantitative analysis. The work on this project developed calibrations of various organic contaminants typically encountered in KCP operations. In addition, a new analysis method was developed to enhance the ability of MESERAN Analyzers to detect organic contamination and yield quantitative data in the microgram and nanogram levels.

  17. PUREX low-level waste radionuclide characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.W.; LeBaron, G.J.

    1995-01-16

    The PUREX low-level waste (LLW) radionuclide characterization document describes the methodology for the characterization of solid LLW and solid low-level mixed waste (MW) with the respect to radiological characteristics. This document only serves as an overview of the PUREX radionuclide characterization methodology and provides specific examples for how the radionuclide distribution is derived. It would be impractical to provide all background information in this document. If further clarification and background information is required, consult the PUREX Regulatory Compliance group files. This document applies to only that waste generated in or is the responsibility of the PUREX facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes the requirements for radioactive solid waste in DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters 2 and 3 from DOE Order 5820.2A requires that generators of solid wastes in the LLW categories and the radioactive mixed waste subcategories: (1) identify the major radionuclides in each solid waste matrix and (2) determine the radionuclide concentrations and waste classes of their solid wastes. In addition, the Order also requires each generator to carry out a compliance program that ensures the proper certification of the solid waste generated.

  18. Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level Control Development Under Various Thermal Conditions Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various Thermal Conditions 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  19. Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly...

  20. Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline Engine Downsizing Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline Engine Downsizing Discussed...

  1. Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low- LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP MANUAL REVISION 3 JUNE 2008 (This page intentionally left blank) Low-Level JVllsfe Disposal Fllcilil' Federal Review Group...

  2. DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities May 16,...

  3. SEM supports CMM-SW Level 2 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMMSW) level 2. SEM supports CMM-SW Level 2 More...

  4. Agricultural Productivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Chen, Jing; Chu, Baojin

    1999-01-01

    bias any measurement of agricultural productivity, becauseProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National MeasurementProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

  5. Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid The National Renewable Energy...

  6. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications Uses a model to predict and...

  7. GIANT GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT OF RELATIVISTIC SOLAR PROTONS ON 2005 JANUARY 20. I. SPACESHIP EARTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.; Pyle, R.; Saiz, A.; Ruffolo, D. E-mail: clem@bartol.udel.edu E-mail: pyle@bartol.udel.edu E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th

    2013-07-10

    A ground level enhancement (GLE) is a solar event that accelerates ions (mostly protons) to GeV range energies in such great numbers that ground-based detectors, such as neutron monitors, observe their showers in Earth's atmosphere above the Galactic cosmic ray background. GLEs are of practical interest because an enhanced relativistic ion flux poses a hazard to astronauts, air crews, and aircraft electronics, and provides the earliest direct indication of an impending space radiation storm. The giant GLE of 2005 January 20 was the second largest on record (and largest since 1956), with up to 4200% count rate enhancement at sea level. We analyzed data from the Spaceship Earth network, supplemented to comprise 13 polar neutron monitor stations with distinct asymptotic viewing directions and Polar Bare neutron counters at South Pole, to determine the time evolution of the relativistic proton density, energy spectrum, and three-dimensional directional distribution. We identify two energy-dispersive peaks, indicating two solar injections. The relativistic solar protons were initially strongly beamed, with a peak maximum-to-minimum anisotropy ratio over 1000:1. The directional distribution is characterized by an axis of symmetry, determined independently for each minute of data, whose angle from the magnetic field slowly varied from about 60 Degree-Sign to low values and then rose to about 90 Degree-Sign . The extremely high relativistic proton flux from certain directions allowed 10 s tracking of count rates, revealing fluctuations of period {approx}> 2 minutes with up to 50% fractional changes, which we attribute to fluctuations in the axis of symmetry.

  8. Laboratory Experiments and Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Bed Leveler Used to Level the Bottom of Ship Channels after Dredging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Ephraim Udo

    2011-02-22

    This study was conducted to ascertain the impacts of bed leveling, following ship channel dredging operations, and to also investigate the hydrodynamic flow field around box bed levelers. Laboratory experiments were conducted with bed levelers...

  9. Modeling and simulation technology readiness levels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clay, Robert L.; Shneider, Max S.; Marburger, S. J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to establish a framework for assigning and communicating technology readiness levels (TRLs) for the modeling and simulation (ModSim) capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories. This effort was undertaken as a special assignment for the Weapon Simulation and Computing (WSC) program office led by Art Hale, and lasted from January to September 2006. This report summarizes the results, conclusions, and recommendations, and is intended to help guide the program office in their decisions about the future direction of this work. The work was broken out into several distinct phases, starting with establishing the scope and definition of the assignment. These are characterized in a set of key assertions provided in the body of this report. Fundamentally, the assignment involved establishing an intellectual framework for TRL assignments to Sandia's modeling and simulation capabilities, including the development and testing of a process to conduct the assignments. To that end, we proposed a methodology for both assigning and understanding the TRLs, and outlined some of the restrictions that need to be placed on this process and the expected use of the result. One of the first assumptions we overturned was the notion of a ''static'' TRL--rather we concluded that problem context was essential in any TRL assignment, and that leads to dynamic results (i.e., a ModSim tool's readiness level depends on how it is used, and by whom). While we leveraged the classic TRL results from NASA, DoD, and Sandia's NW program, we came up with a substantially revised version of the TRL definitions, maintaining consistency with the classic level definitions and the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) approach. In fact, we substantially leveraged the foundation the PCMM team provided, and augmented that as needed. Given the modeling and simulation TRL definitions and our proposed assignment methodology, we conducted four ''field trials'' to examine how this would work in practice. The results varied substantially, but did indicate that establishing the capability dependencies and making the TRL assignments was manageable and not particularly time consuming. The key differences arose in perceptions of how this information might be used, and what value it would have (opinions ranged from negative to positive value). The use cases and field trial results are included in this report. Taken together, the results suggest that we can make reasonably reliable TRL assignments, but that using those without the context of the information that led to those results (i.e., examining the measures suggested by the PCMM table, and extended for ModSim TRL purposes) produces an oversimplified result--that is, you cannot really boil things down to just a scalar value without losing critical information.

  10. Acceptor levels in ZnMgO:N probed by deep level optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, A.; Hierro, A. Muoz, E.

    2014-02-24

    A combination of deep level optical spectroscopy and lighted capacitance voltage profiling has been used to analyze the effect of N into the energy levels close to the valence band of Zn{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}O. Three energy levels at E{sub V}?+?0.47?eV, E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV, and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV are observed in all films with concentrations in the range of 10{sup 15}10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. The two shallowest traps at E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV have very large concentrations that scale with the N exposure and are thus potential acceptor levels. In order to correctly quantify the deep level concentrations, a metal-insulator-semiconductor model has been invoked, explaining well the resulting capacitance-voltage curves.

  11. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  12. Draft low level waste technical summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information.

  13. Level Density in the Complex Scaling Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryusuke Suzuki; Takayuki Myo; Kiyoshi Kato

    2005-05-18

    It is shown that the continuum level density (CLD) at unbound energies can be calculated with the complex scaling method (CSM), in which the energy spectra of bound states, resonances and continuum states are obtained in terms of $L^2$ basis functions. In this method, the extended completeness relation is applied to the calculation of the Green functions, and the continuum-state part is approximately expressed in terms of discretized complex scaled continuum solutions. The obtained result is compared with the CLD calculated exactly from the scattering phase shift. The discretization in the CSM is shown to give a very good description of continuum states. We discuss how the scattering phase shifts can inversely be calculated from the discretized CLD using a basis function technique in the CSM.

  14. The Impact of Teachers' Expectations, Parents' Expectations, and Academic Self-Efficacy on the Achievement of English Language Learners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera, Vivina

    2012-10-19

    Given the projected increase of Hispanic Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs), researchers have begun examining issues related to their high levels of school dropout, largely stemming from academic underachievement. ...

  15. Baldrige Education Criteria for Performance Excellence: perceptions of district personnel of implementation and impact on collective teacher efficacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeRoy, Kathryn A.

    2005-11-01

    systematic approaches throughout the organization. ?? Commitment and implementation begins at the senior leadership level of central office and cascades through the organization to principals and classroom teachers. The extent to which systematic management...

  16. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-04-08

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  17. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-08-18

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  18. Efficacy of amodiaquine, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and their combination for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in children in Cameroon at the time of policy change to artemisinin-based combination therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mbacham, Wilfred F.; Evehe, Marie-Solange B.; Netongo, Palmer M.; Ateh, Isabel A.; Mimche, Patrice N.; Ajua, Anthony; Nji, Akindeh M.; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B.; Tawe, Bantar; Hallett, Rachel; Roper, Cally; Targett, Geoffrey; Greenwood, Brian

    2010-01-27

    , Ngongang O, Netongo P, Ajua A, Achidi EA: Assessment of the efficacy and safety of amodiaquine plus artesunate versus atermether-lumefantrine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children in Ngaoundere, Cameroon, 2007. Report to Ministry...

  19. Stochastic, Utility Accrual Real-Time Scheduling with Task-Level and System-Level Timeliness Assurances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Binoy

    Stochastic, Utility Accrual Real-Time Scheduling with Task-Level and System-Level Timeliness increasing interests and success in the context of Utility Accrual (UA) scheduling. However, few analytical results, such as bounds on task-level and system-level accrued utilities are known. In this paper, we

  20. Theory of Deep Impurity Levels in Cucl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REN, SY; Allen, Roland E.; DOW, JD; LEFKOWITZ, I.

    1982-01-01

    possiby, a' 1 1 ttice relaxation. e p A, Cu site Egap Hf Sc CrY Fe Ag MnPt Re CuRuMp N!tLu Ni Cp~Ir Au0sfcgbV~i Zr ~%At!I]tv! " E Cu site I s I -I5 "IO35 30 -25 -20 IMPURITY PO I s I -5 0 ( -like) substitution-V of the A & s- i~ g edicted... (eV)IMP UR ITY POTENT ies o t e - 'c (d 2 2-like e-f the E-symme?c -like EdA defect levels in the gap when on t e ~20925 P IMPURITY LE S yN CuClTHEORY OF DEE I Hf Sc Cr Y Fa n NELu fbi Cour AuCsPcAbVYhfTi a &r I I"li l II tI "I/I t'I Egop 3...

  1. PSA Bounce and Biochemical Failure After Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Study of 820 Patients With a Minimum of 3 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caloglu, Murat, E-mail: caloglumurat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne (Turkey); Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente-Ohio, Parma, OH (United States); Magi-Galuzzi, Christina [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical or dosimetric factors associated with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, as well as an association between a PSA bounce and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), in patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A variety of clinical and treatment factors were examined in 820 patients who had a minimum of 3 years of PSA follow-up with T1-T2cN0M0 prostate cancer. Four different PSA threshold values were used for defining a PSA bounce: a PSA rise of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL. Results: A PSA bounce of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL was noted in 247 patients (30.1%), 161 (19.6%), 105 (12.8%), and 78 (9.5%), respectively. The median time to the first PSA rise was 17.4, 16.25, 16.23, and 15.71 months, respectively, vs. 34.35 months for a biochemical failure (p < 0.0001). A PSA rise of {>=}0.2 ng/mL was the only definition for which there was a significant difference in bRFS between bounce and non-bounce patients. The 5-year bRFS rate of patients having a PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 was 97.7% vs. 91% for those who did not have a PSA bounce (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis for biochemical failure, age, risk group, and PSAs per year had a statistically significant correlation with PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 ng/mL. On multivariate analysis, age and PSAs per year remained statistically significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0456, respectively). Conclusions: A bounce definition of a rise {>=}0.2 ng/mL is a reliable definition among several other definitions. The time to first PSA rise is the most valuable factor for distinguishing between a bounce and biochemical failure.

  2. On the question of low level cloud response to the temperature field of the sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, James Elwood

    1968-01-01

    in both ship and satellite data. Maximum cloudiness was observed in winter and susrner, and a cloud minimum in April and May. The minimum cloud period reflected the presence of the subtropical high and the associated atmospheric sub- sidence rather... photographs from ESSA III meteorological satellite and urface data. Vi ACKNQWLEDGEMENTS I wish to thank the Office of Naval Research, through Texas AlkM Research Foundation Project 286-13, for providing support for this portion of an examination...

  3. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  4. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmoreeither 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models.less

  5. Variability-aware system-level design and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Saumya

    2009-01-01

    5 Variation-aware Analysis and Design Techniques at theof-the-art system-level analysis and design methodologies dosystem level design. Analysis and design techniques that are

  6. Universality level statistics disordered systems Heiko Bauke* and Stephan Mertens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mertens, Stephan

    k #8# check assumption statistically independent energy levels measured distribution of # kUniversality level statistics disordered systems Heiko Bauke* and Stephan Mertens + Institut published August 2004) Energy spectra disordered systems share a common feature: If entropy quenched

  7. Artificial general intelligence: an organism and level based position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Leslie S.

    Artificial general intelligence: an organism and level based position statement Leslie S. SMITH 1. Keywords. artificial general intelligence, brain model, paramecium, level interaction Introduction There are many views of what should be described as artificial general intelligence. Gen- eral intelligence

  8. Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3 and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels:...

  9. Oxygen levels in thermoplastic microfluidic devices during cell culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochs, Christopher J.

    We developed a computational model to predict oxygen levels in microfluidic plastic devices during cell culture. This model is based on experimental evaluation of oxygen levels. Conditions are determined that provide ...

  10. CRAD, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-11, Rev. 0) CRAD, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-11, Rev. 0) April 2015...

  11. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  12. HIGH-LEVEL STATIC ANALYSIS FOR GENERIC Douglas Gregor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    HIGH-LEVEL STATIC ANALYSIS FOR GENERIC LIBRARIES By Douglas Gregor A Thesis Submitted;HIGH-LEVEL STATIC ANALYSIS FOR GENERIC LIBRARIES By Douglas Gregor An Abstract of a Thesis Submitted. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Static analysis

  13. Automatic Thread-Level Parallelization in the Chombo AMR Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Automatic Thread-Level Parallelization in the Chombo AMRused target language for an automatic migration of the largemacros a perfect target for automatic ?ne-grained loop-level

  14. Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will present a process for developing community-based sea level rise projections and facilitating their use.

  15. Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiyama, Masahiro.

    To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

  16. Architectural Level Risk Assessment Tool Based on UML Specifications 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goseva-Popstojanova, Katerina

    level of a failure of component/connector is estimated using FMEA [12]. Estimate scenario risk factor

  17. Track 1: Safety Culture- Taking ISMS to the Next Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 1: Safety Culture - Taking ISMS to the Next Level

  18. Level-1 Milestone 350 Definitions v1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, T

    2006-11-17

    This milestone is the direct result of work that started seven years ago with the planning for a 100-teraFLOP platform and will be satisfied when 100 teraFLOPS is placed in operation and readied for Stockpile Stewardship Program simulations. The end product of this milestone will be a production-level, high-performance computing system, code named Purple, designed to be used to solve the most demanding stockpile stewardship problems, that is, the large-scale application problems at the edge of our understanding of weapon physics. This fully functional 100 teraFLOPS system must be able to serve a diverse scientific and engineering workload. It must also have a robust code development and production environment, both of which facilitate the workload requirements. This multi-year effort includes major activities in contract management, facilities, infrastructure, system software, and user environment and support. Led by LLNL, the trilabs defined the statement of work for a 100-teraFLOP system that resulted in a contract with IBM known as the Purple contract. LLNL worked with IBM throughout the contract period to resolve issues and collaborated with the Program to resolve contractual issues to ensure delivery of a platform that best serves the Program for a reasonable cost. The Purple system represents a substantial increase in the classified compute resources at LLNL for NNSA. The center computer environment must be designed to accept the Purple system and to scale with the increase of compute resources to achieve required end-to-end services. Networking, archival storage, visualization servers, global file systems, and system software will all be enhanced to support Purple's size and architecture. IBM and LLNL are sharing responsibility for Purple's system software. LLNL is responsible for the scheduler, resource manager, and some code development tools. Through the Purple contract, IBM is responsible for the remainder of the system software including the operating system, parallel file system, and runtime environment. LLNL, LANL, and SNL share responsibility for the Purple user environment. Since LLNL is the host for Purple, LLNL has the greatest responsibility. LLNL will provide customer support for Purple to the tri-labs and as such has the lead for user documentation, negotiating the Purple usage model, mapping of the ASC computational environment requirements to the Purple environment, and demonstrating those requirements have been met. In addition, LLNL will demonstrate important capabilities of the computing environment including full functionality of visualization tools, file transport between Purple and remote site file systems, and the build environment for principle ASC codes. LANL and SNL are responsible for delivering unique capabilities in support of their users, porting important applications and libraries, and demonstrating remote capabilities. The key capabilities that LANL and SNL will test are user authorization and authentication, data transfer, file system, data management, and visualization. SNL and LANL should port and run in production mode a few key applications on a substantial number of Purple nodes.

  19. Learning at the Knowledge Level Thomas G. Dietterich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for such predictions has been suppressed. The key abstraction underlying the knowledge level is the notionLearning at the Knowledge Level Thomas G. Dietterich Department of Computer Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331 dietterich%oregonstate@csnetrelay Running head: Knowledge Level Learning #12

  20. Levels and Sources of Forest Fire Prevention Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Levels and Sources of Forest Fire Prevention Knowledge of California Hunters William S. Folkman U;Folkman, William S. 1963. Levels and sources of forest fire prevention knowl- edge of California hunters-managerial occupations. Their level of knowl- edge about forest fire prevention is generally high, but their knowledge

  1. Pure recoil corrections to hydrogen energy levels. Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Pure recoil corrections to hydrogen energy levels. Krzysztof Pachucki Max--Planck--Institut F approximation for the hydrogenic energy levels we can assume that the mass of the nucleus is infinite, vacuum polarization, etc. For the precise determination of hydrogenic energy levels we have to include

  2. Computing Energy Levels of the Confined Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Computing Energy Levels of the Confined Hydrogen Atom Karl Kastner 02/03/2012 Supervisors: Martin of the Unconfined Atom The Confined Hydrogen Atom Energy Levels of the Confined Two Dimensional Hydrogen Atom Thesis of the Free Hydrogen Atom principal quantum number n EineV 0 5 10 15 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Energy Levels

  3. APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    - 1 - APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION EGAN, C., STEVEN, G. B., SHIM, W of the Camera-ready paper. #12;- 2 - APPLYING CACHING TO TWO-LEVEL ADAPTIVE BRANCH PREDICTION ABSTRACT During the 1990s Two-level Adaptive Branch Predictors were developed to meet the requirement for accurate branch

  4. Multi-Level TESLA: Broadcast Authentication for Distributed Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning, Peng

    Multi-Level TESLA: Broadcast Authentication for Distributed Sensor Networks DONGGANG LIU and PENG named multi-level TESLA based on TESLA, a broadcast authentication protocol whose scalability is limited by its unicast-based initial parameter distribution. Multi-level TESLA satisfies several nice

  5. Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Ofqual: A level Reform Consultation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Ofqual: A level Reform Consultation September 2012 1 Ofqual: A Level Reform Consultation Response by the Wellcome Trust September 2012 Key Points National Subject to university. We are therefore pleased to respond to this consultation on reforming A levels. Our comments

  6. LOW LEVEL JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    THESIS LOW LEVEL JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS Submitted by GABRIELA MORA ROJAS Department LEVEL JETS IN THE TROP- ICAL AMERICAS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS The climatologies of five tropical low level jets are studied through

  7. HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION Nikolai A. Maximenko1 and Pearn P of twin-satellite mission GRACE and mesoscale sea level tilt derived from the momentum balance as seen 55 #12;sea level exhibits excellent accuracy on mesoscale, but may contain significant systematic

  8. Efficacy and Toxicity of Peritumoral Delivery of Nanoconjugated Cisplatin in an In Vivo Murine Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Marcus Laird

    2013-04-01

    , Simis YJ, Verkaik RS, et al. Hearing loss due to concurrent daily low- dose cisplatin chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Ra- diother Oncol. 2008;89(1):38-43. 13. Conley BA. Treatment of advanced head and neck cancer: what lessons... Efficacy and Toxicity of Peritumoral Delivery of Nanoconjugated Cisplatin in an In Vivo Murine Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stephanie M. Cohen, MD, MS; Nick Rockefeller, BS; Ridhwi Mukerji, MD; Dianne Durham, PhD; M. Laird Forrest, Ph...

  9. Randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of aerobic exercise in reducing metabolic risk in healthy older people: The Hertfordshire Physical Activity Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finucane, Francis M.; Horton, Jessica; Purslow, Lisa R.; Savage, David B.; Brage, Sren; Besson, Herve; Horton, Kenneth; De Lucia Rolfe, Ema; Sleigh, Alison; Sharp, Stephen J.; Martin, Helen; Ahie Sayer, Avan; Cooper, Cyrus; Ekelund, Ulf; Griffin, Simon J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2009-06-19

    affects the rela- tionship between muscle function and physical activity remains unknown. Methods/Design Study design This is a single centre, explanatory randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of a fully supervised twelve-week aero- bic exercise... five com- ponents of basic motor function in older people, namely dominant arm grip strength, time taken to rise from a chair and walk a short distance, repeated chair rises, cus- tomary walking speed and balance [55-57]. A sub-maxi- mal exercise test...

  10. The Science of Level Design: Design Patterns and Analysis of Player Behavior in First-person Shooter Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hullett, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    high- speed-data-driven-design-vs-console-development. [59]E. Byrne, Game Level Design, Charles River Media, 2004. A.Clayton, Introduction to Level Design for PC Games, Charles

  11. GreenIT Service Level Agreements IN SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS IN GRIDS WORKSHOP COLOCATED WITH IEEE/ACM GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GreenIT Service Level Agreements IN SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS IN GRIDS WORKSHOP COLOCATED WITH IEEE towards the inclusion of Green IT metrics as part of service level agreements for future Grids and Clouds. As part of this effort we need to revisit Green IT metrics and proxies that we consider optimizing against

  12. Systems study of the feasibility of high-level nuclear-waste fractionation for thermal stress control in a geologic repository: main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, R.W.; Elder, H.K.; McCallum, R.F.; Silviera, D.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Wiles, L.E.

    1983-06-01

    This study assesses the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium (Cs/Sr) components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic-repository thermal stresses in the region of the HLW. System costs are developed for a broad range of conditions comparing the Cs/Sr fractionation concept with disposal of 10-year-old vitrified HLW and vitrified HLW aged to achieve (through decay) the same heat output as the fractionated high-level waste (FHLW). All comparisons are based on a 50,000 metric ton equivalent (MTE) system. The FHLW and the Cs/Sr waste are both disposed of as vitrified waste but emplaced in separate areas of a basalt repository. The FHLW is emplaced in high-integrity packages at relatively high waste loading but low heat loading, while the Cs/Sr waste is emplaced in minimum-integrity packages at relatively high heat loading in a separate region of the repository. System cost comparisons are based on minimum cost combinations of canister diameter, waste concentration, and canister spacing in a basalt repository. The effects on both long- and near-term safety considerations are also addressed. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers the prospect of a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However, there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or lower costs. 37 figures, 58 tables.

  13. High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Gleason Score 8-10 and PSA Level {<=}15 ng/ mL Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, L. Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Murray, Brian C.; Reed, Joshua L. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: With widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, there has been an increase in men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer defined by a Gleason score (GS) {>=}8 coupled with a relatively low PSA level. The optimal management of these patients has not been defined. Cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in brachytherapy patients with a GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to October 2005, 174 patients with GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Of the patients, 159 (91%) received supplemental external beam radiation, and 113 (64.9%) received ADT. The median follow-up was 6.6 years. The median postimplant Day 0 minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume was 121.1% of prescription dose. Biochemical control was defined as a PSA level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Ten-year outcomes for patients without and with ADT were 95.2% and 92.5%, respectively, for CSS (p = 0.562); 86.5% and 92.6%, respectively, for bPFS (p = 0.204); and 75.2% and 66.0%, respectively, for OS (p = 0.179). The median post-treatment PSA level for biochemically controlled patients was <0.02 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis failed to identify any predictors for CSS, whereas bPFS and OS were most closely related to patient age. Conclusions: Patients with GS {>=}8 and PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL have excellent bPFS and CSS after brachytherapy with supplemental external beam radiotherapy. The use of ADT did not significantly impact bPFS, CSS, or OS.

  14. Core-level satellites and outer core-level multiplet splitting in Mn model compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Roos, Joseph W. [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)] [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We report a systematic study of the Mn 2p, 3s, and 3p core-level photoemission and satellite structures for Mn model compounds. Charge transfer from the ligand state to the 3d metal state is observed and is distinguished by prominent shake-up satellites. We also observe that the Mn 3s multiplet splitting becomes smaller as the Mn oxidation state increases, and that 3s-3d electron correlation reduces the branching ratio of the {sup 7}S:{sup 5}S states in the Mn 3s spectra. In addition, as the ligand electronegativity decreases, the spin-state purity is lost in the 3s spectra, as evidenced by peak broadening. Our results are best understood in terms of the configuration-interaction model including intrashell electron correlation, charge transfer, and final-state screening. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  15. Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data.

  16. Level repulsion, nuclear chaos, and conserved quantum numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1993-12-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of level spacings for states with the same spin and parity is described in which the average spacing is calculated for the total ensemble. Though the resulting distribution of level spacings for states of deformed nuclei with Z = 62 - 75 and A = 155 - 185 is the closest to that of a Poisson distribution yet obtained for nuclear levels, significant deviations are observed for small level spacings. Many, but not all, of the very closely-spaced levels have K-values differing by several units. The analysis of level spacings in {sup 157}Ho indicate that considerable caution should be excerised when drawing conclusions from such an analysis for a single deformed nucleus, since the sizable number of spacings that can be obtained from a few rotational bands are not all independent.

  17. Short gamma-ray burst formation rate from BATSE data using E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation and the minimum gravitational-wave event rate of a coalescing compact binary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Sawano, Tatsuya; Toyanago, Asuka [College of Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takahashi, Keitaro, E-mail: yonetoku@astro.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp, E-mail: takashi@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Using 72 short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) with well determined spectral data observed by BATSE, we determine their redshift and luminosity by applying the E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation for SGRBs found by Tsutsui et al. For 53 SGRBs with an observed flux brighter than 4 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup 2} s{sup 1}, the cumulative redshift distribution up to z = 1 agrees well with that of 22 Swift SGRBs. This suggests that the redshift determination by the E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation for SGRBs works well. The minimum event rate at z = 0 is estimated as R{sub on?axis}{sup min}=6.3{sub ?3.9}{sup +3.1} 10{sup ?10} events Mpc{sup ?3} yr{sup ?1}, so that the minimum beaming angle is 0.6-7.8 assuming a merging rate of 10{sup 7}- 4 10{sup 6} events Mpc{sup 3} yr{sup 1} suggested from the binary pulsar data. Interestingly, this angle is consistent with that for SGRB 130603B of ?4-8. On the other hand, if we assume a beaming angle of ?6 suggested from four SGRBs with the observed beaming angle value, then the minimum event rate including off-axis SGRBs is estimated as R{sub all}{sup min}=1.15{sub ?0.66}{sup +0.56} 10{sup ?7} events Mpc{sup ?3} yr{sup ?1}. If SGRBs are induced by the coalescence of binary neutron stars (NSs) and/or black holes (BHs), then this event rate leads to a minimum gravitational-wave detection rate of 3.8{sub ?2.2}{sup +1.8} (146{sub ?83}{sup +71}) events yr{sup ?1} for an NS-NS (NS-BH) binary, respectively, by a worldwide network with KAGRA, advanced-LIGO, advanced-VIRGO, and GEO.

  18. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

  19. Assessment of Geochemical Environment for the Proposed INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Craig Cooper

    2011-11-01

    Conservative sorption parameters have been estimated for the proposed Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. This analysis considers the influence of soils, concrete, and steel components on water chemistry and the influence of water chemistry on the relative partitioning of radionuclides over the life of the facility. A set of estimated conservative distribution coefficients for the primary media encountered by transported radionuclides has been recommended. These media include the vault system, concrete-sand-gravel mix, alluvium, and sedimentary interbeds. This analysis was prepared to support the performance assessment required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management.' The estimated distribution coefficients are provided to support release and transport calculations of radionuclides from the waste form through the vadose zone. A range of sorption parameters are provided for each key transport media, with recommended values being conservative. The range of uncertainty has been bounded through an assessment of most-likely-minimum and most-likely-maximum distribution coefficient values. The range allows for adequate assessment of mean facility performance while providing the basis for uncertainty analysis.

  20. Assessment of Radio-Frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Selected Mobile Base Stations (MBS) in Lokoja, Kogi State, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor, U J Nwankwo; Dada, S S; Onugba, A A; Ushie, P

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition and use of mobile phone is tremendously increasing especially in developing countries, but not without a concern. The greater concern among the public is principally over the proximity of mobile base stations (MBS) to residential areas rather than the use of handsets. In this paper, we present an assessment of Radio-Frequency (RF) radiation exposure level measurements and analysis of radiation power density (in \\mu W/sq m) from mobile base stations relative to radial distance (in metre). The minimum average power density from individual base station in the town was about 47\\mu W/sq m while the average maximum was about 1.5mW/sq m. Our result showed that average power density of a base station decreases with increase in distance (from base station) and that radiation intensity varies from one base station to another even at the same distance away. Our result (obtained signature of power density variation) was also compared with the 'expected' signature. It was found that radiation from external...

  1. Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Peer Evaluation arravt081vssnewhouse2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8...

  2. Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Meeting arravt081vssnewhouse2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8...

  3. Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Taming the Grid: Dynamic Load Composition Quantification at the Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holby, Edward F. Los Alamos...

  4. Energy Levels of "Hydrogen Atom" in Discrete Time Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Khrennikov; Yaroslav Volovich

    2006-04-27

    We analyze dynamical consequences of a conjecture that there exists a fundamental (indivisible) quant of time. In particular we study the problem of discrete energy levels of hydrogen atom. We are able to reconstruct potential which in discrete time formalism leads to energy levels of unperturbed hydrogen atom. We also consider linear energy levels of quantum harmonic oscillator and show how they are produced in the discrete time formalism. More generally, we show that in discrete time formalism finite motion in central potential leads to discrete energy spectrum, the property which is common for quantum mechanical theory. Thus deterministic (but discrete time!) dynamics is compatible with discrete energy levels.

  5. Operating Experience Level 3: Safety Concern: Occurrences of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    : Safety Concern: Occurrences of Crushing Injuries to Operators of Industrial Equipment Operating Experience Level 3: Safety Concern: Occurrences of Crushing Injuries to Operators...

  6. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Sonia; Barnett, Jon; Fincher, Ruth; Hurlimann, Anna; Mortreux, Colette; Waters, Elissa

    2013-07-15

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the lived values of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  7. Operating Experience Level 3, Safe Practices for Working with...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 makes the Department of Energy (DOE) nanotechnology community aware of a new publication as it relates to DOE's nanoscale safety...

  8. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Presentation Archive | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Triay High-Level Waste Corporate Board, Mark Gilbertson EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap and Major Technology Demonstrations Office of River Protection Idaho National...

  9. Quantum Random Access Codes using Single $d$-level Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armin Tavakoli; Alley Hameedi; Breno Marques; Mohamed Bourennane

    2015-04-30

    Random access codes (RACs) are used by a party to despite limited communication access an arbitrary subset of information held by another party. Quantum resources are known to enable RACs that break classical limitations. Here, we study quantum and classical RACs with high-level communication. We derive average performances of classical RACs and present families of high-level quantum RACs. Our results show that high-level quantum systems can significantly increase the advantage of quantum RACs over the classical counterparts. We demonstrate our findings in an experimental realization of a quantum RAC with four-level communication.

  10. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methane that actually preceded recent concerns about potential emissions from fracking," Dubey said. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected over...

  11. Energy level structure and transition probabilities in the spectra...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    H.M. 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DYSPROSIUM IONS; ENERGY LEVELS; ERBIUM IONS; EUROPIUM IONS; GADOLINIUM IONS; HOLMIUM IONS; LANTHANUM...

  12. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling off in 2014 after five years of increase Decline seen in undergraduate and master degrees, while number of doctoral...

  13. Application Assessment of Bi-Level LED Parking Lot Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-02-01

    This report summarizes an assessment project conducted to evaluate light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires with bi-level operation in an outdoor parking lot application.

  14. Operating Experience Level 3, OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 5, 2012 OE-3 2012-04: OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication Standard This Operating Experience Level 3 provides informaiton on the OSHA Revised Hazard Communication Standard. On...

  15. Energy Levels of "Hydrogen Atom" in Discrete Time Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khrennikov, A; Khrennikov, Andrei; Volovich, Yaroslav

    2006-01-01

    We analyze dynamical consequences of a conjecture that there exists a fundamental (indivisible) quant of time. In particular we study the problem of discrete energy levels of hydrogen atom. We are able to reconstruct potential which in discrete time formalism leads to energy levels of unperturbed hydrogen atom. We also consider linear energy levels of quantum harmonic oscillator and show how they are produced in the discrete time formalism. More generally, we show that in discrete time formalism finite motion in central potential leads to discrete energy spectrum, the property which is common for quantum mechanical theory. Thus deterministic (but discrete time!) dynamics is compatible with discrete energy levels.

  16. Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    must prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Copies of the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement are available at the...

  17. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea...

  18. Treatment of External Levels in Neutron Resonance Fitting: Application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    techniques are reviewed. They describe the contribution of external levels to the R matrix concisely in terms of average resonance parameters (strength function, effective...

  19. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

  20. Distributing leadership to teachers through a District Level Math Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Melavel Odviar

    2008-01-01

    to Distribute Leadership through a District-level Math21 Table 3.1: K-12 Math Council potentialinto changes in the Math Literacy Councils organization,