Sample records for mineral test hole

  1. Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

  2. Slant hole completion test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, R.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

  3. Quasinormal modes of test fields around regular black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobir Toshmatov; Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Zden?k Stuchlík; Bobomurat Ahmedov

    2015-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational test fields in the Hayward, Bardeen and Ay\\'on-Beato-Garc\\'ia regular black hole spacetimes and demonstrate that the test fields are stable in all these spacetimes. Using the sixth order WKB approximation of the linear "axial" perturbative scheme, we determine dependence of the quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies on the characteristic parameters of the test fields and the spacetime charge parameters of the regular black holes. We give also the greybody factors, namely the transmission and reflection coefficients of scattered scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational waves. We show that damping of the QNMs in regular black hole spacetimes is suppressed in comparison to the case of Schwarzschild black holes, and increasing charge parameter of the regular black holes increases reflection and decreases transmission factor of incident waves for each of the test fields.

  4. Quasinormal modes of test fields around regular black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobir Toshmatov; Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Zden?k Stuchlík; Bobomurat Ahmedov

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational test fields in the Hayward, Bardeen and Ay\\'{o}n-Beato-Garc\\'{i}a regular black hole spacetimes and demonstrate that the test fields are stable in all these spacetimes. Using the sixth order WKB approximation of the linear "axial" perturbative scheme, we determine dependence of the quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies on the characteristic parameters of the test fields and the spacetime charge parameters of the regular black holes. We give also the greybody factors, namely the transmission and reflection coefficients of scattered scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational waves. We show that damping of the QNMs in regular black hole spacetimes is suppressed in comparison to the case of Schwarzschild black holes, and increasing charge parameter of the regular black holes increases reflection and decreases transmission factor of incident waves for each of the test fields.

  5. Slant Hole Completion Test, Cozzette and Paludal production testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, R.L.; Malinowsky, M.S.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Slant Hole Completion Test has been successful in providing good technology transfer to the oil and gas industry. The gas-producing rate from the Cozzette horizontal open-hole interval was significantly greater than from offset vertical wells. The source of water production from the Cozzette is not presently understood. Diagnosis of the water production mechanism is vital to economic exploitation of the Cozzette gas resource using horizontal well technology. Stimulation in a high-angle cased and cemented wellbore, such as the Paludal 2, 3 and 4 intervals in SHCT No. 1, is more difficult because of high near-wellbore stress that results in higher treating pressures. Low gas production potential following the Paludal 2, 3 and 4 stimulation may result from damage to the natural fracture system resulting from casing cementing operations. Comparison of gas production rates in SHCT No. 1 and MWX No. 1 following similar stimulations in the Paludal 3 and 4 intervals, indicate there is no advantage to a hydraulic fracture treatment in a slant wellbore when compared to a vertical wellbore.

  6. V-Miner: Using Enhanced Parallel Coordinates to Mine Product Design and Test Data 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Bing

    V-Miner: Using Enhanced Parallel Coordinates to Mine Product Design and Test Data 1 Kaidi Zhao patterns can be easily detected visually. The Visual Miner (V-Miner) software includes both automated or data mining. This paper begins with an introduction to the proposed techniques and the V-Miner system

  7. Slant hole completion test (1991) sidetrack ``as built`` report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1990, a slant hole test well, funded by the US Department of Energy, was drilled to 9,466 ft to evaluate the effectiveness of directional drilling in the tight, naturally fractured gas sands and coals of the Mesaverde Group. The surface location of the SHCT No. 1 is 700 ft south of the DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site in Section 34, T6S, R94W, Garfield County, Colorado, approximately 7.5 miles west of Rifle. Mechanical problems following cementing of a production liner resulted in loss of the completion interval, and operations were suspended. In early 1991, DOE decided to sidetrack the hole to permit production testing of the lost interval. The sidetrack was designed to parallel the original wellbore, but to be drilled 1,000 ft to the east to minimize the chances of encountering formation damage from the original hole. The sidetrack, like the original hole, was to intersect the paludal lenticular sands and coals at 60{degrees} and to penetrate the underlying Cozzette sand horizonally. The sidetrack was spudded May 12, 1991. After re-entering the well in late 1991, early production testing of the Cozzette showed that the 300 ft of in-pay horizontal hole can produce at rate 5 to 10 times higher than vertical wells in the same area. This report contains the geological summary and sidetrack drilling operations summary.

  8. Slant hole completion test (1991) sidetrack as built'' report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1990, a slant hole test well, funded by the US Department of Energy, was drilled to 9,466 ft to evaluate the effectiveness of directional drilling in the tight, naturally fractured gas sands and coals of the Mesaverde Group. The surface location of the SHCT No. 1 is 700 ft south of the DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site in Section 34, T6S, R94W, Garfield County, Colorado, approximately 7.5 miles west of Rifle. Mechanical problems following cementing of a production liner resulted in loss of the completion interval, and operations were suspended. In early 1991, DOE decided to sidetrack the hole to permit production testing of the lost interval. The sidetrack was designed to parallel the original wellbore, but to be drilled 1,000 ft to the east to minimize the chances of encountering formation damage from the original hole. The sidetrack, like the original hole, was to intersect the paludal lenticular sands and coals at 60{degrees} and to penetrate the underlying Cozzette sand horizonally. The sidetrack was spudded May 12, 1991. After re-entering the well in late 1991, early production testing of the Cozzette showed that the 300 ft of in-pay horizontal hole can produce at rate 5 to 10 times higher than vertical wells in the same area. This report contains the geological summary and sidetrack drilling operations summary.

  9. Solar System tests of Ho?ava-Lifshitz black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco S. N. Lobo; Tiberiu Harko; Zoltán Kovács

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we consider the possibility of observationally testing Horava gravity at the scale of the Solar System, by considering the classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession of the planet Mercury, deflection of light by the Sun and the radar echo delay) for the Kehagias-Sfetsos asymptotically flat black hole solution of Horava-Lifshitz gravity. All these gravitational effects can be fully explained in the framework of the vacuum solution of Horava gravity, and it is shown that the analysis of the classical general relativistic tests severely constrain the free parameter of the solution.

  10. Experimental Test of Hole-Coupled FEL Resonator Designs Using a CW-HeNe Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemans, W.P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 14 th International FEL Conference, Kobe, Japan, 23-24Test of Hole-Coupled FEL Resonator Designs Using a CW-HeNeuse of hole-coupling for FEL's are: I) reasonable coupling

  11. Application of the Modified Methylene Blue Test to Detect Clay Minerals in Coarse Aggregate Fines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitre, Brandon

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    mix asphalt (HMA) and Portland cement concrete (PCC) mixes was also conducted. In one phase of the study, known amounts of standard clay minerals were introduced to the mixes, and performance testing was carried out. This was done in hopes...

  12. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

  13. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

  14. Masses of Stellar Black Holes and Testing Theories of Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Postnov; A. M. Cherepashchuk

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the mass distribution of stellar black holes derived from the light and radial velocity curves of optical stars in close binary systems using dynamical methods. The systematic errors inherent in this approach are discussed. These are associated primarily with uncertainties in models for the contribution from gaseous structures to the optical brightness of the systems under consideration. The mass distribution is nearly flat in the range 4-15M_sun. This is compared with the mass distribution for black holes in massive close binaries, which can be manifest as ultraluminous X-ray sources (L_x > 10^39 erg/s) observed in other galaxies. If the X-ray luminosities of these objects correspond to the Eddington limit, the black-hole mass distribution should be described by a power law, which is incompatible with the flat shape derived dynamically from observations of close binaries in our Galaxy. One possible explanation of this discrepancy is the rapid evaporation of stellar-mass black holes predicted in recent multi-dimensional models of gravity. This hypothesis can be verifed by measuring the stellar black-hole mass spectrum or finding isolated or binary black holes with masses below 3M_sun.

  15. Fluidized Bed Steam Reformed (FBSR) Mineral Waste Forms: Characterization and Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Lorier, Troy H.; Pareizs, John M.; Marra, James C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, 29803 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a mineralizing technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of wastes that are high in organics, nitrates-nitrites, halides, and/or sulfates. These wastes include the decontaminated High Level Waste (HLW) supernates referred to as low activity waste (LAW) at Department of Energy (DOE) sites in the United States and waste streams that may be generated by the advanced nuclear fuel cycle flowsheets that are being considered by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. The organics are pyrolyzed into CO{sub 2} and steam in the absence of air. The FBSR mineral waste form is a granular but can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals (sodalite, nosean, and nepheline) with cage and ring structures that sequester radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. Iron bearing spinel minerals are also formed and these phases stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Dissolution rates ({eta}) and activation energies of dissolution are parameters needed for Performance Assessments (PA) to be completed on the FBSR mineral waste form. These parameters are defined in this study by Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) testing. The dissolution rate ({eta}) and the activation energies for dissolution calculated in this study agree with the available rate and activation energy data for natural single crystal nepheline. (authors)

  16. Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And...

  17. Asymptotic Analysis of Cross-Hole Hydraulic Tests in Fractured Granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    Asymptotic Analysis of Cross-Hole Hydraulic Tests in Fractured Granite by Walter A. Illman1 hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Introduction Well test analyses in porous and fractured for the interpretation of three-dimensional pneumatic well tests conducted in porous or fractured geologic media, which

  18. MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C

    2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to date and how they compare to testing performed on LAW glasses. Other details about vitreous waste form durability and impacts of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on durability are given in Appendix A. Details about the FBSR process, various pilot scale demonstrations, and applications are given in Appendix B. Details describing all the different leach tests that need to be used jointly to determine the leaching mechanisms of a waste form are given in Appendix C. Cautions regarding the way in which the waste form surface area is measured and in the choice of leachant buffers (if used) are given in Appendix D.

  19. XVIII. TEST HOLES IN THE VALLE TOLEDO AND VALLE GRANDE (1948)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Los Alamos," Consulting Report to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (1948). RIM San Antonio Creek Spr filled up to 73 ft with sand while bailing; abundant water. Thickness Depth Log (ft) (ft) Silt, sand, and gravel 11 11 Sand and gravel alternating with sticky brown clay 89 100 2. Test Hole 2 Location: Valle

  20. Testing the Kerr Nature of Black Hole Candidates using Iron Line Spectra in the CPR Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Jiachen; Steiner, James F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The iron K$\\alpha$ line commonly observed in the X-ray spectrum of both stellar-mass and supermassive black hole candidates originates from X-ray fluorescence of the inner accretion disk. Accordingly, it can be used to map the spacetime geometry around these objects. In this paper, we extend previous work using the iron K$\\alpha$ line to test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. We adopt the Cardoso-Pani-Rico parametrization and we test the possibility of constraining possible deviations from the Kerr solution that can be obtained from observations across the range of black hole spins and inclination angles. We confirm previous claims that the iron K$\\alpha$ line is potentially a quite powerful probe for testing the Kerr metric given sufficiently high quality data and with systematics under control, especially in the case of fast-rotating black holes and high inclination angles since both conditions serve to maximize relativistic effects. We find that some geometric perturbations from Kerr geometry manifest more s...

  1. Downhole cement test in a very hot hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettitt, R.A.; Cocks, G.G.; Dreesen, D.N.; Sims, J.R.; Nicholson, R.W.; Boevers, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Completion of the commercial-sized Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project requires that hydraulic fractures be created between two inclined wellbores at a depth of about 4 km (15,000 ft). Isolation of a section of the open wellbore is necessary for pressurization to achieve the fracture connections. A cemented-in liner/PBR assembly is one of the methods used for zone isolation near the botton of the injection well. A downhole, pumped cement test was first conducted at a wellbore temperature of 275/sup 0/C (525/sup 0/F) to determine if a suitable slurry could be designed, pumped, and later recovered to assure the success of the cemented-in liner operation.

  2. X-ray Probes of Black Hole Accretion Disks for Testing the No-Hair Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannsen, Tim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spins of a number of supermassive and stellar-mass black holes have been measured based on detections of thermal continuum emission and relativistically broadened iron lines in their x-ray spectra. Likewise, quasiperiodic variability has been observed in several sources. Such measurements commonly make the assumption that black holes are described by the Kerr metric, which according to the no-hair theorem characterizes black holes uniquely in terms of their masses and spins. This fundamental property of black holes can be tested observationally by measuring potential deviations from the Kerr metric introduced by a parametrically deformed Kerr-like spacetime. Thermal spectra, iron lines, and variability have already been studied extensively in several such metrics, which usually depend on only one particular type of deviation or contain unphysical regions outside of the compact object. In this paper, I study these x-ray probes in the background of a new Kerr-like metric which depends on four independent de...

  3. Testing the general relativistic ''no-hair'' theorems using the galactic center black hole SgrA*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford M. Will

    2007-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    If a class of stars orbits the central black hole in our galaxy in short period (~ 0.1 year), high eccentricity (~ 0.9) orbits, they will experience precessions of their orbital planes induced by both relativistic frame-dragging and the quadrupolar gravity of the hole, at levels that could be as large as 10 microarcseconds per year, if the black hole is rotating faster than 1/2 of its maximum rotation rate. Astrometric observations of the orbits of at least two such stars can in principle lead to a determination of the angular momentum vector J of the black hole and its quadrupole moment Q_2. This could lead to a test of the general relativistic no-hair theorems, which demand that Q_2 = - J^2/M. Future high-precision adaptive infrared optics instruments make make such a fundamental test of the black-hole paradigm possible.

  4. Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by ¾ of a mile toward the north and is located over ½ mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

  5. Testing the no-hair theorem with black hole ringdowns using TIGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Meidam; M. Agathos; C. Van Den Broeck; J. Veitch; B. S. Sathyaprakash

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Einstein Telescope (ET), a proposed third-generation gravitational wave observatory, would enable tests of the no-hair theorem by looking at the characteristic frequencies and damping times of black hole ringdown signals. In previous work it was shown that with a single $500 - 1000\\,M_\\odot$ black hole at distance $\\lesssim 6$ Gpc (or redshift $z \\lesssim 1$), deviations of a few percent in the frequencies and damping times of dominant and sub-dominant modes would be within the range of detectability. Given that such sources may be relatively rare, it is of interest to see how well the no-hair theorem can be tested with events at much larger distances and with smaller signal-to-noise ratios, thus accessing a far bigger volume of space and a larger number of sources. We employ a model selection scheme called TIGER (Test Infrastructure for GEneral Relativity), which was originally developed to test general relativity with weak binary coalescence signals that will be seen in second-generation detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. TIGER is well-suited for the regime of low signal-to-noise ratio, and information from a population of sources can be combined so as to arrive at a stronger test. By performing a range of simulations using the expected noise power spectral density of Einstein Telescope, we show that with TIGER, similar deviations from the no-hair theorem as considered in previous work will be detectable with great confidence using $\\mathcal{O}(10)$ sources distributed uniformly in co-moving volume out to 50 Gpc ($z \\lesssim 5$).

  6. Test versus predictions for rotordynamic coefficients and leakage rates of hole-pattern gas seals at two clearances in choked and unchoked conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Jonathan Leigh

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    and significantly less effective damping. The inlet pressure of the testing ranged from 6.9 bar-a (100 psi-a) to 17.2 bar-a (250 psi-a). He showed that the rotordynamic coefficients are frequency dependent. Holt [7] performed tests on two sets of hole...-pattern seals with different hole depths. The testing was conducted with two different inlet pressures from 6.9 bar-a (100 psi-a) to 17.2 bar-a (250 psi-a). He compared these results to smooth seal test results and also the straight bore honeycomb data from...

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 542: Disposal Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Pastor

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 542 is located in Areas 3, 8, 9, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 542 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-07, ''UD-3a Disposal Hole''; (2) 03-20-09, ''UD-3b Disposal Hole''; (3) 03-20-10, ''UD-3c Disposal Hole''; (4) 03-20-11, ''UD-3d Disposal Hole''; (5) 06-20-03, ''UD-6 and UD-6s Disposal Holes''; (6) 08-20-01, ''U-8d PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; (7) 09-20-03, ''U-9itsy30 PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; and (8) 20-20-02, ''U-20av PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 30, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 542. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 542 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Conduct geophysical surveys to locate previously unidentified features at CASs 03-20-07, 03-20-09, 03-20-10, 03-20-11, and 06-20-03. (4) Perform field screening. (5) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (6) Collect quality control samples for laboratory analyses to evaluate the performance of measurement systems and controls based on the requirements of the data quality indicators. (7) If COCs are present at the surface/near surface (< 15 feet below ground surface), collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (8) If COCs are present in the subsurface (i.e., base of disposal hole), collect additional samples to define the vertical extent of contamination. A conservative use restriction will be used to encompass the lateral extent of subsurface contamination. (9) Stake or flag sample locations in the field, and record coordinates through global positioning systems surveying. (10) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

  9. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with speci?c sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  10. A New Parameter to Assess Hydromechanical Effect in Single-hole Hydraulic Testing and Grouting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grouting or filling of the open voids in fractured rock is done by introducing a fluid, a grout, through boreholes under pressure. The grout may be either a Newtonian fluid or a Bingham fluid. The penetration of the grout and the resulting pressure profile may give rise to hydromechanical effects, which depends on factors such as the fracture aperture, pressure at the borehole and the rheological properties of the grout. In this paper, we postulate that a new parameter, {angstrom}, which is the integral of the fluid pressure change in the fracture plane, is an appropriate measure to describe the change in fracture aperture volume due to a change in effective stress. In many cases, analytic expressions are available to calculate pressure profiles for relevant input data and the {angstrom} parameter. The approach is verified against a fully coupled hydromechanical simulator for the case of a Newtonian fluid. Results of the verification exercise show that the new approach is reasonable and that the {angstrom}-parameter is a good measure for the fracture volume change: i.e., the larger the {angstrom}-parameter, the larger the fracture volume change, in an almost linear fashion. To demonstrate the application of the approach, short duration hydraulic tests and constant pressure grouting are studied. Concluded is that using analytic expressions for penetration lengths and pressure profiles to calculate the {angstrom} parameter provides a possibility to describe a complex situation and compare, discuss and weigh the impact of hydromechanical couplings for different alternatives. Further, the analyses identify an effect of high-pressure grouting, where uncontrolled grouting of larger fractures and insufficient (or less-than-expected) sealing of finer fractures is a potential result.

  11. An Overview of Hydrothermal Alteration and Vein Mineralization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vein Mineralization in Continental Scientific Drilling Program Core Hole VC-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  12. Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral Faces. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions, and in testing surface complexation theories. Citation: Zarzycki PP, SME Chatman, T Preocanin, and KM Rosso.2011."Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral...

  13. Mineral Requirements of Sheep.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constituents in feed, residues, and excrements were estimated. In connection with other digestion experiments, estimates were made of certain ash constituents in feeds, excrements and urine. The results of this work throw light upon the mineral requirements...,11 grams phosphoric acid. The ratio of lime to phosphoric acid in tri- calcium phosphate is 1 :0.80. Table 7.-Average magnesia eaten and digested. BALANCE EXPEBIMENTS In twenty tests with ten rations, the urine was analyzed in addition to the feeds...

  14. ERRATA SHEET for ''Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. B. Prothro; S. L. Drellack, Jr.; B. M. Allen

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conversion error has been discovered in the physical property data table for Emplacement Hole U-19bg (Supplemental Data) presented on Page 89. Data in the column labeled ''Bulk Density (g/cc)'' are actually presented in pounds per cubic foot rather than grams per cubic centimeter. The following table presents the bulk density values for U-19bg in pounds per cubic foot and grams per cubic centimeter.

  15. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002 MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002 U.S. Department of the Interior U for Mineral Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Role of Nonfuel Minerals in the U.S. Economy . . . 4 2001 U.S. Net Import Reliance for Selected Nonfuel Mineral Materials

  16. Near-infrared polarimetry as a tool for testing properties of accreting super-massive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zamaninasab; A. Eckart; M. Dovciak; V. Karas; R. Schoedel; G. Witzel; N. Sabha; M. Garcia-Marin; D. Kunneriath; K. Muzic; C. Straubmeier; M. Valencia-S; J. A. Zensus

    2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Several massive black holes exhibit flux variability on time scales that correspond to source sizes of the order of few Schwarzschild radii. We survey the potential of near-infrared and X-ray polarimetry to constrain physical properties of such black hole systems, namely their spin and inclination. We have focused on a model where an orbiting hot spot is embedded in an accretion disk. A new method of searching for the time-lag between orthogonal polarization channels is developed and applied to an ensemble of hot spot models that samples a wide range of parameter space. We found that the hot spot model predicts signatures in polarized light which are in the range to be measured directly in the near future. However, our estimations are predicted upon the assumption of a Keplerian velocity distribution inside the flow where the dominant part of the magnetic field is toroidal. We also found that if the right model of the accretion flow can be chosen for each source (e.g. on the basis of magnetohydrodynamics simulations) then the black hole spin and inclination can be constrained to a small two-dimensional area in the spin-inclination space. The results of the application of the method to the available near-infrared polarimetric data of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is presented. It is shown that even with the currently available data the spin and inclination of Sgr A* can be constrained. Next generations of near-infrared and X-ray polarimeters should be able to exploit this tool.

  17. Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. K. Townsend

    1997-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lecture notes for a 'Part III' course 'Black Holes' given in DAMTP, Cambridge. The course covers some of the developments in Black Hole physics of the 1960s and 1970s.

  18. MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT Yadira Soto-Viruet Supervisor: David Menzie, Yolanda Fong-Sam Minerals Information Team (MIT) USGS Summer Internship 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Minerals Information Team (MIT): Annually reports on the minerals facilities of more than 180 countries

  19. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2014 #12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey MINERAL contained within this report. Suggested citation: U.S. Geological Survey, 2014, Mineral commodity summaries and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products......................................................... 4 The Role

  20. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2012 #12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey MINERAL contained within this report. Suggested citation: U.S. Geological Survey, 2012, Mineral commodity summaries and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products......................................................... 4 The Role

  1. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003 MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 20 U.S. Department of the Interior U MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GALE A. NORTON, Secretary For sale;CONTENTS Page General: Growth Rates of Leading and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products

  2. Earth's Mineral Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Earth's Mineral Evolution :: Astrobiology Magazine - earth science - evol...rth science evolution Extreme Life Mars Life Outer Planets Earth's Mineral Evolution Summary (Nov 14, 2008): New research. Display Options: Earth's Mineral Evolution Based on a CIW news release Mineral Kingdom Has Co

  3. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  4. REE MINERALS IN CATALO II, GOIAS, BRASIL Essaid BILAL1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , these minerals interact with the fluid surface and lose some of their REE and Ba. The exchange reactions between (cerrado). The most comprehensive study concerned drill-hole C3B1, located at about 175m north of the pipe). The drill first intersected several tens of meters of reddish-yellow clay soil,

  5. Evaluation of Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hole with drill cuttings. The second test, on November 2, 1978, utilized a nitrogen-foam-water mixture to clean residual particles from bottom hole, following which nitrogen was...

  6. Coronal Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are establish...

  7. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ober, J.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States led the world in lithium mineral and compound production and consumption. Estimated consumption increased slightly, and world production also grew. Sales increased for domestic producers, who announced price increases for the third consecutive year. Because lithium is electrochemically reactive and has other unique properties, there are many commercial lithium products. Producers sold lithium as mineral concentrate, brine, compound, or metal, depending upon the end use. Most lithium compounds were consumed in the production of ceramics, glass, and primary aluminum.

  8. RHIC | Black Holes?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in...

  9. Mineral Maturity and Crystallinity Index Are Distinct Characteristics of Bone D. Farlay, G. Panczer, C. Rey, P. D. Delmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mineral Maturity and Crystallinity Index Are Distinct Characteristics of Bone Mineral D. Farlay, G in "Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism 2010;28(4):433-45" DOI : 10.1007/s00774-009-0146-7 #12;Abstract The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mineral maturity and crystallinity index are two

  10. Energy on black hole spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Corichi

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the issue of defining energy for test particles on a background black hole spacetime. We revisit the different notions of energy as defined by different observers. The existence of a time-like isometry allows for the notion of a total conserved energy to be well defined, and subsequently the notion of a gravitational potential energy is also meaningful. We then consider the situation in which the test particle is adsorbed by the black hole, and analyze the energetics in detail. In particular, we show that the notion of horizon energy es defined by the isolated horizons formalism provides a satisfactory notion of energy compatible with the particle's conserved energy. As another example, we comment a recent proposal to define energy of the black hole as seen by an observer at rest. This account is intended to be pedagogical and is aimed at the level of and as a complement to the standard textbooks on the subject.

  11. Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    News ????????????????? ® College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Winter 2008 table of contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 wvCROSSROADS DepartmentofCivilandEnvironmentalEngineering Civil engineering exchange program and environmental engineering with a focus in transportation will have the opportunity to study abroad as part

  12. Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast to conven-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Structures Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast of mineral crystals. Mesophases are materials which have domain length scales of the order of a few as a molecular blueprint for the site- directed formation of the inorganic phase, by providing an interface

  13. Mineral Rights and Proceeds (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains provisions which determine when mineral rights are presumed to be abandoned by property owners.

  14. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation...

  15. Black holes in Asymptotically Safe Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saueressig, Frank; D'Odorico, Giulio; Vidotto, Francesca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are among the most fascinating objects populating our universe. Their characteristic features, encompassing spacetime singularities, event horizons, and black hole thermodynamics, provide a rich testing ground for quantum gravity ideas. In this note we observe that the renormalization group improved Schwarzschild black holes constructed by Bonanno and Reuter within Weinberg's asymptotic safety program constitute a prototypical example of a Hayward geometry used to model non-singular black holes within quantum gravity phenomenology. Moreover, they share many features of a Planck star: their effective geometry naturally incorporates the one-loop corrections found in the effective field theory framework, their Kretschmann scalar is bounded, and the black hole singularity is replaced by a regular de Sitter patch. The role of the cosmological constant in the renormalization group improvement process is briefly discussed.

  16. Self-regulated growth of supermassive black holes by a dual jet/heating AGN feedback mechanism: methods, tests and implications for cosmological simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubois, Yohan; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a new sub-grid model for the growth of supermassive Black Holes (BHs) and their associated Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) feedback in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Assuming that BHs are created in the early stages of galaxy formation, they grow by mergers and accretion of gas at a Eddington-limited Bondi accretion rate. However this growth is regulated by AGN feedback which we model using two different modes: a quasar-heating mode when accretion rates onto the BHs are comparable to the Eddington rate, and a radio-jet mode at lower accretion rates. In other words, our feedback model deposits energy as a succession of thermal bursts and jet outflows depending on the properties of the gas surrounding the BHs. We assess the plausibility of such a model by comparing our results to observational measurements of the coevolution of BHs and their host galaxy properties, and check their robustness with respect to numerical resolution. We show that AGN feedback must be a crucial physical ingredient f...

  17. Applications of mineral carbonation to geological sequestration of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.; Rush, G.E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration of CO2 is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. However, migration of the CO2 beyond the natural reservoir seals could become problematic, thus the identification of means to enhance the natural seals could prove beneficial. Injection of a mineral reactant slurry could provide a means to enhance the natural reservoir seals by supplying the necessary cations for precipitation of mineral carbonates. The subject study evaluates the merit of several mineral slurry injection strategies by conduct of a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin.

  18. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  19. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  20. Institute for Mineral and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for energy. Mining and processing are vulnerable to energy price increases. Power is the largest contributingInstitute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges #12;Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 2 Vision The vision of the Institute for Mineral and Energy

  1. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals , Vol. 31 (ed. A. F.as a result of secondary mineral precipitation and approachWeathering Rates of Silicate Minerals , Vol. 31, pp. 565-

  2. Dynamics of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review of current theory of black-hole dynamics, concentrating on the framework in terms of trapping horizons. Summaries are given of the history, the classical theory of black holes, the defining ideas of dynamical black holes, the basic laws, conservation laws for energy and angular momentum, other physical quantities and the limit of local equilibrium. Some new material concerns how processes such as black-hole evaporation and coalescence might be described by a single trapping horizon which manifests temporally as separate horizons.

  3. Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals Aluminum oxide in common soil minerals captures uranium Using computational chemistry models, scientists at Pacific Northwest National...

  4. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

  5. Universal ripper miner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Larson, David A. (Minneapolis, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  6. Rotating Hairy Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct stationary black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing non-trivial non-abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent non-perturbative rotating hairy black holes.

  7. Disregarding the 'Hole Argument'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Roberts

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Weatherall has suggested that Einstein's hole argument, as presented by Earman and Norton (1987), is based on a misleading use of mathematics. I argue on the contrary that Weatherall demands an implausible restriction on how mathematics is used. The hole argument, on the other hand, is in no new danger at all.

  8. RON MINER MEMORIAL BIOENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP The Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of J. Ronald Miner, an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    RON MINER MEMORIAL BIOENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP The Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of J. Ronald Miner, an Agricultural Engineering professor at OSU for over thirty years. Ron came to OSU from the Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship which resides with the OSU Foundation. The name

  9. Friction Factor Measurement, Analysis, and Modeling for Flat-Plates with 12.15 mm Diameter Hole-Pattern, Tested with Air at Different Clearances, Inlet Pressures, and Pressure Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deva Asirvatham, Thanesh

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of 800, 1000, and 1200 psi respectively). These nine combinations of clearance and inlet pressure will give a range of friction factor. The following objectives are considered. 17 Figure 10. Detailed view of a 3.175 mm diameter hole...

  10. Rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions and particle acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sadeghi; B. Pourhassan; H. Farahani

    2013-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we construct rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions for infinitesimal black hole charge and rotation parameters. Then we consider this black hole as particle accelerator and calculate the center-of-mass energy of two colliding test particles near the rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions. As we expected, the center-of-mass energy has infinite value.

  11. J Bone Miner Metab . Author manuscript Mineral maturity and crystallinity index are distinct characteristics of bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J Bone Miner Metab . Author manuscript Page /1 13 Mineral maturity and crystallinity index are distinct characteristics of bone mineral Delphine Farlay 1 * , G rard Panczeré 2 , Christian Rey 3 , Pierre the hypothesis that mineral maturity and crystallinity index are two different characteristics of bone mineral

  12. On Noncommutative Black Holes Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faizal, Mir; Ulhoa, S C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we will analyze noncommutative deformation of the Schwarzschild black holes and Kerr black holes. We will perform our analysis by relating the commutative and the noncommutative metrics using an Moyal product. We will also analyze the thermodynamics of these noncommutative black hole solutions. We will explicitly derive expression for the corrected entropy and temperature of these black hole solutions.

  13. Holes in Spectral Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of an atom in the presence of a static perturbation is investigated. The perturbation couples a decaying state with a nondecaying state. A "hole" appears in the emission line at a frequency equal to the frequency difference between...

  14. Do Black Holes Exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1993-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of information loss in black hole formation and the associated violations of basic laws of physics, such as conservation of energy, causality and unitarity, are avoided in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory, if the NGT charge of a black hole and its mass satisfy an inequality that does not violate any known experimental data and allows the existence of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  15. Helical superconducting black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct novel static, asymptotically $AdS_5$ black hole solutions with Bianchi VII$_0$ symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, non-isotropic dual ground states with emergent scaling symmetry.

  16. Minerals handbook 1984/1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowson, P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook consists of statistical tables giving a profile of almost 50 strategic minerals. A compendium of statistics on reserves, production, and trade, the book provides a view of international supply and demand. Information is complied here which is otherwise available only through scattered sources. The 1984/1985 edition has been updated and expanded. Reserves have been recalculated on the new basis instituted by the United States. Seven new minerals have been added: arsenic, berrylium, bismuth, boron, gallium, rare earths, and tellurium. Growth rates of consumption have been extended and the section on end use of patterns for each mineral now shows the percentage for Europe and Japan as well as the U.S.

  17. Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Potential for Improved Fertilizer Recommendations and Decreased Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franzluebbers, Alan; Haney, Richard; Hons, Frank

    In order to prevent overfertilization, which could lead to groundwater contamination, rapid and accurate soil testing procedures are needed to evaluate agricultural surface soils for their potential to mineralize C and N. Our objectives were...

  18. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  19. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Summer Training Report 2010 Abdul-Aziz Al ...........................................................................................13 #12;2 1. Introduction King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) give an opportunity

  20. Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herd, Dennis B.

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient balance is the key to any effective nutrition program, especially where trace minerals are concerned. Many factors cannot be optimized when mineral intake is not properly balanced. Recommendations are given for the producer....

  1. ACCRETION-JET CONNECTION IN BLACK HOLES THE ORIGIN OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    of a sudden drop of the hard X-rays..." ·"The particles (corona/inner disk) are blown away..." ·"Jets have Direct collapse depends on: ·Metal content ·Mass of the core ·Angular momentum Can this model be tested observationally ? #12;HOW ARE FORM BLACK HOLE BINARIES ? CORE COLLAPSE MODELS: (Fryer & Kalogera ; Woosley & Heger

  2. Mineral Selection for Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plamer, C. D.; Ohly, S. R.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, G.; McLing, T.; Mattson, E.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muliticomponent geothermometry requires knowledge of the mineral phases in the reservoir with which the geothermal fluids may be equilibrated.

  3. Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herd, Dennis B.

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in these problem herds returned to acceptable levels with mineral supplementation practices described in this publication. Need for Minerals Maintenance, growth, lactation, reproduction and animal health cannot be optimized where mineral intake is not properly... than during lactation. Since milk is low in copper, the cow must build the fetal liver concentration of copper 4 Table 1. Diet Formulation Guidelines 1996 Beef NRC Common Requirements Formulation Lactating Lactating Maximum Mineral Dry Cow Cow Dry Cow...

  4. Black hole accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an introduction to models of accretion discs around black holes. After a presentation of the non-relativistic equations describing the structure and evolution of geometrically thin accretion discs we discuss their steady-state solutions and compare them to observation. Next we describe in detail the thermal-viscous disc instability model and its application to dwarf novae for which it was designed and its X-ray irradiated-disc version which explains the soft X--ray transients, i.e. outbursting black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We then turn to the role of advection in accretion flow onto black holes illustrating its action and importance with a toy model describing both ADAFs and slim discs. We conclude with a presentation of the general-relativistic formalism describing accretion discs in the Kerr space-time.

  5. Mineral minimization in nature's alternative teeth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    REVIEW Mineral minimization in nature's alternative teeth Christopher C. Broomell1, , Rashda K, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA Contrary to conventional wisdom, mineralization, with little to no help from mineralization. Based on biochemical analyses, three of these mouthparts, the jaws

  6. PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    r PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY 28th ANNUAL MEETING NI\\SI\\National Aeronautit &II LPI #12;PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY 28th ANNUAL MEETING Houston, Texas October contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Clay Minerals Society 28th Annual

  7. Structure and Mass Absorption of Hypothetical Terrestrial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. VanDevender; J. Pace VanDevender

    2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The prospect of mini black holes, either primordial or in planned experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, interacting with the earth motivate us to examine how they may be detected and the scope of their impact on the earth. We propose that the more massive of these objects may gravitationally bind matter without significant absorption. Since the wave functions of gravitationally bound atoms orbiting a black hole are analogous to those of electrons around a nucleus, we call such an object the Gravitationally Equivalent of an Atom (GEA). Mini black holes are expected to lose mass through quantum evaporation, which has become well accepted on purely theoretical grounds. Since all attempts to directly observe x-rays from an evaporating black hole have failed, we examine the possibility of the inverse test: search for extant mini black holes by looking for emissions from matter bound in a GEA. If quantum evaporation does not occur, then miniature black holes left over from the early universe may be stable, contribute to dark matter, and in principle be detectable through emissions associated with the bound matter. We show that small black holes-with masses below \\sim10^12 kg-can bind matter without readily absorbing it into the black hole but the emissions are too weak to be detected from earth.

  8. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R 621 622 623 623 579 #12;580 Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals 2.20.5.3 2.20.5.4 2, and are present in all types of rocks, sediments, and soils. These minerals retain a memory of the geomagnetic

  9. Graphene tests of Klein phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano De Leo; Pietro Rotelli

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is characterized by chiral electronic excitations. As such it provides a perfect testing ground for the production of Klein pairs (electron/holes). If confirmed, the standard results for barrier phenomena must be reconsidered with, as a byproduct, the accumulation within the barrier of holes.

  10. Thermodynamical instability of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to Hawking radiation of black hole with a given spacetime structure, we consider a competitive transition due to a heat transfer from a hotter inner horizon to a colder outer horizon of Kerr black hole, that results in a stable thermodynamical state of extremal black hole. In this process, by supposing an emission of gravitational quanta, we calculate the mass of extremal black hole in the final state of transition.

  11. Towards noncommutative quantum black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Dominguez, J. C.; Obregon, O.; Sabido, M.; Ramirez, C. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, P.O. Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study noncommutative black holes. We use a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate the Hawking's temperature and entropy for the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole.

  12. A List of Kansas Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Charles H.

    1895-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Master Th e s i s Geology Grov e r , C h a r l e s H. 1895 L i s t of Kansas m i n e r a l s * A l i s t of Kansas Minerals with "brief notes on the^cr^stjalogr&phio (form, chemical composition, and the p r i n c i p a l l o c a l i t i e s f...£om which £hey have been reported* ^S/V-y The f o l l o w i n g l i s t , i t i s believed, embraces a l l the minerals of the state that have been so f a r discovered and reported. Two s i m i l a r i i s t s have been heretofore published i n...

  13. Mineral bridges in nacre revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio G. Checa; Julyan H. E. Cartwright; Marc-Georg Willinger

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200 nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (> 100 nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (mineral bridges, found to be such.

  14. Mineral Scavenger Hunt 1. CONTRIBUTOR'S NAME: Johnny MacLean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Carol

    Mineral Scavenger Hunt 1. CONTRIBUTOR'S NAME: Johnny MacLean 2. NAME OF INQUIRY: Mineral Scavenger from minerals? What are some objects in the classroom that come from minerals? What minerals did these objects come from? b. Ecological Theme(s): Minerals are the building blocks of rocks. Rocks

  15. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  16. Quantum black hole inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Altaie

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we follow a new approach for particle creation by a localized strong gravitational field. The approach is based on a definition of the physical vacuum drawn from Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Using the fact that the gravitational field red-shifts the frequency modes of the vacuum, a condition on the minimum stregth of the gravitational field required to achieve real particle creation is derived. Application of this requirement on a Schwartzchid black hole resulted in deducing an upper limit on the region, outside the event horizon, where real particles can be created. Using this regional upper limit, and considering particle creation by black holes as a consequence of the Casimir effect, with the assumption that the created quanta are to be added to the initial energy, we deduce a natural power law for the development of the event horizon, and consequently a logarithmic law for the area spectrum of an inflating black hole. Application of the results on a cosmological model shows that if we start with a Planck-dimensional black hole, then through the process of particle creation we end up with a universe having the presently estimated critical density. Such a universe will be in a state of eternal inflation.

  17. Black Holes at Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Webber

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In theories with large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity, black holes are copiously produced in particle collisions at energies well above the Planck scale. I briefly review some recent work on the phenomenology of this process, with emphasis on theoretical uncertainties and possible strategies for measuring the number of extra dimensions.

  18. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O'Connor, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  19. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  20. BLACK HOLE AURORA POWERED BY A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Masaaki [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aichi University of Education, Kariya, Aichi 448-8542 (Japan); Takahashi, Rohta, E-mail: takahasi@phyas.aichi-edu.ac.j [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for high-energy emission sources generated by a standing magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) shock in a black hole magnetosphere. The black hole magnetosphere would be constructed around a black hole with an accretion disk, where a global magnetic field could be originated by currents in the accretion disk and its corona. Such a black hole magnetosphere may be considered as a model for the central engine of active galactic nuclei, some compact X-ray sources, and gamma-ray bursts. The energy sources of the emission from the magnetosphere are the gravitational and electromagnetic energies of magnetized accreting matters and the rotational energy of a rotating black hole. When the MHD shock generates in MHD accretion flows onto the black hole, the plasma's kinetic energy and the black hole's rotational energy can convert to radiative energy. In this Letter, we demonstrate the huge energy output at the shock front by showing negative energy postshock accreting MHD flows for a rapidly rotating black hole. This means that the extracted energy from the black hole can convert to the radiative energy at the MHD shock front. When an axisymmetric shock front is formed, we expect a ring-shaped region with very hot plasma near the black hole; this would look like an 'aurora'. The high-energy radiation generated from there would carry to us the information for the curved spacetime due to the strong gravity.

  1. The effects of fastener hole defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Scot D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) August 1991 ABSTRACT The Effects of Fastener Hole Defects. (August 1991) Scot D. Andrews, B. S. , Texas A8rM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Orden O. Ochoa The influence of drilling-induced defects, such as delamination, on the fatigue... ambient and elevated temperature wet conditions. Specimens were tested in a bearing tension frame to static failure in order to measure the failure load and to calculate pin bearing stress. From static test results, a fatigue load was selected as 66...

  2. Shape of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, María E Gabach

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that celestial bodies tend to be spherical due to gravity and that rotation produces deviations from this sphericity. We discuss what is known and expected about the shape of black holes' horizons from their formation to their final, stationary state. We present some recent results showing that black hole rotation indeed manifests in the widening of their central regions, limits their global shapes and enforces their whole geometry to be close to the extreme Kerr horizon geometry at almost maximal rotation speed. The results depend only on the horizon area and angular momentum. In particular they are entirely independent of the surrounding geometry of the spacetime and of the presence of matter satisfying the strong energy condition. We also discuss the the relation of this result with the Hoop conjecture.

  3. Delamination characterization of composite plates with holes/inclusions under general in-plane loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bense, Ronald

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution, but more experimental testing is required before this could be accepted as a, simple method for determining stress in an orthotropic laminate with a, circular hole. Others evaluated the complete three dimensional stress field with three dimen.... (August 1989) Ronald Bense, B. S. , Texas A@M Univerisity Chair ot Advisory Committee Dr. O. O. Ochoa Delamination characterization and a model of the stress field around the boundary of a hole or an inclusion, a filled hole, are presented...

  4. Giant black hole ringings induced by massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves Decanini; Antoine Folacci; Mohamed Ould El Hadj

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A distorted black hole radiates gravitational waves in order to settle down in one of the geometries permitted by the no-hair theorem. During that relaxation phase, a characteristic damped ringing is generated. It can be theoretically constructed from the black hole quasinormal frequencies (which govern its oscillating behavior and its decay) and from the associated excitation factors (which determine intrinsically its amplitude) by carefully taking into account the source of the distortion. Here, by considering the Schwarzschild black hole in the framework of massive gravity, we show that the excitation factors have an unexpected strong resonant behavior leading to giant ringings which are, moreover, slowly decaying. Such extraordinary black hole ringings could be observed by the next generations of gravitational wave detectors and allow us to test the various massive gravity theories or their absence could be used to impose strong constraints on the graviton mass.

  5. Minerals and Mining Program (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minerals and Mining Program has the authority to oversee mining activities in the state and issue regulations pertaining to the permitting and environmental impact mitigation of, and...

  6. Understanding microbe-mineral electron exchange | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    insight into how bacteria, such as S. oneidensis (above), exchange electrons with minerals in their surroundings as part of cellular respiration-a series of electron exchanges...

  7. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral...

  8. Black holes in massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babichev, Eugeny

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the black hole solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact black hole solutions, analogous to those of General Relativity. In addition to these solutions, hairy black holes -- solutions with no correspondent in General Relativity -- have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of the Birkhoff's theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these black holes richer and more complex than those of General Relativity. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild black hole exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical black holes are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability o...

  9. Black Hole's 1/N Hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali; Cesar Gomez

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the standard view classically black holes carry no hair, whereas quantum hair is at best exponentially weak. We show that suppression of hair is an artifact of the semi-classical treatment and that in the quantum picture hair appears as an inverse mass-square effect. Such hair is predicted in the microscopic quantum description in which a black hole represents a self-sustained leaky Bose-condensate of N soft gravitons. In this picture the Hawking radiation is the quantum depletion of the condensate. Within this picture we show that quantum black hole physics is fully compatible with continuous global symmetries and that global hair appears with the strength B/N, where B is the global charge swallowed by the black hole. For large charge this hair has dramatic effect on black hole dynamics. Our findings can have interesting astrophysical consequences, such as existence of black holes with large detectable baryonic and leptonic numbers.

  10. Repairs for damaged bolt holes in continuous fiber reinforced plastics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copps, Kevin Daniel

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    repair method for damaged bolt holes in such composites. Bolt holes in three types of graphite-epoxy were purposely damaged and then repaired. Each was tested to characterize its static and fatigue behavior. The tests used a special fixture to simulate... composite joints . Bearing-bypass ratio can change the failure mode of bolted composite joints 7 Drilling defects in graphite-epoxy coupons 12 26 The exit side of a IM7/8551-7A 18 ply tape coupon showing the damage due to drilling 27 9 Resin filled...

  11. Observational Evidence for Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh Narayan; Jeffrey E. McClintock

    2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Astronomers have discovered two populations of black holes: (i) stellar-mass black holes with masses in the range 5 to 30 solar masses, millions of which are present in each galaxy in the universe, and (ii) supermassive black holes with masses in the range 10^6 to 10^{10} solar masses, one each in the nucleus of every galaxy. There is strong circumstantial evidence that all these objects are true black holes with event horizons. The measured masses of supermassive black hole are strongly correlated with properties of their host galaxies, suggesting that these black holes, although extremely small in size, have a strong influence on the formation and evolution of entire galaxies. Spin parameters have recently been measured for a handful of black holes. Based on the data, there is an indication that the kinetic power of at least one class of relativistic jet ejected from accreting black holes may be correlated with black hole spin. If verified, it would suggest that these jets are powered by a generalized Penrose process mediated by magnetic fields.

  12. The mission of the USGS National Minerals Information Center (formerly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    The mission of the USGS National Minerals Information Center (formerly the Minerals Information of and demand for minerals and mineral materials essential to the U.S. economy and national security. Examples with the information required to ensure that the Nation has an adequate and dependable supply of minerals and materials

  13. Probing the Spacetime Around Supermassive Black Holes with Ejected Plasma Blobs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Millimeter-wavelength VLBI observations of the supermassive black holes in Sgr A* and M87 by the Event Horizon Telescope could potentially trace the dynamics of ejected plasma blobs in real time. We demonstrate that the trajectory and tidal stretching of these blobs can be used to test general relativity and set new constraints on the mass and spin of these black holes.

  14. Mind the Resonances: Final stages of accretion into bumpy black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgios Lukes-Gerakopoulos; George Contopoulos

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we discuss a possible way of testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis by taking advantage of phenomena correlated with chaotic motion in the final stages of an accretion disk around a bumpy black hole. We anticipate that these phenomena should have an imprint in the electromagnetic spectrum coming from the accretion disk.

  15. Artificial ozone holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Dolya

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This article considers an opportunity of disinfecting a part of the Earth surface, occupying a large area of ten thousand square kilometers. The sunlight will cause dissociation of molecular bromine into atoms; each bromine atom kills thirty thousand molecules of ozone. Each bromine plate has a mass of forty milligrams grams and destroys ozone in the area of hundred square meters. Thus, to form the ozone hole over the area of ten thousand square kilometers, it is required to have the total mass of bromine equal to the following four tons.

  16. Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals D A R I A K I B A N O V A , A N T O N I O N and toxicity. Herein, potential hazards of clay particle uptake areaddressed.Thispaperreportsthatthecontentanddistribution of structural Fe influence the ability of expandable clay minerals to induce lipid peroxidation (LP), a major

  17. Clay Minerals and Italy the Nannobacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Clay Minerals and Italy ­ the Nannobacterial Connection R. L. FOLK THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN This work is dedicated to F. Leo Lynch, a brilliant clay mineralogist who died in 2009. During Leo of nannobacterial precipitation of clay minerals were identified. (Lynch, 1994; Folk, Lynch & Rasbury, 1994). Leo

  18. Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources #12;IMER VISION IMER's vision is to enable the efficient and sustainable use and development of the world's mineral and energy resources for the benefit of society resources. IMER OBJECTIVES · Advance the science and technology required to enhance the prospectivity

  19. Chapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Materials produced from natural gas or crude oil, such as plastics Fertilizers for agriculture, phosphate tons per year. Gold and silver have annual consumption rates of 10,000 tons or less. Worldwide consumption of minerals #12; The fundamental problem associated with the availability of mineral resources

  20. Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation is hosting the Special Institute on Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country. This two-day conference will cover laws, policies, and practices regarding natural resources development in Indian Country and how they've evolved in the recent years.

  1. New Mexico Bureau Mines and Mineral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunbar, Nelia W.

    Number22 - 1999 New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources a division of Nei~, Mexico Tech forsandblasting five times! ThisIssue Earth Briefs-Better age estimates on some New Mexico volcanic rocks Have You) NewMexico's Most Wanted Minera Is (pageT) Magnification of microscopic miner- als and glass (page 8

  2. Testing Subgroup Workshop on Critical Property Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ConditionsTestTestPropertyProperty #12;Critical Test, Standard Test Method and Test Conditions E1426 (xrd), E837 (hole drilling) Residual sensitivity unknowns · X52 · NIST Workshop conclusion: consider X70 and below as well as >X70. #12;Initial

  3. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Europe and central Eurasia. Volume 3. 1992 international review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Minerals Yearbook -- International Review contains the latest available mineral data on more than 175 foreign countries and discusses the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations. Since the 1989 International Review, the volume has been presented as six reports. The report presents the Mineral Industries of Europe and Central Eurasia. The report incorporates location maps, industry structure tables, and an outlook section previously incorporated in the authors' Minerals Perspectives Series quinquennial regional books, which are being discontinued. This section of the Minerals Yearbook reviews the minerals industries of 45 countries: the 12 nations of the European Community (EC); 6 of the 7 nations of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA); Malta; the 11 Eastern European economies in transition (Albania, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, and Slovenia); and the countries of Central Eurasia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan).

  4. A collaborative research venture between the minerals industry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    A collaborative research venture between the minerals industry and The University of British Columbia MDRUMINERAL DEPOSIT RESEARCH UNIT To increase the understanding of mineral deposits and highly trained geologists for employment in the minerals industry. Mission Vision MDRU

  5. FORMATION OF SEPIOLITE-PALYGORSKITE AND RELATED MINERALS FROM SOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    FORMATION OF SEPIOLITE-PALYGORSKITE AND RELATED MINERALS FROM SOLUTION REZAN BIRSOY* Dokuz Eylu's sepiolite-palygorskite precipitates in lacustrine and perimarine environments. Although these minerals can transform from precursor minerals, the most common formation mechanism involves crystallization from

  6. Senior Research Associate Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Senior Research Associate Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair Job Requisition 170892 Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory Natural Resources Research Institute University of Minnesota Duluth (www.nrri.umn.edu) Position Description The Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair

  7. Mineral Deposit Research Unit The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    1 Mineral Deposit Research Unit The University of British Columbia Earth Sciences Building metallogenic constraints on mineralization in poorly understood or exposed portions of Yukon and Alaska. The mineral deposit studies, models, and metallogenic frameworks developed in this project

  8. The Ozone Hole Some perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    The Ozone Hole · Some perspective · The British Antarctic Survey · The "Ozone Hole" · International of the predicted ozone losses! This was quite a controversy. Ultimately, ozone losses started appearing in the late 1980s (see Figure below), but by then, there was already a credibility issue for ozone scientists. #12

  9. Optical black holes and solitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn Westmoreland

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We exhibit a static, cylindrically symmetric, exact solution to the Euler-Heisenberg field equations (EHFE) and prove that its effective geometry contains (optical) black holes. It is conjectured that there are also soliton solutions to the EHFE which contain black hole geometries.

  10. Black Holes of Negative Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, regions of negative energy density can undergo gravitational collapse into a black hole. The resultant exterior black hole spacetimes necessarily have negative mass and non-trivial topology. A full theory of quantum gravity, in which topology-changing processes take place, could give rise to such spacetimes.

  11. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Abstract: Multiwall carbon...

  12. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP...

  13. Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI)...

  14. Linked Reactivity at Mineral-Water Interfaces Through Bulk Crystal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at mineral-water interfaces is of fundamental importance to geochemistry, but for minerals that are natural semiconductors the pursuit of mechanistic understanding is uniquely...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant - FL 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant (FL.02) Designated Name: Not...

  16. King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering Summer Training King Fahd university of Petroleum and Minerals OMVG Gambia River Basin Development Organization PLCs

  17. Biogeochemical Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer. Biogeochemical Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer. Abstract: Biogeochemical...

  18. Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Abstract Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems...

  19. LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM 02/11/2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mineral-webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis...

  20. Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Minerals - Industry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations Industrial Minerals Association - North America The International Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) was formed in early 2002 to tap the benefits...

  1. affecting bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  2. alters bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  3. absorptiometric bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  4. avoiding mineral pretreatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  5. affecting born mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  6. atrazine mineralization capacity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  7. african mineral dust: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laurent 19 Does the size distribution of mineral dust aerosols depend on the wind speed at emission? CERN Preprints Summary: The size distribution of mineral dust aerosols...

  8. artery calcium mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic October 2008. 1 Correlations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral fluxes into...

  9. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotopes in phosphate. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...

  10. Steady and unsteady calibration of multi-hole probes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Espen S

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties like the density and viscosity. The algorithm utilizes a local least-squares modeling technique and has been tested on 4 novel miniature 7-hole probes that have been calibrated at NASA Langley Flow Modeling and Control Branch for the entire...

  11. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  12. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  13. Local heat transfer distribution in a triangular channel with smooth walls and staggered ejection holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Sung-Won

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient liquid crystal experiments have been conducted to determine the distribution of the local heat transfer coefficient in a triangular channel with smooth wails and ejection holes along one or two of the wails. The end of the test channel...

  14. Pseudospin entanglement and Bell test in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kindermann

    2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a way of producing and detecting pseudospin entanglement between electrons and holes in graphene. Electron-hole pairs are produced by a fluctuating potential and their entanglement is demonstrated by a current correlation measurement. The chirality of electrons in graphene facilitates a well-controlled Bell test with (pseudo-)spin projection angles defined in real space.

  15. Strings, higher curvature corrections, and black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Mohaupt

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review old and recent results on subleading contributions to black hole entropy in string theory.

  16. Sustainable growth and valuation of mineral reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual change in the value of an in-ground mineral is equal to the increase or decrease of inventories ("reserves"), multiplied by the market value of a reserve unit. The limited shrinking resource base does not exist. ...

  17. Minerals on School and Public Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

  18. Mineral Leases by Political Subdivisions (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes local political subdivisions to lease lands they own for the development of mineral interests, including coal and lignite. A public hearing process is required prior to...

  19. Oil, Gas, and Metallic Minerals (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operators of oil, gas, and metallic mineral exploration and production operations are required to obtain a drilling permit from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and file specific forms with...

  20. Alternate Explosions: Collapse and Accretion Events with Red Holes instead of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Graber

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A red hole is "just like a black hole" except it lacks an event horizon and a singularity. As a result, a red hole emits much more energy than a black hole during a collapse or accretion event. We consider how a red hole solution can solve the "energy crisis" and power extremely energetic gamma ray bursts and hypernovae.

  1. Black Hole Collisions, Analytic Continuation, and Cosmic Censorship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieter R. Brill

    1995-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations that describe moving black holes in a cosmological setting are discussed with the aim of discovering the global structure and testing cosmic censorship. Continuation beyond the horizons present in these solutions is necessary in order to identify the global structure. Therefore the possibilities and methods of analytic extension of geometries are briefly reviewed. The global structure of the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-de Sitter geometry is found by these methods. When several black holes are present, the exact solution is no longer everywhere analytic, but less smooth extensions satisfying the Einstein equations everywhere are possible. Some of these provide counterexamples to cosmic censorship.

  2. Thermodynamics of regular black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2008-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

  3. Black Hole Interior Mass Formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue by explicit computations that, although the area product, horizon radii product, entropy product and \\emph {irreducible mass product} of the event horizon and Cauchy horizon are universal, the \\emph{surface gravity product}, \\emph{surface temperature product} and \\emph{Komar energy product} of the said horizons do not seem to be universal for Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole space-time. We show the black hole mass formula on the \\emph{Cauchy horizon} following the seminal work by Smarr\\cite{smarr} for the outer horizon. We also prescribed the \\emph{four} laws of black hole mechanics for the \\emph{inner horizon}. New definition of the extremal limit of a black hole is discussed.

  4. Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balzs Arat1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balázs Arató1 , Mihály Pósfai1 and Rafal E-controlled mineralization Abstract. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetic minerals that have distinct for studying the biological membrane around the mineral grains. Our goals were to deduce the possible growth

  5. 2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE production table was prepared by Lisa D. Miller, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron minerals increased in 2011 to an estimated 4

  6. 2005 Minerals Yearbook ZirconiuM and HafniuM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Minerals Yearbook ZirconiuM and HafniuM U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey of the mining and processing of heavy-mineral sands containing the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile.). duPont produced zircon from its heavy-mineral sands operation near Starke, fL. iluka produced zircon

  7. 2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide continued to increase in 2010 but quantities are withheld's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron minerals increased in 2010

  8. Preventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belzile, Nelson

    processes of sulfide minerals still remains an important issue for both mineral extraction and environmentalPreventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines Yu-Wei Chen a,*, Yuerong on the passivation of pyrite and pyrrhotite minerals. Polyethylene polyamines, such as triethylenetetramine (TETA

  9. West Virginia University College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , and extracted minerals. Mine Environment - Designing and operating ventilation systems and controlling methane

  10. Fishing in Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Brotas

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coordinate system $(\\bar{x},\\bar{t})$ defined by $r = 2m + K\\bar{x}- c K \\bar{t}$ and $t=\\bar{x}/cK - 1 /cK \\int_{r_a}^r (1- 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2} (1 - 2m/r)^{-1}dr$ allow us to write the Schwarzschild metric in the form: \\[ds^2=c^2 d\\bar{t}^2 + (W^2/K^2 - 2W/K) d\\bar{x}^2 + 2c (1 + W/K) d\\bar{x}d\\bar{t} - r^2 (d\\theta^2 + cos^2\\theta d\\phi^2)\\] with $W=(1 - 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2}$, in which the coefficients' pathologies are moved to $r_K = 2m/(1+K^2)$. This new coordinate system is used to study the entrance into a black hole of a rigid line (a line in which the shock waves propagate with velocity c).

  11. Smoking cessation among coal miners as predicted by baseline respiratory function and symptoms: a 5-year prospective study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, R.G.; Hall, D.S.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prospective analysis was used to test whether respiratory impairment or the presence of respiratory symptoms predicts 5-year cigarette smoking cessation in a sample of 1,118 U.S. white, male, underground coal miners. Miners were examined in 1977 and re-examined in 1982 by NIOSH, and all miners with test abnormalities were so informed by letter. Respiratory impairment was measured by an index of airways obstruction combining the spirometric measures of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 sec (FEV1). Bronchitis symptoms were measured by an index that combined chronic cough (3+ months/year) and chronic phlegm (3 + months/year). Among these coal miners, the presence of chronic respiratory symptoms initially was inversely associated with cigarette smoking cessation. Respiratory impairment, however, was positively associated with cigarette smoking cessation but did not reach statistical significance.

  12. Detailed heat transfer distributions in two-pass smooth and turbulated square channels with bleed holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekkad, S.V.; Huang, Y.; Han, J.C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern gas turbine blades have internal serpentine passage for providing effective cooling. Rib turbulators are added periodically on the cooling passage surface to enhance heat transfer. Some of the cooling air is ejected out through bleed (or film) holes for external blade film cooling. The presence of periodic rib turbulators and bleed holes creates strong axial and spanwise variations in the heat transfer distributions on the passage surface. Detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions are presented in this study for a two-pass square channel with a 180{degree} turn. One wall of the channel has periodically placed bleed holes. Four different configurations of 90{degree} parallel, 60{degree} parallel, 60{degree} V ribs, and 60{degree} inverted V ribs are studied in conjunction with the effect of bleed holes on the same wall. The surface is coated with a thin layer of thermochromic liquid crystals and a transient test is run to obtain the detailed heat transfer distributions. The 60{degree} parallel, 60{degree} V, and 60{degree} inverted ribbed channels produce similar levels of heat transfer enhancement in the first pass. However, the 60{degree} inverted V ribbed channel produces higher enhancement in the second pass. Regional averaged heat transfer results indicate that a test surface with bleed holes provides similar heat transfer enhancement as that for a test surface without bleed holes although 20--25% of the inlet mass flow exits through the bleed holes.

  13. One Weird Trick to Stop Selfish Miners: Fresh Bitcoins, A Solution for the Honest Miner.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    One Weird Trick to Stop Selfish Miners: Fresh Bitcoins, A Solution for the Honest Miner. Ethan Heilman Boston University heilman@bu.edu Abstract--A recent result in Bitcoin is the selfish mining incentive-compatible and harmful to Bitcoin. In this paper we introduce a new defense against selfish mining

  14. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, S.T.

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to {approx}42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5%) as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: {approx}50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies ({at} {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  15. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, Soli T

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to ~42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5% as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: ~50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies (@ ~40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches ~40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  16. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeghi, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  17. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sadeghi; Kh. Jafarzade

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  18. Introduction to Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henry Lambert

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    These lecture notes are an elementary and pedagogical introduction to the black hole evaporation, based on a lecture given by the author at the Ninth Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics and are intended for PhD students. First, quantum field theory in curved spacetime is studied and tools needed for the remaining of the course are introduced. Then, quantum field theory in Rindler spacetime in 1+1 dimensions and in the spacetime of a spherically collapsing star are considered, leading to Unruh and Hawking effects, respectively. Finally, some consequences such as thermodynamics of black holes and information loss paradox are discussed.

  19. Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

  20. Geochemical and Petrological Investigations into Mantle Minerals from Experiments and Natural Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macris, Catherine Amy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Schauble (2010) Inter-mineral Iron Isotope Fractionationand E. Tonui (2008) Inter-mineral Iron Isotope Fractionation+ (aq) with carbonate minerals. Geochimica et Cosmochimica

  1. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron(III) oxyhydroxides: effects of mineral solubility andMineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associatedthe accumulation of new mineral phases and biomass. Word

  2. Bone mineral density and fractures in older men with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dam, T.-T.; Harrison, S.; Fink, H. A.; Ramsdell, J.; Barrett-Connor, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    x ORIGINAL ARTICLE Bone mineral density and fractures inwas associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) at theKeywords Bone loss . Bone mineral density . Elderly .

  3. Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. (1994). TABLE 3. Estimates of daily mineral intake,drinking-water mineral contributionand net mineral excretion in lactating cows on Merced County

  4. Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don N. Page

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

  5. Earth Minerals Did you read chapter 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    1 Chapter 29 Earth Minerals Did you read chapter 29 before coming to class? A. Yes B. No Lets play that begins in Hawaii Other "Hot Spots" around the world The interior structure of Earth has been determined outer core #12;2 What is different on earth (as opposed to other planets)? Continents Why does

  6. Clay mineral reactions in clastic diagenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of clastic sediments have documented the formation and transformation of clay mineral assemblages during burial diagensis. The transformation of smectite to illite in shale by its reaction with the decomposition products of detrital K-feldspar and mica results in the production of new pore water at depth. The overall reaction mobilizes all the major chemical components in the shale, most of which are consumed in the formation of the diagenetic assemblage illite/smectite + chlorite + quartz. However, part of all the components is undoubtedly transported from the shale to sandstone units and is involved in cementation, replacement, and diagenetic clay mineral formation in these reservoir rocks. In contrast to burial diagenetic reactions in shale, where the sequence is monotonic and reasonably predictable, diagenetic reactions in sandstone are frequently variable. This variability is probably attributable to the fact that sandstones are open systems in which the reactions that proceed are controlled in part by the influx of new pore water, the chemistry of which is determined by an outside source. The useful understanding role of clay minerals in hydrocarbon exploration will follow from a determination of the system shale/sandstone/organic material. We need to tie in the nature and timing of shale mineral reactions and their control on the fluid and mass transfer from shale to sandstone.

  7. USED MINERAL-BASED CRANKCASE OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Used Mineral-Based Crankcase

    based crankcase oil vary depending on the brand and type of oil, whether gasoline or diesel fuel was used, the mechanical condition of the engine that the oil came from, and the amount of use between oil changes. Used oil is not naturally found in the environment. What happens to used mineral-based crankcase oil when it enters the environment? q Used mineral-based crankcase oil enters the air through the exhaust system during engine use. q It may enter water or soil when disposed of improperly. q The hydrocarbon components of the oil generally stick to the soil surface. q Some hydrocarbons evaporate into the air very quickly, and others evaporate more slowly. q Hydrocarbon components of the oil that enter surface water bind to small particles in the water and eventually settle to the bottom. q Hydrocarbons from used mineral-based crankcase oil may build up in shellfish or other organisms. q Some metals in used mineral-based crankcase oil dissolve in water and move through the s

  8. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  9. 2006 Minerals Yearbook ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Geological Survey from a voluntary survey of domestic operations. Of the 44 operations surveyed, 31 did concentrates are developed by a second voluntary survey of domestic mining operations. Of the two domestic2006 Minerals Yearbook ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

  10. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  11. Signatures of black holes at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Cavaglia; Romulus Godang; Lucien M. Cremaldi; Donald J. Summers

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Signatures of black hole events at CERN's Large Hadron Collider are discussed. Event simulations are carried out with the Fortran Monte Carlo generator CATFISH. Inelasticity effects, exact field emissivities, color and charge conservation, corrections to semiclassical black hole evaporation, gravitational energy loss at formation and possibility of a black hole remnant are included in the analysis.

  12. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  13. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  14. Absorption cross section in Lifshitz black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taeyoon Moon; Yun Soo Myung

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the absorption cross section of a minimally coupled scalar in the Lifshitz black hole obtained from the new massive gravity. The absorption cross section reduces to the horizon area in the low energy and massless limit of s-wave mode propagation, indicating that the Lifshitz black hole also satisfies the universality of low energy absorption cross section for black holes.

  15. Department of Mining & Minerals Engineering Graduate Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Department of Mining & Minerals Engineering Graduate Program of Study Name: ID#: Advisor: Graduate Members, with not less than three from the Department of Mining and Minerals Engineering and not less than

  16. african gold miners: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the outline of the country's geology and its mineral deposits. Mali, its geology and mineral resources Country summary Mali, located in West Africa, has a land area of 24 000...

  17. V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities have been reported in NetworkMiner, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. PLATFORM: NetworkMiner 1.x ABSTRACT: The...

  18. aluminosilicate clay minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used mineral-based crankcase oil may build up in shellfish or other organisms. q Some metals in used mineral-based crankcase oil dissolve in water and move through the s Used...

  19. anaerobic toluene mineralization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and found in nature as the mineral tincal. Boric acid, also known as orthoboric acid boric acid. The most common minerals of commercial importance in the United States were...

  20. accompanying mineral crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 312 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  1. apatite structured minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 166 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  2. azoto mineral durante: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 109 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  3. articular cartilage mineralization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 304 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  4. advanced mineral calciner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 174 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  5. anionic alkali mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 444 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  6. actinide pyrochlore minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 192 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  7. alkali mineral complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 303 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  8. activity bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 325 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  9. amaro mineral sand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 452 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  10. aporte del mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 118 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  11. artisanal gold miners: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 370 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  12. agua por mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 171 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  13. adhesionvia template-driven mineralization: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 90 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  14. austrian mineral water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 223 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  15. antimony minerals part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 151 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  16. Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12;Einstein's Miraculous Year: 1905 · Einstein, A. "¨Uber einen die Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light. · Einstein, A. "¨Uber die von der molekularkinetischen

  17. From Pinholes to Black Holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Pinhole photography has made major contributions to astrophysics through the use of “coded apertures”. Coded apertures were instrumental in locating gamma-ray bursts and proving that they originate in faraway galaxies, some from the birth of black holes from the first stars that formed just after the big bang.

  18. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  19. Black Hole Radiation and Volume Statistical Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The simplest possible equation for Hawking radiation, and other black hole radiated power is derived in terms of black hole density. Black hole density also leads to the simplest possible model of a gas of elementary constituents confined inside a gravitational bottle of Schwarzchild radius at tremendous pressure, which yields identically the same functional dependence as the traditional black hole entropy. Variations of Sbh can be obtained which depend on the occupancy of phase space cells. A relation is derived between the constituent momenta and the black hole radius which is similar to the Compton wavelength relation.

  20. The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of Ni Surface Precipitates R O B E R 19717 The formation of transition-metal surface precipitates may occur during sorption to clay minerals formation are poorly understood. We monitored changes in the reversibility of Ni sorbed to a clay mineral

  1. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey TITANIUM October 2010, international data coordinator. World production of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) contained in titanium mineral to be heavily reliant on imports of titanium mineral concentrates from Australia, Canada, and South Africa

  2. Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol With Enhanced Degradation and Power Generation From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol With Enhanced Degradation and Power Generation From Air to completely mineralize pentachlorophenol (PCP; 5 mg/L), in the pres- ence of acetate or glucose. Degradation; mineralization Introduction Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is one of many recalcitrant and toxic compounds found

  3. 2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON May 2010 #12, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide content (tables 1, 5). Turkey and the United States were the world's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6

  4. Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. The main mineral precipitation and transformation pathways were studied in solutions

  5. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399 Summer Tra Advisor Examiner King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399-Shafie ID: 200669580 King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals #12;2 · TAPLE OF CONNTENT - Introduction

  6. 2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM mineral concentrates in 2011, excluding U.S. production, was about 1.62 million metric tons (Mt) compared with 1.25 Mt in 2010. The primary source of zirconium was the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4 ), principally found

  7. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON October 2010, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide continued and the United States were the world's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron

  8. LUNAR MINERALS James Papike, Lawrence Taylor, and Steven Simon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR MINERALS James Papike, Lawrence Taylor, and Steven Simon The lunar rocks described--make it easy to distinguish them from terrestrial rocks. However, the minerals that make up lunar rocks are (with a few notable exceptions) minerals that are also found on Earth. Both lunar and terrestrial rocks

  9. MIXTURES OF FINE-GRAINED MINERALS KAOLINITE AND CARBONATE GRAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palomino, Angelica M.

    MIXTURES OF FINE-GRAINED MINERALS À KAOLINITE AND CARBONATE GRAINS ANGELICA M. PALOMINO 1, *, SUSAN, Georgia 30332-0355, USA Abstract--The behavior of mineral mixtures can be significantly different from properties of the individual minerals, and their ensuing effects on interparticle interactions and fabric

  10. Ab initio theory of phase transitions and thermoelasticity of minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oganov, Artem R.

    Ab initio theory of phase transitions and thermoelasticity of minerals ARTEM R. OGANOV* , JOHN P transitions, equations of state, elasticity and thermoelastic properties of the Earth-forming minerals minerals at the extreme conditions of the Earth's interior. One can accurately predict the structures

  11. 2006 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Minerals Yearbook BORON U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey October 2007 tetraborate decahydrate and found in nature as the mineral tincal. Boric acid, also known as orthoboric acid boric acid. The most common minerals of commercial importance in the United States were colemanite

  12. Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion THE CALCIFICATION OF COLLAGEN WITH FETUINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion THE CALCIFICATION OF COLLAGEN WITH FETUINS Received is to understand the mechanisms that deposit mineral within collagen fibrils, and as a first step we recentlyDa protein are excluded. Based on these observations, we proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization

  13. COLLECTIONS POLICY MANUAL Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    COLLECTIONS POLICY MANUAL Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum College of Earth and Mineral Sciences Manual for the Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum has been developed to standardize procedures and provide guidelines for handling collections. The policies outlined here were established by the EMS Museum Director

  14. Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

  15. 2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE, and Blacksburg, SC, through Industrial Minerals Inc. (American Borate Co., 2005; Industrial Minerals Inc., 2007 extracted from three salt layers, up to 100 meters (m) deep, in Searles Lake, located near Trona in San

  16. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  17. Primordial black holes from temporally enhanced curvature perturbation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teruaki Suyama; Yi-Peng Wu; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Scalar field with generalized kinetic interactions metamorphoses depending on its field value, ranging from cosmological constant to stiff matter. We show that such a scalar field can give rise to temporal enhancement of the curvature perturbation in the primordial Universe, leading to efficient production of primordial black holes while the enhancement persists. If the inflation energy scale is high, those mini-black holes evaporate by the Hawking radiation much before Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the effective reheating of the Universe is achieved by the black hole evaporation. Dominance of PBHs and the reheating by their evaporation modify the expansion history of the primordial Universe. This results in a characteristic feature of the spectrum of primordial tensor modes in the DECIGO frequency band, opening an interesting possibility of testing PBH reheating scenario by measuring the primordial tensor modes. If the inflation energy scale is low, the PBH mass can be much larger than the solar mass. In this case, PBH is an interesting candidate for seeds for supermassive black holes residing in present galaxies.

  18. Black hole mergers: do gas discs lead to spin alignment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Lodato; Davide Gerosa

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter we revisit arguments suggesting that the Bardeen-Petterson effect can coalign the spins of a central supermassive black hole binary accreting from a circumbinary (or circumnuclear) gas disc. We improve on previous estimates by adding the dependence on system parameters, and noting that the nonlinear nature of warp propagation in a thin viscous disc affects alignment. This reduces the disc's ability to communicate the warp, and can severely reduce the effectiveness of disc-assisted spin alignment. We test our predictions with a Monte Carlo realization of random misalignments and accretion rates and we find that the outcome depends strongly on the spin magnitude. We estimate a generous upper limit to the probability of alignment by making assumptions which favour it throughout. Even with these assumptions, about 40% of black holes with $a \\gtrsim 0.5$ do not have time to align with the disc. If the residual misalignment is not small and it is maintained down to the final coalescence phase this can give a powerful recoil velocity to the merged hole. Highly spinning black holes are thus more likely of being subject to strong recoils, the occurrence of which is currently debated.

  19. Comment on "Static and spherically symmetric black holes in f(R) theories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Habib Mazharimousavi; M. Halilsoy

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the interesting "near-horizon test" reported in (PRD84, 084006(2011), arXiv:1107.5727) for any static, spherically symmetric (SSS) black hole solution admitted in f(R) gravity. Before adopting the necessary conditions for the test, however, revisions are needed as we point out in this Comment.

  20. Mineral content analysis of atmospheric dust using hyperspectral information from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostinski, Alex

    Mineral content analysis of atmospheric dust using hyperspectral information from space A one of the world's largest sources of atmospheric mineral dust. Mineral composition optical properties, and mineral deposition to Amazon forests. In this study we examine hyperspectral

  1. The production of consumption: addressing the impact of mineral mining on tuberculosis in southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Gonsalves, Gregg; Lurie, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of South Africa: Department of Minerals and Energy; SouthSouth Africa, various departments, ranging from the Minerals and Energyof Minerals and Energy: Mining and minerals in South Africa:

  2. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico-IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa-UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Astronomical Institute of Kharkov, V. N. Karazin National University, 35 Sumskaya Street, Kharkov, 61022 (Ukraine)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to be less difficult than one could think of it.

  3. Black Hole Evaporation as a Nonequilibrium Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiromi Saida

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    When a black hole evaporates, there arises a net energy flow from the black hole into its outside environment due to the Hawking radiation and the energy accretion onto black hole. Exactly speaking, due to the net energy flow, the black hole evaporation is a nonequilibrium process. To study details of evaporation process, nonequilibrium effects of the net energy flow should be taken into account. In this article we simplify the situation so that the Hawking radiation consists of non-self-interacting massless matter fields and also the energy accretion onto the black hole consists of the same fields. Then we find that the nonequilibrium nature of black hole evaporation is described by a nonequilibrium state of that field, and we formulate nonequilibrium thermodynamics of non-self-interacting massless fields. By applying it to black hole evaporation, followings are shown: (1) Nonequilibrium effects of the energy flow tends to accelerate the black hole evaporation, and, consequently, a specific nonequilibrium phenomenon of semi-classical black hole evaporation is suggested. Furthermore a suggestion about the end state of quantum size black hole evaporation is proposed in the context of information loss paradox. (2) Negative heat capacity of black hole is the physical essence of the generalized second law of black hole thermodynamics, and self-entropy production inside the matter around black hole is not necessary to ensure the generalized second law. Furthermore a lower bound for total entropy at the end of black hole evaporation is given. A relation of the lower bound with the so-called covariant entropy bound conjecture is interesting but left as an open issue.

  4. Clay minerals in the Meuse -Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Clay minerals in the Meuse - Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution Francis Claret1,2,* , Boris A. Sakharov3 , Victor A. Drits3 words: Callovo-Oxfordian, Clay minerals, Clay diagenesis, Illite-smectite, Mixed- layering

  5. Minerals Management Service perspective of platform reassessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyhrkopp, F.G. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States). Office of Structural and Technical Support

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the destruction caused by the Loma Prieta Earthquake, which occurred in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989, and the passage of Hurricane Andrew through the Central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) oil and gas fields in August 1002, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) has been actively developing a policy over the past few years that will comprehensively address the reassessment of existing Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas structures. Central to the development of such policy has been the need to develop a procedure by which reassessment can be carried out. This paper discusses the history of MMS involvement in the area of reassessment, their concerns, and how they view the reassessment procedures found in the Draft Section 17, Assessment of Existing Platforms, proposed for inclusion in future API RP 2A Editions. Minerals Management Service procedures for review and approval of proposals to remove and reuse existing structures in OCS waters are also discussed.

  6. Evaluation of replacement thread lubricants for red lead and graphite in mineral oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungling, T.L.; Rauth, D.R.; Goldberg, D.

    1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight commercially available thread lubricants were evaluated to determine the best replacement for Red Lead and Graphite in Mineral Oil (RLGMO). The evaluation included coefficient of friction testing, high temperature anti-seizing testing, room temperature anti-galling testing, chemical analysis for detrimental impurities, corrosion testing, off-gas testing, and a review of health and environmental factors. The coefficient of friction testing covered a wide variety of factors including stud, nut, and washer materials, sizes, manufacturing methods, surface coatings, surface finishes, applied loads, run-in cycles, and relubrication. Only one lubricant, Dow Corning Molykote P37, met all the criteria established for a replacement lubricant. It has a coefficient of friction range similar to RLGMO. Therefore, it can be substituted directly for RLGMO without changing the currently specified fastener torque values for the sizes, materials and conditions evaluated. Other lubricants did not perform as well as Molykote P37 in one or more test or evaluation categories.

  7. "Meissner effect" and Blandford-Znajek mechanism in conductive black hole magnetospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Komissarov; J. C. McKinney

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The expulsion of axisymmetric magnetic field from the event horizons of rapidly rotating black holes has been seen as an astrophysically important effect that may significantly reduce or even nullify the efficiency of the Blandford-Znajek mechanism of powering the relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma Ray Bursts. However, this Meissner-like effect is seen in vacuum solutions of black hole electrodynamics whereas the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is concerned with plasma-filled magnetospheres. In this paper we argue that conductivity dramatically changes the properties of axisymmetric electromagnetic solutions -- even for a maximally rotating Kerr black hole the magnetic field is pulled inside the event horizon. Moreover, the conditions resulting in outgoing Poynting flux in the Blandford-Znajek mechanism exist not on the event horizon but everywhere within the black hole ergosphere. Thus, the Meissner effect is unlikely to be of interest in astrophysics of black holes, at least not in the way this has been suggested so far. These conclusions are supported by the results of time-dependent numerical simulations with three different computer codes. The test problems involve black holes with the rotation parameter ranging from $a=0.999$ to $a=1$. The pure electrodynamic simulations deal with the structure of conductive magnetospheres of black holes placed in a uniform-at-infinity magnetic field (Wald's problem) and the magnetohydrodynamic simulations are used to study the magnetospheres arising in the problem of disk accretion.

  8. Energy and mineral resource systems: An introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tapp, B.A.; Watkins, J.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book provides a welcome approach to understanding the fundamental role that energy and mineral resources play in the affairs of nations and individuals. Chapter 1 presents background material on energy in the human environment. Chapter 2 deals with historical changes in predominant energy sources, energy efficiencies based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, potential utility of secondary energy sources, and the distribution of energy reserves among political and economic units. Chapter 3 discusses the methods and pitfalls of projecting future energy demand and technologies of alternative energy sources. Chapter 4 analyzes the projected growth-decline patterns in world oil and coal production, viability of alternative sources, and three possible future energy scenarios. Chapter 5 concludes with methods of energy flow analysis and further discussion on future energy scenarios. Chapter 6 begins by establishing several basic points about mineral resource systems then proceeds with a discussion of consumption-production patterns of metals. Chapter 7 presents estimates of global metal stocks, outlines factors determining metal demand, and examines metal import-export balances and resource potential for Australia and the Pacific Basin region. Chapter 8 highlights current issues that affect the mineral resource industry. Chapter 9 recounts the historical changes in exploration approaches, from prospecting to the utilization of genetic models, specialist teams, and regional geochemical and geophysical surveys. Chapter 10 assesses the implications of the previously noted trends in metal consumption and new technologies and concludes that future energy and mineral resource system evaluations will be according to new strategems and economic criteria.

  9. IEED Energy and Mineral Development Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the Interior, through the Office of lndian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), is soliciting grant proposals from federally recognized Indian tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations for projects that assess, evaluate, or otherwise promote the processing, use, or development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands. Grant awards are subject to the availability of funds as appropriated by Congress and allotted to IEED.

  10. BSW process of the slowly evaporating charged black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liancheng Wang; Feng He; Xiangyun Fu

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the BSW process of the slowly evaporating charged black hole. It can be found that the BSW process will also arise near black hole horizon when the evaporation of charged black hole is very slow. But now the background black hole does not have to be an extremal black hole, and it will be approximately an extremal black hole unless it is nearly a huge stationary black hole.

  11. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  12. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  13. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR); Liberman, Vladimir (Needham, MA); Morse, Jeffrey (Martinez, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  14. Quantum Geometry and Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G., J Fernando Barbero

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overall picture of the advances in the description of black hole physics from the perspective of loop quantum gravity. After an introduction that discusses the main conceptual issues we present some details about the classical and quantum geometry of isolated horizons and their quantum geometry and then use this scheme to give a natural definition of the entropy of black holes. The entropy computations can be neatly expressed in the form of combinatorial problems solvable with the help of methods based on number theory and the use of generating functions. The recovery of the Bekenstein-Hawking law and corrections to it is explained in some detail. After this, due attention is paid to the discussion of semiclassical issues. An important point in this respect is the proper interpretation of the horizon area as the energy that should appear in the statistical-mechanical treatment of the black hole model presented here. The chapter ends with a comparison between the microscopic and semiclassical app...

  15. INTEGRATED DRILLING SYSTEM USING MUD ACTUATED DOWN HOLE HAMMER AS PRIMARY ENGINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John V. Fernandez; David S. Pixton

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A history and project summary of the development of an integrated drilling system using a mud-actuated down-hole hammer as its primary engine are given. The summary includes laboratory test results, including atmospheric tests of component parts and simulated borehole tests of the hammer system. Several remaining technical hurdles are enumerated. A brief explanation of commercialization potential is included. The primary conclusion for this work is that a mud actuated hammer can yield substantial improvements to drilling rate in overbalanced, hard rock formations. A secondary conclusion is that the down-hole mud actuated hammer can serve to provide other useful down-hole functions including generation of high pressure mud jets, generation of seismic and sonic signals, and generation of diagnostic information based on hammer velocity profiles.

  16. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, wear problems of mineral processing equipment including screens, sieve bends, heavy media vessel, dewatering centrifuge, etc., were identified. A novel surface treatment technology, high density infrared (HDI) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated samples were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of AISI 4140 and ASTM A36 steels can be increased 3 and 5 folds, respectively by the application of HDI coatings.

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Old Hydrofracture Facility Waste Remediation Using the Borehole-Miner Extendible-Nozzle Sluicer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Boris, G.F.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A borehole-miner extendible-nozzle sluicing system was designed, constructed, and deployed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to remediate five horizontal underground storage tanks containing sludge and supernate at the ORNL Old Hydrofracture Facility site. The tanks were remediated in fiscal year 1998 to remove {approx}98% of the waste, {approx}3% greater than the target removal of >95% of the waste. The tanks contained up to 18 in. of sludge covered by supernate. The 42,000 gal of low level liquid waste were estimated to contain 30,000 Ci, with 97% of this total located in the sludge. The retrieval was successful. At the completion of the remediation, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation agreed that the tanks were cleaned to the maximum extent practicable using pumping technology. This deployment was the first radioactive demonstration of the borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting system. The extendible nozzle is based on existing bore hole-miner technology used to fracture and dislodge ore deposits in mines. Typically borehole-miner technology includes both dislodging and retrieval capabilities. Both dislodging, using the extendible-nozzle water-jetting system, and retrieval, using a jet pump located at the base of the mast, are deployed as an integrated system through one borehole or riser. Note that the extendible-nozzle system for Oak Ridge remediation only incorporated the dislodging capability; the retrieval pump was deployed through a separate riser. The borehole-miner development and deployment is part of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements project under the direction of the US Department of Energy's EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. This development and deployment was conducted as a partnership between RPD and E and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's US DOE EM040 Old Hydrofracture Facility remediation project team.

  18. Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ," POST 2,000LIST OFK I N

  19. Black holes are almost optimal quantum cloners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adami; G. Ver Steeg

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If black holes were able to clone quantum states, a number of paradoxes in black hole physics would disappear. However, the linearity of quantum mechanics forbids exact cloning of quantum states. Here we show that black holes indeed clone incoming quantum states with a fidelity that depends on the black hole's absorption coefficient, without violating the no-cloning theorem because the clones are only approximate. Perfectly reflecting black holes are optimal universal "quantum cloning machines" and operate on the principle of stimulated emission, exactly as their quantum optical counterparts. In the limit of perfect absorption, the fidelity of clones is equal to what can be obtained via quantum state estimation methods. But for any absorption probability less than one, the cloning fidelity is nearly optimal as long as $\\omega/T\\geq10$, a common parameter for modest-sized black holes.

  20. Preliminary prediction of inflow into the D-holes at the Stripa Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.C.S.; Karasaki, K.; Davey, A.; Peterson, J.; Landsfeld, M.; Kemeny, J.; Martel, S.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is contracted by the US Department of Energy to provide an auxiliary modeling effort for the Stripa Project. Within this effort, we are making calculations of inflow to the Simulated Drift Experiment (SDE), i.e. inflow to six parallel, closely spaced D-holes, using a preliminary set of data collected in five other holes, the N- and W-holes during Stages 1 and 2 of the Site Characterization and Validation (SCV) project. Our approach has been to focus on the fracture zones rather than the general set of ubiquitous fractures. Approximately 90% of all the water flowing in the rock is flowing in fracture zones which are neither uniformly conductive nor are they infinitely extensive. Our approach has been to adopt the fracture zone locations as they have been identified with geophysics. We use geologic sense and the original geophysical data to add one zone where significant water inflow has been observed that can not be explained with the other geophysical zones. This report covers LBL's preliminary prediction of flow into the D-holes. Care should be taken in interpreting the results given in this report. As explained below, the approach that LBL has designed for developing a fracture hydrology model requires cross-hole hydrologic data. Cross-hole tests are planned for Stage 3 but were unavailable in Stage 1. As such, we have inferred from available data what a cross-hole test might show and used this synthetic data to make a preliminary calculation of the inflow into the D-holes. Then using all the Stage 3 data we will calculate flow into the Validation Drift itself. The report mainly demonstrates the use of our methodology and the simulated results should be considered preliminary.

  1. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Europe and the USSR. Volume 3. 1990 international review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The section of the Minerals Yearbook reviews the minerals industries of 29 countries: the 12 nations of the European Community (Belgium, France, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), Italy, Greece, the Netherlands, Denmark/Greenland, Spain, Portugal, Luxembourg, The United Kingdom, and Ireland); 6 of the 7 nations of the European Free Trade Association (Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland, Austria, and Switzerland); Malta; the 8 Centrally Planned Economies of Eastern Europe (the German Democratic Republic (GDR), Poland, Yugoslavia, Albania, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Bulgaria); and the USSR.

  2. Remarks on Renormalization of Black Hole Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Sung Ku Kim; Kwang-Sup Soh; Jae Hyung Yee

    1996-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We elaborate the renormalization process of entropy of a nonextremal and an extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole by using the Pauli-Villars regularization method, in which the regulator fields obey either the Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac distribution depending on their spin-statistics. The black hole entropy involves only two renormalization constants. We also discuss the entropy and temperature of the extremal black hole.

  3. Hole cleaning requirements with seabed returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordt, David Paul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of different non-Newtonian fluids 56 INTRODUCTION A drilling fluid is used for removing cuttings from the hole, controlling subsurface pressures, preventing caving-in of the formations, suspension of cuttings, weighting materials, and many other uses... of the hole. The drilling problems related to hole cleaning can occur at low as well as high annular velocities. Cuttings can travel no faster than the fluid in which they are transported; however, they can travel more slowly. Their fall (slip) rate...

  4. Probing the Constituent Structure of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas Gruending; Stefan Hofmann; Sophia Müller; Tehseen Rug

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the cross section for scattering processes between graviton emitters on the near side of a Schwarzschild surface and absorbers on its far side, that is black hole constituents. We show that these scatterings allow to directly extract structural observables such as the momentum distribution of black hole constituents. For this we employ a quantum bound state description originally developed in quantum chromodynamics and recently applied to general relativity that allows to consider black holes in a relativistic Hartree like framework.

  5. Black hole initial data without elliptic equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    István Rácz; Jeffrey Winicour

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore whether a new method to solve the constraints of Einstein's equations, which does not involve elliptic equations, can be applied to provide initial data for black holes. We show that this method can be successfully applied to a nonlinear perturbation of a Schwarzschild black hole by establishing the well-posedness of the resulting constraint problem. We discuss its possible generalization to the boosted, spinning multiple black hole problem.

  6. Absorption cross section of RN black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sini R.; V. C. Kuriakose

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a charged scalar field in the RN black hole space time is studied using WKB approximation. In the present work it is assumed that matter waves can get reflected from the event horizon. Using this effect, the Hawking temperature and the absorption cross section for RN black hole placed in a charged scalar field are calculated. The absorption cross section $\\sigma _{abs}$ is found to be inversely proportional to square of the Hawking temperature of the black hole.

  7. Black holes with massive graviton hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Brito; Vitor Cardoso; Paolo Pani

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    No-hair theorems exclude the existence of nontrivial scalar and massive vector hair outside four-dimensional, static, asymptotically flat black-hole spacetimes. We show, by explicitly building nonlinear solutions, that black holes can support massive graviton hair in theories of massive gravity. These hairy solutions are, most likely, the generic end state of the recently discovered monopole instability of Schwarzschild black holes in massive graviton theories.

  8. A photoelastic study of rectangular beams in bending with a hole on the vertical center line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, James Fletcher

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To plot the stress concentration factors in the tested beams so that they may be used in design work. 4. To compare the results of this study with those obtained by Cox (1)~, Morgan (2), and Lindsay (3) . * Numbers in parentheses refer to references... that the maximum stresses occurred at one of four points on each of the beams tested. The four points of stress concentration were at the top or bottom of the beam and of the hole. In a rectangular beam in bending, without a hole on the vertical center line...

  9. Role of microbial iron reduction in the dissolution of iron hydroxysulfate minerals - article no. G01012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.J.P.; Nadeau, T.L.; Voytek, M.A.; Landa, E.R. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction of structural sulfate in the iron-hydroxysulfate mineral jarosite by sulfate-reducing bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The primary objective of this work was to evaluate the potential for anaerobic dissolution of the iron-hydroxysulfate minerals jarosite and schwertmannite at neutral pH by iron-reducing bacteria. Mineral dissolution was tested using a long-term cultivar, Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15, and a fresh isolate Geobacter sp. strain ENN1, previously undescribed. ENN1 was isolated from the discharge site of Shadle Mine, in the southern anthracite coalfield of Pennsylvania, where schwertmannite was the predominant iron-hydroxysulfate mineral. When jarosite from Elizabeth Mine (Vermont) was provided as the sole terminal electron acceptor, resting cells of both G. metallireducens and ENN1 were able to reduce structural Fe(III), releasing Fe{sup +2}, SO{sub 4}{sup -2}, and K{sup +} ions. A lithified jarosite sample from Utah was more resistant to microbial attack, but slow release of Fe{sup +2} was observed. Neither bacterium released Fe{sup +2} from poorly crystalline synthetic schwertmannite. Our results indicate that exposure of jarosite to iron-reducing conditions at neutral pH is likely to promote the mobility of hazardous constituents and should therefore be considered in evaluating waste disposal and/or reclamation options involving jarosite-bearing materials.

  10. Thermoelectric DC conductivities from black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic expression for the DC electrical conductivity in terms of black hole horizon data was recently obtained for a class of holographic black holes exhibiting momentum dissipation. We generalise this result to obtain analogous expressions for the DC thermoelectric and thermal conductivities. We illustrate our results using some holographic Q-lattice black holes as well as for some black holes with linear massless axions, in both $D=4$ and $D=5$ bulk spacetime dimensions, which include both spatially isotropic and anisotropic examples. We show that some recently constructed ground states of holographic Q-lattices, which can be either electrically insulating or metallic, are all thermal insulators.

  11. Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  12. Lower Dimensional Black Holes: Inside and Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    I survey the physics of black holes in two and three spacetime dimensions, with special attention given to an understanding of their exterior and interior properties.

  13. Approximate initial data for binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth A. Dennison; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Harald P. Pfeiffer

    2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct approximate analytical solutions to the constraint equations of general relativity for binary black holes of arbitrary mass ratio in quasicircular orbit. We adopt the puncture method to solve the constraint equations in the transverse-traceless decomposition and consider perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes caused by boosts and the presence of a binary companion. A superposition of these two perturbations then yields approximate, but fully analytic binary black hole initial data that are accurate to first order in the inverse of the binary separation and the square of the black holes' momenta.

  14. A new spin on black hole hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that scalar hair can be added to rotating, vacuum black holes of general relativity. These hairy black holes (HBHs) clarify a lingering question concerning gravitational solitons: if a black hole can be added at the centre of a boson star, as it typically can for other solitons. We argue that it can, but only if it is spinning. The existence of such HBHs is related to the Kerr superradiant instability triggered by a massive scalar field. This connection leads to the following conjecture: a (hairless) black hole which is afflicted by the superradiant instability of a given field must allow hairy generalizations with that field.

  15. Nevada Division of Minerals | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind Power ProjectNeutron LogWildlifeMinerals

  16. Mineral Springs of Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanao GEPP Jump to:WestReport: Mineral

  17. Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jan D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wang, Xuming (Salt Lake City, UT); Li, Minhua (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

  18. Rotating embedded black holes: Entropy and Hawking's radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng Ibohal

    2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we derive a class of rotating embedded black holes. Then we study Hawking's radiation effects on these embedded black holes. The surface gravity, entropy and angular velocity are given for each of these black holes.

  19. Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE MINERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT interest. It arises in the provision of water for Queensland coal mines, where additional water is available via a pipeline from a public supply, and also in cases where recycled or more expensive water

  20. Black Holes at the LHC: Progress since 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Seong Chan [FRDP, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the recent noticeable progresses in black hole physics focusing on the up-coming super-collider, the LHC. We discuss the classical formation of black holes by particle collision, the greybody factors for higher dimensional rotating black holes, the deep implications of black hole physics to the 'energy-distance' relation, the security issues of the LHC associated with black hole formation and the newly developed Monte-Carlo generators for black hole events.

  1. Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

  2. Australasian Code for Reporting of Exploration Results, Mineral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (JORC) Published The Joint Ore Reserves Committee of The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Australian Institute of Geoscientists, and Minerals Council of...

  3. Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  4. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Inventory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Inventory Protocols Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) Borates and Soda Ash Sections Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol (PDF 75 KB) Download...

  5. Understanding Mineral Transport in Switchgrass | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    minerals influence the platform (e.g., pyrolysis, thermochemistry) used to produce biofuels from plant feedstocks. For example, high levels of silicon in ash decrease conversion...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Corp - Bonnie Mill Plant - FL 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemicals Corp., Bonnie Mill Plant (FL.03) Eliminated from consideration under...

  7. archaeology mineral exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Archaeology Press emphasizes primary research data and its 172 Oil and Gas Exploration Geosciences Websites Summary: Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal...

  8. Earth's most abundant mineral finally has a name | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clarified the definition of Bridgmanite, a high-density form of magnesium iron silicate and the Earth's most abundant mineral - using Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced...

  9. SpectraMiner, an Interactive Data Mining and Visualization Software...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we call SpectraMiner that makes it possible to handle hundreds of clusters without loss of information and thus overcome the limits set by traditional statistical data...

  10. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Oxygen...

  11. atomic minerals exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    method for delineating covered mineralization. Plants are capable of accumulating rare earth elements (REEs) in their tissue, and (more) Bluemel, Britt 2014-01-01 35...

  12. arable mineral soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    year (tyr) of magnesium ferrosilicon, and 8,500 tyr of ferrosilicon (Globe Specialty Metals, inc 320 Placement of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Using Two Different Techniques....

  13. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin. Abstract: Biomineralization proteins, present during the...

  14. A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to solid-aqueous phase reactions. Citation: Freedman VL, P Saripalli, DH Bacon, and PD Meyer.2004."A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions in Unsaturated...

  15. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular diffusion. The magnitude of the reaction rate is important, since it is found that scaling effects (and thus rate discrepancies) are negligible at the single pore and fracture scale for plagioclase and iron hydroxide because of the slow rate at which they dissolve. In the case of calcite, where dissolution rates are rapid, scaling effects can develop at high flow rates from 0.1 cm/s to 1000 cm/s and for fracture lengths less than 1 cm. At more normal flow rates, however, mixing via molecular diffusion is effective in homogenizing the concentration field, thus eliminating any discrepancies between the Poiseuille Flow and the Well-Mixed Reactor model. This suggests that a scale dependence to mineral dissolution rates is unlikely at the single pore or fracture scale under normal geological/hydrologic conditions, implying that the discrepancy between laboratory and field rates must be attributed to other factors.

  16. Gravitating discs around black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas; J. -M. Hure; O. Semerak

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid discs and tori around black holes are discussed within different approaches and with the emphasis on the role of disc gravity. First reviewed are the prospects of investigating the gravitational field of a black hole--disc system by analytical solutions of stationary, axially symmetric Einstein's equations. Then, more detailed considerations are focused to middle and outer parts of extended disc-like configurations where relativistic effects are small and the Newtonian description is adequate. Within general relativity, only a static case has been analysed in detail. Results are often very inspiring, however, simplifying assumptions must be imposed: ad hoc profiles of the disc density are commonly assumed and the effects of frame-dragging and completely lacking. Astrophysical discs (e.g. accretion discs in active galactic nuclei) typically extend far beyond the relativistic domain and are fairly diluted. However, self-gravity is still essential for their structure and evolution, as well as for their radiation emission and the impact on the environment around. For example, a nuclear star cluster in a galactic centre may bear various imprints of mutual star--disc interactions, which can be recognised in observational properties, such as the relation between the central mass and stellar velocity dispersion.

  17. The effect of unidentified factor supplements and trace minerals on the reproductive performance of turkeys and chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiteside, Charles Hugh

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Unidentified Factor ". euces and Trace Minerals nn Egg Froonction 5 n ~ Hens During 20 Week Test ~ e o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ 3g Table 3 Effect of Unidentified Factor Bonrces ?nd Trace Minerals on Weight of Eggs Lau ~inc Hens ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ e e ~ a 36... of foxnwxtation res14ua to the diet (group 4) vas 15. N carer th? basal group (Table 2), %hi the fexnantation residue vas fed in cmhLnation with condensed fiab solubles or Wth condensed fiab solubles and dried bracer's yeasty the hatchabilitg was increased...

  18. Topological Black Holes in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kowalski-Glikman; D. Nowak-Szczepaniak

    2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the black hole solutions with horizons of non-trivial topology and investigate their properties in the framework of an approach to quantum gravity being an extension of Bohm's formulation of quantum mechanics. The solutions we found tend asymptotically (for large $r$) to topological black holes. We also analyze the thermodynamics of these space-times.

  19. Primordial black holes and asteroid danger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Shatskiy

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Probability for a primordial black hole to invade the Kuiper belt was calculated. We showed that primordial black holes of certain masses can significantly change asteroids' orbits. These events may result in disasters, local for our solar system and global for the Earth (like the Tunguska meteorite). We also estimated how often such events occur.

  20. Dynamics of Primordial Black Hole Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; K. Jedamzik

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical investigation of the gravitational collapse of horizon-size density fluctuations to primordial black holes (PBHs) during the radiation-dominated phase of the Early Universe. The collapse dynamics of three different families of initial perturbation shapes, imposed at the time of horizon crossing, is computed. The perturbation threshold for black hole formation, needed for estimations of the cosmological PBH mass function, is found to be $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.7$ rather than the generally employed $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 1/3$, if $\\delta$ is defined as $\\Delta M/\\mh$, the relative excess mass within the initial horizon volume. In order to study the accretion onto the newly formed black holes, we use a numerical scheme that allows us to follow the evolution for long times after formation of the event horizon. In general, small black holes (compared to the horizon mass at the onset of the collapse) give rise to a fluid bounce that effectively shuts off accretion onto the black hole, while large ones do not. In both cases, the growth of the black hole mass owing to accretion is insignificant. Furthermore, the scaling of black hole mass with distance from the formation threshold, known to occur in near-critical gravitational collapse, is demonstrated to apply to primordial black hole formation.

  1. Black holes cannot support conformal scalar hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Zannias

    1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the only static asymptotically flat non-extrema black hole solution of the Einstein-conformally invariant scalar field equations having the scalar field bounded on the horizon, is the Schwarzschild one. Thus black holes cannot be endowed with conformal scalar hair of finite length.

  2. Strings, black holes, and quantum information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We find multiple relations between extremal black holes in string theory and 2- and 3-qubit systems in quantum information theory. We show that the entropy of the axion-dilaton extremal black hole is related to the concurrence of a 2-qubit state, whereas the entropy of the STU black holes, Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) as well as non-BPS, is related to the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state. We relate the 3-qubit states with the string theory states with some number of D-branes. We identify a set of large black holes with the maximally entangled Greenberger, Horne, Zeilinger (GHZ) class of states and small black holes with separable, bipartite, and W states. We sort out the relation between 3-qubit states, twistors, octonions, and black holes. We give a simple expression for the entropy and the area of stretched horizon of small black holes in terms of a norm and 2-tangles of a 3-qubit system. Finally, we show that the most general expression for the black hole and black ring entropy in N=8 supergravity/M theory, which is given by the famous quartic Cartan E{sub 7(7)} invariant, can be reduced to Cayley's hyperdeterminant describing the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state.

  3. Quantum Entropy of Charged Rotating Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a method for obtaining the one-loop quantum corrections to the tree-level entropy for a charged Kerr black hole. Divergences which appear can be removed by renormalization of couplings in the tree-level gravitational action in a manner similar to that for a static black hole.

  4. Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking Materials for Blue Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking...

  5. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues....

  6. T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site...

  7. Can Superconducting Cosmic Strings Piercing Seed Black Holes Generate Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Matthew J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a large number of supermassive black holes at redshifts $z> 6$, when the Universe was only nine hundred million years old, has raised the fundamental question of how such massive compact objects could form in a (cosmologically) short time interval. Each of the proposed standard scenarios for black hole formation, involving rapid accretion of seed black holes, or black hole mergers, faces severe theoretical difficulties in explaining the short time formation of supermassive objects. In the present Letter, we propose an alternative scenario for the formation of supermassive black holes in the early Universe in which energy transfer from superconducting cosmic strings, piercing small seed black holes, is the main physical process leading to rapid mass increase. The increase in mass of a primordial seed black hole pierced by two antipodal strings is estimated and it is shown that this increases linearly in time. Due to the high energy transfer rate from the cosmic strings, we find that supermassi...

  8. Black hole and holographic dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the connection between black hole and holographic dark energy. We examine the issue of the equation of state (EOS) for holographic energy density as a candidate for the dark energy carefully. This is closely related to the EOS for black hole, because the holographic dark energy comes from the black hole energy density. In order to derive the EOS of a black hole, we may use its dual (quantum) systems. Finally, a regular black hole without the singularity is introduced to describe an accelerating universe inside the cosmological horizon. Inspired by this, we show that the holographic energy density with the cosmological horizon as the IR cutoff leads to the dark energy-dominated universe with $\\omega_{\\rm \\Lambda}=-1$.

  9. Quantum Black Hole Model and Hawking's Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Berezin

    1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The black hole model with a self-gravitating charged spherical symmetric dust thin shell as a source is considered. The Schroedinger-type equation for such a model is derived. This equation appeared to be a finite differences equation. A theory of such an equation is developed and general solution is found and investigated in details. The discrete spectrum of the bound state energy levels is obtained. All the eigenvalues appeared to be infinitely degenerate. The ground state wave functions are evaluated explicitly. The quantum black hole states are selected and investigated. It is shown that the obtained black hole mass spectrum is compatible with the existence of Hawking's radiation in the limit of low temperatures both for large and nearly extreme Reissner-Nordstrom black holes. The above mentioned infinite degeneracy of the mass (energy) eigenvalues may appeared helpful in resolving the well known information paradox in the black hole physics.

  10. Black Hole Thermodynamics Based on Unitary Evolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yu-Lei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we try to construct black hole thermodynamics based on the fact that, the formation and evaporation of a black hole can be described by quantum unitary evolutions. First, we show that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy $S_{BH}$ cannot be a Boltzmann or thermal entropy. To confirm this statement, we show that the original black hole's "first law" cannot be treated as the first law of thermodynamics formally, due to some missing metric perturbations caused by matter. Then, by including those (quantum) metric perturbations, we show that the black hole formation and evaporation can be described in a unitary manner effectively, through a quantum channel between the exterior and interior of the event horizon. In this way, the paradoxes of information loss and firewall can be resolved effectively. Finally, we show that black hole thermodynamics can be constructed in an ordinary way, by constructing statistical mechanics.

  11. Fourier Analysis of the BTZ Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian M. Tolfree

    2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we extend our previous work regarding the role of the Fourier transformation in bulk to boundary mappings to include the BTZ black hole. We follow standard procedures for modifying Fourier Transformations to accommodate quotient spaces and arrive at a bulk to boundary mapping in a black hole background. We show that this mapping is consistent with known results and lends a new insight into the AdS/CFT duality. We find that the micro-states corresponding to the entropy of a bulk scalar field are the Fourier coefficients on the boundary, which transform under the principal series representation of $SL(2,R)$. Building upon this we present a toy model to analyze the implications of this for the origin of black hole entropy. We find that the black hole micro-states live on the boundary and correspond to the possible emission modes of the black hole

  12. An electromagnetic black hole made of metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Qiang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, a black hole is a region of space with huge gravitational field in the means of general relativity, which absorbs everything hitting it including the light. In general relativity, the presence of matter-energy densities results in the motion of matter propagating in a curved spacetime1, which is similar to the electromagnetic-wave propagation in a curved space and in an inhomogeneous metamaterial2. Hence one can simulate the black hole using electromagnetic fields and metamaterials. In a recent theoretical work, an optical black hole has been proposed based on metamaterials, in which the numerical simulations showed a highly efficient light absorption3. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of electromagnetic black hole in the microwave frequencies. The proposed black hole is composed of non-resonant and resonant metamaterial structures, which can absorb electromagnetic waves efficiently coming from all directions due to the local control of electromagnetic fields. Hence the elect...

  13. Fermionic greybody factors in dilaton black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahed Abedi; Hessamaddin Arfaei

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the question of emission of fermions in the process of dilaton black hole evolution and its characters for different dilaton coupling constants $\\alpha$ is studied. The main quantity of interest, the greybody factors are calculated both numerically and in analytical approximation. The dependence of rates of evaporation and behaviour on the dilaton coupling constant is analyzed. Having calculated the greybody factors we are able to address the question of the final fate of the dilaton black hole. For that we also need to make dynamical treatment of the solution by considering the backreaction which will show a crucial effect on the final result. We find a transition line in $(Q/M, \\alpha)$ plane that separates the two regimes for the fate of the black hole, decay regime and extremal regime. In the decay regime the black hole completely evaporates, while in the extremal regime the black hole approaches the extremal limit by radiation and becomes stable.

  14. Mass and Angular Momentum of Black Holes: An Overlooked Effect of General Relativity Applied to the Galactic Center Black Hole Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    I report the discovery of a new effect of General Relativity which is important to understand very rapidly rotating (Kerr) black holes. The orbital velocity of a test particle is no longer a monotonic function of the orbit radius when the spin of the black hole is >0.9953, but displays a local minimum-maximum structure for radii smaller than 1.8 gravitational radii. There the rate of change of the orbital velocity per radius unit equals the radial epicyclic frequency and is exactly one third of the polar epicyclic frequency, suggesting a 3:1 resonant oscillatory motion of the particle. If associated with the observed quasi-periods - including the most recent 2005/2006 data - the mass of the supermassive black hole Sgr A* in the centre of the our Galaxy is determined to 3.3 million solar masses and the spin is 0.99616.

  15. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This topical report covers Phase 2b, which is the construction phase of pilot demonstration subsystems that make up the integrated plant. The subsystems included are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant is now capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The topical report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. At the end of Phase 2b, the CCMP pilot demonstration is fully ready for testing.

  16. Radionuclide Partitioning in an Underground Nuclear Test Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, T P; Hu, Q; Zhao, P; Conrado, C L; Dickerson, R; Eaton, G F; Kersting, A B; Moran, J E; Nimz, G; Powell, B A; Ramon, E C; Ryerson, F J; Williams, R W; Wooddy, P T; Zavarin, M

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, a borehole was drilled into the 1983 Chancellor underground nuclear test cavity to investigate the distribution of radionuclides within the cavity. Sidewall core samples were collected from a range of depths within the re-entry hole and two sidetrack holes. Upon completion of drilling, casing was installed and a submersible pump was used to collect groundwater samples. Test debris and groundwater samples were analyzed for a variety of radionuclides including the fission products {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 155}Eu, the activation products {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu, and the actinides U, Pu, and Am. In addition, the physical and bulk chemical properties of the test debris were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Microprobe measurements. Analytical results were used to evaluate the partitioning of radionuclides between the melt glass, rubble, and groundwater phases in the Chancellor test cavity. Three comparative approaches were used to calculate partitioning values, though each method could not be applied to every nuclide. These approaches are based on: (1) the average Area 19 inventory from Bowen et al. (2001); (2) melt glass, rubble, and groundwater mass estimates from Zhao et al. (2008); and (3) fission product mass yield data from England and Rider (1994). The U and Pu analyses of the test debris are classified and partitioning estimates for these elements were calculated directly from the classified Miller et al. (2002) inventory for the Chancellor test. The partitioning results from this study were compared to partitioning data that were previously published by the IAEA (1998). Predictions of radionuclide distributions from the two studies are in agreement for a majority of the nuclides under consideration. Substantial differences were noted in the partitioning values for {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}I, and uranium. These differences are attributable to two factors: chemical volatility effects that occur during the initial plasma condensation, and groundwater remobilization that occurs over a much longer time frame. Fission product partitioning is very sensitive to the early cooling history of the test cavity because the decay of short-lived (t{sub 1/2} < 1 hour) fission-chain precursors occurs on the same time scale as melt glass condensation. Fission product chains that include both volatile and refractory elements, like the mass 99, 125, and 129 chains, can show large variations in partitioning behavior depending on the cooling history of the cavity. Uranium exhibits similar behavior, though the chemical processes are poorly understood. The water temperature within the Chancellor cavity remains elevated (75 C) more than two decades after the test. Under hydrothermal conditions, high solubility chemical species such as {sup 125}Sb and {sup 129}I are readily dissolved and transported in solution. SEM analyses of melt glass samples show clear evidence of glass dissolution and secondary hydrothermal mineral deposition. Remobilization of {sup 99}Tc is also expected during hydrothermal activity, but moderately reducing conditions within the Chancellor cavity appear to limit the transport of {sup 99}Tc. It is recommended that the results from this study should be used together with the IAEA data to update the range in partitioning values for contaminant transport models at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site).

  17. Dual-axis hole-drilling ESPI residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinzig, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schajer, Gary [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel dual-axis ESPI hole-drilling residual stress measurement method is presented. The method enables the evaluation of all the in-plane normal stress components with similar response to measurement errors, significantly lower than with single-axis measurements. A numerical method is described that takes advantage of, and compactly handles, the additional optical data that are available from the second measurement axis. Experimental tests were conducted on a calibrated specimen to demonstrate the proposed method, and the results supported theoretical expectations.

  18. Equilibrium temperature anisotropy and black-hole analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel K. L. Oi; Jonathan Oppenheim

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When long-range interactions are present the usual definition of temperature implies that two systems in thermal equilibrium can be at different temperatures. This local temperature has physical significance, if the sub-systems cease to interact, each system will be at their different local temperatures. This is formally related to redshifting of temperature in general relativity. We propose experiments to test this effect which are feasible using current microfabrication techniques. It is also possible to display thermodynamical analogues to black-hole space-time.

  19. Repairs for damaged bolt holes in continuous fiber reinforced plastics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copps, Kevin Daniel

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS Model Definition Analysis Results Comparing Lay-ups Pin-conditions vs. clamping pressure Stress interactions Repair material CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA 21 22 23 24 25 25 25 26 27 27 28 29 30 30 31 33 33 34 34... under pin conditions . 35 16 A modification was made to the test fixture to relieve the high cyclic stresses on the bolt 37 vu 17 When clamping pressure is applied, a normally drilled, unrepaired, fastener hole is stronger and tends to fail in net...

  20. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's penumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  1. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's pneumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  2. Trichloroethylene Mineralization in a Fixed-Film Bioreactor Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Trichloroethylene Mineralization in a Fixed-Film Bioreactor Using a Pure Culture Expressing: An aerobic, single-pass, fixed-film bioreactor become an important compound for hazardous waste was designed). Although M. trichosporium OB3b has the highestindicator of TCE mineralization, the bioreactor with acti

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE FGF and ERK signaling coordinately regulate mineralization-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE FGF and ERK signaling coordinately regulate mineralization- related genes and play for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer 2011 Abstract To examine the roles of FGF and ERK MAPK signaling in an ERK MAPK-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that FGF2 upregulates Ank, Enpp1, Mgp, Slc

  4. Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    #12;i Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza 60 ECTS thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of a Magister Scientiarum #12;iv Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells 60 ECTS thesis

  5. Nanoparticulate bioavailable iron minerals in icebergs and glaciers R. RAISWELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    Nanoparticulate bioavailable iron minerals in icebergs and glaciers R. RAISWELL 1 , L. G. BENNING 1+ Raiswell et al. (2006, 2008) used high- resolution microscopy, combined with chemical extraction methods an important mineral signature for the chemistry of the subglacial environment, and that they are significant

  6. 2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    subsidiary of Australian company Iluka Resources Ltd.). DuPont produced zircon from its heavy-mineral sands2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM. In 2010, the global economy began to recover, and consumption of zirconium ores and concentrates increased

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Comparison of manure compost and mineral fertilizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL PAPER Comparison of manure compost and mineral fertilizer for hybrid poplar plantation and methods Composted sheep manure (10 and 20 kg/tree) at planting was compared to N and P mineral Contrary to what we expected, compost treatments neither increased root development nor tree water status

  8. The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics forKinetic rate law for mineral dissolution and precipitationwhere n denotes kinetic mineral index, positive values of r

  9. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Reaction- Rates among Minerals and Aqueous-Solutions .1.as a result of secondary mineral precipitation and approachterm and Contemporary Mineral Weathering rates. Geochim.

  10. Gravitational waves versus black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevor W. Marshall

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that, in order for the gravitational field to be propagated as a wave, it is necessary for it to satisfy a further set of field equations, in addition to those of Einstein and Hilbert, and these equations mean there is a preferred coordinate frame, called the Global Inertial Frame, giving rise to a unique metric . The implication is that a true gravitational field is not compatible with Einstein's Principle of Equivalence, which is in contradiction with his other fundamental concept of locality. The additional field equations ensure that gravitational collapse does not go below the Schwarzschild radius, thereby excluding the possibility of singular solutions (black holes) of the Einstein-Hilbert equations. Such solutions would also violate Einstein's locality principle.

  11. Holes in the ghost condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krotov, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Moscow State University, Department of Physics, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya, 25, Moscow, 117259 (Russian Federation); Rebbi, C. [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rubakov, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, V. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik, Foeringer Ring 6, 80805, Munichn (Germany)

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recently proposed model of 'ghost condensation', spatially homogeneous states may mix, via tunneling, with inhomogeneous states which are somewhat similar to bubbles in the theory of false vacuum decay, the corresponding bubble nucleation rate being exponentially sensitive to the ultraviolet completion of the model. The conservation of energy and charge requires that the energy density is negative and the field is strongly unstable in a part of the nucleated bubble. Unlike in the theory of false vacuum decay, this region does not expand during subsequent real-time evolution. In the outer part, positive energy outgoing waves develop, which eventually form shocks. Behind the outgoing waves and away from the bubble center, the background settles down to its original value. The outcome of the entire process is thus a microscopic region of negative energy and strong field - 'hole in the ghost condensate' - plus a collection of outgoing waves (particles of the ghost condensate field) carrying away finite energy.

  12. Log of Changes to IMA Mineral List This log file was begun in June 2010 to keep track of changes to the IMA list of minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    1 Log of Changes to IMA Mineral List This log file was begun in June 2010 to keep track of changes to the IMA list of minerals at http://rruff.info/IMA. 2 August 2013: Eltyubyuite: New mineral descriptions of wadalite: a new mineral from the Northern Caucasus, Kabardino-Balkaria, Russia. European Journal

  13. Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Steve

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

  14. Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bauer, Steve

    this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

  15. Lab 2: Mineral Lab notes. Minerals are inorganic, solid, naturally occurring substances that have a characteristic chemical compositions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    a characteristic chemical compositions, distinctive physical properties, and crystalline structures. Chemical is silicon dioxide SiO2; the mineral galena is an ore of lead, and its chemical formula is PbS, a lead sulfide; and the mineral calcite, which is used as an antacid and in fertilizers, is calcium carbonate Ca

  16. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Tao; R. Honaker; B. K. Parekh

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral and coal processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a significant improvement of the service life.

  17. Bone Mineral Density, Bone Turnover, and Systemic Inflammation in Non-cirrhotics with Chronic Hepatitis C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, J; Shoback, DMA; Zipperstein, J; Lizaola, B; Tseng, S; Terrault, NA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mun˜oz-Torres M, et al. Bone mineral density, serum insulin-et al. Osteoporosis and bone mineral metabolism disorders in1069-9. 11. George J. Bone mineral density and disorders of

  18. Thermodynamics of Dyonic Lifshitz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Zingg

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes with asymptotic anisotropic scaling are conjectured to be gravity duals of condensed matter system close to quantum critical points with non-trivial dynamical exponent z at finite temperature. A holographic renormalization procedure is presented that allows thermodynamic potentials to be defined for objects with both electric and magnetic charge in such a way that standard thermodynamic relations hold. Black holes in asymptotic Lifshitz spacetimes can exhibit paramagnetic behavior at low temperature limit for certain values of the critical exponent z, whereas the behavior of AdS black holes is always diamagnetic.

  19. Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

  20. Black hole hair in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao Cao; Yi-Xin Chen; Jian-Long Li

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the property of matter in equilibrium with a static, spherically symmetric black hole in D-dimensional spacetime. It requires this kind of matter has an equation of state (\\omega\\equiv p_r/\\rho=-1/(1+2kn), k,n\\in \\mathbb{N}), which seems to be independent of D. However, when we associate this with specific models, some interesting limits on space could be found: (i)(D=2+2kn) while the black hole is surrounded by cosmic strings; (ii)the black hole can be surrounded by linear dilaton field only in 4-dimensional spacetime. In both cases, D=4 is special.

  1. Radion clouds around evaporating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Kaluza-Klein model, with a matter source associated with Hawking radiation from an evaporating black hole, is used to obtain a simple form for the radion effective potential. The environmental effect generally causes a matter-induced shift of the radion vacuum, resulting in the formation of a radion cloud around the hole. There is an albedo due to the radion cloud, with an energy dependent reflection coefficient that depends upon the size of the extra dimensions and the temperature of the hole.

  2. The effect of injection hole orientation on flat-plate film cooling and heat transfer using a transient liquid crystal technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapata, Dyrk Oliver

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 63 64 65 NOMENCLATURE Cv specific heat of test surface injection hole diameter convective heat transfer coefficient (W/m -K) convective heat transfer coefficient for no film injection momentum ratio, prUt2/p U 2 N Rea test surface... thermal conductivity length of injection hole blowing ratio, prUi/p U number of step changes Reynolds number, p U d/lt TOW time of color change adiabatic wall temperature Tm TU initial temperature film temperature mainstream temperature...

  3. Chemically Accelerated Carbon Mineralization: Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals as Novel Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: Columbia University is developing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants and turn it into a solid that can be easily and safely transported, stored above ground, or integrated into value-added products (e.g. paper filler, plastic filler, construction materials, etc.). In nature, the reaction of CO2 with various minerals over long periods of time will yield a solid carbonate—this process is known as carbon mineralization. The use of carbon mineralization as a CO2 capture and storage method is limited by the speeds at which these minerals can be dissolved and CO2 can be hydrated. To facilitate this, Columbia University is using a unique process and a combination of chemical catalysts which increase the mineral dissolution rate, and the enzymatic catalyst carbonic anhydrase which speeds up the hydration of CO2.

  4. Evaluation of CAVIJET cavitating jets for deep-hole rock cutting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, A.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Liu, H.L.; Frederick, G.S.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study has shown that the CAVIJET cavitating fluid jet method should be capable of successfully augmenting the cutting action of mechanical bits under deep-hole conditions. Increased rock cutting rates by existing cavitating jet nozzles can be anticipated with conventional rig pressures for hole depths of at least 1200 m (4000 ft) and possibly deeper. Improved rates of penetration, based on preliminary laboratory roller bit tests, should be achieved by simply substituting CAVIJET nozzles absorbing equivalent hydraulic power for conventional roller bit nozzles.

  5. Thermodynamics of Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole: thermal stability of Nariai black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole in five dimensions by introducing two temperatures based on the standard and Bousso-Hawking normalizations. We use the first-law of thermodynamics to derive thermodynamic quantities. The two temperatures indicate that the Nariai black hole is thermodynamically unstable. However, it seems that black hole thermodynamics favors the standard normalization, and does not favor the Bousso-Hawking normalization.

  6. Black hole evolution: I. Supernova-regulated black hole growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubois, Yohan; Silk, Joseph; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of a supermassive black hole (BH) is determined by how much gas the host galaxy is able to feed it, which in turn is controlled by the cosmic environment, through galaxy mergers and accretion of cosmic flows that time how galaxies obtain their gas, but also by internal processes in the galaxy, such as star formation and feedback from stars and the BH itself. In this paper, we study the growth of a 10^12 Msun halo at z=2, which is the progenitor of an archetypical group of galaxies at z=0, and of its central BH by means of a high-resolution zoomed cosmological simulation, the Seth simulation. We study the evolution of the BH driven by the accretion of cold gas in the galaxy, and explore the efficiency of the feedback from supernovae (SNe). For a relatively inefficient energy input from SNe, the BH grows at the Eddington rate from early times, and reaches self-regulation once it is massive enough. We find that at early cosmic times z>3.5, efficient feedback from SNe forbids the formation of a settled...

  7. au ag-polymetallic mineralization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  8. The production of consumption: addressing the impact of mineral mining on tuberculosis in southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Gonsalves, Gregg; Lurie, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Rights Alliance: The Mining Sector, Tuberculosis andthe impact of mineral mining on tuberculosis in southernbetween mineral mining activities and tuberculosis incidence

  9. Tucker Wireline Open Hole Wireline Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.

    2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tucker Wireline unit ran a suite of open hole logs right behind the RMOTC logging contractor for comparison purposes. The tools included Dual Laterolog, Phased Induction, BHC Sonic, and Density-Porosity.

  10. Towards Black Hole Entropy in Shape Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Herczeg; Vasudev Shyam

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape dynamics is classical theory of gravity which agrees with general relativity in many important cases, but possesses different gauge symmetries and constraints. Rather than spacetime diffeomorphism invariance, shape dynamics takes spatial diffeomorphism invariance and spatial Weyl invariance as the fundamental gauge symmetries associated with the gravitational field. Since the area of the event horizon of a black hole transforms under a generic spatial Weyl transformation, there has been some doubt that one can speak sensibly about the thermodynamics of black holes in shape dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to show that by treating the event horizon of a black hole as an interior boundary, one can recover familiar notions of black hole thermodynamics in shape dynamics and define a gauge invariant entropy that agrees with general relativity.

  11. Multipole moments of bumpy black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeland, Sarah Jane

    General relativity predicts the existence of black holes, compact objects whose spacetimes depend only on their mass, spin, and charge in vacuum (the “no-hair” theorem). As various observations probe deeper into the strong ...

  12. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Total round-trip power loss, coupling efficiency and themicron. Total round-trip power loss and coupling efficiencythe total fractional power loss per round trip, the hole

  13. Black Hole Thermodynamics in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas R. Mureika; John W. Moffat; Mir Faizal

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the thermodynamics of a non-rotating and rotating black hole in a modified theory of gravity that includes scalar and vector modifications to general relativity, which results in a modified gravitational constant $G = G_N(1+\\alpha)$ and a new gravitational charge $Q = \\sqrt{\\alpha G_N}M$. The influence of the parameter $\\alpha$ alters the non-rotating black hole's lifetime, temperature and entropy profiles from the standard Schwarzschild case. The thermodynamics of a rotating black hole is analyzed and it is shown to possess stable, cold remnants. The thermodynamic properties of a vacuum solution regular at $r=0$ are investigated and the solution without a horizon called a "gray hole" is not expected to possess an information loss problem.

  14. Energy of 4-Dimensional Black Hole, etc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy Palatnik

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter I suggest possible redefinition of mass density, not depending on speed of the mass element, which leads to a more simple stress-energy for an object. I calculate energy of black hole.

  15. Anosov maps with rectangular holes. Nonergodic cases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingenier'ia. Universidad de la Rep'ublica C.C. 30, Montevideo, Uruguay E­mail: roma@fing.edu.uy; Fax: (598 Partially supported by CONICYT (Uruguay). 1 #12; Running head: Anosov maps with rectangular holes Address

  16. Horizon Operator Approach to Black Hole Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. 't Hooft

    1994-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The $S$-matrix Ansatz for the construction of a quantum theory of black holes is further exploited. We first note that treating the metric tensor $g_{\\m\

  17. Topological Black Holes -- Outside Looking In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the general mathematical construction and physical picture of topological black holes, which are black holes whose event horizons are surfaces of non-trivial topology. The construction is carried out in an arbitrary number of dimensions, and includes all known special cases which have appeared before in the literature. I describe the basic features of massive charged topological black holes in $(3+1)$ dimensions, from both an exterior and interior point of view. To investigate their interiors, it is necessary to understand the radiative falloff behaviour of a given massless field at late times in the background of a topological black hole. I describe the results of a numerical investigation of such behaviour for a conformally coupled scalar field. Significant differences emerge between spherical and higher genus topologies.

  18. Spacetime constraints on accreting black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garofalo, David [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California 91109 (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spin dependence of accretion onto rotating Kerr black holes using analytic techniques. In its linear regime, angular momentum transport in MHD turbulent accretion flow involves the generation of radial magnetic field connecting plasma in a differentially rotating flow. We take a first principles approach, highlighting the constraint that limits the generation and amplification of radial magnetic fields, stemming from the transfer of energy from mechanical to magnetic form. Because the energy transferred in magnetic form is ultimately constrained by gravitational potential energy or Killing energy, the spin dependence of the latter allows us to derive spin-dependent constraints on the success of the accreting plasma to expel its angular momentum. We find an inverse relationship between this ability and black hole spin. If this radial magnetic field generation forms the basis for angular momentum transfer in accretion flows, accretion rates involving Kerr black holes are expected to be lower as the black hole spin increases in the prograde sense.

  19. Scattering map for two black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro P. S. de Moura; Patricio S. Letelier

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the motion of light in the gravitational field of two Schwarzschild black holes, making the approximation that they are far apart, so that the motion of light rays in the neighborhood of one black hole can be considered to be the result of the action of each black hole separately. Using this approximation, the dynamics is reduced to a 2-dimensional map, which we study both numerically and analytically. The map is found to be chaotic, with a fractal basin boundary separating the possible outcomes of the orbits (escape or falling into one of the black holes). In the limit of large separation distances, the basin boundary becomes a self-similar Cantor set, and we find that the box-counting dimension decays slowly with the separation distance, following a logarithmic decay law.

  20. Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, William E. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  1. Thermodynamics and evaporation of the noncommutative black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2007-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamics of the noncommutative black hole whose static picture is similar to that of the nonsingular black hole known as the de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. It turns out that the final remnant of extremal black hole is a thermodynamically stable object. We describe the evaporation process of this black hole by using the noncommutativity-corrected Vaidya metric. It is found that there exists a close relationship between thermodynamic approach and evaporation process.

  2. Spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikun Ding; Changqing Liu; Qian Guo

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators and, find that particle falling from infinity with zero velocity cannot collide with unbound energy when the noncommutative Kerr black hole is exactly extremal. Our results also show that the bigger of the spinning black hole's mass is, the higher of center of mass energy that the particles obtain. For small and medium noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole, the collision energy depends on the black holes' mass.

  3. Shaped-charge tests in support of the coal-gasification program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheloske, R.F.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LLNL concept for in-situ coal gasification requires forming horizontal holes in deep coal beds to connect vertical bore shafts. These lateral holes are required to provide a passage for the gases between the vertical shafts. Shaped charges are being considered for producing these horizontal bore holes. This report describes a test method for evaluating new shaped charge designs and presents the results for three designs.

  4. Durability Testing of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JANTZEN, CAROL M.; PAREIZS, JOHN M.; LORIER, TROY H.; MARRA, JAMES C.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes but especially aqueous high sodium wastes at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The FBSR technology converts organic compounds to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, converts nitrate/nitrite species to N{sub 2}, and produces a solid residue through reactions with superheated steam, the fluidizing media. If clay is added during processing a ''mineralized'' granular waste form can be produced. The mineral components of the waste form are primarily Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The cage and ring structured minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc{sup 99} and Cs{sup 137} and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals appear to stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Durability testing of the FBSR products was performed using ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The FBSR mineral products (bed and fines) evaluated in this study were found to be two orders of magnitude more durable than the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass requirement of 2 g/m{sup 2} release of Na{sup +}. The PCT responses for the FBSR samples tested were consistent with results from previous FBSR Hanford LAW product testing. Differences in the response can be explained by the minerals formed and their effects on PCT leachate chemistry.

  5. Comment on "Black holes constrain varying constants"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Flambaum

    2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper [DDL] claims that the increase of the proton electric charge e leads to a (forbidden) decrease of black hole entropy, therefore, possible evidence for variation of $\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ [alpha] must be interpreted as a decrease of the speed of light. We argue that purely theoretical consideration of black holes possibly cannot give any model-independent limitations on variation of fundamental constants.

  6. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinec, Emil J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  7. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emil J. Martinec

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  8. Local temperature for dynamical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward; R. Di Criscienzo; M. Nadalini; L. Vanzo; S. Zerbini

    2008-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A local Hawking temperature was recently derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method, and is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. Descriptions are given of the operational meaning of the temperature, in terms of what observers measure, and its relation to the usual Hawking temperature for static black holes. Implications for the final fate of an evaporating black hole are discussed.

  9. Notes on Black Hole Fluctuations and Backreaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu; Alpan Raval; Sukanya Sinha

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In these notes we prepare the ground for a systematic investigation into the issues of black hole fluctuations and backreaction by discussing the formulation of the problem, commenting on possible advantages and shortcomings of existing works, and introducing our own approach via a stochastic semiclassical theory of gravity based on the Einstein-Langevin equation and the fluctuation-dissipation relation for a self-consistent description of metric fluctuations and dissipative dynamics of the black hole with backreaction of its Hawking radiance.

  10. Are black holes a serious threat to scalar field dark matter models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Barranco; Argelia Bernal; Juan Carlos Degollado; Alberto Diez-Tejedor; Miguel Megevand; Miguel Alcubierre; Darío Núñez; Olivier Sarbach

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical scalar fields have been proposed as possible candidates for the dark matter component of the universe. Given the fact that super-massive black holes seem to exist at the center of most galaxies, in order to be a viable candidate for the dark matter halo a scalar field configuration should be stable in the presence of a central black hole, or at least be able to survive for cosmological time-scales. In the present work we consider a scalar field as a test field on a Schwarzschild background, and study under which conditions one can obtain long-lived configurations. We present a detailed study of the Klein-Gordon equation in the Schwarzschild spacetime, both from an analytical and numerical point of view, and show that indeed there exist quasi-stationary solutions that can remain surrounding a black hole for large time-scales.

  11. Analytical Tendex and Vortex Fields for Perturbative Black Hole Initial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth A. Dennison; Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Tendex and vortex fields, defined by the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl curvature tensor, form the basis of a recently developed approach to visualizing spacetime curvature. In particular, this method has been proposed as a tool for interpreting results from numerical binary black hole simulations, providing a deeper insight into the physical processes governing the merger of black holes and the emission of gravitational radiation. Here we apply this approach to approximate but analytical initial data for both single boosted and binary black holes. These perturbative data become exact in the limit of small boost or large binary separation. We hope that these calculations will provide additional insight into the properties of tendex and vortex fields, and will form a useful test for future numerical calculations.

  12. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  13. Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

  14. Report for Treating Hanford LAW and WTP SW Simulants: Pilot Plant Mineralizing Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arlin Olson

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for managing the disposal of radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Washington State. The Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant (WPT) will separate the waste into a small volume of high level waste (HLW), containing most of the radioactive constituents, and a larger volume of low activity waste (LAW), containing most of the non-radioactive chemical and hazardous constituents. The HLW and LAW will be converted into immobilized waste forms for disposal. Currently there is inadequate LAW vitrification capacity planned at the WTP to complete the mission within the required timeframe. Therefore additional LAW capacity is required. One candidate supplemental treatment technology is the fluidized bed steam reformer process (FBSR). This report describes the demonstration testing of the FBSR process using a mineralizing flowsheet for treating simulated Hanford LAW and secondary waste from the WTP (WTP SW). The FBSR testing project produced leach-resistant solid products and environmentally compliant gaseous effluents. The solid products incorporated normally soluble ions into an alkali alumino-silicate (NaS) mineral matrix. Gaseous emissions were found to be within regulatory limits. Cesium and rhenium were captured in the mineralized products with system removal efficiencies of 99.999% and 99.998 respectively. The durability and leach performance of the FBSR granular solid were superior to the low activity reference material (LMR) glass standards. Normalized product consistency test (PCT) release rates for constituents of concern were approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than that of sodium in the Hanford glass [standard].

  15. Old Maid Flat geothermal exploratory hole No. 7A drilling and completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling and testing efforts for a 6000-foot geothermal exploratory hole on the western approaches to Mount Hood, near Portland, Oregon were completed. The intent of the drilling was to encounter a hydrothermal reservoir in a postulated fracture system and confirm the existence of a moderate-temperature (200/sup 0/F) geothermal resource in the Old Main Flat (OMF) vicinity of Mount Hood. The exploratory hole, OMF No. 7A, was completed to a total depth of 6027 feet in 54 days using conventional rotary drilling techniques. The hole was found to be incapable of producing fluids with the desired temperatures. A maximum hole temperature of about 235/sup 0/F was recorded at total depth and a temperature gradient of about 3.3/sup 0/F/100 feet was exhibited over the lower 1000 feet of hole. A variety of technical data, including physical samples such as cores, cuttings, and borehole fluids, plus geophysical well logs were acquired. Data analyses are continuing, with results to be made available through future separate reports.

  16. aqueous mineral carbonation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of1 coal combustion fly-ash2 3 G. Montes that could possibly4 contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the in-situ mineral sequestration (long term5 geological...

  17. Select Minerals and Potable Use of Reclaimed Wastewaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, H.

    The long-observed relationships of an influence of drinking water mineral content on heart-circulatory deaths are developed to indicate that sodium -- when present in sufficiently high concentrations -- may be detrimental to human health...

  18. Immersion freezing of clay minerals and bacterial ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiranuma, Naruki

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals and biological aerosols has been investigated using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber. Both monodisperse and polydisperse ...

  19. LipidMiner: A Software for Automated Identification and Quantification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LipidMiner also only processes file formats generated from mass spectrometers from Thermo, i.e. the .RAW format. In the future, we are planning to accommodate file formats...

  20. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Information Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) 2011 Greenhouse Gas and Energy Survey Industry Summary for the period from 2000 to 2010 (PDF 16...

  1. and J. Selverstone, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 83, 348 (1982); (19)].

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Selverstone, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 83, 348 (1982); (19)]. 16. C. R. Vyhnal and C. P. Petrol. 132, 371 (1998); J. L. M. van Haren, J. J. Ague, D. M. Rye, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 3487

  2. A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The...

  3. Net receipts sharing and transfer of federal mineral responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCannon, S. (Colorado Dept. of Natural Resources, Denver, CO (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two interrelated issues - the policy of net receipt sharing and the [open quotes]Mineral Royalty Transfer Study[close quotes] that was submitted to Congress in June of this year by the Minerals Management Service of the Department of Interior are discussed. The 1993 Interior Appropriations Act, P.L. 102-381, which was signed by the president on October 5, 1992, includes a provision that, in addition to costing states $37.5 million has a few other problems: It may be illegal, it flies in the face of the Mineral Leasing Act, it sets a frightening precedent, it is bad public policy and it ignores the substantial contribution of states to federal mineral development. This provision is known as net receipt sharing. The advantages and disadvantages of this Act are discussed.

  4. The Revival of White Holes as Small Bangs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alon Retter; Shlomo Heller

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are extremely dense and compact objects from which light cannot escape. There is an overall consensus that black holes exist and many astronomical objects are identified with black holes. White holes were understood as the exact time reversal of black holes, therefore they should continuously throw away material. It is accepted, however, that a persistent ejection of mass leads to gravitational pressure, the formation of a black hole and thus to the "death of while holes". So far, no astronomical source has been successfully tagged a white hole. The only known white hole is the Big Bang which was instantaneous rather than continuous or long-lasting. We thus suggest that the emergence of a white hole, which we name a 'Small Bang', is spontaneous - all the matter is ejected at a single pulse. Unlike black holes, white holes cannot be continuously observed rather their effect can only be detected around the event itself. Gamma ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the universe. Long gamma-ray bursts were connected with supernova eruptions. There is a new group of gamma-ray bursts, which are relatively close to Earth, but surprisingly lack any supernova emission. We propose identifying these bursts with white holes. White holes seem like the best explanation of gamma-ray bursts that appear in voids. We also predict the detection of rare gigantic gamma-ray bursts with energies much higher than typically observed.

  5. Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Macune

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objective of the project, to deliver an integrated 3 1/8-inch diameter Measurement While Drilling (MWD) and Logging While Drilling (LWD) system for drilling small boreholes using coiled tubing drilling, has been achieved. Two prototype systems have been assembled and tested in the lab. One of the systems has been successfully tested downhole in a conventional rotary drilling environment. Development of the 3 1/8-inch system has also lead to development and commercialization of a slightly larger 3.5-inch diameter system. We are presently filling customer orders for the 3.5-inch system while continuing with commercialization of the 3 1/8-inch system. The equipment developed by this project will be offered for sale to multiple service providers around the world, enabling the more rapid expansion of both coiled tubing drilling and conventional small diameter drilling. The project was based on the reuse of existing technology whenever possible in order to minimize development costs, time, and risks. The project was begun initially by Ultima Labs, at the time a small company ({approx}12 employees) which had successfully developed a number of products for larger oil well service companies. In September, 2006, approximately 20 months after inception of the project, Ultima Labs was acquired by Sondex plc, a worldwide manufacturer of downhole instrumentation for cased hole and drilling applications. The acquisition provided access to proven technology for mud pulse telemetry, downhole directional and natural gamma ray measurements, and surface data acquisition and processing, as well as a global sales and support network. The acquisition accelerated commercialization through existing Sondex customers. Customer demand resulted in changes to the product specification to support hotter (150 C) and deeper drilling (20,000 psi pressure) than originally proposed. The Sondex acquisition resulted in some project delays as the resistivity collar was interfaced to a different MWD system and also as the mechanical design was revised for the new pressure requirements. However, the Sondex acquisition has resulted in a more robust system, secure funding for completion of the project, and more rapid commercialization.

  6. A NOVEL APPROACH TO MINERAL CARBONATION: ENHANCING CARBONATION WHILE AVOIDING MINERAL PRETREATMENT PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V.G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamadallah Bearat

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our first year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. Synergistic control of these parameters offers the potential for further improvements in carbonation reactivity. A new sonication exfoliation system incorporating a novel sealing system was developed to carry out the sonication studies. Our initial studies that incorporate controlled sonication have not yet lead to a significant improvement in the extent of carbonation observed. Year 2 studies will emphasize those approaches that offer the greatest potential to cost effectively enhance carbonation, as well as combined approaches that may further enhance carbonation. Mechanistic investigations indicate incongruent dissolution results in the observed silica-rich passivating layer formation. Observations of magnesite nanocrystals within the passivating layers that form indicate the layers can exhibit significant permeability to the key reactants present (e.g., Mg{sup 2+}, H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and HCO{sub 3} -). Atomistic modeling supports the observation of robust passivating layers that retain significant permeability to the key reaction species involved. Studies in Year 2 will emphasize the impact that controlled aqueous speciation and activity and slurry-flow dynamics have on the mechanisms that control carbonation reactivity and the potential they offer to substantially reduce olivine mineral sequestration process cost.

  7. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, William M. [Geological and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Chico, CA, 95929 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  8. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM By Joseph Gambogi Zirconium at crust; however, zircon is the primary naturally occurring mineral the Old Hickory deposit south of the mining and processing zircon (Mineral Sands Report, 1997b). of heavy-mineral sands for the titanium

  9. The mineral nature of asbestos Malcolm Ross a,*, Arthur M. Langer a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    The mineral nature of asbestos Malcolm Ross a,*, Arthur M. Langer a , Gordon L. Nord a , Robert P Received 13 September 2007 Available online 1 October 2007 Abstract Fibrous minerals are common in nature but asbestiform minerals are rare. The unique mineralogical characteristic common to all the asbestos minerals

  10. cAnt-Miner: An Ant Colony Classification Algorithm to Cope with Continuous Attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinke, Dietmar

    cAnt-Miner: An Ant Colony Classification Algorithm to Cope with Continuous Attributes Fernando E. B {febo2,A.A.Freitas,C.G.Johnson}@kent.ac.uk Abstract. This paper presents an extension to Ant-Miner, named cAnt- Miner (Ant-Miner coping with continuous attributes), which incorpo- rates an entropy

  11. GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 1. Minerals Key 1. What's a cation? Anion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 1. Minerals Key 1. What's a cation? Anion? A cation is a charged atom material. 5. What kinds of evidence tell us about the internal structure of minerals? How does the cleavage. Cleavage planes in minerals are planes of relatively weaker bonds that allow minerals to preferentially

  12. PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133 Rocks and Minerals I. OBJECTIVES One of the many ways to study Earth is by examining the rocks that make up its types of rocks and minerals; · determine the formation and the history of each rock and mineral; · infer

  13. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Minerals Form a Continuum Phase in Mature Cancellous Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH Minerals Form a Continuum Phase in Mature Cancellous Bone Po-Yu Chen · Damon the hierarchical structure of mineral in mature bone. A method to completely deproteinize bone without altering of mineral and protein constituents. SEM revealed that bone minerals are fused together and form a sheet

  14. Soil Interfaces in a Changing World International Symposium of Interactions of Soil Minerals with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Minerals with Organic Components and Microorganisms 3rd InterCongress of Commission 2.5 IUSS Soil chemical at Carbon/Mineral and Metal(loid)/Mineral Interfaces Donald L. Sparks, Chunmei Chen, Peter Leinweber, Matt to investigate biogeochemical processes at mineral/microbe interfaces that involve nutrients such as C, N, and P

  15. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON NICKEL SORPTION ON CLAY MINERAL AND OXIDE SURFACES. K. G. Scheckel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON NICKEL SORPTION ON CLAY MINERAL AND OXIDE SURFACES. K. G. Scheckel1- ues are within the range of mineral formation which sup- ports previous findings of nickel precipitation on these mineral and oxide surfaces. Conclusions: Sorption of nickel on the mineral phases results

  16. Running Head: Correlation of Microbial Communities with Caclium Carbonate1 (Travertine) Mineral Precipitation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    Precipitation2 3 4 Correlation of Microbial Communities with Calcium Carbonate (Travertine)5 Mineral of changing environmental conditions and associated calcium carbonate mineral18 precipitation along the spring and morphology of calcium carbonate mineral precipitation.3 Carbonate minerals are ideal for this type of study

  17. Holographic superconductor in the exact hairy black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Chanyong Park

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged black hole of hyperbolic horizon with scalar hair (charged Martinez-Troncoso-Zanelli: CMTZ black hole) as a model of analytic hairy black hole for holographic superconductor. For this purpose, we investigate the second order phase transition between CMTZ and hyperbolic Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-AdS (HRNAdS) black holes. However, this transition unlikely occur. As an analytic treatment for holographic superconductor, we develop superconductor in the bulk and superfluidity on the boundary using the CMTZ black hole below the critical temperature. The presence of charge destroys the condensates around the zero temperature, which is in accord with the thermodynamic analysis of the CMTZ black hole.

  18. The Environmental Impact of Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham Loeb

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The supermassive black holes observed at the centers of almost all present-day galaxies, had a profound impact on their environment. I highlight the principle of self-regulation, by which supermassive black holes grow until they release sufficient energy to unbind the gas that feeds them from their host galaxy. This principle explains several observed facts, including the correlation between the mass of a central black hole and the depth of the gravitational potential well of its host galaxy, and the abundance and clustering properties of bright quasars in the redshift interval of z~2-6. At lower redshifts, quasars might have limited the maximum mass of galaxies through the suppression of cooling flows in X-ray clusters. The seeds of supermassive black holes were likely planted in dwarf galaxies at redshifts z>10, through the collapse of massive or supermassive stars. The minimum seed mass can be identified observationally through the detection of gravitational waves from black hole binaries by Advanced LIGO or LISA. Aside from shaping their host galaxies, quasar outflows filled the intergalactic medium with magnetic fields and heavy elements. Beyond the reach of these outflows, the brightest quasars at z>6 have ionized exceedingly large volumes of gas (tens of comoving Mpc) prior to global reionization, and must have suppressed the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in these volumes before the same occurred through the rest of the universe.

  19. Perturbative String Thermodynamics near Black Hole Horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Mertens; Henri Verschelde; Valentin I. Zakharov

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work JHEP 1403 (2014) 086. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of $\\alpha'$-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large $k$ limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in $g_s$) to compute thermodynamical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  20. Investigating Dark Energy with Black Hole Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini-Houghton; Adam Kelleher

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The accelerated expansion of the universe is ascribed to the existence of dark energy. Black holes accretion of dark energy induces a mass change proportional to the energy density and pressure of the background dark energy fluid. The time scale during which the mass of black holes changes considerably is too long relative to the age of the universe, thus beyond detection possibilities. We propose to take advantage of the modified black hole masses for exploring the equation of state $w[z]$ of dark energy, by investigating the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries on a dark energy background. Deriving the signatures of dark energy accretion on the evolution of binaries, we find that dark energy imprints on the emitted gravitational radiation and on the changes in the orbital radius of the binary can be within detection limits for certain supermassive black hole binaries. In this talk I describe how binaries can provide a useful tool in obtaining complementary information on the nature of dark energy, based on the work done with A.Kelleher.

  1. Black Holes with Flavors of Quantum Hair?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali

    2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that black holes can posses a long-range quantum hair of super-massive tensor fields, which can be detected by Aharonov-Bohm tabletop interference experiments, in which a quantum-hairy black hole, or a remnant particle, passes through the loop of a magnetic solenoid. The long distance effect does not decouple for an arbitrarily high mass of the hair-providing field. Because Kaluza-Klein and String theories contain infinite number of massive tensor fields, we study black holes with quantum Kaluza-Klein hair. We show that in five dimensions such a black hole can be interpreted as a string of `combed' generalized magnetic monopoles, with their fluxes confined along it. For the compactification on a translation-invariant circle, this substructure uncovers hidden flux conservation and quantization of the monopole charges, which constrain the quantum hair of the resulting four-dimensional black hole. For the spin-2 quantum hair this result is somewhat unexpected, since the constituent `magnetic' charges have no `electric' counterparts. Nevertheless, the information about their quantization is encoded in singularity.

  2. Black Hole Chromosphere at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If the scale of quantum gravity is near a TeV, black holes will be copiously produced at the LHC. In this work we study the main properties of the light descendants of these black holes. We show that the emitted partons are closely spaced outside the horizon, and hence they do not fragment into hadrons in vacuum but more likely into a kind of quark-gluon plasma. Consequently, the thermal emission occurs far from the horizon, at a temperature characteristic of the QCD scale. We analyze the energy spectrum of the particles emerging from the "chromosphere", and find that the hard hadronic jets are almost entirely suppressed. They are replaced by an isotropic distribution of soft photons and hadrons, with hundreds of particles in the GeV range. This provides a new distinctive signature for black hole events at LHC.

  3. Hole interactions with molecular vibrations on DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Omerzu; M. Licer; T. Mertelj; V. V. Kabanov; D. Mihailovic

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the interactions between holes and molecular vibrations on dry DNA using photoinduced infrared absorption spectroscopy. Laser photoexcited (PE) holes are found to have a room-temperature lifetime in excess of 1 ms, clearly indicating the presence of localization. However, from a quantitative model analysis of the frequency shifts of vibrational modes caused by the PE holes, we find the holevibrational coupling constant to be relatively small, 0.2. This interaction leads to a change in the conformational energy of 0.015 eV, which is too small to cause selftrapping at room temperature. We conclude that, at least in the dry (A) form, DNA is best understood in terms of a double chain of coupled quantum dots arising from the pseudo-random chain sequence of base pairs, in which Anderson localization prevents the formation of a metallic state.

  4. Neutrino Majorana Mass from Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Uehara

    2002-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the neutrino Majorana mass in TeV-scale gravity models. The black hole violates all non-gauged symmetries and can become the origin of lepton number violating processes. The fluctuation of higher-dimensional spacetime can result in the production of a black hole, which emits 2 neutrinos. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, this process is equivalent to the free propagation of a neutrino with the insertion of the black hole. From this fact, we derive the neutrino Majorana mass. The result is completely consistent with the recently observed evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay. And the obtained neutrino Majorana mass satisfies the constraint from the density of the neutrino dark matter, which affects the cosmic structure formation. Furthermore, we can explain the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by the Z-burst scenario with it.

  5. Particle-hole symmetry parameters for nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Bentley

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two parameters, nu and zeta, motivated by particle-hole symmetry are introduced. These parameters are determined using the number of proton (or neutron) particles and holes counted from neighboring shell closures. The new parameters can be used to evaluate particle-hole and proton-neutron symmetries of adopted B(E2) values, which indicate that both symmetries are approximate for A>100. The combined symmetries motivate empirical fits of binding energies and the energy ratio E(4_1^+)/E(2_1^+). A global binding energy fit consisting of a traditional liquid droplet and one new shell term, comprised of a function of nu and zeta, reproduces the experimental binding energies of 2353 nuclei with an r.m.s. standard deviation of 1.55 MeV.

  6. Turbodrilling in the hot-hole environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, P.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, geothermal and other types of hot-hole drilling have presented what seemed to be insurmountable barriers to efficient and extended use of downhole drilling motors, particularly those containing elastomeric bearing or motor components. Typical temperatures of 350 to 700/sup 0/F (177 to 371/sup 0/C) damage the elastomers and create other operating problems, reducing the life of the motors and their ability to drill efficiently. Recent innovations in turbodrill design have opened heretofore unrealized potentials and have allowed, for the first time, extended downhole drilling time in hot-hole conditions. The unique feature of this turbodrill is the lack of any elastomers or other temperature-sensitive materials. Its capabilities are matched closely to the requirements of drilling in elevated-temperature environments. The bearing assembly can withstand conditions encountered in typical geothermal formations and provides the performance necessary to stay in the hole. The result is increased rate of penetration (ROP) and more economical drilling.

  7. Structure of the Spherical Black Hole Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bonanno; S. Droz; W. Israel; S. M. Morsink

    1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal structure of a charged spherical black hole is still a topic of debate. In a nonrotating but aspherical gravitational collapse to form a spherical charged black hole, the backscattered gravitational wave tails enter the black hole and are blueshifted at the Cauchy horizon. This has a catastrophic effect if combined with an outflux crossing the Cauchy horizon: a singularity develops at the Cauchy horizon and the effective mass inflates. Recently a numerical study of a massless scalar field in the \\RN background suggested that a spacelike singularity may form before the Cauchy horizon forms. We will show that there exists an approximate analytic solution of the scalar field equations which allows the mass inflation singularity at the Cauchy horizon to exist. In particular, we see no evidence that the Cauchy horizon is preceded by a spacelike singularity.

  8. Gravitational energy of rotating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Maluf; E. F. Martins; A. Kneip

    1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity the energy density of asymptotically flat gravitational fields can be naturaly defined as a scalar density restricted to a three-dimensional spacelike hypersurface $\\Sigma$. Integration over the whole $\\Sigma$ yields the standard ADM energy. After establishing the reference space with zero gravitational energy we obtain the expression of the localized energy for a Kerr black hole. The expression of the energy inside a surface of constant radius can be explicitly calculated in the limit of small $a$, the specific angular momentum. Such expression turns out to be exactly the same as the one obtained by means of the method preposed recently by Brown and York. We also calculate the energy contained within the outer horizon of the black hole for {\\it any} value of $a$. The result is practically indistinguishable from $E=2M_{ir}$, where $M_{ir}$ is the irreducible mass of the black hole.

  9. Capillary flow solderability test for printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Hernandez, C.L.; Sackinger, S.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new technique for evaluating capillary flow solderability on printed circuit boards. The test involves the flow of molten solder from a pad onto different-sized conductor lines. It simulates the spreading dynamics of either plated-through-hole (PTH) or surface mount technology (SMT) soldering. A standard procedure has been developed for the test. Preliminary experiments were conducted and the results demonstrate test feasibility. Test procedures and results are presented in this report.

  10. Permeability Change of Crystalline Silicate Mineral-Packed Bed Column by Highly Alkaline Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hideo Usui; Yuichi Niibori; Hitoshi Mimura [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza Aoba 6-6-01-2, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Osamu Tochiyama [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the construction of the geological disposal system, the use of the cementitious material may change the permeability of the natural barrier around the repository. Cementitious materials may alter the pH of ground water to highly alkaline. Also, the potential permeability change of the natural barrier is one of the notable factors for performance assessments of geological disposal systems. In the high pH region, the solubility of silica is very high compared to that in the natural pH (around 8). Therefore, highly alkaline groundwater would dissolve and alter a part of rock surface. Usui et al. (2005) reported that the change of mineral pore structure due to chemical reaction is the key factor to consider the change of the permeability [5-6]. Moreover, such a change of the pore structure was considered to be the result of the spatial heterogeneity of chemical composition. Since such spatial heterogeneity exists also in the sedimentary rocks consisting of crystalline minerals such as quartz and feldspar, we need to examine natural rock, in order to obtain more reliable understanding about the change of permeability induced by highly alkaline groundwater (plume). In this study, silica sand as crystalline mineral was packed in the column, and the effect of dissolution induced by the highly alkaline plume on the permeability-change was examined. The silica sand particles mainly consist of SiO{sub 2} and include Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeO, and K{sub 2}O. The volumetric flow rate and the pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of the column were measured, and the permeability was calculated. At the same time, the concentrations of elements in the fluid were measured by ICP-AES. The experimental result showed that permeability decreased gradually, although the silica sand was continuously dissolved in the column. The behavior of the permeability is considered to be the result from the rearrangement of the particles, or precipitation of secondary mineral. In the column test using the silica sand as packed mineral, the flow-path seems to be clogged by the rearrangement of the particles rather than the increase of the pore space between the particles. (authors)

  11. A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation apparatus with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated investigations to explore the potential that sonication may offer to enhance carbonation reactivity. During the second project year, we extended our investigations of the effects of sonication on the extent of carbonation as a function of the following parameters: particle size distribution, the mass of solid reactant, volume fraction of aqueous solution present, sonication power, time, temperature, and CO{sub 2} pressure. To date, none of the conditions investigated have significantly enhanced carbonation. Mechanistic investigations of the stirred ({approx}1,500 rpm) aqueous olivine carbonation process indicate the carbonation process involves both incongruent magnesium dissolution and silica precipitation, which results in robust silica-rich passivating layer formation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry observation of H within the passivating layer that forms during static carbonation suggests 2H{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ion exchange is associated with incongruent dissolution. Apparently, H{sub 2}O forms at or near the olivine/passivating-layer interface during the process and diffuses out through the passivating layers during the carbonation reaction. This is

  12. A Novel Approach To Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our second year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. As our second year progress is intimately related to our earlier work, the report is presented in that context to provide better overall understanding of the progress made. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (i) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (ii) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (iii) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. We have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. Synergistic control of the slurry-flow and aqueous chemistry parameters offers further potential to improve carbonation reactivity, which is being investigated during the no-cost extension period. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation system with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated(Abstract truncated).

  13. Vacuum polarization for lukewarm black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Winstanley; Phil M. Young

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the renormalized expectation value of the square of a quantum scalar field on a Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter black hole in which the temperatures of the event and cosmological horizons are equal (`lukewarm' black hole). Our numerical calculations for a thermal state at the same temperature as the two horizons indicate that this renormalized expectation value is regular on both the event and cosmological horizons. We are able to show analytically, using an approximation for the field modes near the horizons, that this is indeed the case.

  14. Vacuum polarization for lukewarm black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winstanley, Elizabeth; Young, Phil M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the renormalized expectation value of the square of a quantum scalar field on a Reissner-Nordstroem-de Sitter black hole in which the temperatures of the event and cosmological horizons are equal ('lukewarm' black hole). Our numerical calculations for a thermal state at the same temperature as the two horizons indicate that this renormalized expectation value is regular on both the event and cosmological horizons. We are able to show analytically, using an approximation for the field modes near the horizons, that this is indeed the case.

  15. Tachyon Perturbation on Two Dimensional Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aniket Basu

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the black hole geometry in the presence of tachyonic perturbations, and solve for the form of allowed tachyonic hair in the presence of back reaction, and for the form of the metric under the assumption that only the metric is perturbed but not the dilaton. We evaluate the Kretschmann scalar and argue that the horizon becomes singular in the presence of tachyons, implying that the black hole has turned into a naked singularity. A form of the allowed tachyon potential emerges as a requirement of self-consistency of our solution.

  16. Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

  17. Einstein-Yang-Mills-Lorentz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose A. R. Cembranos; Jorge Gigante Valcarcel

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Different black hole solutions of the coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills equations are well known from long time. They have attracted much attention from mathematicians and physicists from their discovery. In this work, we analyze black holes associated with the gauge Lorentz group. In particular, we study solutions which identify the gauge connection with the spin connection. This ansatz allows to find exact solutions to the complete system of equations. By using this procedure, we show the equivalence between the Yang-Mills-Lorentz model in curved space-time and a particular set of extended gravitational theories.

  18. Chaotic Information Processing by Extremal Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axenides, Minos; Nicolis, Stam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review an explicit regularization of the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence, that preserves all isometries of bulk and boundary degrees of freedom. This scheme is useful to characterize the space of the unitary evolution operators that describe the dynamics of the microstates of extremal black holes in four spacetime dimensions. Using techniques from algebraic number theory to evaluate the transition amplitudes, we remark that the regularization scheme expresses the fast quantum computation capability of black holes as well as its chaotic nature.

  19. Dynamics of galaxy cores and supermassive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work on the dynamical evolution of galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes is reviewed. Topics include galaxy structural properties; collisionless and collisional equilibria; loss-cone dynamics; and dynamics of binary and multiple supermassive black holes.

  20. Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electron–hole...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electron–hole pairs in CsI. Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electron–hole pairs in CsI. Abstract: A Monte Carlo...

  1. Topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Ronggen [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China) and Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao Liming [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ohta, Nobuyoshi [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We find topological (charged) black holes whose horizon has an arbitrary constant scalar curvature 2k in Horava-Lifshitz theory. Without loss of generality, one may take k=1, 0, and -1. The black hole solution is asymptotically anti-de Sitter with a nonstandard asymptotic behavior. Using the Hamiltonian approach, we define a finite mass associated with the solution. We discuss the thermodynamics of the topological black holes and find that the black hole entropy has a logarithmic term in addition to an area term. We find a duality in Hawking temperature between topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory and Einstein's general relativity: the temperature behaviors of black holes with k=1, 0, and -1 in Horava-Lifshitz theory are, respectively, dual to those of topological black holes with k=-1, 0, and 1 in Einstein's general relativity. The topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory are thermodynamically stable.

  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300...

  3. RMOTC - Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sale of Equipment and Materials DOE to Sell NPR-3 Testing Tomorrow's Technology Today RMOTC - Testing - From Lab to Industry, Moving Your Ideas Forward RMOTC provides a neutral,...

  4. A Note on Black Hole Temperature and Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose intuitive derivations of the Hawking temperature and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of a Schwarzschild black hole.

  5. Entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanwi Ghosh; Soumitra SenGupta

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using brick wall method the entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole is determined for both asymptotically flat and non-flat cases. The entropy turns out to be proportional to the horizon area of the black hole confirming the Beckenstien, Hawking area-entropy formula for black holes. The leading order logarithmic corrections to the entropy are also derived for such black holes.

  6. Can the fluctuations of a black hole be treated thermodynamically?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyantyn Ropotenko

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the temperature of a typical Schwarzschild black hole is very low, some doubts are raised about whether the fluctuations of the black hole can be treated thermodynamically. It is shown that this is not the case: the thermodynamic fluctuations of a black hole are considerably larger than the corresponding quantum fluctuations. Moreover the ratio of the mean square thermodynamic fluctuation to the corresponding quantum fluctuation can be interpreted as a number of the effective constituents of a black hole.

  7. Black holes in Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghodsi, Ahmad; Yekta, Davood Mahdavian [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 1436, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we find different types of black holes for the Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity. Our solutions include (un)charged warped (anti-)de Sitter black holes for four and six derivative expanded action. We also look at the black holes in unexpanded Born-Infeld action. In each case we calculate the entropy, angular momentum and mass of the black holes. We also find the central charges for the conformal field theory duals.

  8. Entropy and Area of Black Holes in Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple arguments related to the entropy of black holes strongly constrain the spectrum of the area operator for a Schwarzschild black hole in loop quantum gravity. In particular, this spectrum is fixed completely by the assumption that the black hole entropy is maximum. Within the approach discussed, one arrives in loop quantum gravity at a quantization rule with integer quantum numbers $n$ for the entropy and area of a black hole.

  9. Lung cancer mortality among U. S. uranium miners: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, A.S.; McMillan, A.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines lung cancer mortality among a cohort of white underground uranium miners in the Colorado plateau and is based on mortality follow-up through December 31, 1977. The analytic methods represent a miner's annual age-specific lung cancer mortality rate as the (unspecified) rate among nonsmoking men born at the same time and with no mining history, multiplied by the relative risk factor R. This factor depends on the miner's total exposures to radon daughters (in working level months (WLM) and to cigarettes (in packs), accumulated from start of exposure until 10 years before his current age. Among those examined, the relative risk function giving the highest likelihood of the data was R . (1 + 0.31 X 10(-/sup 2/) WLM)(1 + 0.51 X 10(-/sup 3/) packs). This multiplicative function specifies that ratios of mortality rates for miners versus nonminers with similar age and smoking characteristics do not depend on smoking status. By contrast, differences between miners' and nonminers' mortality rates are substantially higher for smokers than for nonsmokers. The data rejected (P . .01) several additive functions for R that specify relative risk as a sum of components due to radiation and to cigarette smoking. Cumulative exposures to both radiation and cigarettes gave better fits to the data than did average annual exposure rates. Age at start of underground mining had no effect on risk, after controlling for age at lung cancer death, year of birth, and cumulative radiation and smoking exposures.

  10. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  11. Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument JONATHAN BAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    1 Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument JONATHAN BAIN Department of Humanities and Social@duke.poly.edu word count: 5498 #12;2 word count: 5498 Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument ABSTRACT. Einstein. In particular, I suggest that a gauge-invariant interpretation of Einstein algebras that avoids the hole

  12. MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westervelt, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R. M. Westervelt, J. C.MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R. M. Westervelt, J. C.OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R M Westervelt, J C Culbertson

  13. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive $\\geq30\\Msun$, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos in the mass range $10^{6}-10^{10}\\Ms$. Such early black holes, at redshifts z$\\gtsim10$, could be the seed black holes for the many supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If they exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime signal for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation of black holes in the center of high redshift dark matter halos and explore implications of initial natal kick velocities conjectured by some formation models. The central concentration of early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they are born even with moderate kicks of tens of km/s. The modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the lower mass black holes as compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N--body simulations we quantify the role of natal kicks of black holes formed from massive metal free stars on their merger rates with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies. Our results also apply to black holes ejected by the gravitational slingshot mechanism.

  14. On Space-Time Singularities, Holes, and Extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    On Space-Time Singularities, Holes, and Extensions John Byron Manchak*y Here, we clarify the relationship among three space-time conditions of interest: geodesic completeness, hole. In what follows, we consider three space-time conditions of interest: geodesic completeness, hole

  15. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  16. Limits on New Physics from Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford Cheung; Stefan Leichenauer

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes emit high energy particles which induce a finite density potential for any scalar field $\\phi$ coupling to the emitted quanta. Due to energetic considerations, $\\phi$ evolves locally to minimize the effective masses of the outgoing states. In theories where $\\phi$ resides at a metastable minimum, this effect can drive $\\phi$ over its potential barrier and classically catalyze the decay of the vacuum. Because this is not a tunneling process, the decay rate is not exponentially suppressed and a single black hole in our past light cone may be sufficient to activate the decay. Moreover, decaying black holes radiate at ever higher temperatures, so they eventually probe the full spectrum of particles coupling to $\\phi$. We present a detailed analysis of vacuum decay catalyzed by a single particle, as well as by a black hole. The former is possible provided large couplings or a weak potential barrier. In contrast, the latter occurs much more easily and places new stringent limits on theories with hierarchical spectra. Finally, we comment on how these constraints apply to the standard model and its extensions, e.g. metastable supersymmetry breaking.

  17. Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngangbam Ishwarchandra; Ng. Ibohal; K. Yugindro Singh

    2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present an exact solution of Einstein's field equations describing the Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background. It is also regarded as an embedded solution that the Schwarzschild black hole is embedded into the dark energy space producing Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole. It is found that the space-time geometry of Schwarzschild-dark energy solution is non-vacuum Petrov type $D$ in the classification of space-times. We study the energy conditions (like weak, strong and dominant conditions) for the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution. We also find that the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution violates the strong energy condition due to the negative pressure leading to a repulsive gravitational force of the matter field in the space-time. It is shown that the time-like vector field for an observer in the Schwarzschild-dark energy space is expanding, accelerating, shearing and non-rotating. We investigate the surface gravity and the area of the horizons for the Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole.

  18. Black hole formation in the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive black holes with up to a $\\rm 10^{9}~M_{\\odot}$ dwell in the centers of present-day galaxies, and their presence has been confirmed at z $\\geq$ 6. Their formation at such early epochs is still an enigma. Different pathways have been suggested to assemble supermassive black holes in the first billion years after the Big Bang. Direct collapse has emerged as a highly plausible scenario to form black holes as it provides seed masses of $\\rm 10^{5}-10^{6}~M_{\\odot}$. Gravitational collapse in atomic cooling haloes with virial temperatures T$_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$~K may lead to the formation of massive seed black holes in the presence of an intense background UV flux. Turbulence plays a central role in regulating accretion and transporting angular momentum. We present here the highest resolution cosmological large-eddy simulations to date which track the evolution of high-density regions on scales of $0.25$~AU beyond the formation of the first peak, and study the impact of subgrid-scale turbulence. The pe...

  19. Vector particles tunneling from BTZ black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge-Rui Chen; Shiwei Zhou; Yong-Chang Huang

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate vector particles' Hawking radiation from a BTZ black hole. By applying the WKB approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi Ansatz to the Proca equation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. The expected Hawking temperature is recovered.

  20. Brief review on higher spin black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Perez; David Tempo; Ricardo Troncoso

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some relevant results in the context of higher spin black holes in three-dimensional spacetimes, focusing on their asymptotic behaviour and thermodynamic properties. For simplicity, we mainly discuss the case of gravity nonminimally coupled to spin-3 fields, being nonperturbatively described by a Chern-Simons theory of two independent sl(3,R) gauge fields. Since the analysis is particularly transparent in the Hamiltonian formalism, we provide a concise discussion of their basic aspects in this context; and as a warming up exercise, we briefly analyze the asymptotic behaviour of pure gravity, as well as the BTZ black hole and its thermodynamics, exclusively in terms of gauge fields. The discussion is then extended to the case of black holes endowed with higher spin fields, briefly signaling the agreements and discrepancies found through different approaches. We conclude explaining how the puzzles become resolved once the fall off of the fields is precisely specified and extended to include chemical potentials, in a way that it is compatible with the asymptotic symmetries. Hence, the global charges become completely identified in an unambiguous way, so that different sets of asymptotic conditions turn out to contain inequivalent classes of black hole solutions being characterized by a different set of global charges.

  1. Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    surface to purify air, employing existing technology in a new way. It is the brainchild of artistFEATURE Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish Björk FEATURE Academics & Industry: ResearchIScOvER mAGAZInE discover@sheffield.ac.uk Research and Innovation Services University of Sheffield New

  2. On the Fueling of Massive Black Holes and the Properties of their Host Spheroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres Escala

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relation between nuclear massive black holes and their host spheroid gravitational potential. Using simple models, we analyze how gas is expected to be transported in the nuclear regions of galaxies. When we couple it with the expected gas lifetime given by the Kennicutt-Schmidt Law, this naturally leads to the `M_BH - M_virial' and `M_BH - sigma' relations. We also numerically test, using AMR simulations, our simple models for the mass transport with satisfactory results.

  3. Effect of film hole location on heat transfer coefficient and film effectiveness of a gas turbine blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huan Wanda

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were performed to study the effect of film hole location on local heat transfer coefficient and film effectiveness distributions of a turbine blade model with air (D.R. = 1.0) and C02 (D.R. = 1.52) film injection. Tests were performed...

  4. Measurements of wall heat (mass) transfer for flow through blockages with round and square holes in a wide rectangular channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Joel

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) transfer on the channel wall by 4.7 to 6.3 times, and increased the pressure drop along the test channel by up to almost 490 times that for fully developed turbulent flow through a smooth channel at the same mass flow rates. The blockages with round holes...

  5. Uranium Sequestration by Aluminum Phosphate Minerals in Unsaturated Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerden, James L. Jr. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mineralogical and geochemical study of soils developed from the unmined Coles Hill uranium deposit (Virginia) was undertaken to determine how phosphorous influences the speciation of uranium in an oxidizing soil/saprolite system typical of the eastern United States. This paper presents mineralogical and geochemical results that identify and quantify the processes by which uranium has been sequestered in these soils. It was found that uranium is not leached from the saturated soil zone (saprolites) overlying the deposit due to the formation of a sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate mineral of the meta-autunite group. The concentration of uranium in the saprolites is approximately 1000 mg uranium per kg of saprolite. It was also found that a significant amount of uranium was retained in the unsaturated soil zone overlying uranium-rich saprolites. The uranium concentration in the unsaturated soils is approximately 200 mg uranium per kg of soil (20 times higher than uranium concentrations in similar soils adjacent to the deposit). Mineralogical evidence indicates that uranium in this zone is sequestered by a barium-strontium-calcium aluminum phosphate mineral of the crandallite group (gorceixite). This mineral is intimately inter-grown with iron and manganese oxides that also contain uranium. The amount of uranium associated with both the aluminum phosphates (as much as 1.4 weight percent) has been measured by electron microprobe micro-analyses and the geochemical conditions under which these minerals formed has been studied using thermodynamic reaction path modeling. The geochemical data and modeling results suggest the meta-autunite group minerals present in the saprolites overlying the deposit are unstable in the unsaturated zone soils overlying the deposit due to a decrease in soil pH (down to a pH of 4.5) at depths less than 5 meters below the surface. Mineralogical observations suggest that, once exposed to the unsaturated environment, the meta-autunite group minerals react to form U(VI)- bearing aluminum phosphates. (author)

  6. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the activities of the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) at Iowa State University for the period July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990. Activities include research in mining- and mineral-related areas, education and training of scientists and engineers in these fields, administration of the Institute, and cooperative interactions with industry, government agencies, and other research centers. During this period, ISMMRRI has supported research efforts to: (1) Investigate methods of leaching zinc from sphalerite-containing ores. (2) Study the geochemistry and geology of an Archean gold deposit and of a gold-telluride deposit. (3) Enchance how-quality aggregates for use in construction. (4) Pre-clean coal by triboelectric charging in a fluidized-bed. (5) Characterize the crystal/grain alignment during processing of yttrium-barium-copper-perovskite (1-2-3) superconductors. (5) Study the fluid inclusion properties of a fluorite district. (6) Study the impacts of surface mining on community planning. (7) Assess the hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite for beneficiation. (8) Investigate the use of photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy for monitoring unburnt carbon in the exhaust gas from coal-fired boilers. The education and training program continued within the interdepartmental graduate minor in mineral resources includes courses in such areas as mining methods, mineral processing, industrial minerals, extractive metallurgy, coal science and technology, and reclamation of mined land. In addition, ISMMRRI hosted the 3rd International Conference on Processing and Utilization of High-Sulfur Coals in Ames, Iowa. The Institute continues to interact with industry in order to foster increased cooperation between academia and the mining and mineral community.

  7. The river model of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton; Jason P. Lisle

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an under-appreciated way to conceptualize stationary black holes, which we call the river model. The river model is mathematically sound, yet simple enough that the basic picture can be understood by non-experts. %that can by understood by non-experts. In the river model, space itself flows like a river through a flat background, while objects move through the river according to the rules of special relativity. In a spherical black hole, the river of space falls into the black hole at the Newtonian escape velocity, hitting the speed of light at the horizon. Inside the horizon, the river flows inward faster than light, carrying everything with it. We show that the river model works also for rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes, though with a surprising twist. As in the spherical case, the river of space can be regarded as moving through a flat background. However, the river does not spiral inward, as one might have anticipated, but rather falls inward with no azimuthal swirl at all. Instead, the river has at each point not only a velocity but also a rotation, or twist. That is, the river has a Lorentz structure, characterized by six numbers (velocity and rotation), not just three (velocity). As an object moves through the river, it changes its velocity and rotation in response to tidal changes in the velocity and twist of the river along its path. An explicit expression is given for the river field, a six-component bivector field that encodes the velocity and twist of the river at each point, and that encapsulates all the properties of a stationary rotating black hole.

  8. Resource characterization for uranium mineralization in the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Balog, S.H.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-classification scheme was developed to detect potential uranium mineralization in the Montrose 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Colorado. The methodology developed is a rapid and efficient method of resource evaluation on a reconnaissance scale. The necessary techniques were developed and refined to digitize, integrate, and register various large geological, geochemical, and geophysical data sets for the Montrose quadrangle, Colorado, using a grid resolution of 1 km. All data sets for the Montrose quadrangle were registered to the Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The data sets include hydrogeochemical and stream sediment analyses for 23 elements, uranium-to-thorium ratios, airborne geophysical survey data, the locations of 90 uranium occurrences, and a geologic map (scale 1:250 000). Geochemical samples were collected from 3965 locations in the 19 200 km/sup 2/ quadrangle; aerial data were collected on flight lines flown with 3 to 5 km spacings. These data sets were smoothed by universal kriging and interpolated to a 179 x 119 rectangular grid (each grid block is 1 km/sup 2/). A mylar transparency of the geologic map was prepared and digitized. All possible combinations of three, for all data sets, were examined for general geologic correlations by utilizing a color microfilm output. Subsets of data were further examined for selected test areas. A classification scheme for uranium mineralization, based on selected test areas in the Cochetopa uranium district, is presented. Areas favorable for uranium mineralization, based on this scheme, were identified and are discussed.

  9. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowCDevelopment33.0 8.0MineralMineral

  10. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised:7, atMineral Deformation atMineral

  11. Alba Field cased-hole horizontal gravel pack: A team approach to design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, K. [Chevron U.K. Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Winton, S. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Price-Smith, C. [Dowell Schlumberger, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 700-ft cased-hole horizontal well was gravel packed and completed in the Alba Field, central North Sea. The completion incorporated a number of new technologies adopted for a horizontal cased-hole completion, including both equipment and fluids. The zone was completed in two stages using a horizontal stack-pack approach. Perforation packing was optimized by performing a staged acid prepack with the guns in the hole using a low-density synthetic gravel substitute in a shear thinning carrier fluid. This was a world-first achievement at a cased-hole gravel pack using the stack-pack approach in a horizontal well. A solids-free fluid-loss control material was evaluated and chosen for the high-permeability Alba sands (3 darcies). Extensive lab testing was performed to ensure minimal damage from various fluids. A 30-ft physical model was used to optimize annular pack efficiency. A gravel placement computer simulation was used to design pump rate, sand concentration, and gel loading to optimize annular and perforation-pack efficiency.

  12. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keller, A.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test`s ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  13. Oscillations of Thick Accretion Discs Around Black Holes - II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo Rubio-Herrera; William H. Lee

    2005-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical study of the global modes of oscillation of thick accretion discs around black holes. We have previously studied the case of constant distributions of specific angular momentum. In this second paper, we investigate (i) how the size of the disc affects the oscillation eigenfrequencies, and (ii) the effect of power-law distributions of angular momentum on the oscillations. In particular, we compare the oscillations of the disc with the epicyclic eigenfrequencies of a test particle with different angular momentum distributions orbiting around the central object. We find that there is a frequency shift away from the epicyclic eigenfrequency of the test particle to lower values as the size of the tori is increased. We have also studied the response of a thick accretion disc to a localized external perturbation using non constant specific angular momentum distributions within the disc. We find that in this case it is also possible (as reported previously for constant angular momentum distributions) to efficiently excite internal modes of oscillation. In fact we show here that the local perturbations excite global oscillations (acoustic p modes) closely related to the epicyclic oscillations of test particles. Our results are particularly relevant in the context of low mass X-ray binaries and microquasars, and the high frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) observed in them. Our computations make use of a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code in azimuthal symmetry, and use a gravitational potential that mimics the effects of strong gravity.

  14. Improved methods for simulating nearly extremal binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark A. Scheel; Matthew Giesler; Daniel A. Hemberger; Geoffrey Lovelace; Kevin Kuper; Michael Boyle; Bela Szilagyi; Lawrence E. Kidder

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical black holes could be nearly extremal (that is, rotating nearly as fast as possible); therefore, nearly extremal black holes could be among the binaries that current and future gravitational-wave observatories will detect. Predicting the gravitational waves emitted by merging black holes requires numerical-relativity simulations, but these simulations are especially challenging when one or both holes have mass $m$ and spin $S$ exceeding the Bowen-York limit of $S/m^2=0.93$. We present improved methods that enable us to simulate merging, nearly extremal black holes more robustly and more efficiently. We use these methods to simulate an unequal-mass, precessing binary black hole coalescence, where the larger black hole has $S/m^2=0.99$. We also use these methods to simulate a non-precessing binary black hole coalescence, where both black holes have $S/m^2=0.994$, nearly reaching the Novikov-Thorne upper bound for holes spun up by thin accretion disks. We demonstrate numerical convergence and estimate the numerical errors of the waveforms; we compare numerical waveforms from our simulations with post-Newtonian and effective-one-body waveforms; we compare the evolution of the black-hole masses and spins with analytic predictions; and we explore the effect of increasing spin magnitude on the orbital dynamics (the so-called "orbital hangup" effect).

  15. Predictability in Quantum Gravity and Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A possible resolution of the information loss paradox for black holes is proposed in which a phase transition occurs when the temperature of an evaporating black hole equals a critical value, $T_c$, and Lorentz invariance and diffeomorphism invariance are spontaneously broken. This allows a generalization of Schr\\"odinger's equation for the quantum mechanical density matrix, such that a pure state can evolve into a mixed state, because in the symmetry broken phase the conservation of energy-momentum is spontaneously violated. TCP invariance is also spontaneously broken together with time reversal invariance, allowing the existence of white holes, which are black holes moving backwards in time. Domain walls would form which separate the black holes and white holes (anti-black holes) in the broken symmetry regime, and the system could evolve into equilibrium producing a balance of information loss and gain.

  16. Field tests of a small instrumented pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korb, Kenneth Wayne

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pilot. Hole Installation of tbe Smail Pile Dynamic Test Procedure Static Test Procedure 23 24 2S 28 29 30 30 V ANALYSIS OF TIP DAKPING DATA Fine-Grained Soils Coarse-Grained Soils 34 40 VI ANAI YSIS OF FRICTION DAIiPING DATA Fine... Friction Damping Data for. Fine-Grained Soils 41 Friction Damping Constants from Modified Smith Model 48 VT Friction Damping Data for Coarse-Grained Soils 51 VII /nake Data from Field Test Program VIII Load Distribution Data 57 62 viii LISi...

  17. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Keller, A.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  18. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive >30 Msun, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos. We expect primordial stars to form in halos in the mass range 10^6-10^10 Msun. Some of these early black holes, formed at redshifts z>10, could be the seed black hole for a significant fraction of the supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If the black hole descendants of the primordial stars exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime candidate for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation and evolution of dark matter halos in LambdaCDM universe. We seed high-redshift dark matter halos with early black holes, and explore the merger history of the host halos and the implications of black hole's kick velocities arising from their coalescence. The central concentration of low mass early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they experience even moderate kicks of tens of km/s. Even such modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the low mass black holes that were ejected, compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates with central supermassive black holes in the largest halos may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N-body simulations, we quantify the role of kicks on the merger rates of black holes formed from massive metal free stars with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies.

  19. Heavy mineral distribution in stream sediment of Tapah area, Perak, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sibon, Mahat Hj [Jabatan Mineral dan Geosains Malaysia, 40000 Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia and Program Geologi, Pusat Pengajian Sains Sekitaran dan Sumber Alam, Fakulti Sains dan Teknologi, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Jamil, Habibah; Umor, Mohd Rozi [Program Geologi, Pusat Pengajian Sains Sekitaran dan Sumber Alam, Fakulti Sains dan Teknologi, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hassan, Wan Fuad Wan [Jabatan Geologi, Fakulti Sains Universiti Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to provide the overview of occurrence, distribution and origin of the heavy minerals in the study area. A total of 45 selected stream sediment heavy mineral concentrate samples were panned using standard dulangs, dried and separated from other light minerals using bromoform. The heavy minerals were separated into different fractions at different amperes using Frantz Isodynamic magnetic separator. Mineral identification was done using binocular microscope augmented by X-ray diffraction analyses. Mineral abundance data were analysed graphically using triangular diagrams to show their origin. Dominant minerals present in the heavy mineral samples collected are ilmenite, cassiterite, tourmaline, zircon, topaz, and magnetite. The less common minerals, present in trace amounts are hematite, xenotime, allanite, monazite, rutile, anatase, leucoxene, chromite, garnet and olivine. Examination of the heavy mineral assemblage shows that they originated from granite batholiths of the Main Range, Changkat Rembian as well as from the metasedimentary rock in the area. The gold flakes present are found together with cassiterite and topaz indicating that gold originates from the mineralized veins contact-metamorphosed metasedimentary rocks. Almost all samples collected contain cassiterite grains in various amounts. From the mineral assemblage, the source of cassiterite originates from the mineralized quartz veins that cut granitic rocks of Main Range, Changkat Rembian as well as the metasedimentary rock in the area. Greisenized veins containing quartz, mica and tourmaline with the presence of wolframite and arsenopyrite also contribute to the presence of cassiterite in this study area.

  20. Analytical solutions of the geodesic equation in the spacetime of a black hole in f(R) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soroushfar, Saheb; Kunz, Jutta; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the motion of test particles in the spacetime of a black hole in f(R) gravity. The complete set of analytic solutions of the geodesic equation in the spacetime of this black hole are presented. The geodesic equations are solved in terms of Weierstrass elliptic functions and derivatives of Kleinian sigma functions. The different types of the resulting orbits are characterized in terms of the conserved energy and angular momentum as well as the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ and the real constant $\\beta$.

  1. Analytical solutions of the geodesic equation in the spacetime of a black hole in f(R) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saheb Soroushfar; Reza Saffari; Jutta Kunz; Claus Lämmerzahl

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the motion of test particles in the spacetime of a black hole in f(R) gravity. The complete set of analytic solutions of the geodesic equation in the spacetime of this black hole are presented. The geodesic equations are solved in terms of Weierstrass elliptic functions and derivatives of Kleinian sigma functions. The different types of the resulting orbits are characterized in terms of the conserved energy and angular momentum as well as the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ and the real constant $\\beta$.

  2. Quasinormal modes of self-dual warped AdS{sub 3} black hole in topological massive gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Ran; Ren Jirong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, Gansu (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000, Gansu (China)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the scalar, vector and spinor field perturbations in the background of self-dual warped AdS{sub 3} black hole of topological massive gravity. The corresponding exact expressions for quasinormal modes are obtained by analytically solving the perturbation equations and imposing the vanishing Dirichlet boundary condition at asymptotic infinity. It is expected that the quasinormal modes agree with the poles of retarded Green's functions of the CFT dual to self-dual warped AdS{sub 3} black hole. Our results provide a quantitative test of the warped AdS/CFT correspondence.

  3. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  4. 2005 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sector Initiatives: Opportunities Now), a presidential public-private partnership established in 2003 produced by surface and underground mining and from brine. U.S. consumption of minerals and compounds and installing energy efficient burners in the driers has rewarded SVM by increased efficiency and energy savings

  5. 2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titanium Initiative whose objective is to develop revolutionary processes for the low-cost extraction of titanium metal from oxide ores. DARPA efforts were aimed at producing high-quality titanium at target costs, and titaniferous slag. Mining of titanium minerals is usually performed using surface methods. Dredging and dry

  6. The semismooth Newton method for multicomponent reactive transport with minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraeutle, Serge

    is that problems containing CCs (so-called complementarity problems, CPs) are well known in the field of optimization theory. In this field, it is a well known strategy to solve CPs with the semismooth Newton method essential. The article is structured as follows. In Sec. 2.1 we introduce the mineral precipitation

  7. Preliminary conceptual model for mineral evolution in Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, C.J.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is presented for mineral alteration in Yucca Mountain, Nevada, that suggests that the mineral transformations observed there are primarily controlled by the activity of aqueous silica. The rate of these reactions is related to the rate of evolution of the metastable silica polymorphs opal-CT and cristobalite assuming that a{sub SiO{sub 2(aq)}} is fixed at the equilibrium solubility of the most soluble silica polymorph present. The rate equations accurately predict the present depths of disappearance of opal-CT and cristobalite. The rate equations have also been used to predict the extent of future mineral alteration that may result from emplacement of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain. Relatively small changes in mineralogy are predicted, but these predictions are based on the assumption that emplacement of a repository would not increase the pH of water in Yucca Mountain nor increase its carbonate content. Such changes may significantly increase mineral alteration. Some of the reactions currently occurring in Yucca Mountain consume H{sup +} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Combining reaction rate models for these reactions with water chemistry data may make it possible to estimate water flux through the basal vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Member and to help confirm the direction and rate of flow of groundwater in Yucca Mountain.

  8. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), were 4% higher than those at yearend 2007. Combined inventories of aluminum metal and alloys held2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ALUMINUM October 2010 #12;Aluminum--2008 5.1 Aluminum By E. lee Bray Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Paula

  9. 2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of aluminum metal and alloys held by the London Metal Exchange Ltd. (LME), however, increased by 16%. Primary2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ALUMINUM May 2010 #12;ALUMINUM--2007 5.1 ALUMINUM By E. Lee Bray Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Paula R. Neely

  10. CITBA & SAS SAS Enterprise Miner Training-Oct 18 & 19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    , easy-to-use set of integrated capabilities for creating and sharing insights that can be used to drive for Technometrics, American Statistician, and Journal of the American Statistical Society. He has also served exhaust emission data. André de Waal, PhD, Instructor SAS Enterprise Miner: André was born in South Africa

  11. Mineral balance in juvenile horses in race training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Tonya Leigh

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Total collections of feces and urine were performed on days 0, 64 and 128 of the trial, and mineral absorption and retention were determined. The horses were maintained in a typical race training protocol to mimic the nutritional stresses placed on long...

  12. Contrib Mineral Petrol (2991) 109:10-18 Contributions to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , which is now separated into the Liberian Craton in Africa and the Guyana Shieldofnorthern South America tholeiitic intrusions, including the dyke swarms in Africa, eastern North America and northern SouthCentre, Department of Geology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada, K1N 6N5 z Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy

  13. Lidar fluorosensing of mineral oil spills on the sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    be discriminated from heavy fuel, and from less harmful substances like fish oil or vegetable oil, Fig. 3, whichLidar fluorosensing of mineral oil spills on the sea surface Theo Hengstermann and Rainer Reuter Airborne .fluorosensor measurements over maritime oil spills show that this method enables a sensitive

  14. Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeboah, F. E.; Yegulalp, T. M.; Singh, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation Frank E. Yeboah Tuncel M. Yegulalp Harmohindar Singh Research Associate Professor Professor Center for Energy Research... them carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). This paper assesses the cost of sequestering CO 2 produced by a ZEC power plant using solid sequestration process. INTRODUCTION CO 2 is produced when electrical energy is generated using conventional fossil...

  15. 2006 Minerals Yearbook ClaY and Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Minerals Yearbook ClaY and Shale U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey January 2008 #12;Clay and Shale--2006 18.1 The amount of clay sold or used by domestic producers in 2006 in 2005 (table 1). Common clay and shale accounted for 59% of the tonnage, and kaolin accounted for 55

  16. Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeboah, F. E.; Yegulalp, T. M.; Singh, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation Frank E. Yeboah Tuncel M. Yegulalp Harmohindar Singh Research Associate Professor Professor Center for Energy Research... them carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). This paper assesses the cost of sequestering CO 2 produced by a ZEC power plant using solid sequestration process. INTRODUCTION CO 2 is produced when electrical energy is generated using conventional fossil...

  17. July 1, 2009 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    in Chemical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering: chemical engineering; civil and environmental engineering; computer science and electrical engineering102 July 1, 2009 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Eugene V. Cilento, Ph.D., Dean Warren

  18. January 1, 2007 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    in Chemical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering programs are administered through seven academic departments: chemical engineering; civil and environmentalJanuary 1, 2007 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Eugene V. Cilento, Ph.D., Dean Warren

  19. July 1, 2006 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    in Chemical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering programs are administered through seven academic departments: chemical engineering; civil and environmentalJuly 1, 2006 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Eugene V. Cilento, Ph.D., Dean Warren R

  20. July 1, 2008 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    in Chemical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering programs are administered through seven academic departments: chemical engineering; civil and environmental102 July 1, 2008 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Eugene V. Cilento, Ph.D., Dean Warren

  1. July 1, 2005 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    in Chemical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering102 July 1, 2005 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Eugene V. Cilento, Ph.D., Dean Warren for Administration www.cemr.wvu.edu Degrees Offered Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering Bachelor of Science

  2. July 1, 2007 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    in Chemical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering programs are administered through seven academic departments: chemical engineering; civil and environmentalJuly 1, 2007 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Eugene V. Cilento, Ph.D., Dean Warren R

  3. Mineral mesopore effects on nitrogenous organic matter Andrew R. Zimmermana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    as sequestration of pollutants in soils and sediments (Luthy et al., 1997), turnover of natural soil organic carbon that organic matter (OM) may be protected from enzymatic degradation by sequestration within mineral mesopores observations. These results provide a potential mechanism for the selective sequestration and preservation

  4. 2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy by UT-Battelle, LLC, was developing methods to consolidate new and conventional titanium powders2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey TITANIUM [ADVANCE RELEASE] June 2012 #12;TITANIUM--2010 [ADVANCE RELEASE] 78.1 TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey

  5. mineral grains pore spaces Subsurface Geology and Resource Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    mineral grains pore spaces Subsurface Geology and Resource Exploration Locating earth resources deals with the exploration for oil, which is important to Louisiana, the Gulf of Mexico area oil (petroleum) and natural gas, that are refined for use as fuels. When sediments are deposited

  6. KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    Rocks By Dr. Sidqi A. Abu-Khamsin Professor, Department of Petroleum Engineering © Copyright by Dr;1. INTRODUCTION 1.1: The nature of petroleum All chemical compounds found in nature are classified as eitherKING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Basic Properties of Reservoir

  7. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    statistics and world tungsten concentrate production for 2008 and the previous 4 years are listed in table 1 for lead in bullets, shot, and other products. Tungsten chemicals are used to make catalysts, corrosion2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey TUNGSTEN October 2010

  8. U.S. Geological Survey China's Growing Appetite for Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , crude 23 1 Tin 32 1 Tungsten 83 1 Zinc 22 1 #12;Infrastructure Cement #12;Production of Hydraulic Cement's exportation of some metals is declining (rare-earth elements, tin, and tungsten) Foreign investment is increasing (minerals, infrastructure, aid) Environmental residuals from production could rise #12;Background

  9. 2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    statistics and world tungsten concentrate production for 2007 and the previous 4 years are listed in table 12007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey TUNGSTEN May 2010 #12;TUNGSTEN--2007 79.1 TUNGSTEN By Kim B. Shedd Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Danielle L

  10. 2005 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Minerals Yearbook TungsTen U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;TungsTen--2005 79.1 TungsTen ByKimB.shedd Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Amy C. Tolcin, statistical assistant, and the world production table was prepared by Glenn J. Wallace, international data

  11. 2006 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , international data coordinator. No U.S. tungsten mine production was reported in 2006. U.S. supply of tungsten Service (FWS) granted final approval to four new tungsten shot products for hunting waterfowl and coots--iron-tungsten2006 Minerals Yearbook TUNGSTEN U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey April 2008

  12. 2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with that of 2009. Salient U.S. tungsten statistics and world tungsten concentrate production for 20102010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey TUNGSTEN [ADVANCE RELEASE] February 2012 #12;TUNGSTEN--2010 [ADVANCE RELEASE] 79.1 TUNGSTEN By Kim B. Shedd Domestic survey

  13. 2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumption increased significantly in 2011, as compared with that of 2010. World tungsten mine production. salient u.s. tungsten statistics and world tungsten concentrate production for 2007­11 are listed in table2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey TUNGSTEN [ADVANCE

  14. 2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ); Oil-dri Corp. of america (fuller's earth); Texas Industries, Inc. (common clay and shale); Thiele2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey CLAY AND SHALE [ADVANCE RELEASE] May 2013 #12;Clay and Shale--2011 [adVanCe ReleaSe] 18.1 Clay and Shale By Robert l

  15. Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals Rare earth elements (REEs) compose in the earth's crust. However, because of their geochemical proper es, rare earth elements are typically. Briefing Paper 02/12 Jim Hein | May 2012 www.isa.org.jm Table 1: Rare Earth Elements This paper

  16. 2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Geological Survey from a voluntary survey of domestic operations. Of the 44 operations surveyed, 32 did concentrates are developed by a second voluntary survey of domestic mining operations. Of the two domestic2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

  17. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of domestic operations. of the 46 operations surveyed, 21 responded. data for nonrespondents were estimated concentrates were developed from a second voluntary survey of domestic mining operations. The two domestic2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

  18. 2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a voluntary survey of domestic operations. of the 41 operations surveyed, 20 responded. data concentrates were developed from a second voluntary survey of domestic mining operations. The two domestic2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

  19. Dynamics of stellar black holes in young star clusters with different metallicities - II. Black hole-black hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunetto Marco Ziosi; Michela Mapelli; Marica Branchesi; Giuseppe Tormen

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the formation and dynamical evolution of black hole-black hole (BH-BH) binaries in young star clusters (YSCs), by means of N-body simulations. The simulations include metallicity-dependent recipes for stellar evolution and stellar winds, and have been run for three different metallicities (Z = 0.01, 0.1 and 1 Zsun). Following recent theoretical models of wind mass-loss and core-collapse supernovae, we assume that the mass of the stellar remnants depends on the metallicity of the progenitor stars. We find that BH-BH binaries form efficiently because of dynamical exchanges: in our simulations, we find about 10 times more BH-BH binaries than double neutron star binaries. The simulated BH-BH binaries form earlier in metal-poor YSCs, which host more massive black holes (BHs) than in metal-rich YSCs. The simulated BH-BH binaries have very large chirp masses (up to 80 Msun), because the BH mass is assumed to depend on metallicity, and because BHs can grow in mass due to the merger with stars. The simulated BH-BH binaries span a wide range of orbital periods (10^-3-10^7 yr), and only a small fraction of them (0.3 per cent) is expected to merge within a Hubble time. We discuss the estimated merger rate from our simulations and the implications for Advanced VIRGO and LIGO.

  20. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming of Hanford LAW Using THORsm Mineralizing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Arlin L.; Nicholas R Soelberg; Douglas W. Marshall; Gary L. Anderson

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented, in 2002, a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified steam reforming technology as a candidate for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was completed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel. The pilot scale facility was equipped with a highly efficient cyclone separator and heated sintered metal filters for particulate removal, a thermal oxidizer for reduced gas species and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for residual volatile species capture. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, but located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Pilot scale testing was performed August 2–5, 2004. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Science Application International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, personnel performed actual pilot scale operation. The pilot scale test achieved a total of 68.7 hrs of cumulative/continuous processing operation before termination in response to a bed de-fluidization condition. 178 kg of LAW surrogate were processed that resulted in 148 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 17%. The process achieved essentially complete bed turnover within approximately 40 hours. Samples of mineralized solid product materials were analyzed for chemical/physical properties. SRNL will report separately the results of product performance testing that were accomplished.