National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for minimum core competency

  1. DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS puzzle-693870_960_720.jpg PDF icon DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS More Documents & Publications DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR)

  2. Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OCIO has developed core competency worksheets for significant cyber roles to assist training personnel, curricula developers, supervisors, etc. with identifying core skills needed to perform their functional roles. Core competencies can be used to develop training objectives for site or organization-specific role-based training.

  3. Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    core competencies for each functional cyber role as documented in the DOE Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK). These worksheets can be used by any agency or private entity to...

  4. DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. Key Cyber Security Role: Certification Agent (CA)

  5. CSAT Role-Based/Core Competency Training Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CSAT Role-Based/Core Competency Training Program CSAT Role-Based/Core Competency Training Program empty-314554_960_720.jpg The DOE OCIO has developed role-based/core competency training modules to support DOE Cybersecurity staff and other employees charged with protecting DOE information assets. The courses listed below are available at the OnlineTraining Center (OLC) and are free of charge for all DOE Federal employees and contractors with current DOE OLC accounts. For OLC access questions,

  6. Neutronics Analyses of the Minimum Original HEU TREAT Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontogeorgakos, D.; Connaway, H.; Yesilyurt, G.; Wright, A.

    2014-04-01

    This work was performed to support the feasibility study on the potential conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory from the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by the GTRI Reactor Conversion staff at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of this study was to validate the MCNP model of the TREAT reactor with the well-documented measurements which were taken during the start-up and early operation of TREAT. Furthermore, the effect of carbon graphitization was also addressed. The graphitization level was assumed to be 100% (ANL/GTRI/TM-13/4). For this purpose, a set of experiments was chosen to validate the TREAT MCNP model, involving the approach to criticality procedure, in-core neutron flux measurements with foils, and isothermal temperature coefficient and temperature distribution measurements. The results of this study extended the knowledge base for the TREAT MCNP calculations and established the credibility of the MCNP model to be used in the core conversion feasibility analysis.

  7. Webinar: Review Core Competencies for Appraisers to Value Green Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appraisal Foundation is developing a document to describe the fundamentals of the Valuation of Green Buildings. This document highlights the core skill sets and data necessary for appraisers to...

  8. Closeout of IE Compliance Bulletin 86-03: Potential failure of multiple ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System) pumps due to single failure of air-operated valve in minimum flow recirculation line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, W.J.; Dean, R.S.; Hennick, A. )

    1990-10-01

    Documentation is provided in this report for the closeout of IE Compliance Bulletin 86-03 regarding the potential failure of multiple Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) pumps due to a single failure of an air-operated valve in a minimum flow recirculation line. Closeout is based on the implementation and verification of four actions required by the bulletin. Evaluation of utility responses and NRC/Region inspection reports in accordance with specific criteria indicates that the bulletin is closed for 116 (98%) of the 118 nuclear power facilities in operation or under construction to which it was issued for action. Facilities which were shut down indefinitely or permanently or which had construction halted indefinitely were not included in this review. A follow-up item is proposed for the two (2) facilities with open bulletin status. It is concluded that the bulletin concern has been resolved, pending closeout by the NRC of Zion 1,2. Background information is provided in the Introduction and Appendix A.

  9. Competency Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An industry-validated competency model is an excellent tool for identifying the skills needed to succeed in a particular job, developing curricula to teach them, and benchmarking their attainment. Particularly valuable in dynamic industries like solar energy, a competency framework is critical to any training program attempting to advance lower-skilled workers into navigable career pathways, or transition higher skilled workers into new industry sectors.

  10. CAMS Competencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAMS Competencies The research and development made possible by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and ion beam analytical techniques is diverse and includes geochronology (for archaeology, paleoclimatology, paleoseismology, and other disciplines); neotectonics; geomorphology; ground water hydrogeology; carbon-cycle dynamics; oceanic and atmospheric chemistry; bioavailability, and metabolism of chemicals, toxic compounds, and nutrients; forensic reconstruction of Hiroshima and Chernobyl

  11. Intent to Compete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IntenttoCompete Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance &...

  12. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Core Specialization Core Specialization Core Specialization (CS) is a feature of the Cray operating system that allows the user to reserve one or more cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the expense of (possibly) requiring more nodes to run an application. The specialized cores may also be used in conjunction with Cray's MPI asynchronous progress engine [1] to improve the overlap of

  13. Program Evaluation: Minimum EERE Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The minimum requirements for EERE's in-progress peer reviews are described below. Given the diversity of EERE programs and activities, a great deal of flexibility is provided within these...

  14. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  15. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the user to reserve one or more cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the...

  16. CSAT Role-Based/Core Competency Training Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For OLC access questions, please contact energyolc@hq.doe.gov. To request a course CD, contact the OCIO CSAT team at cybsectrn@hq.doe.gov. Authorizing Officials (AO) and ...

  17. CBEI Competency Model and Career Map

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupation Specific Competencies Industry Sector Technical Competencies Industry-Wide Technical Competencies Workplace Competencies Academic Competencies Personal Effectiveness Competencies CBEI Competency Model and Career Map 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Maureen K. Roskoski, maureen.roskoski@feapc.com Facility Engineering Associates Lisa Shulock, lshulock@engr.psu.edu CBEI, The Pennsylvania State University Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 2.01.2013 Planned end date:

  18. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Form for the SES program ...

  19. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    you must meet the following minimum standards listed below. * New natural gas or propane boilers must be at least 90% AFUE to be eligible. * New oil boilers must be at least...

  20. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimum Daytime Load Calculation and Screening Page 1 of 30 Kristen Ardani, Dora Nakfuji, Anthony Hong, and Babak Enayati Page 1 of 30 [Speaker: Kristen Ardani] Cover Slide: Thank you everyone for joining us today for our DG interconnection collaborative informational webinar. Today we are going to talk about minimum day time load calculation and screening procedures and their role in the distributed PV interconnection process. We're going to hear from Babak Enayati of the Massachusetts

  1. FTCP Supplemental Competencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Supplemental Competencies FTCP Supplemental Competencies FTCP Supplemental Competencies Supplemental Competencies cover important skills and abilities that are less than an entire function or position, and for which an entire Functional Area Qualification Standard (FAQS) is not appropriate. They are developed for or by the FTCP, approved by the Panel, and posted on the FTCP web pages for use. They are optional competencies developed to standardize the qualification process for personnel in

  2. Competing Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Opening utility energy service contracts to competing franchised utility companies ensures federal agencies get the best value for their projects.

  3. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening" Dora Nakafuji and Anthony Hong, Hawaiian Electric Co. Babak Enayati, DG Techincal Standards Review Group April 30, 2014 2 Speakers Babak Enayati Chair of Massachusetts DG Technical Standards Review Group Dora Nakafuji Director of Renewable Energy Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL Anthony Hong Director of Distribution Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Standardization of

  4. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative (DGIC) "Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening" Dora Nakafuji and Anthony Hong, Hawaiian Electric Co. Babak Enayati, DG Techincal Standards Review Group April 30, 2014 2 Speakers Babak Enayati Chair of Massachusetts DG Technical Standards Review Group Dora Nakafuji Director of Renewable Energy Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL Anthony Hong Director of

  5. Core Drilling Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

  6. ARM - Ice Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PastIce Cores Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Ice Cores Ice cores reveal information about the earth's climate history. The information from ice cores is both more precise and more compelling than from other sources. Accurate history of our earth's temperature and carbon

  7. Core Design Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  8. Hopper Multi-Core FAQ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 cores per node. Franklin had only four. Q. What else is different? A. There is less memory per core. Hopper has 1.3 GB core rather than 2.0 GB core on Franklin. A code using...

  9. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Liaison | Department of Energy Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Form for the SES program emphasizes the range of communications and public relations aspects of executive positions as found in official correspondence and documentation, as well as, formal and informal verbal communications, and it describes the major competencies within this activity PDF icon Part II -

  10. Property:CompeteLeasing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "CompeteLeasing" Showing 13 pages using this property. R RAPIDGeothermalLand AccessAlaska + Yes, if multiple applications are received for a mineral tract. RAPID...

  11. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resources that can aid in the accelerating need for Secure Power Systems Professionals, ... and competencies along with assessing the need and qualifications for a certification ...

  12. Competing Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opening utility energy service contracts to competing franchised utility companies ensures ... in its model agreement requires utility companies to competitively select technical ...

  13. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements Presents additional resources on loan standards and requirements from Elise Avers' presentation on HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements. PDF icon Minimum Standards and Requirements More Documents & Publications Building America Best Practices Series Vol. 14: Energy Renovations - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners STEP Financial Incentives Summary Energy Saver 101: Home

  14. Minimum wear tube support hole design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

    1986-01-01

    A minimum-wear through-bore (16) is defined within a heat exchanger tube support plate (14) so as to have an hourglass configuration as determined by means of a constant radiused surface curvature (18) as defined by means of an external radius (R3), wherein the surface (18) extends between the upper surface (20) and lower surface (22) of the tube support plate (14). When a heat exchange tube (12) is disposed within the tube support plate (14) so as to pass through the through-bore (16), the heat exchange tube (12) is always in contact with a smoothly curved or radiused portion of the through-bore surface (16) whereby unacceptably excessive wear upon the heat exchange tube (12), as normally developed by means of sharp edges, lands, ridges, or the like conventionally part of the tube support plates, is eliminated or substantially reduced.

  15. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conditions, March 2000 | Department of Energy Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 PDF icon theoretical_minimum_energies.pdf More Documents & Publications Ironmaking Process Alternatives Screening Study ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005 ITP Steel: Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Stu

  16. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  17. Core shroud corner joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  18. Core assembly storage structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jr., Charles E. (Northridge, CA); Brunings, Jay E. (Chatsworth, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  19. ARM - Coral Reef Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PastCoral Reef Cores Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Coral Reef Cores Coral reefs grow in warm, saline water in the tropics and subtropics. They accumulate layer upon layer on an annual basis and leave a record of their growth (and the climate) much like rings on trees or

  20. 2000 BTS Core Databook

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 BTS CORE DATABOOK 2000 BTS CORE DATABOOK OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY * U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This version is dated: August 7, 2000 DISCLAIMER This document was designed for the internal use of the United States Department of Energy. This document was also designed to be occasionally updated and, therefore, this copy may not reflect the most current version. This document was prepared as account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the

  1. Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Categories | Department of Energy Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product

  2. Emergency core cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  3. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  4. Core Values | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Core Values What we do and how we do it is determined by our core values. Our core values are how we operate and what we value most. They are the qualities that define our culture...

  5. "Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ... (a) Minimum consumption represents actual 1991 consumption decreased by the" "quantity of ...

  6. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energyspin-flip density functional theory approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  7. JOBAID-PARTICIPATING IN COMPETENCY ASSESSMENTS (EMPLOYEE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide users and supervisors through the step-by-stepprocess of participating in a competency assessment by viewing gaps, assigning items, conducting a self...

  8. JOBAID-PARTICIPATING IN COMPETENCY ASSESSMENTS (SUPERVISOR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisors through the step-by-step process of participating in a competency assessment by viewing gaps, assigning items, conducting a self-assessment,...

  9. Webcast of the Renewable Energy Competency Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy held a webcast titled ""Renewable Energy Competency Model: An Aid to Build a Renewable Energy Skilled Workforce"" on Monday, October 22, 2012. The Renewable Energy...

  10. COMPETENCY MODEL ASSESSMENT DESIGN, ADMINISTRATION, AND ANALYSIS |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Learning and Workforce Development » Workforce Development » COMPETENCY MODEL ASSESSMENT DESIGN, ADMINISTRATION, AND ANALYSIS COMPETENCY MODEL ASSESSMENT DESIGN, ADMINISTRATION, AND ANALYSIS DOE faces a talent challenge derived from a number of factors including a dynamic operating environment, an anticipated wave of retirements from the workforce, and a projected shortage of workers with needed skills. The Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer (CHCO) is charged

  11. Solar Manufacturing: To Compete or Not To Compete | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Manufacturing: To Compete or Not To Compete Solar Manufacturing: To Compete or Not To Compete June 28, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis Damien LaVera Damien LaVera Deputy Director, Office of Public Affairs One Thing is Clear: America must continue playing to win in the clean energy race. Last year, the global market for clean, renewable energies reached a record $260 billion - and is expected to grow into the trillions over the next 20 years. Solar manufacturing in particular is growing dramatically in

  12. Theoretical minimum energies to produce steel for selected conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R. J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H. W.; Brindle, R.

    2000-03-01

    An ITP study has determined the theoretical minimum energy requirements for producing steel from ore, scrap, and direct reduced iron. Dr. Richard Fruehan's report, Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, provides insight into the potential energy savings (and associated reductions in carbon dioxide emissions) for ironmaking, steelmaking, and rolling processes (PDF459 KB).

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  14. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA); Dahl, Leslie R. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  15. High School Teams Compete in Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teams from Across Colorado Compete in Science Bowl For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., Feb. 23, 1998 — On the surfaces of which three planets would you weigh more than you do on Earth? How many molecules are in two moles of sulfur trioxide? High school students from across Colorado will face such questions as they test their mental agility in the 1998 Colorado Science Bowl Feb. 28 at Metropolitan State College in Denver. More than 40 teams will compete in this

  16. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  17. Hopper Multi-Core FAQ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hopper Multi-Core FAQ Hopper Multi-Core FAQ Q. How is Hopper Different than Franklin? A. The new Hopper Phase-II system will have 24 cores per node. Franklin had only four. Q. What else is different? A. There is less memory per core. Hopper has 1.3 GB / core rather than 2.0 GB / core on Franklin. A code using MPI on Hopper may be more likely to exhaust available memory, causing an error. Additionally, Hopper's memory hierarchy is "deeper" and more non-uniform than Franklin's and this

  18. Modified Theoretical Minimum Emittance Lattice for an Electron Storage Ring

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with Extreme-Low Emittance (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Modified Theoretical Minimum Emittance Lattice for an Electron Storage Ring with Extreme-Low Emittance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modified Theoretical Minimum Emittance Lattice for an Electron Storage Ring with Extreme-Low Emittance Authors: Jiao, Yi ; Cai, Yunhai ; Chao, Alexander Wu ; /SLAC Publication Date: 2013-06-04 OSTI Identifier: 1082826 Report Number(s): SLAC-REPRINT-2013-081 DOE Contract Number:

  19. Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2002; " " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;" " Unit: Physical Units." ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Energy Sources","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column

  20. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Peter M. (Hamburg, NY); Reger, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  1. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  2. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  3. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  4. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  5. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Gonzales, Aaron A. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Mahadeo R. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  6. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Gonzales, Aaron A. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Mahadeo R. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  7. GEOS-CORE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone formore » linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.« less

  8. Core Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area 1992 K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Core Analysis At...

  9. OpenStudio Core

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OpenStudio Core 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Dr. Larry Brackney, larry.brackney@nrel.gov National Renewable Energy Laboratory Oliver Davis, oliver@concept3d.com concept3D Inc. Project Summary Timeline: Key Partners: Start date: Q1 FY10 Planned end date: Ongoing w/ Frequent Off-Ramping of Components Key Milestones: 1. V1.1 (Cloud) - 9/27/2013 2. V1.2 (Refrigeration) - 12/20/2013 3. V1.3 (HVAC/Refrigeration) - 3/28/2014 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $7,655,000 * Total Cost Share to

  10. America Competes to Build the Best Energy App | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America Competes to Build the Best Energy App America Competes to Build the Best Energy App March 25, 2014 - 11:04am Addthis Participants at the Los Angeles Apps for Energy...

  11. Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO 3 Prev Next Title: Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO ...

  12. Towards a framework of nuclear competencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghitescu, P.

    2012-07-01

    For the countries considering the introduction of a nuclear energy program, the management of human resources should be a part of the wider integrated management system in order to ensure long term safe and reliable operation. Nuclear energy strategy and approaches to human resources development should take into consideration such fundamental aspects as: development and implementation of a workforce plan, required competencies and qualifications, prerequisites for staffing a nuclear energy program, needed training programs and training facilities, qualification and training requirements. Development of common instruments that respond to the above needs and vision has lead to a new concept of European Credit System for Vocational Education and Training. The European Credit System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET) is based on definition of 'learning outcomes ' in terms of knowledge, skills and competence, and on identification of portfolios of learning outcomes that allow an individual to prove competencies in a coherent manner. ECVET proposes a common understanding of basic definitions of education and training as well as of the new proposed concepts and it should be recognized by all employers in the EU. In this context, a number of 'Euratom Fission Training Schemes' (EFTS) have been launched in specific areas where a shortage of skilled professionals has been identified. In these schemes the competence building is the result of traditional education plus life-long learning, non-traditional learning, and other forms of educational experiences, relying, in particular, on border-less mobility to get acquainted with various sectors. Each particular Training Scheme should follow a similar path for the achievement of the designed learning outcomes (knowledge, skills, and attitudes). This path to the Training Scheme consists of different activities regarding: definition of training scheme learning outcomes and modules, assessment of prerequisites and student selection, student interview for development of individual training plan, start of the training activities under a specific training scheme. The introduction and recognition of ECVET will lead to a common taxonomy of competencies, and will provide also information about qualifications and units in numerical form, enabling mutual recognition of a training scheme. The description of the learning outcomes to be achieved for qualifying to a specific job profile may follow the analysis phase of the systematic approach to training (SAT). This would ensure a common tool, already used by all trainers. All these steps contribute to establishing of a framework of nuclear competencies recognized and accepted throughout member states. (authors)

  13. Core fluctuations test. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betts, W.S.

    1987-06-01

    Fluctuations were first encountered in the Fort St. Vrain reactor early in cycle 1 operation, during the initial rise from 40% to 70% power. Subsequent in-core tests and operation throughout cycles 1 and 2 demonstrated that fluctuations were repeatable, occurring at core pressure drops of between 2.5 psi and 4.0 psi, and that in each instance their characteristics were very similar. Subsequently, tests and analysis were done to understand the core fluctuation phenomenon. These efforts also lead to a design fix which stopped these fluctuations in the FSV reactor core. This fix required that keys be used in addition to the keys in the core support floor which already existed. This report outlines a test plan to validate that core fluctuations will not occur in the MHTGR core. 2 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. FTCP-12-003, Supplemental Competencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3, Supplemental Competencies FTCP-12-003, Supplemental Competencies FTCP Issue Paper: FTCP-12-003 Approved by FTCP Chair, December 19, 2012 PDF icon FTCP-12-003 Supplemental Competencies File Supplemental-Competencies-Template More Documents & Publications Functional Area Qualification Standards Template FTCP-08-002, Technical Qualification Program Requalification FTCP-12-001, Use of "Expert Level" in Qualification Path Forward

  15. Category:Core Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis page? For detailed information on Core Analysis as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Core Analysis Add.png Add a new Core Analysis Technique Pages in...

  16. core values | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Blog Home core values core values Livermore Field Office sets core values as part of continuous improvement process At their recent off-site continuous improvement session,...

  17. Theoretical solution of the minimum charge problem for gaseous detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1990-12-01

    A theoretical model was developed for the minimum charge to trigger a gaseous detonation in spherical geometry as a generalization of the Zeldovich model. Careful comparisons were made between the theoretical predictions and experimental data on the minimum charge to trigger detonations in propane-air mixtures. The predictions are an order of magnitude too high, and there is no apparent resolution to the discrepancy. A dynamic model, which takes into account the experimentally observed oscillations in the detonation zone, may be necessary for reliable predictions. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman, Yolanda Lin, Trieu Mai, Andrew Martinez, David Mulcahy, Walter Short, Travis Simpkins, and Caroline Uriarte National Renewable Energy Laboratory Corey Peck Lexidyne, LLC Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54217 May 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable

  19. 2001 BTS Core Databook

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 BTS CORE DATABOOK OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This version is dated: November 30, 2001 REVISED data tables on the web site that have been changed since November 30, 2001 include tables: 5.6.7 5.6.8 5.6.9 5.10.8 5.10.9 5.10.10 5.10.11 5.10.12 5.10.13 5.10.14 5.10.15 5.10.16 5.10.17 5.10.18 NEW data tables on the web site that have been added since July 13, 2001 include tables: 5.6.14 5.9.7 5.9.8 5.9.9 REVISED data tables on the web site that have

  20. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  1. Core Values Postcard | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Core Values Postcard Document Number: NA Effective Date: 09/2014 File (public): PDF icon Print_CoreValuesPostcard

  2. HMX Cooling Core Optimization Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-31

    The Software consists of code which is used to determine the optimal configuration of an HMX cooling core in a heat exchanger.

  3. Promoting Intercultural Competency in the Nuclear Workplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachner K. M.

    2015-07-12

    Intercultural preparedness training is a staple of many workplaces that require international competence, including government, business, and non-profits. Even highly experienced diplomats are often advised to attend training sessions on this topic. Intercultural preparedness training promises to be especially relevant and useful for professionals working in the field of nuclear nonproliferation, including in the application of international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the fundamental philosophies underlying a training program that will benefit professionals in the nuclear arena, whether practitioners of nonproliferation or other sub-fields relying on international cooperation and collaboration, and how such a training program might be implemented efficiently.

  4. Heat recuperator having ceramic core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohnken, K.H.

    1987-08-25

    This patent describes a recuperator comprising a ceramic heat-exchanger core within a housing, the core having six faces, two solid and four having openings for the flow of gas therethrough, the improvement comprising a layer of intumescent material disposed between a solid face and the housing.

  5. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael

    2013-04-19

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  6. Improved initial guess for minimum energy path calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidstrup, Sren; Pedersen, Andreas; Stokbro, Kurt

    2014-06-07

    A method is presented for generating a good initial guess of a transition path between given initial and final states of a system without evaluation of the energy. An objective function surface is constructed using an interpolation of pairwise distances at each discretization point along the path and the nudged elastic band method then used to find an optimal path on this image dependent pair potential (IDPP) surface. This provides an initial path for the more computationally intensive calculations of a minimum energy path on an energy surface obtained, for example, by ab initio or density functional theory. The optimal path on the IDPP surface is significantly closer to a minimum energy path than a linear interpolation of the Cartesian coordinates and, therefore, reduces the number of iterations needed to reach convergence and averts divergence in the electronic structure calculations when atoms are brought too close to each other in the initial path. The method is illustrated with three examples: (1) rotation of a methyl group in an ethane molecule, (2) an exchange of atoms in an island on a crystal surface, and (3) an exchange of two Si-atoms in amorphous silicon. In all three cases, the computational effort in finding the minimum energy path with DFT was reduced by a factor ranging from 50% to an order of magnitude by using an IDPP path as the initial path. The time required for parallel computations was reduced even more because of load imbalance when linear interpolation of Cartesian coordinates was used.

  7. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  8. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J. R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J. A.

    2011-05-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences - the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The 'environmental packages' apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we present the minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS). Adoption of MIxS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  9. Energy Department Announces 16 Collegiate Teams to Compete in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    16 Collegiate Teams to Compete in Solar Decathlon 2017 Energy Department Announces 16 Collegiate ... and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency. ...

  10. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 3: Competing Radiative and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    understanding of the competing physical processes that determine light-emission efficiency of InGaN materials and heterostructures. With such understanding, new routes to...

  11. Energy Department Selects Student Teams to Compete in 2009 Solar...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Student Teams to Compete in 2009 Solar Decathlon Energy Department Selects Student Teams to ... Decathlon to Highlight Innovation, Future Green Jobs German Technische ...

  12. Department of Energy to Compete Management & Operating Contract...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Operating Contract for its National Renewable Energy Laboratory Department of Energy to Compete Management & Operating Contract for its National Renewable Energy Laboratory June ...

  13. Department of Energy to Compete Management and Operating Contract...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Department of Energy to Compete Management and Operating Contract for Brookhaven National ... Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW ...

  14. Department of Energy to Compete Management and Operating Contracts...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Department of Energy to Compete Management and Operating Contracts for Three Office of ... Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW ...

  15. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

    2012-05-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

  16. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r?0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  17. GreenCore Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GreenCore Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GreenCore Capital Name: GreenCore Capital Address: 10509 Vista Sorrento Parkway Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92121 Region:...

  18. Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H.W.; Brindle, R.

    2000-05-01

    The energy used to produce liquid steel in today's integrated and electric arc furnace (EAF) facilities is significantly higher than the theoretical minimum energy requirements. This study presents the absolute minimum energy required to produce steel from ore and mixtures of scrap and scrap alternatives. Additional cases in which the assumptions are changed to more closely approximate actual operating conditions are also analyzed. The results, summarized in Table E-1, should give insight into the theoretical and practical potentials for reducing steelmaking energy requirements. The energy values have also been converted to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in order to indicate the potential for reduction in emissions of this greenhouse gas (Table E-2). The study showed that increasing scrap melting has the largest impact on energy consumption. However, scrap should be viewed as having ''invested'' energy since at one time it was produced by reducing ore. Increasing scrap melting in the BOF mayor may not decrease energy if the ''invested'' energy in scrap is considered.

  19. Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores (Patent) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    United States Language: English Subject: method; apparatus; recovering; unstable; cores; method; apparatus; suitable; stabilizing; hydrocarbon; cores; stabilized; cores;...

  20. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Core Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization Core materials characterization

  1. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  2. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  3. Grain alignment in starless cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T. J.; Bagley, M. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Krejny, M. [Cree Inc., 4600 Silicon Dr., Durham, NC (United States); Andersson, B.-G. [SOFIA Science Center, USRA, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Bastien, P., E-mail: tjj@astro.umn.edu [Centre de recherche en astrophysique du Qubec and Dpartment de Physique, Universit de Montral, Montral (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    We present near-IR polarimetry data of background stars shining through a selection of starless cores taken in the K band, probing visual extinctions up to A{sub V}?48. We find that P{sub K}/?{sub K} continues to decline with increasing A{sub V} with a power law slope of roughly ?0.5. Examination of published submillimeter (submm) polarimetry of starless cores suggests that by A{sub V}?20 the slope for P versus ? becomes ??1, indicating no grain alignment at greater optical depths. Combining these two data sets, we find good evidence that, in the absence of a central illuminating source, the dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores with no internal radiation source cease to become aligned with the local magnetic field at optical depths greater than A{sub V}?20. A simple model relating the alignment efficiency to the optical depth into the cloud reproduces the observations well.

  4. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; Konik, R. M.; Gritsev, V.; Caux, J. -S.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions at longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.

  5. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; Konik, R. M.; Gritsev, V.; Caux, J. -S.

    2014-10-14

    In this study, we introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions atmore » longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.« less

  6. Induced supersolidity in a mixture of normal and hard-core bosons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Tapan; Das, B. P.; Pai, Ramesh V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a scenario where a supersolid is induced in one of the components of a mixture of two species bosonic atoms where there are no long-range interactions. We study a system of normal and hard-core boson mixture with only the former possessing long-range interactions. We consider three cases: the first where the total density is commensurate and the other two where it is incommensurate to the lattice. By suitable choices of the densities of normal and hard-core bosons and the interaction strengths between them, we predict that the charge density wave and the supersolid orders can be induced in the hard-core species as a result of the competing interatomic interactions.

  7. Core File Settings | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Core File Settings About Core Files By default, a rank that aborts will dump core, and the control system will signal the other ranks to quit (without dumping core). Multiple core files will be generated only when several ranks abort almost simultaneously. The ranks that do not dump core are those that received the system signal to quit before anything bad happened on that rank. The settings listed below can modify this behaviour in various ways. The core files generated will be in a lightweight

  8. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  9. Video: Future STEM Leaders Compete in the National Science Bowl |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Video: Future STEM Leaders Compete in the National Science Bowl Video: Future STEM Leaders Compete in the National Science Bowl June 12, 2014 - 12:55pm Addthis Watch four students from Washington, D.C.'s Woodrow Wilson High School as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Former Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs For four students at Woodrow Wilson

  10. Laminated grid and web magnetic cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefko, John; Pavlik, Norman M.

    1984-01-01

    A laminated magnetic core characterized by an electromagnetic core having core legs which comprise elongated apertures and edge notches disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of the legs, such as high reluctance cores with linear magnetization characteristics for high voltage shunt reactors. In one embodiment the apertures include compact bodies of microlaminations for more flexibility and control in adjusting permeability and/or core reluctance.

  11. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  12. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John M. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  13. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INLs LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  14. Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) A Competency and Functional Framework For Cyber Security Workforce Development Documents Available for Download More Documents & Publications Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS

  15. Twenty Teams to Compete in Virginia High School Science Bowl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twenty Teams to Compete in Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb. 7 2014 Virginia High School Science Bowl The final match of the 2014 Virginia High School Science Bowl pitted...

  16. Modeling the Market Potential of Hydrogen from Wind and Competing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 May 2005 Modeling the Market Potential of Hydrogen from Wind and Competing Sources Preprint W. Short, N. Blair, and D. Heimiller To be presented at WINDPOWER 2005 Denver,...

  17. Energy Competence Centre GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Competence Centre GmbH Place: Berlin, Germany Zip: 10709 Sector: Wind energy Product: Germany-based wind project developer with...

  18. CORE SHAPES AND ORIENTATIONS OF CORE-SRSIC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Graham, Alister W., E-mail: Bdullo@astro.swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    The inner and outer shapes and orientations of core-Srsic galaxies may hold important clues to their formation and evolution. We have therefore measured the central and outer ellipticities and position angles for a sample of 24 core-Srsic galaxies using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images and data. By selecting galaxies with core-Srsic break radii R{sub b} a measure of the size of their partially depleted corethat are ? 0.''2, we find that the ellipticities and position angles are quite robust against HST seeing. For the bulk of the galaxies, there is a good agreement between the ellipticities and position angles at the break radii and the average outer ellipticities and position angles determined over R {sub e}/2 < R < R {sub e}, where R {sub e} is the spheroids' effective half light radius. However there are some interesting differences. We find a median ''inner'' ellipticity at R{sub b} of ?{sub med}= 0.13 0.01, rounder than the median ellipticity of the ''outer'' regions ?{sub med}= 0.20 0.01, which is thought to reflect the influence of the central supermassive black hole at small radii. In addition, for the first time we find a trend, albeit weak (2? significance), such that galaxies with larger (stellar deficit-to-supermassive black hole) mass ratiosthought to be a measure of the number of major dry merger eventstend to have rounder inner and outer isophotes, suggesting a connection between the galaxy shapes and their merger histories. We show that this finding is not simply reflecting the well known result that more luminous galaxies are rounder, but it is no doubt related.

  19. Hanford Firefighters Compete in Combat Challenge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Firefighters Compete in Combat Challenge Hanford Firefighters Compete in Combat Challenge October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Hanford Fire Department Lt. Anthony Lovato, Jr. (left) urges his teammate, Capt. Sean Barajas, to carry the 175-pound life-sized dummy across the finish line at the Scott Firefighter Combat Challenge in Everett, Wash. Hanford Fire Department Lt. Anthony Lovato, Jr. (left) urges his teammate, Capt. Sean Barajas, to carry the 175-pound life-sized dummy across the finish line

  20. Building an American Economy to Last: American Competiveness in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing | Department of Energy an American Economy to Last: American Competiveness in Manufacturing Building an American Economy to Last: American Competiveness in Manufacturing August 16, 2012 - 9:20am Addthis Saving Energy and Resources 1 of 4 Saving Energy and Resources Thanks to additive manufacturing technology, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was able to fabricate a robotic hand with less energy use and material waste. The novel, lightweight, low-cost fluid powered hand was

  1. Students Compete to Design Energy-Efficient Appliances | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Students Compete to Design Energy-Efficient Appliances Students Compete to Design Energy-Efficient Appliances May 10, 2012 - 1:39pm Addthis 1 of 5 Team Cal Poly Solar is working to significantly reduce the cost and construction time on their solar concentrator for cooking. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 5 Professor Dale Dolan's students from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo Electrical Engineering department testing the placement of their

  2. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in Workforce Development Programs - Phase 2 (July/August 2013) | Department of Energy Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs - Phase 2 (July/August 2013) Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs - Phase 2 (July/August 2013) DOE has recognized that the electricity industry needs workforce development resources that can aid in the accelerating need for

  3. Competency Management and Cross-Cutting Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business Operations » Project Management Coordination Office » Competency Management and Cross-Cutting Activities Competency Management and Cross-Cutting Activities PMCO works with the Workforce Management Office to provide project and risk management training and certification support. Goals and Priorities Provide project and risk management training and certification as well as knowledge sharing. News & Blog Mission Leadership Budget EERE Offices Business Operations Budget Workforce

  4. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S.; Myers, Gregory J.

    2007-01-30

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  5. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S. (New York, NY); Myers, Gregory J. (Cornwall, NY)

    2007-11-13

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  6. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  7. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2005-05-10

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  8. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2006-08-22

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  9. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.

    1995-08-08

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

  10. Multi-core Performance Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    core Performance Analysis HPC Computation 1 Performance Analysis * Compiler Feedback * HWPC Data * Load Balance 2 Compiler Feedback * Before optimizing code, it's critical to know what the compiler does to your code - Loop optimizations - Vectorization - Prefetching - ... * Equally important to what the compiler does is what it doesn't do, and why - Data dependencies - Misplaced branches - Unknown loop counts - ... 3 Enabling Compiler Feedback * Portland Group - Minfo=all - Mneginfo - Minfo=ccff

  11. Core Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the Western Hemisphere. Photons are accelerated to over 99% of the speed of light around its ring, which is the size of a baseball stadium. Click to enlarge. The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne is a premier user facility, providing expertise, instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Core Capabilities Argonne's

  12. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. SolviCore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SolviCore is JV between Umicore and Solvay focusing on the development of MEAs for fuel cells. References: SolviCore1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. HyCore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HyCore Jump to: navigation, search Name: HyCore Place: Norway Sector: Hydro, Solar Product: JV between Umicore and Norsk Hydro to manufacture solar-grade silicon. References:...

  15. IDAPA 37.03.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction and Use of Injection Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  16. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, John Wesley (Schenectady, NY); Tong, Wei (Clifton Park, NY)

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  17. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A.

    1996-12-31

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  18. DIODE STEERED MANGETIC-CORE MEMORY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melmed, A.S.; Shevlin, R.T.; Laupheimer, R.

    1962-09-18

    A word-arranged magnetic-core memory is designed for use in a digital computer utilizing the reverse or back current property of the semi-conductor diodes to restore the information in the memory after read-out. In order to ob tain a read-out signal from a magnetic core storage unit, it is necessary to change the states of some of the magnetic cores. In order to retain the information in the memory after read-out it is then necessary to provide a means to return the switched cores to their states before read-out. A rewrite driver passes a pulse back through each row of cores in which some switching has taken place. This pulse combines with the reverse current pulses of diodes for each column in which a core is switched during read-out to cause the particular cores to be switched back into their states prior to read-out. (AEC)

  19. Energy Department Announces 16 Collegiate Teams to Compete in Solar

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Decathlon 2017 | Department of Energy 16 Collegiate Teams to Compete in Solar Decathlon 2017 Energy Department Announces 16 Collegiate Teams to Compete in Solar Decathlon 2017 January 20, 2016 - 12:26pm Addthis Crowds gather at the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2015 village in October. Today, the Energy Department announced the 16 collegiate teams selected to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2017 competition. | Photo by Thomas Kelsey, U.S. Department

  20. Test report -- Prototype core sampler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linschooten, C.G.

    1995-01-17

    The purpose of this test is to determine the adequacy of the prototype sampler, provided to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by DOE-RL. The sampler was fabricated for DOE-RL by the Concord Company by request of DOE-RL. This prototype sampler was introduced as a technology that can be easily deployed (similar to the current auger system) and will reliably collect representative samples. The sampler is similar to the Universal Sampler i.e., smooth core barrel and piston with an O-ring seal, but lacks a rotary valve near the throat of the sampler. This makes the sampler inappropriate for liquid sampling, but reduces the outside diameter of the sampler considerably, which should improve sample recovery. Recovery testing was performed with the supplied sampler in three different consistencies of Kaolin sludge simulants.

  1. Nuclear core and fuel assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A fast flux nuclear core of a plurality of rodded, open-lattice assemblies having a rod pattern rotated relative to a rod support structure pattern. Elongated fuel rods are oriented on a triangular array and laterally supported by grid structures positioned along the length of the assembly. Initial inter-assembly contact is through strongbacks at the corners of the support pattern and peripheral fuel rods between adjacent assemblies are nested so as to maintain a triangular pitch across a clearance gap between the other portions of adjacent assemblies. The rod pattern is rotated relative to the strongback support pattern by an angle .alpha. equal to sin .sup.-1 (p/2c), where p is the intra-assembly rod pitch and c is the center-to-center spacing among adjacent assemblies.

  2. High schools compete for Nevada Science Bowl title | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration schools compete for Nevada Science Bowl title | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  3. Material with core-shell structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Claudia; Richard, Monique N.; Dehne, Aaron; Phillips, Jonathan; Stamm, Kimber L.; Fanson, Paul T.

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  4. VERA Core Physics Benchmark Progression Problems Specifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VERA Core Physics Benchmark Progression Problem Specifications Revision 4 August 29, 2014 Andrew T. Godfrey Physics Integration Oak Ridge National Laboratory CASL-U-2012-0131-004 ...

  5. Over Core Stress | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis- Rock Over Core Stress Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis Rock Density X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) References Page Area Activity Start...

  6. Secretary Chu to Attend Event in Colorado on the Need to Compete...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Event in Colorado on the Need to Compete Globally in Solar Manufacturing Secretary Chu to Attend Event in Colorado on the Need to Compete Globally in Solar Manufacturing November ...

  7. Webcast of the Renewable Energy Competency Model: An Aid to Build a Renewable Energy Skilled Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy held a webcast titled "Renewable Energy Competency Model: An Aid to Build a Renewable Energy Skilled Workforce" on Monday, October 22, 2012. The Renewable Energy Competency...

  8. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  9. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorholt, Wilhelm (San Diego, CA); Luci, Raymond K. (Del Mar, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  10. Core sampling system spare parts assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, E.J.

    1995-04-04

    Soon, there will be 4 independent core sampling systems obtaining samples from the underground tanks. It is desirable that these systems be available for sampling during the next 2 years. This assessment was prepared to evaluate the adequacy of the spare parts identified for the core sampling system and to provide recommendations that may remediate overages or inadequacies of spare parts.

  11. Fermilab | Illinois Accelerator Research Center | Fermilab Core

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Core Capabilities photo Core capabilities Areas of Expertise Accelerator Science Beam dynamics and theory Design of linear and circular accelerators Simulation and Modeling Phase-space manipulation Energy Deposition Accelerator Operation Operation and commissioning of large, complex accelerator systems Accelerator Technology (design, fabrication, test) Particle sources Superconducting RF cavities and Cryomodules Conventional magnets Pulsed magnets and kickers Superconducting

  12. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  13. Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, Patrick L. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus suitable for stabilizing hydrocarbon cores are given. Such stabilized cores have not previously been obtainable for laboratory study, and such study is believed to be required before the hydrate reserves can become a utilizable resource. The apparatus can be built using commercially available parts and is very simple and safe to operate.

  14. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: ...

  15. Title 43 CFR 3206.12 What are the Minimum and Maximum Lease Sizes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .12 What are the Minimum and Maximum Lease Sizes? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43...

  16. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hallam, Steven

    2011-04-26

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  17. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  18. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  19. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states « Prev Next » Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding

  20. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a

  1. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE)

  2. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated

  3. Phase Field model elucidates competing thermodynamic effects on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanocrystalline stability Field model elucidates competing thermodynamic effects on nanocrystalline stability - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid

  4. Research Challenge 3: Competing Radiative and Nonradiative Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3: Competing Radiative and Nonradiative Processes - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  5. Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HTSC Figure 1 Fig. 1. Measured electronic structure of underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 in the orthorhombic spin-density-wave (SDW) ordered state. The antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic directions are indicated by arrows. High-temperature superconductivity (HTSC), one of the long-standing unsolved mysteries of condensed matter physics, is a beautiful example of

  6. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  7. Stabilization of solitons under competing nonlinearities by external potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zegadlo, Krzysztof B. Karpierz, Miroslaw A.; Wasak, Tomasz; Trippenbach, Marek; Malomed, Boris A.

    2014-12-15

    We report results of the analysis for families of one-dimensional (1D) trapped solitons, created by competing self-focusing (SF) quintic and self-defocusing (SDF) cubic nonlinear terms. Two trapping potentials are considered, the harmonic-oscillator (HO) and delta-functional ones. The models apply to optical solitons in colloidal waveguides and other photonic media, and to matter-wave solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates loaded into a quasi-1D trap. For the HO potential, the results are obtained in an approximate form, using the variational and Thomas-Fermi approximations, and in a full numerical form, including the ground state and the first antisymmetric excited one. For the delta-functional attractive potential, the results are produced in a fully analytical form, and verified by means of numerical methods. Both exponentially localized solitons and weakly localized trapped modes are found for the delta-functional potential. The most essential conclusions concern the applicability of competing Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) and anti-VK criteria to the identification of the stability of solitons created under the action of the competing SF and SDF terms.

  8. NCAR Multi-core 5 Workshop!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NCAR Multi-core 5 Workshop! Sept 16-17, 2015 Lessons Learned from Selected NESAP Applications The Big Picture * The next large NERSC produc6on system "Cori" will be Intel Xeon Phi KNL (Knights Landing) architecture - Self-hosted (not an accelerator). 72 cores per node, 4 hardware threads per core - Larger vector units (512 bits) - On package high-bandwidth memory (HBM) - Burst Buffer * To achieve high performance, applica6ons need to explore more on-node parallelism with thread scaling

  9. Secretary Chu Announces Middle and High School Finalists Set to Compete in the 2012 National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Over 100 Teams Will Compete in Finals After Nearly 14,000 Students Competed in Regional Competitions

  10. Armor systems including coated core materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  11. Armor systems including coated core materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  12. SoCore Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SoCore Energy Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60601 Sector: Solar Product: Chicago-based solar installer and mounting solution company that also arranges for solar loans and PPAs....

  13. Multiple network interface core apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Keith D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hemmert, Karl Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-04-26

    A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

  14. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  15. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  17. TCEQ-CoreDataForm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TCEQ-CoreDataForm Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: TCEQ-CoreDataForm Abstract This is the core data form from the Texas Commission on...

  18. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 The behavior of the core hole...

  19. OpenEI:Core content policies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core content policies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI models its core content policies after those established by the Wikipedia.1 Specifically, the OpenEI core content...

  20. Students To Compete in Model Solar Car Race

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compete in Model Solar Car Race For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., May 8, 1998 — Middle school students from across Colorado will design, build and race model solar cars in the 1998 Junior Solar Sprint. The race will be held at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on Sat., May 16. Each team starts with a silicon solar cell, which converts light into electricity, and a motor. Using any other materials, competitors

  1. High School Students Compete in Solar-Powered Bike Race

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compete in Solar-Powered Bike Race For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., April 23, 1998 — Photo opportunity: Media are invited to cover the workshop and solar-powered bicycle race designed to give students hands-on learning experiences with renewable energy technologies. What: The Colorado Solar BikeRayce is a competition for high school students to race solar-powered bikes that they design and build. The event will prepare the teams for the national Solar

  2. Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript y] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript y] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript y] Authors: Hucker, M. ; Christensen, N.B. ; Holmes, A.T. ; Blackburn, E. ; Forgan, E.M. ; Liang, Ruixing ; Bonn, D.A. ; Hardy, W.N. ; Gutowski, O. ; Zimmermann, M.v. ; Hayden, S.M. ; Chang, J. [1] ; Denmark) [2] ;

  3. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 kVA transformer passed the impulse test in KEMA high-voltage laboratories. Additional products include: nine papers published in the IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, one patent has been filed, three PhD students were supported from beginning to graduation, five postdoctoral fellows, and three MSc students were partially supported. The electrical characteristics of our dry-type toroidal transformers are similar to those of the oil-immersed pole mounted transformers currently in use by many utilities, but toroids have higher efficiency. The no-load losses of the 50 kVA prototype are only 45 W. A standard transformer has no-load losses between 90 and 240 W. Thus, even the finest transformer built today with standard technology has double the amount of no-load losses than the prototype toroidal transformer. When the manufacturing process is prepared for mass production, the cost of a dry-type toroidal transformer would be similar to the price of an oil-filed standard design. However, because of the greatly reduced losses, the total ownership cost of a toroidal transformer could be about half of a traditional design. We got a grant from Power Bridge NY in the amount of $149,985 from June 2014 to May 2015 to continue developing the transformer with commercialization objectives. We are considering the possibility to incorporate a company to manufacture the transformers and have contacted investors. The current status of the real life testing is as follows: after several months of silence, Con Edison has re-started conversations and has shown willingness to test the transformer. Other companies, PSE&G and National Grid have recently also shown interest and we will present our product to them soon.

  4. Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Philippe H. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A point-sensitive NMR imaging system (10) in which a main solenoid coil (11) produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils (PZ1 and PZ2) powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils (PX1, PX2; PY1, PY2) superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An RF generator (22) irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

  5. Core Carbon Group AS CCG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbon Group AS CCG Jump to: navigation, search Name: Core Carbon Group AS (CCG) Place: Copenhagen, Denmark Zip: DK-1074 Sector: Carbon Product: The Core Carbon Group (formerly...

  6. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    core lithology descriptions for the core recovered from the SOH 2 borehole. Authors Elizabeth A. Novak, Frank A. Trusdell and Renee S. Evans Published Department of the Interior,...

  7. Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National ... Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National...

  8. Core Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date 2002 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Cores...

  9. Core Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  10. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P.; Young, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of thin layers of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick.

  12. FTCP-09-001, Safety System Oversight competencies and FAQS Options |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 1, Safety System Oversight competencies and FAQS Options FTCP-09-001, Safety System Oversight competencies and FAQS Options FTCP Issue Paper: FTCP-09-001 Approved by FTCP, August 25, 2009 Face to Face Meeting. PDF icon FTCP-09-001 SSO competencies and FAQS Options More Documents & Publications FTCP-08-001, Methodology for Counting TQP Personnel and Qualifications FTCP-08-002, Technical Qualification Program Requalification FTCP Biennial Report - Calendar Years

  13. ASHRAE Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product categories. Download the tables below to incorporate FEMP and ENERGY STAR purchasing requirements into federal product acquisition documents.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL BOLTZMANN HYDRO CODE FOR CORE COLLAPSE IN MASSIVE STARS. I. SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC TREATMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    We propose a novel numerical method for solving multi-dimensional, special relativistic Boltzmann equations for neutrinos coupled with hydrodynamics equations. This method is meant to be applied to simulations of core-collapse supernovae. We handle special relativity in a non-conventional way, taking account of all orders of v/c. Consistent treatment of the advection and collision terms in the Boltzmann equations has been a challenge, which we overcome by employing two different energy grids: Lagrangian remapped and laboratory fixed grids. We conduct a series of basic tests and perform a one-dimensional simulation of core-collapse, bounce, and shock-stall for a 15 M {sub ?} progenitor model with a minimum but essential set of microphysics. We demonstrate in the latter simulation that our new code is capable of handling all phases in core-collapse supernova. For comparison, a non-relativistic simulation is also conducted with the same code, and we show that they produce qualitatively wrong results in neutrino transfer. Finally, we discuss a possible incorporation of general relativistic effects into our method.

  15. Defense Program Equivalencies for Technical Qualification Standard Competencies12/12/1995

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Defense Programs has undertaken an effort to compare the competencies in the GeneralTechnical Base Qualification Standard and the Functional Area Qualification Standards withvarious positions in...

  16. ARCADIA{sup R} - A New Generation of Coupled Neutronics / Core Thermal- Hydraulics Code System at AREVA NP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curca-Tivig, Florin; Merk, Stephan; Pautz, Andreas; Thareau, Sebastien

    2007-07-01

    Anticipating future needs of our customers and willing to concentrate synergies and competences existing in the company for the benefit of our customers, AREVA NP decided in 2002 to develop the next generation of coupled neutronics/ core thermal-hydraulic (TH) code systems for fuel assembly and core design calculations for both, PWR and BWR applications. The global CONVERGENCE project was born: after a feasibility study of one year (2002) and a conceptual phase of another year (2003), development was started at the beginning of 2004. The present paper introduces the CONVERGENCE project, presents the main feature of the new code system ARCADIA{sup R} and concludes on customer benefits. ARCADIA{sup R} is designed to meet AREVA NP market and customers' requirements worldwide. Besides state-of-the-art physical modeling, numerical performance and industrial functionality, the ARCADIA{sup R} system is featuring state-of-the-art software engineering. The new code system will bring a series of benefits for our customers: e.g. improved accuracy for heterogeneous cores (MOX/ UOX, Gd...), better description of nuclide chains, and access to local neutronics/ thermal-hydraulics and possibly thermal-mechanical information (3D pin by pin full core modeling). ARCADIA is a registered trademark of AREVA NP. (authors)

  17. Container Security - part of the CORE system

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-10-02

    A data integration system to support the US Customs and Border Protection Officers to supervise and make decisions for container inspections. CORE is designed to act as a framework to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization.

  18. Requirements for transporting the TMI-2 core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, D.E.

    1983-08-01

    This report summarizes the requirements associated with the actual transport of core debris from the damaged Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The requirements are discussed under six headings: accountability, security, quality, safety, environment, and transportation.

  19. In-core and ex-core calculations of the VENUS simulated PWR benchmark experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.L.; Chowdhury, P.; Landesman, M.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The VENUS PWR engineering mockup experiment was established to simulate a beginning-of-life, generic PWR configuration at the zero-power VENUS critical facility located at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium. The experimental measurement program consists of (1) gamma scans to determine the core power distribution, (2) in-core and ex-core foil activations, (3) neutron spectrometer measurements, and (4) gamma heating measurements with TLD's. Analysis of the VENUS benchmark has been performed with two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory, using the DOT-IV code.

  20. THE TURBULENT CASCADE AND PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Joshua.Stawarz@Colorado.edu

    2012-08-01

    The recently protracted solar minimum provided years of interplanetary data that were largely absent in any association with observed large-scale transient behavior on the Sun. With large-scale shear at 1 AU generally isolated to corotating interaction regions, it is reasonable to ask whether the solar wind is significantly turbulent at this time. We perform a series of third-moment analyses using data from the Advanced Composition Explorer. We show that the solar wind at 1 AU is just as turbulent as at any other time in the solar cycle. Specifically, the turbulent cascade of energy scales in the same manner proportional to the product of wind speed and temperature. Energy cascade rates during solar minimum average a factor of 2-4 higher than during solar maximum, but we contend that this is likely the result of having a different admixture of high-latitude sources.

  1. Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael

    2012-07-01

    As part of the ongoing effort to estimate the foreseeable impacts of aggressive minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) programs in the worlds major economies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a scenario to analyze the technical potential of MEPS in 13 major economies around the world1 . The best available technology (BAT) scenario seeks to determine the maximum potential savings that would result from diffusion of the most efficient available technologies in these major economies.

  2. Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling Products into Federal Acquisition Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) organized information about FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and water heating products into tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 minimum efficiency requirement tables. Federal buyers can use these tables as a reference and to incorporate the proper purchasing requirements set by FEMP and ENERGY STAR into federal acquisition documents.

  3. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    2015-03-11

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  4. Resilient Core Networks for Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuntze, Nicolai; Rudolph, Carsten; Leivesley, Sally; Manz, David O.; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.

    2014-07-28

    AbstractSubstations and their control are crucial for the availability of electricity in todays energy distribution. Ad- vanced energy grids with Distributed Energy Resources require higher complexity in substations, distributed functionality and communication between devices inside substations and between substations. Also, substations include more and more intelligent devices and ICT based systems. All these devices are connected to other systems by different types of communication links or are situated in uncontrolled environments. Therefore, the risk of ICT based attacks on energy grids is growing. Consequently, security measures to counter these risks need to be an intrinsic part of energy grids. This paper introduces the concept of a Resilient Core Network to interconnected substations. This core network provides essen- tial security features, enables fast detection of attacks and allows for a distributed and autonomous mitigation of ICT based risks.

  5. Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    2001-05-15

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

  6. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    2001-07-17

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  7. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    1998-01-01

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  8. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

    1998-10-13

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

  9. DOE GIS core team - a best practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J.; Bhaduri, Budhendra; Bleakly, D. R.; Brady-Sabeff, Liz; Guber, Al; Guziel, K. A.; Hargrove, Susan; Lee, J.; Lee, R.; Mickus, Kurt; Morehouse, David; Moore, K.; Ramsdell, Amy; Rich, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    Large government organizations such as the Department of Energy (DOE) are challenged with identifying and implementing best geospatial information management practices to ensure that operational needs are met and government objectives are achieved. Geographic Information System (GIS) professionals, complex wide within the Department, conduct spatial information management practices on a daily basis to complete a wide variety of science and engineering tasks. The DOE Office of the CIO recognized the wealth of geospatial information management knowledge within the DOE complex and formed the DOE GIS Core Team in 2001 as a result. The team is comprised of GIS experts-representing all major DOE labs, site facilities, and programs-who volunteer their time to address issues impacting the entire complex. These include the President's management agenda (with emphasis on the Geospatial One-Stop), homeland security, emergency response, site management, software and geospatial data licensing, and federal, national, and international standards governing the creation and dissemination of geospatial data. The strength of the DOE GIS Core Team is the wide diversity of GIS and scientific expertise represented on the team, which allows it to provide the DOE CIO's office with sound guidance on complex wide issues from a GIS practitioner's perspective. The Core Team's mission is 'to foster technical excellence and communication, to identify and advocate best business practices, and to provide sound recommendations on policy and standards.' As a first step toward identifying best practices the feam conducted a survey of all known GIS assets across the DOE complex. The survey identified each site's GIS expertise, operating systems architecture and software applications, major project areas supported, and a number of other metrics important to the operation of a GIS organization. Results of the survey will be discussed, along with the mission of the Core Team. A broad overview of best practices utilized by many of the leading GIS organizations across the complex will also be provided.

  10. Computed microtomography of reservoir core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, M.E.; Muegge, E.L.; Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W.

    1995-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is often utilized to evaluate and characterize structural characteristics within reservoir core material systems. Generally, medical CT scanners have been employed because of their availability and ease of use. Of interest lately has been the acquisition of three-dimensional, high resolution descriptions of rock and pore structures for characterization of the porous media and for modeling of single and multiphase transport processes. The spatial resolution of current medical CT scanners is too coarse for pore level imaging of most core samples. Recently developed high resolution computed microtomography (CMT) using synchrotron X-ray sources is analogous to conventional medical CT scanning and provides the ability to obtain three-dimensional images of specimens with a spatial resolution on the order of micrometers. Application of this technique to the study of core samples provides two- and three-dimensional high resolution description of pore structure and mineral distributions. Pore space and interconnectivity is accurately characterized and visualized. Computed microtomography data can serve as input into pore-level simulation techniques. A generalized explanation of the technique is provided, with comparison to conventional CT scanning techniques and results. Computed microtomographic results of several sandstone samples are presented and discussed. Bulk porosity values and mineralogical identification were obtained from the microtomograms and compared with gas porosity and scanning electron microscope results on tandem samples.

  11. Natural radionuclides in ground waters and cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.; Maiti, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations of natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium decay series in site-specific ground waters and cores (water/rock interaction) can provide information on the expected migration behavior of their radioactive waste and analog radionuclides in the unlikely event of radioactive releases from a repository. These data in ground waters can provide in situ retardation and sorption/desorption parameters for transport models and their associated kinetics (residence time). These data in cores can also provide information on migration or leaching up to a period of about one million years. Finally, the natural radionuclide data can provide baseline information for future monitoring of possible radioactive waste releases. The natural radionuclides of interest are {sup 238}U, {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Bi, {sup 210}Po, {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, and {sup 224}Ra. The half-lives of the daughter radionuclides range from 3 days to 2.5 x 10{sup 5} yr. The data discussed are for low ionic strength ground waters from the Hanford (basalt) site and briny ground waters (high ionic strength) and cores from the Deaf Smith salt site. Similar applications of the natural radionuclide data can be extended to the Nevada Tuff repository site and subseabed disposal site. The concentrations of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, and polonium radionuclides are generally very low in ground waters. However, significant differences in disequilibrium exist between basalt and briny ground waters.

  12. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, R. T.; Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T.; Williams, K. A.; Moses, D. L.

    2006-11-01

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, continuously graded fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 ?m is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457?m. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

  13. Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840); Soika, Rainer H. (1 Hensel, #X4C, College Station, TX 77840)

    2002-01-01

    An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

  14. Drilling and coring methods that minimize the disturbance of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Drilling and coring methods that minimize the disturbance of cuttings, core, and rock formation in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Hammermeister, D.P.; Blout, D.O.;...

  15. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have...

  16. Core Analysis At Jemez Mountain Area (Eichelberger & Koch, 1979...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Jemez Mountain Area (Eichelberger & Koch, 1979) Exploration Activity...

  17. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic

  18. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in

  19. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  20. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  1. Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office PDF icon Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office More Documents & Publications E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  2. Four Minority Serving Institutions Selected to Compete in the 2013 Solar

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Decathlon | Department of Energy Four Minority Serving Institutions Selected to Compete in the 2013 Solar Decathlon Four Minority Serving Institutions Selected to Compete in the 2013 Solar Decathlon January 27, 2012 - 3:38pm Addthis An aerial shot of Orange County Great Park, site of the 2013 Solar Decathlon. An aerial shot of Orange County Great Park, site of the 2013 Solar Decathlon. Of the elite twenty teams that have been selected from across the country and around the world to compete

  3. Flux harmonics in large SFR cores in relation with core characteristics such as power peaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimpault, G.; Buiron, L.; Fontaine, B.; Sciora, P.; Tommasi, J.

    2013-07-01

    Designing future Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) requires enhancing their operational performance and reducing the probability to go into core disruption. As a consequence of these constraints, these novel reactors exhibit rather unusual features compared to past designs. The cores are much larger with rather flat shape. The consequences of that shape on the core characteristics deserve to be studied. The approach taken in this paper is to calculate the eigenvalue associated to the first harmonic and its associated flux. It is demonstrated that these values are linked to some core features, in particular, those sensitive to spatial effects such as power peaks induced by the movement of control rods. The uncertainty associated to these characteristics is being tentatively studied and guidelines for further studied are being identified. In the development strategy of these new SFR designs, a first demonstration plant of limited installed power (around 1500 MWth) will have to be built first. Identifying the possibility of going later to higher power plants (around 3600 MWth) without facing new challenges is an important criterion for designing such a plant. That strategy is being studied, in this paper, focusing on some rather frequent initiator such as the inadvertent control rod withdrawal for different core sizes with the help of the perturbation theory and the flux harmonics. (authors)

  4. Confronting Regulatory Cost and Quality Expectations. An Exploration of Technical Change in Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Margaret; Spurlock, C. Anna; Yang, Hung-Chia

    2015-09-21

    The dual purpose of this project was to contribute to basic knowledge about the interaction between regulation and innovation and to inform the cost and benefit expectations related to technical change which are embedded in the rulemaking process of an important area of national regulation. The area of regulation focused on here is minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances and other energy-using products. Relevant both to U.S. climate policy and energy policy for buildings, MEPS remove certain product models from the market that do not meet specified efficiency thresholds.

  5. Exotic equilibria of Harary graphs and a new minimum degree lower bound for synchronization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canale, Eduardo A.; Monzn, Pablo

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with stability of equilibria in the homogeneous (equal frequencies) Kuramoto model of weakly coupled oscillators. In 2012 [R. Taylor, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 115 (2012)], a sufficient condition for almost global synchronization was found in terms of the minimum degreeorder ratio of the graph. In this work, a new lower bound for this ratio is given. The improvement is achieved by a concrete infinite sequence of regular graphs. Besides, non standard unstable equilibria of the graphs studied in Wiley et al. [Chaos 16, 015103 (2006)] are shown to exist as conjectured in that work.

  6. Video: Federal Energy Management Program eTraining Core Courses |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Video: Federal Energy Management Program eTraining Core Courses Video: Federal Energy Management Program eTraining Core Courses Video summarizes the Federal Energy Management Program's eTraining core courses available anytime online on the Whole Building Design Guide website

  7. Core-in-shell sorbent for hot coal gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Akiti, Jr., Tetteh T.

    2004-02-10

    A core-in-shell sorbent is described herein. The core is reactive to the compounds of interest, and is preferably calcium-based, such as limestone for hot gas desulfurization. The shell is a porous protective layer, preferably inert, which allows the reactive core to remove the desired compounds while maintaining the desired physical characteristics to withstand the conditions of use.

  8. Hunton Group core workshop and field trip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.S.

    1993-12-31

    The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

  9. Twenty-three Teams to Compete in Virginia High School Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twenty-three Teams to Compete in Virginia High School Science Bowl NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Jan. 30, 2014 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the U.S....

  10. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs—Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, D. H.; Conway, T. J.; Vanderhorst, Jr, T. J.; Januszewski, III, J.; Leo, R.; Perman, K.

    2013-07-01

    This document is a summarization of the report, Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs, the final report for phase 2 of the SPSP (DOE workforce study) project.

  11. Department of Energy to Compete Management & Operating Contract for its National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will compete the management and operating (M&O) contract for its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in...

  12. Analysis of Hydrogen and Competing Technologies for Utility-Scale Energy Storage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.

    2010-02-11

    Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's analysis of hydrogen energy storage scenarios, including analysis framework, levelized cost comparison of hydrogen and competing technologies, analysis results, and conclusions drawn from the analysis.

  13. Where can I find APIs and other resources for developers competing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Where can I find APIs and other resources for developers competing at Cleanweb hackathons? Home > Groups > Developer Submitted by Rmckeel on 25 June, 2012 - 07:23 1 answer Points:...

  14. Department of Energy to Compete Management and Operating Contracts for Three Office of Science Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it plans to begin competing the management and operating (M&O) contracts for three of its Office of Science national...

  15. Apparatus and method for closed-loop control of reactor power in minimum time

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Jr., John A.

    1988-11-01

    Closed-loop control law for altering the power level of nuclear reactors in a safe manner and without overshoot and in minimum time. Apparatus is provided for moving a fast-acting control element such as a control rod or a control drum for altering the nuclear reactor power level. A computer computes at short time intervals either the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e '.rho.-.SIGMA..beta..sub.i (.lambda..sub.i -.lambda..sub.e ')+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e '.omega.] or the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e .rho.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e)(.beta.-.rho.)+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e .omega.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e).omega.] These functions each specify the rate of change of reactivity that is necessary to achieve a specified rate of change of reactor power. The direction and speed of motion of the control element is altered so as to provide the rate of reactivity change calculated using either or both of these functions thereby resulting in the attainment of a new power level without overshoot and in minimum time. These functions are computed at intervals of approximately 0.01-1.0 seconds depending on the specific application.

  16. Minimum separation distances for natural gas pipeline and boilers in the 300 area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Graham, T.M.

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing actions to reduce energy expenditures and improve energy system reliability at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. These actions include replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing a new natural gas distribution system to provide a fuel source for many of these units, and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. The individual heating units will include steam boilers that are to be housed in individual annex buildings located at some distance away from nearby 300 Area nuclear facilities. This analysis develops the basis for siting the package boilers and natural gas distribution systems to be used to supply steam to 300 Area nuclear facilities. The effects of four potential fire and explosion scenarios involving the boiler and natural gas pipeline were quantified to determine minimum separation distances that would reduce the risks to nearby nuclear facilities. The resulting minimum separation distances are shown in Table ES.1.

  17. Prognostic Importance of Gleason 7 Disease Among Patients Treated With External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Detailed Biopsy Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Zumsteg, Zach; Ghadjar, Pirus; Pangasa, Misha; Pei, Xin; Fine, Samson W.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary Gleason (pG) grade among a large cohort of Gleason 7 prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From May 1989 to January 2011, 1190 Gleason 7 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT at a single institution. Of these patients, 613 had a Gleason 7 with a minimum of a sextant biopsy with nonfragmented cores and full biopsy core details available, including number of cores of cancer involved, percentage individual core involvement, location of disease, bilaterality, and presence of perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 1-16 years). The prognostic implication for the following outcomes was analyzed: biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: The 8-year bRFS rate for pG3 versus pG4 was 77.6% versus 61.3% (P<.0001), DMFS was 96.8% versus 84.3% (P<.0001), and PCSM was 3.7% versus 8.1% (P=.002). On multivariate analysis, pG4 predicted for significantly worse outcome in all parameters. Location of disease (apex, base, mid-gland), perineural involvement, maximum individual core involvement, and the number of Gleason 3+3, 3+4, or 4+3 cores did not predict for distant metastases. Conclusions: Primary Gleason grade 4 independently predicts for worse bRFS, DMFS, and PCSM among Gleason 7 patients. Using complete core information can allow clinicians to utilize pG grade as a prognostic factor, despite not having the full pathologic details from a prostatectomy specimen. Future staging and risk grouping should investigate the incorporation of primary Gleason grade when complete biopsy core information is used.

  18. Science Bowl 2014: Future STEM Leaders to Compete in National Contest |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Longfellow Middle School from Falls Church, Virginia and Hopkins Junior High from Fremont, California, compete in the final academics round for the championship during the 2012 National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. | Photograph by Jack Dempsey, U.S. Department of Energy. Longfellow Middle School from Falls Church, Virginia and Hopkins Junior High from Fremont, California, compete in the final academics round for the championship during the 2012 National Science Bowl

  19. Competing for a grade and our nuclear security | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex Competing for a grade and ... Competing for a grade and our nuclear security Posted: February 25, 2016 - 2:05pm UT students and Y-12 nuclear security subject matter experts conduct a battle board challenge in Oak Ridge. It's like a semester-long chess game with the final moves played live at Y-12 National Security Complex. Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC nuclear security training experts and University of Tennessee graduate students strategize over a 3-dimensional battle board

  20. Calloway Makes Sweet 16, Lone Oak Competes in DOE National Science Bowl |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Calloway Makes Sweet 16, Lone Oak Competes in DOE National Science Bowl Calloway Makes Sweet 16, Lone Oak Competes in DOE National Science Bowl April 29, 2014 - 2:43pm Addthis Calloway County High School's Mia Beth Morehead, coach, Landon Fike, Cody Bergman, Sam Morehead, Josh Betts, and Hudson Elliott from Murray, Kentucky, pose for a team photo during the 2014 National Science Bowl competition, Thursday, April 24, 2014, in Washington, DC. Calloway County High School's

  1. Twelve Collegiate Teams Gear Up to Compete at WINDPOWER 2016 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Twelve Collegiate Teams Gear Up to Compete at WINDPOWER 2016 Twelve Collegiate Teams Gear Up to Compete at WINDPOWER 2016 May 18, 2015 - 2:38pm Addthis Twelve collegiate teams are gearing up to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) second Collegiate Wind Competition that will take place at the annual American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans, Louisiana, from May 23 to 26, 2016. The Collegiate Wind Competition

  2. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

  3. The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A.

    2013-06-13

    Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

  4. On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it

    2013-07-01

    We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

  5. A fast tomographic method for searching the minimum free energy path

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Changjun; Huang, Yanzhao; Xiao, Yi; Jiang, Xuewei

    2014-10-21

    Minimum Free Energy Path (MFEP) provides a lot of important information about the chemical reactions, like the free energy barrier, the location of the transition state, and the relative stability between reactant and product. With MFEP, one can study the mechanisms of the reaction in an efficient way. Due to a large number of degrees of freedom, searching the MFEP is a very time-consuming process. Here, we present a fast tomographic method to perform the search. Our approach first calculates the free energy surfaces in a sequence of hyperplanes perpendicular to a transition path. Based on an objective function and the free energy gradient, the transition path is optimized in the collective variable space iteratively. Applications of the present method to model systems show that our method is practical. It can be an alternative approach for finding the state-to-state MFEP.

  6. Rotary Mode Core Sample System availability improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, W.W.; Bennett, K.L.; Potter, J.D.; Cross, B.T.; Burkes, J.M.; Rogers, A.C.

    1995-02-28

    The Rotary Mode Core Sample System (RMCSS) is used to obtain stratified samples of the waste deposits in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The samples are used to characterize the waste in support of ongoing and future waste remediation efforts. Four sampling trucks have been developed to obtain these samples. Truck I was the first in operation and is currently being used to obtain samples where the push mode is appropriate (i.e., no rotation of drill). Truck 2 is similar to truck 1, except for added safety features, and is in operation to obtain samples using either a push mode or rotary drill mode. Trucks 3 and 4 are now being fabricated to be essentially identical to truck 2.

  7. Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-02-01

    Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

  8. Test report for core drilling ignitability testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, K.S.

    1996-08-08

    Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

  9. Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrick, Todd

    2011-05-25

    Efficiency in drilling is measured by Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE). MSE is the measure of the amount of energy input required to remove a unit volume of rock, expressed in units of energy input divided by volume removed. It can be expressed mathematically in terms of controllable parameters; Weight on Bit, Torque, Rate of Penetration, and RPM. It is well documented that minimizing MSE by optimizing controllable factors results in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to minimize MSE in the field only through a trial-and-error process. This work makes it possible to compute the optimum drilling parameters that result in minimum MSE. The parameters that have been traditionally used to compute MSE are interdependent. Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional MSE equation was rewritten in terms of a single parameter, Weight on Bit, establishing a form that can be minimized mathematically. Once the optimum Weight on Bit was determined, the interdependent relationship that Weight on Bit has with Torque and Penetration per Revolution was used to determine optimum values for those parameters for a given drilling situation. The improved method was validated through laboratory experimentation and analysis of published data. Two rock types were subjected to four treatments each, and drilled in a controlled laboratory environment. The method was applied in each case, and the optimum parameters for minimum MSE were computed. The method demonstrated an accurate means to determine optimum drilling parameters of Weight on Bit, Torque, and Penetration per Revolution. A unique application of micro-cracking is also presented, which demonstrates that rock failure ahead of the bit is related to axial force more than to rotation speed.

  10. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-03-21

    Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

  11. Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

  12. NEWLY DISCOVERED GLOBAL TEMPERATURE STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Zhenguang; Frazin, Richard A.; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward B.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Vasquez, Alberto M.

    2012-08-20

    Magnetic loops are building blocks of the closed-field corona. While active region loops are readily seen in images taken at EUV and X-ray wavelengths, quiet-Sun (QS) loops are seldom identifiable and are therefore difficult to study on an individual basis. The first analysis of solar minimum (Carrington Rotation 2077) QS coronal loops utilizing a novel technique called the Michigan Loop Diagnostic Technique (MLDT) is presented. This technique combines Differential Emission Measure Tomography and a potential field source surface (PFSS) model, and consists of tracing PFSS field lines through the tomographic grid on which the local differential emission measure is determined. As a result, the electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} at each point along each individual field line can be obtained. Using data from STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/MDI, the MLDT identifies two types of QS loops in the corona: so-called up loops in which the temperature increases with height and so-called down loops in which the temperature decreases with height. Up loops are expected, however, down loops are a surprise, and furthermore, they are ubiquitous in the low-latitude corona. Up loops dominate the QS at higher latitudes. The MLDT allows independent determination of the empirical pressure and density scale heights, and the differences between the two remain to be explained. The down loops appear to be a newly discovered property of the solar minimum corona that may shed light on the physics of coronal heating. The results are shown to be robust to the calibration uncertainties of the EUVI instrument.

  13. TOUGH+ v1.5 Core Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-08-27

    TOUGH+ v1.5 is a numerical code for the simulation of multi-phase, multi-component flow and transport of mass and heat through porous and fractured media, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. TOUGH+ is a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRANmore » 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstations, PC, Macintosh). TOUGH+ v1.5 employs dynamic memory allocation, thus minimizing storage requirements. It has a completely modular structure, follows the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), and involves the advanced features of FORTRAN 95/2003, i.e., modules, derived data types, the use of pointers, lists and trees, data encapsulation, defined operators and assignments, operator extension and overloading, use of generic procedures, and maximum use of the powerful intrinsic vector and matrix processing operations. TOUGH+ v1.5 is the core code for its family of applications, i.e., the part of the code that is common to all its applications. It provides a description of the underlying physics and thermodynamics of non-isothermal flow, of the mathematical and numerical approaches, as well as a detailed explanation of the general (common to all applications) input requirements, options, capabilities and output specifications. The core code cannot run by itself: it needs to be coupled with the code for the specific TOUGH+ application option that describes a particular type of problem. The additional input requirements specific to a particular TOUGH+ application options and related illustrative examples can be found in the corresponding User’s Manual.« less

  14. TOUGH+ v1.5 Core Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-08-27

    TOUGH+ v1.5 is a numerical code for the simulation of multi-phase, multi-component flow and transport of mass and heat through porous and fractured media, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. TOUGH+ is a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRANmore95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstations, PC, Macintosh). TOUGH+ v1.5 employs dynamic memory allocation, thus minimizing storage requirements. It has a completely modular structure, follows the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), and involves the advanced features of FORTRAN 95/2003, i.e., modules, derived data types, the use of pointers, lists and trees, data encapsulation, defined operators and assignments, operator extension and overloading, use of generic procedures, and maximum use of the powerful intrinsic vector and matrix processing operations. TOUGH+ v1.5 is the core code for its family of applications, i.e., the part of the code that is common to all its applications. It provides a description of the underlying physics and thermodynamics of non-isothermal flow, of the mathematical and numerical approaches, as well as a detailed explanation of the general (common to all applications) input requirements, options, capabilities and output specifications. The core code cannot run by itself: it needs to be coupled with the code for the specific TOUGH+ application option that describes a particular type of problem. The additional input requirements specific to a particular TOUGH+ application options and related illustrative examples can be found in the corresponding User?s Manual.less

  15. TOUGH+ v1.5 Core Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-27

    TOUGH+ v1.5 is a numerical code for the simulation of multi-phase, multi-component flow and transport of mass and heat through porous and fractured media, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. TOUGH+ is a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstations, PC, Macintosh). TOUGH+ v1.5 employs dynamic memory allocation, thus minimizing storage requirements. It has a completely modular structure, follows the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), and involves the advanced features of FORTRAN 95/2003, i.e., modules, derived data types, the use of pointers, lists and trees, data encapsulation, defined operators and assignments, operator extension and overloading, use of generic procedures, and maximum use of the powerful intrinsic vector and matrix processing operations. TOUGH+ v1.5 is the core code for its family of applications, i.e., the part of the code that is common to all its applications. It provides a description of the underlying physics and thermodynamics of non-isothermal flow, of the mathematical and numerical approaches, as well as a detailed explanation of the general (common to all applications) input requirements, options, capabilities and output specifications. The core code cannot run by itself: it needs to be coupled with the code for the specific TOUGH+ application option that describes a particular type of problem. The additional input requirements specific to a particular TOUGH+ application options and related illustrative examples can be found in the corresponding User?s Manual.

  16. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI)=1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (?), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  17. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  18. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2013-03-26

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shapped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  19. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Scher, Erik C. (San Francisco, CA); Manna, Liberato (Lecce, IT)

    2010-12-14

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shaped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  20. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein is a graded core/shell semiconductor nanorod having at least a first segment of a core of a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor, a graded shell overlying the core, wherein the graded shell comprises at least two monolayers, wherein the at least two monolayers each independently comprise a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor.

  1. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists

  2. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists

  3. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists

  4. Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Wednesday, November 27, 2013 The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix

  5. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  6. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  7. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  8. SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT The first phase of the Lemnos Interoperable Security Program shall lay the foundation for future work by providing a guiding example of the vocabulary, metrics, interoperability requirements and interoperability assurance methodologies used to create interoperable network security products. From a requirements definition perspective, this translates to: PDF icon SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT

  9. Next Generation Sequencing at the University of Chicago Genomics Core

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Next Generation Sequencing at the University of Chicago Genomics Core Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Next Generation Sequencing at the University of Chicago Genomics Core The University of Chicago Genomics Core provides University of Chicago investigators (and external clients) access to State-of-the-Art genomics capabilities: next generation sequencing, Sanger sequencing / genotyping and micro-arrays (gene expression, genotyping, and methylation).

  10. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print Wednesday, 22 February 2006 00:00 A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in

  11. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists

  12. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  13. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  14. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology and Product Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Opportunities (Round 5) | Department of Energy for SSL Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 5) DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 5) The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce its selections for solid-state lighting (SSL) funding opportunities. Fourteen projects were chosen in response to Core Technology and

  15. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  16. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  17. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  18. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  19. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  20. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  1. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  2. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  3. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  4. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to flip the vortex cores on demand. Because these structures are highly stable, very

  5. DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sequestration Test | Department of Energy Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test May 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has begun collecting core samples from a new characterization well near Spectra Energy's Fort

  6. Preparation of Core-Shell Coordination Molecular Assemblies via...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Preparation of Core-Shell Coordination Molecular Assemblies via the Enrichment of ... Subject: membrane, carbon capture, materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel ...

  7. Core Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to...

  8. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Benoit, 1984...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Basis Several core holes were also drilled in the caldera's west moat by Phillips Petroleum Company in 1982, including: PLV-1, drilled to approximately 711 m depth...

  9. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Although their practical realization is still far off, data storage systems based on this core-switching scheme could have several advantages, including high thermal stability,...

  10. Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis...

  11. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Urban, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Core Holes Activity Date 1986 - 1986 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis After several temperature-gradient holes were drilled in 1982 to the...

  12. Core Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) Exploration...

  13. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development ... to employ this understanding in the design and growth of high-efficiency LEDs ...

  14. Livermore Field Office sets core values as part of continuous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sets core values as part of continuous improvement process | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  15. Core Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Carothers, Et Al., 1987...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Carothers, Et Al., 1987) Exploration Activity...

  16. MHK Projects/Cornwall Ontario River Energy CORE | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cornwall Ontario River Energy CORE < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3",...

  17. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core...

  18. Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment of moisture for large-eddy simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modifications to ...

  19. Core-Collapse Supernovae and Host Galaxy Stellar Populations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Core-Collapse Supernovae and Host Galaxy Stellar Populations Authors: Kelly, Patrick L. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ; Kirshner, Robert P. ; Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. ...

  20. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that were conducted on the core sample are presented. References Jones, C.; Moore, J.; Teplow, W.; Craig, S. (1 January 2011) GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE...

  1. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to...

  2. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff, Et Al., 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,...

  3. ORIGIN OF THE DENSE CORE MASS FUNCTION IN CONTRACTING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2013-02-20

    Mass functions of starless dense cores (CMFs) may arise from contraction and dispersal of core-forming filaments. In an illustrative model, a filament contracts radially by self-gravity, increasing the mass of its cores. During this contraction, FUV photoevaporation and ablation by shocks and winds disperse filament gas and limit core growth. The stopping times of core growth are described by a waiting-time distribution. The initial filament column density profile and the resulting CMF each match recent Herschel observations in detail. Then low-mass cores have short growth ages and arise from the innermost filament gas, while massive cores have long growth ages and draw from more extended filament gas. The model fits the initial density profile and CMF best for mean core density 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} and filament dispersal timescale 0.5 Myr. Then the typical core mass, radius, mean column density, and contraction speed are respectively 0.8 solar masses, 0.06 pc, 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, and 0.07 km s{sup -1}, also in accord with observed values.

  4. DOE Issues Draft RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Draft Request for Proposal (DRFP) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Core procurement.

  5. Core Analysis At Geysers Area (Boitnott, 2003) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Greg N. Boitnott...

  6. Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Boitnott...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Greg N. Boitnott...

  7. Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    vortex cores in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films Authors: Winchester, B. 1 ; Balke, ... Author Affiliations Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania ...

  8. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    setting), scientists are looking farther down the road at completely new ways to encode binary information. Magnetic vortex cores, being thermally stable and measuring just...

  9. CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of non-contact substrate processing, handling, and testing equipments for Flat Panel Display (FPD), semiconductor, and solar industries. References: CoreFlow Scientific...

  10. Solid State Lighting LED Core Technology R&D Roundtable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The document should be referenced as: DOE SSL Program, "Solid State Lighting LED Core Technology R&D Roundtable," November 2015. Authors Monica Hansen LED Lighting Advisors Nnamnor ...

  11. Core melt/coolant interactions: modelling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.; McGlaun, J.M.; Corradini, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    If there is not adequate cooling water in the core of a light-water reactor (LWR), the fission product decay heat would eventually cause the reactor fuel and cladding to melt. This could lead to slumping of the molten core materials into the lower plenum of the reactor vessel, possibly followed by failure of the vessel wall and pouring of the molten materials into the reactor cavity. When the molten core materials enter either region, there is a strong possibility of molten core contacting water. This paper focuses on analysis of recent FITS experiments, mechanistic and probabilistic model development, and the application of these models to reactor considerations.

  12. Preparation of Core-Shell Coordination Molecular Assemblies via...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparation of Core-Shell Coordination Molecular Assemblies via the Enrichment of Structure-Directing "Codes" of Bridging Ligands and Metathesis of Metal Units Previous Next List...

  13. Core Analysis At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  14. Core Analysis At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. Core Analysis At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  16. Core Technology Ventures Services CTV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An independent advisory team focused on seed and early stage companies developing fuel cell systems and hydrogen storage technologies. References: Core Technology Ventures...

  17. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0...

  18. Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  19. Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Compare microcracks between Coso and Raft River geothermal areas Notes Microcracks were observed in core samples from Coso. Both...

  20. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration...

  1. Core excitation effects in the breakup of halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, A. M.; Diego, R. de; Lay, J. A.; Crespo, R.; Johnson, R. C.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.

    2012-10-20

    The role of core excitation in the structure and dynamics of two-body halo nuclei is investigated. We present calculations for the resonant breakup of {sup 11}Be on protons at an incident energy of 63.7 MeV/nucleon, where core excitation effects were shown to be important. To describe the reaction, we use a recently developed extension of the DWBA formalism which incorporates these core excitation effects within the no-recoil approximation. The validity of the no-recoil approximation is also examined by comparing with DWBA calculations which take into account core recoil. In addition, calculations with two different continuum representations are presented and compared.

  2. Testing to expand the rotary mode core sampling system operating envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, K.S.

    1998-01-21

    Rotary sampling using the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System (RMCSS) is constrained by what is referred to as the ``Operating Envelope``. The Operating Envelop defines the maximum downward force, maximum rotational speed and minimum purge gas flow allowed during operation of the RMCSS. The original values of 1170 lb. down force, 55 RPM rotational speed, and 30 SCFM nitrogen purge gas were determined during original envelope testing. This envelope was determined by observing the temperature rise on the bitface while drilling into waste simulants. The maximum temperature in single-shell tanks (SSTS) is considered to be approximately 9O C and the critical drill bit temperature, which is the temperature at which an exothermic reaction could be initiated in the tank waste, was previously determined to be 150 C. Thus, the drill bit temperature increase was limited to 60 C. Thermal properties of these simulants approximated typical properties of waste tank saltcake. Later, more detailed envelope testing which used a pumice block simulant, showed a notably higher temperature rise while drilling. This pumice material, which simulated a ``worst case`` foreign object embedded in the waste, has lower thermal conductivity and lower thermal diffusivity than earlier simulants. These properties caused a slower heat transfer in the pumice than in the previous simulants and consequently a higher temperature rise. The maximum downward force was subsequently reduced to 750 lb (at a maximum 55 RPM and minimum 30 SCFM purge gas flow) which was the maximum value at which the drill bit could be operated and still remain below the 60 C temperature rise.

  3. Effects of minimum monitor unit threshold on spot scanning proton plan quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Michelle Beltran, Chris; Mayo, Charles S.; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the minimum monitor unit (MU) on the quality of clinical treatment plans for scanned proton therapy. Methods: Delivery system characteristics limit the minimum number of protons that can be delivered per spot, resulting in a min-MU limit. Plan quality can be impacted by the min-MU limit. Two sites were used to investigate the impact of min-MU on treatment plans: pediatric brain tumor at a depth of 5–10 cm; a head and neck tumor at a depth of 1–20 cm. Three-field, intensity modulated spot scanning proton plans were created for each site with the following parameter variations: min-MU limit range of 0.0000–0.0060; and spot spacing range of 2–8 mm. Comparisons were based on target homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. For the pediatric brain, two versions of the treatment planning system were also compared to judge the effects of the min-MU limit based on when it is accounted for in the optimization process (Eclipse v.10 and v.13, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Results: The increase of the min-MU limit with a fixed spot spacing decreases plan quality both in homogeneous target coverage and in the avoidance of critical structures. Both head and neck and pediatric brain plans show a 20% increase in relative dose for the hot spot in the CTV and 10% increase in key critical structures when comparing min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0060 with a fixed spot spacing of 4 mm. The DVHs of CTVs show min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0010 produce similar plan quality and quality decreases as the min-MU limit increases beyond 0.0020. As spot spacing approaches 8 mm, degradation in plan quality is observed when no min-MU limit is imposed. Conclusions: Given a fixed spot spacing of ≤4 mm, plan quality decreases as min-MU increased beyond 0.0020. The effect of min-MU needs to be taken into consideration while planning proton therapy treatments.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPheeters, Charles C. (Plainfield, IL); Mrazek, Franklin C. (Hickory Hills, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700.degree. C. and 1100.degree. C.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.

    1988-08-02

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700 C and 1,100 C. 8 figs.

  6. Use of finite volume radiation for predicting the Knudsen minimum in 2D channel flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, Chetan P.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2014-12-09

    In an earlier paper we employed an analogy between surface-to-surface radiation and free-molecular flow to model Knudsen flow through tubes and onto planes. In the current paper we extend the analogy between thermal radiation and molecular flow to model the flow of a gas in a 2D channel across all regimes of rarefaction. To accomplish this, we break down the problem of gaseous flow into three sub-problems (self-diffusion, mass-motion and generation of pressure gradient) and use the finite volume method for modeling radiation through participating media to model the transport in each sub-problem as a radiation problem. We first model molecular self-diffusion in the stationary gas by modeling the transport of the molecular number density through the gas starting from the analytical asymptote for free-molecular flow to the kinetic theory limit of gaseous self-diffusion. We then model the transport of momentum through the gas at unit pressure gradient to predict Poiseuille flow and slip flow in the 2D gas. Lastly, we predict the generation of pressure gradient within the gas due to molecular collisions by modeling the transport of the forces generated due to collisions per unit volume of gas. We then proceed to combine the three radiation problems to predict flow of the gas over the entire Knudsen number regime from free-molecular to transition to continuum flow and successfully capture the Knudsen minimum at Kn ? 1.

  7. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  8. Approaching the Minimum Thermal Conductivity in Rhenium-Substituted Higher Manganese Silicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Girard, S. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Meng, F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jin, S [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Goodenough, J. B. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Zhou, J. S. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Shi, L [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-01-01

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) made of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are regarded as promising p-type thermoelectric materials because their complex crystal structure results in low lattice thermal conductivity. It is shown here that the already low thermal conductivity of HMS can be reduced further to approach the minimum thermal conductivity via partial substitu- tion of Mn with heavier rhenium (Re) to increase point defect scattering. The solubility limit of Re in the obtained RexMn1 xSi1.8 is determined to be about x = 0.18. Elemental inhomogeneity and the formation of ReSi1.75 inclusions with 50 200 nm size are found within the HMS matrix. It is found that the power factor does not change markedly at low Re content of x 0.04 before it drops considerably at higher Re contents. Compared to pure HMS, the reduced lattice thermal conductivity in RexMn1 xSi1.8 results in a 25% increase of the peak figure of merit ZT to reach 0.57 0.08 at 800 K for x = 0.04. The suppressed thermal conductivity in the pure RexMn1 xSi1.8 can enable further investigations of the ZT limit of this system by exploring different impurity doping strategies to optimize the carrier concentration and power factor.

  9. Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-08-05

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified marine waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change. This expansion alters marine ecosystem function and the productivity of fisheries due to habitat compression and changes in biogeochemical cycling leading to fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally anoxic fjord, Saanich Inlet to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification and inorganic carbon fixation predominantly co-varied with abundance and distribution patterns of Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Within these groups, pathways mediating inorganic carbon fixation and nitrogen and sulfur transformations were differentially expressed across the redoxcline. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters and denitrification, sulfur-oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with SUP05 dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrite-oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nitrospina and Planctomycetes respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The differential expression of these pathways under changing water column redox conditions has quantitative implications for coupled biogeochemical cycling linking different modes of inorganic carbon fixation with distributed nitrogen and sulfur-based energy metabolism extensible to coastal and open ocean OMZs.

  10. Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TiO 3 (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO 3 « Prev Next » Title: Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO 3 Authors: Chi, Songxue ; Ye, Feng ; Zhou, H. D. ; Choi, E. S. ; Hwang, J. ; Cao, Huibo ; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A. Publication Date: 2014-10-24 OSTI Identifier: 1181043 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal

  11. Fourteen Teams to Compete in Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Jefferson Lab Fourteen Teams to Compete in Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., March 3, 2015 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on March 7, to compete in the Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl. Teams from 14 schools are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl® - sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Science since 1991 - is an

  12. Secretary Chu to Attend Event in Colorado on the Need to Compete Globally

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Solar Manufacturing | Department of Energy Event in Colorado on the Need to Compete Globally in Solar Manufacturing Secretary Chu to Attend Event in Colorado on the Need to Compete Globally in Solar Manufacturing November 17, 2011 - 12:59pm Addthis Washington D.C. - On Friday, November 18, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will meet with General Electric (GE) leadership and participate in a tour of its solar manufacturing facility in Arvada, Colorado. A press conference will occur after

  13. Thousands of Students Prepare to Compete in the National Science Bowl |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Thousands of Students Prepare to Compete in the National Science Bowl Thousands of Students Prepare to Compete in the National Science Bowl January 29, 2013 - 5:00pm Addthis Members of the Los Alamos High School team, Los Alamos, New Mexico, concentrates on the answer to a question at the 2012 National Science Bowl in Washington D.C. on April 29, 2012. | Photograph by Dennis Brack, Office of Science Members of the Los Alamos High School team, Los Alamos, New Mexico,

  14. 10 Colleges to Compete in First Collegiate Wind Competition | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 10 Colleges to Compete in First Collegiate Wind Competition 10 Colleges to Compete in First Collegiate Wind Competition April 1, 2013 - 12:58pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Washington, D.C.-In April, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announced that 10 collegiate teams were selected to participate in its inaugural Collegiate Wind Competition that will take

  15. Star cell type core configuration for structural sandwich materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, Richard M. (Danville, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A new pattern for cellular core material used in sandwich type structural materials. The new pattern involves star shaped cells intermixed with hexagonal shaped cells. The new patterned cellular core material includes star shaped cells interconnected at points thereof and having hexagonal shape cells positioned adjacent the star points. The new pattern allows more flexibility and can conform more easily to curved shapes.

  16. Full Core Multiphysics Simulation with Offline Mesh Deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merzari, E.; Shemon, E. R.; Yu, Y.; Thomas, J. W.; Obabko, A.; Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay; Solberg, Jerome; Ferencz, R.; Whitesides, R.

    2015-12-21

    In this report, building on previous reports issued in FY13 we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core. The focus of the present report is a full core simulation with off-line mesh deformation.

  17. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

  18. Process to make core-shell structured nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N

    2014-01-07

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains core-shell structured nanoparticles. The process includes providing a precursor in the form of a powder a liquid and/or a vapor of a liquid that contains a core material and a shell material, and suspending the precursor in an aerosol gas to produce an aerosol containing the precursor. In addition, the process includes providing a plasma that has a hot zone and passing the aerosol through the hot zone of the plasma. As the aerosol passes through the hot zone of the plasma, at least part of the core material and at least part of the shell material in the aerosol is vaporized. Vapor that contains the core material and the shell material that has been vaporized is removed from the hot zone of the plasma and allowed to condense into core-shell structured nanoparticles.

  19. Pre-conceptual design study of ASTRID core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varaine, F.; Marsault, P.; Chenaud, M. S.; Bernardin, B.; Conti, A.; Sciora, P.; Venard, C.; Fontaine, B.; Devictor, N.; Martin, L.; Scholer, A. C.; Verrier, D.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the ASTRID project at CEA, core design studies are performed at CEA with the AREVA and EDF support. At the stage of the project, pre-conceptual design studies are conducted in accordance with GEN IV reactors criteria, in particularly for safety improvements. An improved safety for a sodium cooled reactor requires revisiting many aspects of the design and is a rather lengthy process in current design approach. Two types of cores are under evaluation, one classical derived from the SFR V2B and one more challenging called CFV (low void effect core) with a large gain on the sodium void effect. The SFR V2b core have the following specifications: a very low burn-up reactivity swing (due to a small cycle reactivity loss) and a reduced sodium void effect with regard to past designs such as the EFR (around 2$ minus). Its performances are an average burn-up of 100 GWd/t, and an internal conversion ratio equal to one given a very good behavior of this core during a control rod withdrawal transient). The CFV with its specific design offers a negative sodium void worth while maintaining core performances. In accordance of ASTRID needs for demonstration those cores are 1500 MWth power (600 MWe). This paper will focus on the CFV pre-conceptual design of the core and S/A, and the performances in terms of safety will be evaluated on different transient scenario like ULOF, in order to assess its intrinsic behavior compared to a more classical design like V2B core. The gap in term of margin to a severe accident due to a loss of flow initiator underlines the potential capability of this type of core to enhance prevention of severe accident in accordance to safety demonstration. (authors)

  20. An In-Core Power Deposition and Fuel Thermal Environmental Monitor for Long-Lived Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don W. Miller

    2004-09-28

    The primary objective of this program is to develop the Constant Temperature Power Sensor (CTPS) as in-core instrumentation that will provide a detailed map of local nuclear power deposition and coolant thermal-hydraulic conditions during the entire life of the core.

  1. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor coremore » examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ¼ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.« less

  2. Concentric core optical fiber with multiple-mode signal transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A concentric core optical fiber provides for the simultaneous but independent transmission of signals over a single optical fiber. The concentric optical fiber is constructed of a single-mode or multimode inner optical fiber defined by a core and a cladding of a lower index of refraction than the core and an outer optical fiber defined by additional cladding concentrically disposed around the cladding and of an index of refraction lower than the first mentioned cladding whereby the latter functions as the core of the outer optical fiber. By employing such an optical fiber construction with a single-mode inner core or optical fiber, highly sensitive interferometric and stable less sensitive amplitude based sensors can be placed along the same length of a concentric core optical fiber. Also, by employing the concentric core optical fiber secure telecommunications can be achieved via the inner optical fiber since an intrusion of the concentric optical fiber will first cause a variation in the light being transmitted through the outer optical fiber and this variation of light being used to trigger a suitable alarm indicative of the intrusion.

  3. Concentric core optical fiber with multiple-mode signal transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, J.D.

    1997-05-06

    A concentric core optical fiber provides for the simultaneous but independent transmission of signals over a single optical fiber. The concentric optical fiber is constructed of a single-mode or multimode inner optical fiber defined by a core and a cladding of a lower index of refraction than the core and an outer optical fiber defined by additional cladding concentrically disposed around the cladding and of an index of refraction lower than the first mentioned cladding whereby the latter functions as the core of the outer optical fiber. By employing such an optical fiber construction with a single-mode inner core or optical fiber, highly sensitive interferometric and stable less sensitive amplitude based sensors can be placed along the same length of a concentric core optical fiber. Also, by employing the concentric core optical fiber secure telecommunications can be achieved via the inner optical fiber since an intrusion of the concentric optical fiber will first cause a variation in the light being transmitted through the outer optical fiber and this variation of light being used to trigger a suitable alarm indicative of the intrusion. 3 figs.

  4. One pass core design of a super fast reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qingjie; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-07-01

    One pass core design for Supercritical-pressure light water-cooled fast reactor (Super FR) is proposed. The whole core is cooled with upward flow in one through flow pattern like PWR. Compared with the previous two pass core design; this new flow pattern can significantly simplify the core concept. Upper core structure, coolant flow scheme as well as refueling procedure are as simple as in PWR. In one pass core design, supercritical-pressure water is at approximately 25.0 MPa and enters the core at 280 C. degrees and is heated up in one through flow pattern upwardly to the average outlet temperature of 500 C. degrees. Great density change in vertical direction can cause significant axial power offset during the cycle. Meanwhile, Pu accumulated in the UO{sub 2} fuel blanket assemblies also introduces great power increase during cycle, which requires large amount of flow for heat removal and makes the outlet temperature of blanket low at the beginning of equilibrium cycle (BOEC). To deal with these issues, some MOX fuel is applied in the bottom region of the blanket assembly. This can help to mitigate the power change in blanket due to Pu accumulation and to increase the outlet temperature of the blanket during cycle. Neutron transport and thermohydraulics coupled calculation shows that this design can satisfy the requirement in the Super FR principle for both 500 C. degrees outlet temperature and negative coolant void reactivity. (authors)

  5. SCDAP/RELAP5 Lower Core Plate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coryell, Eric Wesley; Griffin, F. P.

    1999-10-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. This report describes the justification, theory, implementation, and testing of a new modeling capability which will refine the analysis of the movement of molten material from the core region to the vessel lower head. As molten material moves from the core region through the core support structures it may encounter conditions which will cause it to freeze in the region of the lower core plate, delaying its arrival to the vessel head. The timing of this arrival is significant to reactor safety, because during the time span for material relocation to the lower head, the core may be experiencing steam-limited oxidation. The time at which hot material arrives in a coolant-filled lower vessel head, thereby significantly increasing the steam flow rate through the core region, becomes significant to the progression and timing of a severe accident. This report is a revision of a report INEEL/EXT-00707, entitled "Preliminary Design Report for SCDAP/RELAP5 Lower Core Plate Model".

  6. SCDAP/RELAP5 lower core plate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coryell, E.W.; Griffin, F.P.

    1999-09-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code is a best-estimate analysis tool for performing nuclear reactor severe accident simulations. This report describes the justification, theory, implementation, and testing of a new modeling capability which will refine the analysis of the movement of molten material from the core region to the vessel lower head. As molten material moves from the core region through the core support structures it may encounter conditions which will cause it to freeze in the region of the lower core plate, delaying its arrival to the vessel head. The timing of this arrival is significant to reactor safety, because during the time span for material relocation to the lower head, the core may be experiencing steam-limited oxidation. The time at which hot material arrives in a coolant-filled lower vessel head, thereby significantly increasing the steam flow rate through the core region, becomes significant to the progression and timing of a severe accident. This report is a revision of a report INEEL/EXT-00707, entitled ``Preliminary Design Report for SCDAP/RELAP5 Lower Core Plate Model''.

  7. TREAT Transient Analysis Benchmarking for the HEU Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontogeorgakos, D. C.; Connaway, H. M.; Wright, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    This work was performed to support the feasibility study on the potential conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by the GTRI Reactor Conversion staff at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of this study was to benchmark the transient calculations against temperature-limited transients performed in the final operating HEU TREAT core configuration. The MCNP code was used to evaluate steady-state neutronics behavior, and the point kinetics code TREKIN was used to determine core power and energy during transients. The first part of the benchmarking process was to calculate with MCNP all the neutronic parameters required by TREKIN to simulate the transients: the transient rod-bank worth, the prompt neutron generation lifetime, the temperature reactivity feedback as a function of total core energy, and the core-average temperature and peak temperature as a functions of total core energy. The results of these calculations were compared against measurements or against reported values as documented in the available TREAT reports. The heating of the fuel was simulated as an adiabatic process. The reported values were extracted from ANL reports, intra-laboratory memos and experiment logsheets and in some cases it was not clear if the values were based on measurements, on calculations or a combination of both. Therefore, it was decided to use the term reported values when referring to such data. The methods and results from the HEU core transient analyses will be used for the potential LEU core configurations to predict the converted (LEU) cores performance.

  8. CORE ELECTRON HEATING IN SOLAR WIND RECONNECTION EXHAUSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulupa, M. P.; Salem, C.; Phan, T. D.; Bale, S. D.; Gosling, J. T.

    2014-08-10

    We present observational evidence of core electron heating in solar wind reconnection exhausts. We show two example events, one which shows clear heating of the core electrons within the exhaust, and one which demonstrates no heating. The event with heating occurred during a period of high inflow Alfvn speed (V {sub AL}), while the event with no heating had a low V {sub AL}. This agrees with the results of a recent study of magnetopause exhausts, and suggests that similar core electron heating can occur in both symmetric (solar wind) and asymmetric (magnetopause) exhausts.

  9. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  10. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  11. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  12. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  13. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  14. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron grains in the Earth's inner core comes from x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction

  15. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Wednesday, 30 April 2014 00:00 Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that transmits waves more efficiently in one direction than the other. Recent evidence for this "texturing" of iron

  16. Ignitability testing for core drilling system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashdollar, K.L.; Furno, A.; Green, G.M.; Thomas, R.A.; Witwer, K.S.

    1995-06-15

    As part of a study of the hazards of the inspection of nuclear waste material stored at the Hanford, WA site, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) have developed a core drilling system to sample the material in large waste storage tanks. In support of this work, the US Bureau of Mines has studied the probability of ignition while core drilling into simulated salt cake that was permeated with a flammable gas mixture. No ignitions were observed while core drilling into the saltcake with or without a purge gas and no ignitions were observed while drilling into a steel plate.

  17. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Wednesday, 28 March 2007 00:00 In micrometer-sized magnetic thin films, the magnetization typically adopts an in-plane, circular configuration known as a magnetic vortex. At the vortex core, the magnetization turns sharply out of the plane, pointing either up or down. Magnetic data storage based on this binary phenomenon is an intriguing concept, but it would require the ability to

  18. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  19. Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-04-26

    For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform.

  20. Serially connected solid oxide fuel cells having monolithic cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herceg, Joseph E. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of cell segments electrically serially connected in the flow direction, each segment consisting of electrolyte walls and interconnect that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageways; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte composite materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick. Between 2 and 50 cell segments may be connected in series.

  1. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, New Mexico Jamie N. Gardner, Fraser E. Goff, Sue Goff, Larry Maassen, K. Mathews, Daniel Wachs, D. Wilson (1987) Core Lithology, Valles Caldera No. 1, New Mexico John...

  2. Shalf_NUG2006_QuadCore.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Memory Subsystem Performance and QuadCore Predictions John Shalf SDSA Team Leader jshalf@lbl.gov NERSC User Group Meeting September 17, 2007 NERSC User Group Meeting, September 17,...

  3. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  4. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith, D. Wilson (1989) Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico:...

  5. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial...

  6. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    millitesla (mT) to reverse the direction of a vortex core. ... and their possible application to data storage technologies. ... Is there a physical limit to how far this process can go? At ...

  7. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  8. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this...

  9. Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes See linked abstract for a synopsis of chemical analyses and Rb-Sr age determinations for gneissic...

  10. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory is that the grains of iron that make up most of the solid inner core could be aligned in a way that...

  11. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory...

  12. Core Analysis At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Quane, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rates lavas from Kilauea's East Rift Zone. The core analysis revealed that the average rate of lava expelled from the volcano has been remarkably constant for the last 350,000...

  13. Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    were 43 hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from Yellowstone drill cores Y-5, Y-6, Y-7, Y-8, Y-11, Y-12, and Y-13 (Fig. 1). References N. C. Sturchio, T. E. C....

  14. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOUST, D.J.

    2000-10-26

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  15. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betts, Jr., William S. (Del Mar, CA); Pickering, J. Larry (Del Mar, CA); Black, William E. (San Diego, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A thermal barrier/core support for the fuel core of a nuclear reactor having a metallic cylinder secured to the reactor vessel liner and surrounded by fibrous insulation material. A top cap is secured to the upper end of the metallic cylinder that locates and orients a cover block and post seat. Under normal operating conditions, the metallic cylinder supports the entire load exerted by its associated fuel core post. Disposed within the metallic cylinder is a column of ceramic material, the height of which is less than that of the metallic cylinder, and thus is not normally load bearing. In the event of a temperature excursion beyond the design limits of the metallic cylinder and resulting in deformation of the cylinder, the ceramic column will abut the top cap to support the fuel core post.

  16. Descriptive logs, skeletonized samples, and photographs of core...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    skeletonized samples, and photographs of core from Presco Energy's thermal gradient wells P3-1, P10-1, and P32-2 in the Rye Patch area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to:...

  17. Fabrication method for cores of structural sandwich materials including star shaped core cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, R.M.

    1997-07-15

    A method for fabricating structural sandwich materials having a core pattern which utilizes star and non-star shaped cells is disclosed. The sheets of material are bonded together or a single folded sheet is used, and bonded or welded at specific locations, into a flat configuration, and are then mechanically pulled or expanded normal to the plane of the sheets which expand to form the cells. This method can be utilized to fabricate other geometric cell arrangements than the star/non-star shaped cells. Four sheets of material (either a pair of bonded sheets or a single folded sheet) are bonded so as to define an area therebetween, which forms the star shaped cell when expanded. 3 figs.

  18. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  19. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  20. Star cell type core configuration for structural sandwich materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    A new pattern for cellular core material used in sandwich type structural materials is disclosed. The new pattern involves star shaped cells intermixed with hexagonal shaped cells. The new patterned cellular core material includes star shaped cells interconnected at points thereof and having hexagonal shape cells positioned adjacent the star points. The new pattern allows more flexibility and can conform more easily to curved shapes. 3 figs.

  1. Preparation of Core-Shell Coordination Molecular Assemblies via the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enrichment of Structure-Directing "Codes" of Bridging Ligands and Metathesis of Metal Units (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Preparation of Core-Shell Coordination Molecular Assemblies via the Enrichment of Structure-Directing "Codes" of Bridging Ligands and Metathesis of Metal Units Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preparation of Core-Shell Coordination Molecular Assemblies via the Enrichment of Structure-Directing "Codes" of Bridging Ligands and

  2. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys Cerium (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted

  3. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  4. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  5. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  6. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental

  7. CASL-U-2015-0155-000 VERA Core Simulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-000 VERA Core Simulator Methodology for PWR Cycle Depletion Brendan Kochunas, Daniel Jabaay, Shane Stimpson, Aaron Graham, and Thomas Downar University of Michigan Benjamin Collins, Kang Seog Kim, William Wieselquist, Kevin Clarno, and Jess Gehin Oak Ridge National Laboratory Scott Palmtag Core Physics, Inc. March 29, 2015 CASL-U-2015-0155-000 ANS MC2015 - Joint International Conference on Mathematics and Computation (M&C), Supercomputing in Nuclear Applications (SNA) and the Monte Carlo

  8. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1998-08-03

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-113 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment.

  9. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-116

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOWLER, K.D.

    1999-02-24

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-116 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment.

  10. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10),

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10), Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10), Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of

  11. DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Opportunity Announcement and Laboratory Call | Department of Energy from Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies Funding Opportunity Announcement and Laboratory Call DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Core Technologies Funding Opportunity Announcement and Laboratory Call The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pleased to announce the selection of sixteen (16) applications in response to the Solid-State

  12. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-02-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation.

  13. V-052: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy 2: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution Vulnerabilities V-052: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution Vulnerabilities December 21, 2012 - 12:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Drupal 6.x versions prior to 6.27 Drupal 7.x versions prior to 7.18 ABSTRACT: Drupal Core Multiple vulnerabilities REFERENCE LINKS: SA-CORE-2012-004 - Drupal core

  14. An estimate for the sum of a Dirichlet series in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a vertical line segment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaisin, Ahtyar M; Rakhmatullina, Zhanna G

    2011-12-31

    The behaviour of the sum of an entire Dirichlet series is analyzed in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a system of vertical line segments. Also a more general problem, connected with the Polya conjecture is posed and solved. It concerns the minimum modulus of an entire function with Fabri gaps and its growth along curves going to infinity. Bibliography: 33 titles.

  15. Casting core for a cooling arrangement for a gas turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Heneveld, Benjamin E

    2015-01-20

    A ceramic casting core, including: a plurality of rows (162, 166, 168) of gaps (164), each gap (164) defining an airfoil shape; interstitial core material (172) that defines and separates adjacent gaps (164) in each row (162, 166, 168); and connecting core material (178) that connects adjacent rows (170, 174, 176) of interstitial core material (172). Ends of interstitial core material (172) in one row (170, 174, 176) align with ends of interstitial core material (172) in an adjacent row (170, 174, 176) to form a plurality of continuous and serpentine shaped structures each including interstitial core material (172) from at least two adjacent rows (170, 174, 176) and connecting core material (178).

  16. Efficiency of static core turn-off in a system-on-a-chip with variation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cher, Chen-Yong; Coteus, Paul W; Gara, Alan; Kursun, Eren; Paulsen, David P; Schuelke, Brian A; Sheets, II, John E; Tian, Shurong

    2013-10-29

    A processor-implemented method for improving efficiency of a static core turn-off in a multi-core processor with variation, the method comprising: conducting via a simulation a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage includes a first output corresponding to a first multi-core processor core to turn off; conducting a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage includes a second output corresponding to a second multi-core processor core to turn off; comparing the first output and the second output to determine if the first output is referring to the same core to turn off as the second output; outputting a third output corresponding to the first multi-core processor core if the first output and the second output are both referring to the same core to turn off.

  17. V-052: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution Vulnerabilities V-052: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution Vulnerabilities December 21, 2012 - ...

  18. Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEU/Pb Core (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEUPb Core Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEUPb Core Rossi alpha...

  19. Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEU/Pb Core (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEUPb Core Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEUPb Core You are accessing...

  20. Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock core analyses and mineral assemblage investigations References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake...

  1. Twenty High School Teams Compete in Virginia Regional Science Bowl Being

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Held At Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab Media Advisory: Twenty High School Teams Compete in Virginia Regional Science Bowl Being Held At Jefferson Lab February 7, 2002 The Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Va., is hosting this year's Virginia Regional Science Bowl on February 9, 2002. Twenty teams, representing high schools from across the state are participating in the annual, academic competition. News media are invited to

  2. Twenty-one high school teams compete in Virginia Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hosted by Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab MEDIA ADVISORY: Twenty-one high school teams compete in Virginia Regional Science Bowl hosted by Jefferson Lab February 4, 2003 The Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Va., is hosting this year's Virginia Regional Science Bowl on Saturday, February 8, 2003. Twenty-one teams, representing high schools from across the state, are participating in the annual academic competition. News media

  3. Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horoi, Mihai

    2013-12-30

    Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

  4. Science Superbowl: Junior High students compete to win the Regional Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bowl | Argonne National Laboratory Bill Foster, congressman and former physicist, gives opening remarks to an auditorium of students, coaches and parents before the 2016 Argonne Regional Science Bowl. Bill Foster, congressman and former physicist, gives opening remarks to an auditorium of students, coaches and parents before the 2016 Argonne Regional Science Bowl. A team from Daniel Wright Middle School has won the 2016 Argonne Regional Science Bowl. The team now goes on to compete against

  5. Evaluation of the Start-Up Core Physics Tests at Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (Annular Core Loadings)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2010-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The Japanese government approved construction of the HTTR in the 1989 fiscal year budget; construction began at the Oarai Research and Development Center in March 1991 and was completed May 1996. Fuel loading began July 1, 1998, from the core periphery. The first criticality was attained with an annular core on November 10, 1998 at 14:18, followed by a series of start-up core physics tests until a fully-loaded core was developed on December 16, 1998. Criticality tests were carried out into January 1999. The first full power operation with an average core outlet temperature of 850C was completed on December 7, 2001, and operational licensing of the HTTR was approved on March 6, 2002. The HTTR attained high temperature operation at 950 C in April 19, 2004. After a series of safety demonstration tests, it will be used as the heat source in a hydrogen production system by 2015. Hot zero-power critical, rise-to-power, irradiation, and safety demonstration testing , have also been performed with the HTTR, representing additional means for computational validation efforts. Power tests were performed in steps from 0 to 30 MW, with various tests performed at each step to confirm core characteristics, thermal-hydraulic properties, and radiation shielding. The high-temperature test operation at 950 C represented the fifth and final phase of the rise-to-power tests. The safety tests demonstrated inherent safety features of the HTTR such as slow temperature response during abnormal events due to the large heat capacity of the core and the negative reactivity feedback. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for the annular core criticals from the initial six isothermal, annular and fully-loaded, core critical measurements performed at the HTTR. Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core is compiled elsewhere (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001).

  6. Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Pan, Yen-Cheng (Naperville, IL); Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Seidensticker, Ralph W. (Wheaton, IL)

    1987-01-01

    For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform. Motion or radiation sensing detectors can be provide at the lower ends of the tension rods for obtaining pertinent readings proximate the core.

  7. Incremental k-core decomposition: Algorithms and evaluation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem; Gedik, Bugra; Jacques-SIlva, Gabriela; Wu, Kun -Lung; Catalyurek, Umit V.

    2016-02-15

    A k-core of a graph is a maximal connected subgraph in which every vertex is connected to at least k vertices in the subgraph. k-core decomposition is often used in large-scale network analysis, such as community detection, protein function prediction, visualization, and solving NP-hard problems on real networks efficiently, like maximal clique finding. In many real-world applications, networks change over time. As a result, it is essential to develop efficient incremental algorithms for dynamic graph data. In this paper, we propose a suite of incremental k-core decomposition algorithms for dynamic graph data. These algorithms locate a small subgraph that ismore » guaranteed to contain the list of vertices whose maximum k-core values have changed and efficiently process this subgraph to update the k-core decomposition. We present incremental algorithms for both insertion and deletion operations, and propose auxiliary vertex state maintenance techniques that can further accelerate these operations. Our results show a significant reduction in runtime compared to non-incremental alternatives. We illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms on different types of real and synthetic graphs, at varying scales. Furthermore, for a graph of 16 million vertices, we observe relative throughputs reaching a million times, relative to the non-incremental algorithms.« less

  8. Text-Alternative Version: Webcast of the Renewable Energy Competency Model: An Aid to Build a Renewable Energy Skilled Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the Webcast of Renewable Energy and Competency model. Led by Linda Silverman an economist at Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Pam Frugoli Department of Labor. This webcast was on...

  9. Core coolability following loss-of-heat sink accidents. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1983-01-01

    Most investigations of core meltdown scenarios in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) have focused on accidents resulting from unprotected transients. In comparison, protected accidents which may lead to loss of core coolability and subsequent meltdown have received considerably less attention until recently. The sequence of events leading to the protected loss-of-heat sink (LOHS) accident is among other things dependent on plant type and design. The situation is vastly different in pool-type LMFBRs as compared to the loop-type design; this is as a result of major differences in the primary system configuration, coolant inventory and the structural design. The principal aim of the present paper is to address LOHS accidents in a loop-type LMFBR in regard to physical sequences of events which could lead to loss-of-core coolability and subsequent meltdown.

  10. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Governato, Fabio [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ?CDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ?}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup }dark mass ejected per unit stellar massranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, ? ? dlog M/dlog R ? 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup 1} in the inner 1kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  11. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse physics.

  12. The Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae The Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae 2D and 3D Models Shed New Light on What Fuels an Exploding Star July 2, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, kkincade@lbl.gov,+1 510 495 2124 corecollapse3 2D simulations of the evolution of the entropy (upper half) and radial velocity (lower half) of a supernovae explosion at 150, 300 and 600 milliseconds. Red material is moving outward, blue material is moving inward. Simulations run at NERSC (Hopper and

  13. Apparatus For Laminating Segmented Core For Electric Machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Robert Anthony (Kokomo, IN); Stabel, Gerald R (Swartz Creek, MI)

    2003-06-17

    A segmented core for an electric machine includes segments stamped from coated electric steel. The segments each have a first end, a second end, and winding openings. A predetermined number of segments are placed end-to-end to form layers. The layers are stacked such that each of the layers is staggered from adjacent layers by a predetermined rotation angle. The winding openings of each of the layers are in vertical alignment with the winding openings of the adjacent layers. The stack of layers is secured to form the segmented core.

  14. Lithium Intercalation in Core-Shell Materials-Theoretical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suthar, B; Subramanian, VR

    2014-03-04

    Core-shell composite structures are potential candidates for Li-ion battery electrodes as they can take advantage of materials with higher energy density and materials with higher cyclability. This paper derives an analytical solution for isotropic 1-dimensional diffusion with galvanostatic boundary condition in composite slab, cylinder and sphere using separation of variables method. A general interfacial condition has been used to represent the dynamics at the interface of the composite material rendering the solution useful for wide variety of battery materials. Using the derived analytical solution for diffusion, intercalation induced stresses were estimated for spherical core-shell materials. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in epitaxial

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BiFeO3 thin films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 4, 2016 Title: Electroelastic fields in artificially created vortex cores in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films Authors: Winchester, B. [1] ; Balke, N. [2] ; Cheng, X. X. [1] ; Morozovska, A. N. [3] ; Kalinin, S. [2] Search SciTech Connect for author "Kalinin,

  16. On defining core properties for composite sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSautel, J.M.; Sikarskie, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    In the interests of performance, fuel economy, as well as other factors, weight reduction in transportation vehicles is receiving considerable attention. It is well know that sandwich construction can provide a structural component that has both high stiffness and high strength per unit weight. In a sandwich structure a low density, low stiffness, low strength core is bonded between two high stiffness, high strength facesheets producing a structure that is particularly efficient in resisting bending loads. A key element in a sandwich construction is the core. Its` properties, particularly its` shear modulus and yield/failure stress, must be accurately known for proper structural design. Two ASTM standards exist for determining these properties; ASTM C273-88 and ASTM C393-94. The ASTM C273-88 is a simple shear test on the core material alone, while the ASTM C393-94 obtains core properties through bending data on sandwich beams. It is well known, particularly for the lower cost cores, e.g. foams, that differences in properties, sometimes appreciable, exist for these two tests. One of the main purposes of the present paper is to show that specimen geometry can have a first order effect on the material properties, i.e. only for ratios of sandwich beam length to thickness in the ASTM C393-94 test greater than 20 do the results of the two ASTM tests approach each other. A second objective of the paper is to determine the effect of the shear test plate thickness in the ASTM C273-88 test. Steel plates of thickness {1/4} inches, 5/8 inches, and 1 inch were used, i.e. bonded to the core specimens and then tested in simple shear. Only for the stiffest cores tested were any statistically different results obtained and then only minor differences for the {1/4} inches plates. Some typical test results through to core yield/failure are shown to demonstrate the different post yield behaviors.

  17. DOE Issues Final RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center 250 E. 5th Street, Suite 500, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461 Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709 millerdc@id.doe.gov March 16, 2015 DOE Issues Final RFP for Idaho Cleanup Project Core Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the final Request for Proposal (RFP) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Core procurement. At the end of this contract the majority of cleanup will be

  18. Fault current limiter with shield and adjacent cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony; Moriconi, Franco; Hodge, Eoin Patrick

    2013-10-22

    In a fault current limiter (FCL) of a saturated core type having at least one coil wound around a high permeability material, a method of suppressing the time derivative of the fault current at the zero current point includes the following step: utilizing an electromagnetic screen or shield around the AC coil to suppress the time derivative current levels during zero current conditions.

  19. BWR containment failure analysis during degraded-core accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, D.D.

    1982-06-06

    This paper presents a containment failure mode analysis during a spectrum of postulated degraded core accident sequences in a typical 1000-MW(e) boiling water reactor (BWR) with a Mark-I wetwell containment. Overtemperature failure of containment electric penetration assemblies (CEPAs) has been found to be the major failure mode during such accidents.

  20. Magnetic braking of stellar cores in red giants and supergiants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges E-mail: georges.meynet@unige.ch

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic configurations, stable on the long term, appear to exist in various evolutionary phases, from main-sequence stars to white dwarfs and neutron stars. The large-scale ordered nature of these fields, often approximately dipolar, and their scaling according to the flux conservation scenario favor a fossil field model. We make some first estimates of the magnetic coupling between the stellar cores and the outer layers in red giants and supergiants. Analytical expressions of the truncation radius of the field coupling are established for a convective envelope and for a rotating radiative zone with horizontal turbulence. The timescales of the internal exchanges of angular momentum are considered. Numerical estimates are made on the basis of recent model grids. The direct magnetic coupling of the core to the extended convective envelope of red giants and supergiants appears unlikely. However, we find that the intermediate radiative zone is fully coupled to the core during the He-burning and later phases. This coupling is able to produce a strong spin down of the core of red giants and supergiants, also leading to relatively slowly rotating stellar remnants such as white dwarfs and pulsars. Some angular momentum is also transferred to the outer convective envelope of red giants and supergiants during the He-burning phase and later.

  1. EFFECTS OF RESISTIVITY ON MAGNETIZED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawai, H.; Suzuki, H.; Yamada, S.; Kotake, K.

    2013-02-10

    We studied the role of turbulent resistivity in the core-collapse of a strongly magnetized massive star, carrying out two-dimensional resistive-MHD simulations. Three cases with different initial strengths of magnetic field and rotation are investigated: (1) a strongly magnetized rotating core, (2) a moderately magnetized rotating core, and (3) a very strongly magnetized non-rotating core. In each case, one ideal-MHD model and two resistive-MHD models are computed. As a result of these computations, each model shows an eruption of matter assisted by magnetic acceleration (and also by centrifugal acceleration in the rotating cases). We found that resistivity attenuates the explosion in cases 1 and 2, while it enhances the explosion in case 3. We also found that in the rotating cases, the main mechanisms for the amplification of a magnetic field in the post-bounce phase are an outward advection of the magnetic field and a twisting of poloidal magnetic field lines by differential rotation, which are somewhat dampened down with the presence of resistivity. Although magnetorotational instability seems to occur in the rotating models, it plays only a minor role in magnetic field amplification. Another impact of resistivity is that on the aspect ratio. In the rotating cases, a large aspect ratio of the ejected matter, >2.5, attained in an ideal-MHD model is reduced to some extent in a resistive model. These results indicate that resistivity possibly plays an important role in the dynamics of strongly magnetized supernovae.

  2. Serially connected solid oxide fuel cells having monolithic cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herceg, J.E.

    1985-05-20

    Disclosed is a solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output. The cell core has an array of cell segments electrically serially connected in the flow direction, each segment consisting of electrolyte walls and interconnect that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageways; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte composite materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick. Between 2 and 50 cell segments may be connected in series.

  3. Well cored to 9,800 ft in Paraguay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunn, K.B. )

    1991-05-13

    The mining industry's slim hole drilling rigs have proven applicable to primary oil exploration. These machines are smaller than conventional drilling rigs and can be transported with relative ease to remote locations. A typical rig drills an entire well by coring, with the cores retrieved by wire line without tripping the pipe. The core drilling system is specially suited to drilling hard rock formations. This paper reports on the project which evaluated the geological aspects of the Parana basin and determined the applicability of slim hole, core drilling techniques as an exploration tool. The Parana basin is found in the eastern third of Paraguay, part of northeastern Argentina, and part of southern Brazil. Much of the basin is overlaid by basalt flows up to 5,000-ft thick, and there are numerous igneous intrusions and dikes within the sedimentary section. This combination makes seismic quality poor and interpretation extremely difficult. The formations are relatively old, with Triassic red beds occurring only a few feet below the surface or immediately below the basalt. Beneath the Triassic are Permian marine deposits, Permo-Carboniferous tillites, and then Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician deposits to the basement. The section outcrops 100 miles west of the Mallorquin Well No. 1 site. The Parana basin has been only randomly explored. To date, success has been limited to a minor gas find near Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  4. Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid: Models & Tools (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    This brochure describes Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE), a trademarked process NREL employs to produce conceptual microgrid designs. This systems-based process enables designs to be optimized for economic value, energy surety, and sustainability. Capabilities NREL offers in support of microgrid design are explained.

  5. Analytical chemistry methods for metallic core components: Revision March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of alloys used to fabricate core components. These alloys are 302, 308, 316, 316-Ti, and 321 stainless steels and 600 and 718 Inconels and they may include other 300-series stainless steels.

  6. Soft-core processor study for node-based architectures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Houten, Jonathan Roger; Jarosz, Jason P.; Welch, Benjamin James; Gallegos, Daniel E.; Learn, Mark Walter

    2008-09-01

    Node-based architecture (NBA) designs for future satellite projects hold the promise of decreasing system development time and costs, size, weight, and power and positioning the laboratory to address other emerging mission opportunities quickly. Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based modules will comprise the core of several of the NBA nodes. Microprocessing capabilities will be necessary with varying degrees of mission-specific performance requirements on these nodes. To enable the flexibility of these reconfigurable nodes, it is advantageous to incorporate the microprocessor into the FPGA itself, either as a hardcore processor built into the FPGA or as a soft-core processor built out of FPGA elements. This document describes the evaluation of three reconfigurable FPGA based processors for use in future NBA systems--two soft cores (MicroBlaze and non-fault-tolerant LEON) and one hard core (PowerPC 405). Two standard performance benchmark applications were developed for each processor. The first, Dhrystone, is a fixed-point operation metric. The second, Whetstone, is a floating-point operation metric. Several trials were run at varying code locations, loop counts, processor speeds, and cache configurations. FPGA resource utilization was recorded for each configuration. Cache configurations impacted the results greatly; for optimal processor efficiency it is necessary to enable caches on the processors. Processor caches carry a penalty; cache error mitigation is necessary when operating in a radiation environment.

  7. Test report for slow rotation core sampling test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralston, G.L.

    1995-04-03

    This report documents the temperature increase experienced when core sampling equipment is rotated slowly with a relatively low downforce applied to the drill string (nominal 10 rpm/400 lb downforce). The test was carried out in close to worst-case conditions, rotating against a cement mixture in one test sequence, and a steel plate in the second test sequence.

  8. Nine teams compete in Virginia Middle School Science Bowl competition at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab on March 11 | Jefferson Lab Nine teams compete in Virginia Middle School Science Bowl competition at Jefferson Lab on March 11 March 17, 2006 Peasley Middle School The Peasley Middle School Team from Gloucester, Va., is coached by Ray Yoh (far right). The team (from left to right) includes Tavis Sparrier, Sayer Fisher, William Wei-Xi Wang and Caleb Dyke. Photo by Steve Gagnon, Jefferson Lab. The Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl (MSSB) drew a crowd of more than 200

  9. Nineteen Teams to Compete in Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb. 6 | Jefferson Lab Nineteen Teams to Compete in Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl on Feb. 6 Jefferson Lab Open House The final match of the 2015 Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl pitted Langley High School, McLean, against Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria. The team from TJHSST won the day and advanced to the national finals. Teams that didn't make it into the semi-finals participated in the Stay All Day design and engineering

  10. Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped YBa 2 Cu 3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    O y (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect YBa 2 Cu 3 O y Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped YBa 2 Cu 3 O y Authors: Hücker, M. ; Christensen, N. B. ; Holmes, A. T. ; Blackburn, E. ; Forgan, E. M. ; Liang, Ruixing ; Bonn, D. A. ; Hardy, W. N. ; Gutowski, O. ; Zimmermann, M. v. ; Hayden, S. M. ; Chang, J. Publication Date: 2014-08-21 OSTI Identifier: 1180599 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-06CH11357; AC02-98CH10886 Type:

  11. Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect YBa2Cu3Oy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy Authors: Huecker M. ; Christensen, N. B. ; Holmes, A. T. ; Blackburn, E. ; Forgan, E. M. ; Liang, Ruixing ; Bonn, D. A. ; Hardy, W. N. ; Gutowski, O. ; v Zimmermann, M. ; Hayden, S. M. ; Chang, J. Publication Date: 2014-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1178217 Report Number(s): BNL--106215-2014-JA R&D Project: PO010; KC0201060 DOE

  12. THE ORIGIN OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN PRESTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-11-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperatures of these objects, these detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations toward the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3mm band at the IRAM 30m telescope as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide a full census of the oxygen-bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5 10{sup 11} to 6 10{sup 9}. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core at a radius of ?8000 AU, where T ? 10K and n {sub H{sub 2}} ?2 10{sup 4}cm{sup 3}. Previous works have shown that water vapor is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and COMs from the same layer. The desorbed oxygen and a small amount of desorbed methanol and ethene are enough to reproduce the abundances of tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ketene measured in L1544. These new findings open the possibility that COMs in prestellar cores originate in a similar outer layer rather than in the dense inner cores, as previously assumed, and that their formation is driven by the non-thermally desorbed species.

  13. HUD (Housing and Urban Development) Intermediate Minimum Property Standards Supplement 4930. 2 (1989 edition). Solar heating and domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The Minimum Property Standards for Housing 4910.1 were developed to provide a sound technical basis for housing under numerous programs of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). These Intermediate Minimum Property Standards for Solar Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems are intended to provide a companion technical basis for the planning and design of solar heating and domestic hot water systems. These standards have been prepared as a supplement to the Minimum Property Standards (MPS) and deal only with aspects of planning and design that are different from conventional housing by reason of the solar systems under consideration. The document contains requirements and standards applicable to one- and two-family dwellings, multifamily housing, and nursing homes and intermediate care facilities references made in the text to the MPS refer to the same section in the Minimum Property Standards for Housing 4910.1.

  14. A dynamically collapsing core and a precursor of a core in a filament supported by turbulent and magnetic pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuya, Ray S.; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Shinnaga, Hiroko E-mail: kitamura@isas.jaxa.jp

    2014-10-01

    To study physical properties of the natal filament gas around the cloud core harboring an exceptionally young low-mass protostar GF 9-2, we carried out J = 1-0 line observations of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O molecules using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The mapping area covers ? one-fifth of the whole filament. Our {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O maps clearly demonstrate that the core formed at the local density maxima of the filament, and the internal motions of the filament gas are totally governed by turbulence with Mach number of ?2. We estimated the scale height of the filament to be H = 0.3-0.7 pc, yielding the central density of n {sub c} = 800-4200 cm{sup 3}. Our analysis adopting an isothermal cylinder model shows that the filament is supported by the turbulent and magnetic pressures against the radial and axial collapse due to self-gravity. Since both the dissipation timescales of the turbulence and the transverse magnetic fields can be comparable to the free-fall time of the filament gas of 10{sup 6} yr, we conclude that the local decay of the supersonic turbulence and magnetic fields made the filament gas locally unstable, hence making the core collapse. Furthermore, we newly detected a gas condensation with velocity width enhancement to ?0.3 pc southwest of the GF 9-2 core. The condensation has a radius of ?0.15 pc and an LTE mass of ?5 M {sub ?}. Its internal motion is turbulent with Mach number of ?3, suggesting a gravitationally unbound state. Considering the uncertainties in our estimates, however, we propose that the condensation is a precursor of a cloud core, which would have been produced by the collision of the two gas components identified in the filament.

  15. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Support arrangements for core modules of nuclear reactors. [PWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1983-11-03

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  17. Large Flow Birefringence of Nematogenic Bent-Core Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, C.; Fodor-Csorba, K; Verduzco, R; Gleeson, J; Sprunt, S; Jakli, A

    2009-01-01

    We have found that bent-core liquid crystalline materials show exceptionally large intrinsic flow birefringence in their isotropic liquid phase. This effect is more than 100 times larger than typical values measured for low molecular weight liquid crystals. The specific flow birefringence (i.e., normalized by the flow viscosity) is an order of magnitude larger than in both side-chain polymeric as well as low molecular weight liquid crystals. We propose that this large enhancement for bent-core compounds may be attributed to nanoscale smecticlike clusters that persist above the nematic-isotropic transition temperature, and shear align under shear flow; however, this mechanism has not yet been definitively confirmed.

  18. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-matallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved, 1) To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug. 2) investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys. 3) Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  19. Laser cutting apparatus for nuclear core fuel subassembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walch, Allan P. (Manchester, CT); Caruolo, Antonio B. (Vernon, CT)

    1982-02-23

    The object of the invention is to provide a system and apparatus which employs laser cutting to disassemble a nuclear core fuel subassembly. The apparatus includes a gantry frame (C) which straddles the core fuel subassembly (14), an x-carriage (22) travelling longitudinally above the frame which carries a focus head assembly (D) having a vertically moving carriage (46) and a laterally moving carriage (52), a system of laser beam transferring and focusing mirrors carried by the x-carriage and focusing head assembly, and a shroud follower (F) and longitudinal follower (G) for following the shape of shroud (14) to maintain a beam focal point (44) fixed upon the shroud surface for accurate cutting.

  20. Evaluation of ATWS core damage frequency for a BWR/4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiu, K.; Ilberg, D.; Hanan, N.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports a study performed to evaluate the core damage frequency contribution from Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) in a BWR/4 plant. Discussions on improvements in the design and operation of BWR plants to reduce the likelihood of occurrence and core damage frequency of ATWS have continued for years. In November 1981, subsequent to the issuance of three alternate proposed ATWS rules, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission invited comments on these rules. In June 1984, a final rule on the reduction of risk from ATWS events was issued. In the study, it is assumed that the BWR/4 reactor is of an earlier vintage. However, only two of the modifications have been implemented in accordance with the final rule: a diverse scram system and automatic recirculation pump trip. It is further assumed that the setpoint for Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSIVs) closure is at reactor pressure vessel (RPV) water level 1 and that the BWR emergency procedure guidelines are implemented.

  1. Support arrangement for core modules of nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

    1987-01-01

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  2. Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, Thomas J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  3. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  4. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Davidson, Carolyn; McLaren, Joyce; Miller, John

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  5. Hydrogen Storage R&D Core Characterization Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Fact sheet summarizing the hydrogen storage R&D core characterization capabilities of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. These labs are part of an NREL-led national laboratory collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office.

  6. A reactor core on-line monitoring program - COMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2012-07-01

    A program named COMP is developed for on-line monitoring PWRs' in-core power distribution in this paper. Harmonics expansion method is used in COMP. The Unit 1 reactor of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant (Daya Bay NPP) in China is considered for verification. The numerical results show that the maximum relative error between measurement and reconstruction results from COMP is less than 5%, and the computing time is short, indicating that COMP is capable for online monitoring PWRs. (authors)

  7. Core-Shell Fuel Cell Electrodes - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Core-Shell Fuel Cell Electrodes Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Artists rendition of the arrangement of platinum atoms in common use (left) and in the inventive scheme (right).<br type="_moz" /> Artists rendition of the arrangement of platinum atoms in common use (left) and in the inventive scheme (right). Technology Marketing Summary Platinum is the best catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction, the limiting reaction in fuel cells. It is also

  8. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology (Round 6), Product

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development (Round 6), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 1) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy (Round 6), Product Development (Round 6), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 1) Funding Opportunities DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology (Round 6), Product Development (Round 6), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 1) Funding Opportunities The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the following selections for

  9. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 7),

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy Research (Round 7), Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding Opportunities DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 7), Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding Opportunities The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the

  10. Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-04-10

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

  11. Mechanical design of core components for a high performance light water reactor with a three pass core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Kai; Schneider, Tobias; Redon, Thomas; Schulenberg, Thomas; Starflinger, Joerg

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear reactors using supercritical water as coolant can achieve more than 500 deg. C core outlet temperature, if the coolant is heated up in three steps with intermediate mixing to avoid hot streaks. This method reduces the peak cladding temperatures significantly compared with a single heat up. The paper presents an innovative mechanical design which has been developed recently for such a High Performance Light Water Reactor. The core is built with square assemblies of 40 fuel pins each, using wire wraps as grid spacers. Nine of these assemblies are combined to a cluster having a common head piece and a common foot piece. A downward flow of additional moderator water, separated from the coolant, is provided in gaps between the assemblies and in a water box inside each assembly. The cluster head and foot pieces and mixing chambers, which are key components for this design, are explained in detail. (authors)

  12. Chu: America Faces a Choice to "Compete in the Clean Energy Race" or

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Wave the White Flag" | Department of Energy Chu: America Faces a Choice to "Compete in the Clean Energy Race" or "Wave the White Flag" Chu: America Faces a Choice to "Compete in the Clean Energy Race" or "Wave the White Flag" November 3, 2011 - 10:36am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - In his speech to the Washington Post Live Smart Energy Conference today, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu highlighted the choice America faces on whether or not to

  13. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

  14. The Red Storm Architecture and Early Experiences With Multi-Core...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    With Multi-Core Processors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Red Storm Architecture and Early Experiences With Multi-Core Processors Authors: Tomkins, James L 1 ;...

  15. Mass-radius relations and core-envelope decompositions of super...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We perform this decomposition for both ''Earth-like'' rock-iron cores and pure ice cores, and find that the necessary gaseous envelope masses for this important sub-class of ...

  16. Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model Calculations for Light Nuclei ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model Calculations for Light Nuclei Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model Calculations for Light Nuclei You are...

  17. Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer The...

  18. Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer You are...

  19. High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon alloying Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Poisson;s ratio of Earth;s inner core explained by carbon ...

  20. Core Log Valles Caldera No. 2A, New Mexico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    scientific core hole in the caldera, was cored through a faulted and brecciated sequence of intracauldron tuffs and volcaniclastic rocks to a depth of 528 m. As of November...

  1. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibilitymore » of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.« less

  2. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibility of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozymes CTec3) loading (11.628.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozymes HTec3) loading (05 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NRELs 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.

  3. Competing magnetic fluctuations in iron pnictide superconductors: Role of ferromagnetic spin correlations revealed by NMR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wiecki, P.; Roy, B.; Johnston, D. C.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-09-22

    In the iron pnictide superconductors, theoretical calculations have consistently shown enhancements of the static magnetic susceptibility at both the stripe-type antiferromagnetic and in-plane ferromagnetic (FM) wave vectors. However, the possible existence of FM fluctuations has not yet been examined from a microscopic point of view. Here, using 75As NMR data, we provide clear evidence for the existence of FM spin correlations in both the hole- and electron-doped BaFe2As2 families of iron-pnictide superconductors. Furthermore, these FM fluctuations appear to compete with superconductivity and are thus a crucial ingredient to understanding the variability of Tc and the shape of the superconducting domemore » in these and other iron-pnictide families.« less

  4. Competing decay modes of a high-spin isomer in the proton-unbound nucleus ??Ta*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, R. J.; Page, R. D.; Joss, D. T.; Uusitalo, J.; Darby, I. G.; Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Gray-Jones, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hadinia, B.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppnen, A. -P.; Nyman, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarn, J.; Scholey, C.; Seweryniak, D.; Simpson, J.

    2015-01-01

    An isomeric state at high spin and excitation energy was recently observed in the proton-unbound nucleus 158Ta. This state was observed to decay by both ? and ? decay modes. The large spin change required to decay via ?-ray emission incurs a lifetime long enough for ? decay to compete. The ? decay has an energy of 8644(11) keV, which is among the highest observed in the region, a partial half-life of 440(70) ?s and changes the spin by 11?. In this study, additional evidence supporting the assignment of this ? decay to the high-spin isomer in 158Ta will be presented.

  5. Competing magnetic fluctuations in iron pnictide superconductors: Role of ferromagnetic spin correlations revealed by NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiecki, P.; Roy, B.; Johnston, D. C.; Budko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-09-22

    In the iron pnictide superconductors, theoretical calculations have consistently shown enhancements of the static magnetic susceptibility at both the stripe-type antiferromagnetic and in-plane ferromagnetic (FM) wave vectors. However, the possible existence of FM fluctuations has not yet been examined from a microscopic point of view. Here, using 75As NMR data, we provide clear evidence for the existence of FM spin correlations in both the hole- and electron-doped BaFe2As2 families of iron-pnictide superconductors. Furthermore, these FM fluctuations appear to compete with superconductivity and are thus a crucial ingredient to understanding the variability of Tc and the shape of the superconducting dome in these and other iron-pnictide families.

  6. Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores (Patent) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores A method and apparatus suitable for stabilizing hydrocarbon cores are given. Such stabilized cores have not previously been obtainable for laboratory study, and such study is believed to be required before the hydrate reserves can become a utilizable resource. The apparatus can be built using commercially available parts and is very simple

  7. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MODELS WITH MULTI-DIMENSIONAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TRANSPORT (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MODELS WITH MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TRANSPORT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MODELS WITH MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TRANSPORT We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD)

  8. Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah | Department of Energy Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah PDF icon Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah More

  9. Competing effective interactions of Dirac electrons in the SpinFermion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, E.C.; Nunes, Lizardo H.C.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recently discovered advanced materials, such as heavy fermions, frequently exhibit a rich phase diagram suggesting the presence of different competing interactions. A unified description of the origin of these multiple interactions, albeit very important for the comprehension of such materials is, in general not available. It would be therefore very useful to have a simple model where the common source of different interactions could be possibly traced back. In this work we consider a system consisting in a set of localized spins on a square lattice with antiferromagnetic nearest neighbors interactions and itinerant electrons, which are assumed to be Dirac-like and interact with the localized spins through a Kondo magnetic interaction. This system is conveniently described by the SpinFermion model, which we use in order to determine the effective interactions among the itinerant electrons. By integrating out the localized degrees of freedom we obtain a set of different interactions, which includes: a BCS-like superconducting term, a NambuJona-Lasinio-like, excitonic term and a spinspin magnetic term. The resulting phase diagram is investigated by evaluation of the mean-field free-energy as a function of the relevant order parameters. This shows the competition of the above interactions, depending on the temperature, chemical potential and coupling constants. -- Highlights: Antiferromagnetic HeisenbergKondo lattice model with itinerant Dirac fermions. Integrating out the spins generates competing interactions: BCS-like, excitonic and magnetic. Novel mechanism of superconductivity from magnetic interactions between the spins and electrons. Dome-shaped dependence of the temperature on the chemical potential in agreement with pnictides.

  10. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

    2009-09-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  11. 216-Day report for Tank 241-C-111, cores 58 and 59

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, A.D.

    1994-12-05

    Three core samples from tank C-111, and a field blank, were received by the 222-S laboratories. Cores 58, 59, and the field blank were analyzed in accordance with plans. A hot cell blank was analyzed at the direction of the hot cell chemist. No sample results exceeded the notification limits. Core 60 was not analyzed.

  12. Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

  13. Parallel Access of Out-Of-Core Dense Extendible Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otoo, Ekow J; Rotem, Doron

    2007-07-26

    Datasets used in scientific and engineering applications are often modeled as dense multi-dimensional arrays. For very large datasets, the corresponding array models are typically stored out-of-core as array files. The array elements are mapped onto linear consecutive locations that correspond to the linear ordering of the multi-dimensional indices. Two conventional mappings used are the row-major order and the column-major order of multi-dimensional arrays. Such conventional mappings of dense array files highly limit the performance of applications and the extendibility of the dataset. Firstly, an array file that is organized in say row-major order causes applications that subsequently access the data in column-major order, to have abysmal performance. Secondly, any subsequent expansion of the array file is limited to only one dimension. Expansions of such out-of-core conventional arrays along arbitrary dimensions, require storage reorganization that can be very expensive. Wepresent a solution for storing out-of-core dense extendible arrays that resolve the two limitations. The method uses a mapping function F*(), together with information maintained in axial vectors, to compute the linear address of an extendible array element when passed its k-dimensional index. We also give the inverse function, F-1*() for deriving the k-dimensional index when given the linear address. We show how the mapping function, in combination with MPI-IO and a parallel file system, allows for the growth of the extendible array without reorganization and no significant performance degradation of applications accessing elements in any desired order. We give methods for reading and writing sub-arrays into and out of parallel applications that run on a cluster of workstations. The axial-vectors are replicated and maintained in each node that accesses sub-array elements.

  14. Validation of HELIOS for ATR Core Follow Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bays, Samuel E.; Swain, Emily T.; Crawford, Douglas S.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    This work summarizes the validation analyses for the HELIOS code to support core design and safety assurance calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Past and current core safety assurance is performed by the PDQ-7 diffusion code; a state of the art reactor physics simulation tool from the nuclear industrys earlier days. Over the past twenty years, improvements in computational speed have enabled the use of modern neutron transport methodologies to replace the role of diffusion theory for simulation of complex systems, such as the ATR. More exact methodologies have enabled a paradigm-shift away from highly tuned codes that force compliance with a bounding safety envelope, and towards codes regularly validated against routine measurements. To validate HELIOS, the 16 ATR operational cycles from late-2009 to present were modeled. The computed power distribution was compared against data collected by the ATRs on-line power surveillance system. It was found that the ATRs lobe-powers could be determined with 10% accuracy. Also, the ATRs cold startup shim configuration for each of these 16 cycles was estimated and compared against the reported critical position from the reactor log-book. HELIOS successfully predicted criticality within the tolerance set by the ATR startup procedure for 13 out of the 16 cycles. This is compared to 12 times for PDQ (without empirical adjustment). These findings, as well as other insights discussed in this report, suggest that HELIOS is highly suited for replacing PDQ for core safety assurance of the ATR. Furthermore, a modern verification and validation framework has been established that allows reactor and fuel performance data to be computed with a known degree of accuracy and stated uncertainty.

  15. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Brygoo, S.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Mazevet, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Boehly, T.; and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  16. The use of water in a fusion power core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillack, M. S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Malang, S.; Rowcliffe, A. F.

    2015-02-01

    Water has both advantages and disadvantages as a coolant in conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. In the United States, water has not been chosen as a fusion power core coolant for decades. Researchers in other countries continue to adopt water in their designs, in some cases as the leading or sole candidate. In this article, we summarize the technical challenges resulting from the choice of water coolant and the differences in approach and assumptions that lead to different design decisions amongst researchers in this field.

  17. Bolometric and UV light curves of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritchard, T. A.; Roming, P. W. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Brown, Peter J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Bayless, Amanda J. [Southwest Research Institute, Department of Space Science, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Frey, Lucille H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Swift UV-Optical Telescope (UVOT) has been observing core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) of all subtypes in the UV and optical since 2005. Here we present 50 CCSNe observed with the Swift UVOT, analyzing their UV properties and behavior. Where we have multiple UV detections in all three UV filters (? {sub c} = 1928-2600 ), we generate early time bolometric light curves, analyze the properties of these light curves and the UV contribution to them, and derive empirical corrections for the UV-flux contribution to optical-IR based bolometric light curves.

  18. A star harbouring a wormhole at its core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta E-mail: vfolomeev@mail.ru E-mail: kunz@theorie.physik.uni-oldenburg.de

    2011-04-01

    We consider a configuration consisting of a wormhole filled by a perfect fluid. Such a model can be applied to describe stars as well as neutron stars with a nontrivial topology. The presence of a tunnel allows for motion of the fluid, including oscillations near the core of the system. Choosing the polytropic equation of state for the perfect fluid, we obtain static regular solutions. Based on these solutions, we consider small radial oscillations of the configuration and show that the solutions are stable with respect to linear perturbations in the external region.

  19. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 19982012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  20. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10),

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Product Development (Round 10), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 6) Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of 10 projects for solid-state lighting (SSL), in response to the SSL R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001171. The one- to two-year projects will focus on the areas of Core Technology Research, which involves the application of fundamental scientific concepts to SSL technology; Product

  1. An Accelerated Method for Testing Soldering Tendency of Core Pins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Xu, Hanbing [ORNL; Ried, Paul [Ried, Engineering; Olson, Paul [Balzers, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    An accelerated method for testing die soldering has been developed. High intensity ultrasonic vibrations has been used to simulate the die casting conditions such as high pressure and high impingement speed of molten metal on the pin. Soldering tendency of steels and coated pins has been examined. The results indicate that in the low carbon steel/Al system, the onset of soldering is 60 times faster with ultrasonic vibration than that without ultrasonic vibration. In the H13/A380 system, the onset of soldering reaction is accelerated to 30-60 times. Coating significantly reduces the soldering tendency of the core pins.

  2. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 19982012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

  3. A NEW SUB-PERIOD-MINIMUM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE WITH PARTIAL HYDROGEN DEPLETION AND EVIDENCE OF SPIRAL DISK STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlefield, C.; Garnavich, P.; Magno, K.; Applegate, A.; Pogge, R.; Irwin, J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R.; Vinko, J.

    2013-06-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (=SBS 1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55 minute orbital period is well below the cataclysmic variable (CV) period minimum of {approx}78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long-period CVs-but still at least 10 times higher than that in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in CSS 120422 began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that this CV is a strong candidate progenitor of an AM CVn system as described by Podsiadlowski et al. Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the H{alpha} line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.

  4. A study of the minimum wetting rate of isothermal films flowing down on outer surface of vertical pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Ueda, Tatsuhiro

    1999-07-01

    The minimum wetting rate (MWR) was investigated experimentally with an isothermal water film flowing down on the outer surface of test pipes arranged vertically. A dry patch was generated by blowing a small air jet onto the film temporally, and observation was made to discriminate whether the dry patch was rewetted or not. The contact angle of the film at the top edge of the dry patch and the amplitude, length and velocity of large waves on the film were measured. The MWR decreased rapidly as the film flowed down and reached a nearly constant value at a position around 0.6 m down from the film inlet. There were large waves on the film. The tendency of the variation of MWR with the distance coincided well with the growth of the amplitude of large waves with the distance. The contact angle at the top edge of the dry patch varied periodically in a range synchronizing with the arrival of the waves. When the contact angle exceeded the maximum advancing contact angle, the rewetting of the dry patch was initiated. The existing correlations where the smooth surface film was assumed considerably over-predicted the MWR. The MWR was properly given by supposing that the dry patch is rewetted when the maximum of the fluctuating dynamic pressure of the film exceeds the upward component of the surface tension corresponding to the maximum advancing contact angle at the top edge of the dry patch.

  5. Part I, DAA Overview ; AODR Role-Based Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I, DAA Overview ; AODR Role-Based Training Part I, DAA Overview ; AODR Role-Based Training AODR Role-Based Training PDF icon Part I, DAA Overview ; AODR Role-Based Training More Documents & Publications AO Role-Based Training Part I, DAA Overview DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS Audit Report: IG-0752

  6. Photonic bandgap narrowing in conical hollow core Bragg fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozturk, Fahri Emre; Yildirim, Adem; Kanik, Mehmet; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-08-18

    We report the photonic bandgap engineering of Bragg fibers by controlling the thickness profile of the fiber during the thermal drawing. Conical hollow core Bragg fibers were produced by thermal drawing under a rapidly alternating load, which was applied by introducing steep changes to the fiber drawing speed. In conventional cylindrical Bragg fibers, light is guided by omnidirectional reflections from interior dielectric mirrors with a single quarter wave stack period. In conical fibers, the diameter reduction introduced a gradient of the quarter wave stack period along the length of the fiber. Therefore, the light guided within the fiber encountered slightly smaller dielectric layer thicknesses at each reflection, resulting in a progressive blueshift of the reflectance spectrum. As the reflectance spectrum shifts, longer wavelengths of the initial bandgap cease to be omnidirectionally reflected and exit through the cladding, which narrows the photonic bandgap. A narrow transmission bandwidth is particularly desirable in hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensing schemes, where broadband light is coupled to the fiber and the analyte vapor is introduced into the hollow core to measure infrared absorption. We carried out sensing simulations using the absorption spectrum of isopropyl alcohol vapor to demonstrate the importance of narrow bandgap fibers in chemical sensing applications.

  7. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Jr., Fred; Schatzel, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas- a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers, a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container, and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use.

  8. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, F. Jr.; Schatzel, S.J.

    1998-04-21

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas; a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers and a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container; and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use. 5 figs.

  9. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchena, Martin H.; Granada, Mara; Bordoni, Andrea V.; Joselevich, Maria; Troiani, Horacio; Williams, Federico J.; Wolosiuk, Alejandro

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  10. Chapter 13. Exploring Use of the Reserved Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmen, John; Humphrey, Alan; Berzins, Martin

    2015-07-29

    In this chapter, we illustrate benefits of thinking in terms of thread management techniques when using a centralized scheduler model along with interoperability of MPI and PThread. This is facilitated through an exploration of thread placement strategies for an algorithm modeling radiative heat transfer with special attention to the 61st core. This algorithm plays a key role within the Uintah Computational Framework (UCF) and current efforts taking place at the University of Utah to model next-generation, large-scale clean coal boilers. In such simulations, this algorithm models the dominant form of heat transfer and consumes a large portion of compute time. Exemplified by a real-world example, this chapter presents our early efforts in porting a key portion of a scalability-centric codebase to the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. Specifically, this chapter presents results from our experiments profiling the native execution of a reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing-based radiation model on a single coprocessor. These results demonstrate that our fastest run configurations utilized the 61st core and that performance was not profoundly impacted when explicitly oversubscribing the coprocessor operating system thread. Additionally, this chapter presents a portion of radiation model source code, a MIC-centric UCF cross-compilation example, and less conventional thread management technique for developers utilizing the PThreads threading model.

  11. Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

  12. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  13. Main results of Phenix final core physics tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pascal, V.; Prulhiere, G.; Vanier, M.; Fontaine, B.

    2012-07-01

    The French sodium cooled fast reactor Phenix was shut down in 2009 after 35 years of operation. Before decommissioning a final set of tests was performed. This paper focuses on the following core physics tests: - measurement of control rod reactivity worth by several methods (sub-critical, critical, rod-drop methods), - control rod shifting during a full power operation state, - measurement of individual subassembly reactivity worth (fresh and burned fuel and fertile, sodium hole), - simulation of a gas bubble crossing the core. The control rod measurement test has shown some discrepancies between the different measurement methods, mainly for the rod bank worth. Considering a macroscopic parameter (the reactivity loss estimation), NSMM method seems to produce the better results. The control rod shifting test has highlighted the impact of the spatial effects generated by control rods movements over the power map. These spatial effects, known as shadowing effects, can modify up to 15% the individual control rod worth. The tests concerning individual subassembly worth and gas bubble have permit to evaluate the impact of local perturbations on the reactivity. All these tests can be considered as successful and the ability of the European neutronic code for fast reactors, ERANOS 2.2, to reproduce complex and atypical configuration has been demonstrated by good agreement between measured and computed values. (authors)

  14. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  15. High-burnup core design using minor actinide-containing metal fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Obara, T.

    2013-07-01

    A neutronic design study of metal fuel fast reactor (FR) cores is conducted on the basis of an innovative fuel design concept to achieve an extremely high burnup and realize an efficient fuel cycle system. Since it is expected that the burnup reactivity swing will become extremely large in an unprecedented high burnup core, minor actinides (MAs) from light water reactors (LWRs) are added to fresh fuel to improve the core internal conversion. Core neutronic analysis revealed that high burnups of about 200 MWd/kg for a small-scale core and about 300 MWd/kg for a large-scale core can be attained while suppressing the burnup reactivity swing to almost the same level as that of conventional cores with normal burnup. An actinide burnup analysis has shown that the MA consumption ratio is improved to about 60% and that the accumulated MAs originating from LWRs can be efficiently consumed by the high-burnup metal fuel FR. (authors)

  16. A computer program to determine the specific power of prismatic-core reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-05-01

    A computer program has been developed to determine the maximum specific power for prismatic-core reactors as a function of maximum allowable fuel temperature, core pressure drop, and coolant velocity. The prismatic-core reactors consist of hexagonally shaped fuel elements grouped together to form a cylindrically shaped core. A gas coolant flows axially through circular channels within the elements, and the fuel is dispersed within the solid element material either as a composite or in the form of coated pellets. Different coolant, fuel, coating, and element materials can be selected to represent different prismatic-core concepts. The computer program allows the user to divide the core into any arbitrary number of axial levels to account for different axial power shapes. An option in the program allows the automatic determination of the core height that results in the maximum specific power. The results of parametric specific power calculations using this program are presented for various reactor concepts.

  17. Field and laboratory investigations of coring-induced damage in core recovered from Marker Bed 139 at the waste isolation pilot plant underground facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, D.J.; Zeuch, D.H.; Morin, K.; Hardy, R.; Tormey, T.V.

    1995-09-01

    A combined laboratory and field investigation was carried out to determine the extent of coring-induced damage done to samples cored from Marker Bed 139 at the WIPP site. Coring-induced damage, if present, has the potential to significantly change the properties of the material used for laboratory testing relative to the in situ material properties, resulting in misleading conclusions. In particular, connected, crack-like damage could make the permeability of cored samples orders of magnitude greater than the in situ permeabilities. Our approach compared in situ velocity and resistivity measurements with laboratory measurements of the same properties. Differences between in situ and laboratory results could be attributed to differences in the porosity due to cracks. The question of the origin of the changes could not be answered directly from the results of the measurements. Pre-existing cracks, held closed by the in situ stress, could open when the core was cut free, or new cracks could be generated by coring-induced damage. We used core from closely spaced boreholes at three orientations (0{degree}, {plus_minus}45{degrees} relative to vertical) to address the origin of cracks. The absolute orientation of pre-existing cracks would be constant, independent of the borehole orientation. In contrast, cracks induced by coring were expected to show an orientation dependent on that of the source borehole.

  18. Collapse and fragmentation of magnetic molecular cloud cores with the Enzo AMR MHD code. II. Prolate and oblate cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of a large suite of three-dimensional models of the collapse of magnetic molecular cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.2 in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics approximation. The cloud cores are initially either prolate or oblate, centrally condensed clouds with masses of 1.73 or 2.73 M {sub ?}, respectively. The radial density profiles are Gaussian, with central densities 20 times higher than boundary densities. A barotropic equation of state is used to represent the transition from low density isothermal phases, to high density optically thick phases. The initial magnetic field strength ranges from 6.3 to 100 ?G, corresponding to clouds that are strongly to marginally supercritical, respectively, in terms of the mass to magnetic flux ratio. The magnetic field is initially uniform and aligned with the clouds' rotation axes, with initial ratios of rotational to gravitational energy ranging from 10{sup 4} to 0.1. Two significantly different outcomes for collapse result: (1) formation of single protostars with spiral arms, and (2) fragmentation into multiple protostar systems. The transition between these two outcomes depends primarily on the initial magnetic field strength, with fragmentation occurring for mass to flux ratios greater than about 14 times the critical ratio for prolate clouds. Oblate clouds typically fragment into several times more clumps than prolate clouds. Multiple, rather than binary, system formation is the general rule in either case, suggesting that binary stars are primarily the result of the orbital dissolution of multiple protostar systems.

  19. THE EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS ON A CORONAL SOURCE SURFACE AT 2.3 R{sub Sun} DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Kohl, J. L.; Lamy, P.

    2012-01-20

    We analyze data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory to produce global maps of coronal outflow velocities and densities in the regions where the solar wind is undergoing acceleration. The maps use UV and white light coronal data obtained from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer and the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, respectively, and a Doppler dimming analysis to determine the mean outflow velocities. The outflow velocities are defined on a sphere at 2.3 R{sub Sun} from Sun-center and are organized by Carrington Rotations during the solar minimum period at the start of solar cycle 23. We use the outflow velocity and density maps to show that while the solar minimum corona is relatively stable during its early stages, the shrinkage of the north polar hole in the later stages leads to changes in both the global areal expansion of the coronal hole and the derived internal flux tube expansion factors of the solar wind. The polar hole areal expansion factor and the flux tube expansion factors (between the coronal base and 2.3 R{sub Sun }) start out as super-radial but then they become more nearly radial as the corona progresses away from solar minimum. The results also support the idea that the largest flux tube expansion factors are located near the coronal hole/streamer interface, at least during the deepest part of the solar minimum period.

  20. Expedited site characterization (ESC) using the M{sup 3} approach, M{sup 3} = massive, moderate, minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tindall, S.

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of this approach is to quickly and cost effectively identify and classify potential Areas of Concern (AOCS) as clean or contaminated, thus allowing potentially responsible parties (PRPS) to save limited resources by ceasing costly investigations and undertaking removal type actions expeditiously. The ESC M{sup 3} approach also overcomes the high degree of uncertainty typically associated with traditional site investigations resulting from a lack of comprehensive scoping. Thus, EPA Region 9 has agreed to accept and use, for risk assessment purposes, the data generated from the ESC M{sup 3} approach, providing the data quality is known and confirmation analyses are performed. The extraordinary benefit will be to eliminate any further action on those AOCs found to be clean using this approach. Finally this approach reduces the large number of non-detect samples that are customarily submitted for CLP-type (i.e., Contract Laboratory Program) analyses. The ESC M{sup 3} approach consists of the following three steps: (1) a massive sampling effort is first conducted at an AOC (e.g., 200 samples are collected using a grid approach); the samples are analyzed on a daily basis using real time onsite methods and field screening (FS)-type data are generated; (2) a moderate sampling effort is then conducted to provide onsite verification of the FS-type data; the samples are analyzed using onsite CLP-type methods and field quantitation (FQ)-type data are generated with an agreed upon level of QC; and finally, (3) a minimum sampling effort is conducted to provide verification of the FQ-type data; these confirmation samples are sent to an offsite laboratory for analysis, and CLP-type data are generated.