Sample records for min max aromatics

  1. Min-max and min-max regret versions of some combinatorial optimization problems : a survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , such as deterministic or stochastic approaches, will fail to protect against exceptional high-impact events (earthquakes-clefs : Min-max, min-max regret, optimisation combinatoire, complexité, ap- proximation, analyse de robustesse in order to max- imize the level of protection. Quantifying the protection level using the expected impact

  2. APPLICATION OF THE FUZZY MIN-MAX NEURAL NETWORK CLASSIFIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blekas, Konstantinos

    . The fuzzy min-max classi cation network constitutes a promisimg pattern recognition approach that is based. Experimental results us- ing the modi ed model on a di cult pattern recognition prob- lem establishes of the fuzzy min-max clas- si cation neural network on a pattern recognition problem that involves both

  3. Min-max redundancy resolution for a mobile manipulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reister, D.B.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have considered the problem of determining the values of the joint variables of a mobile manipulator with many redundant degrees of freedom that will minimize an objective function when the position and orientation of the end of the manipulator are given. The objective function is the weighted sum of three components: distance, torque, and reach. Each of the three components is a max or min. We have converted the min-max optimization problem into a nonlinear programming problem and used the Kuhn-Tucker conditions to derive necessary conditions for the optimum solutions. The necessary conditions require that one or more of each of the three sets (distance, torque, and reach) of nonnegative Lagrange multipliers must be positive. If one of the Lagrange multipliers is positive, the corresponding slack variable must be zero. When two or more of the Lagrange multipliers from a single set are positive, the slack variables place constraints on the joint variables. Specification of the Cartesian position and orientation of the end of the arm also places constraints on the joint variables. If the mobile manipulator has N degrees of freedom and the total number of constraints is M, the constraints define a manifold of dimensions N - M. When N = M, the dimension of the manifold is zero (it consists of isolated points). When N > M, a search of the manifold may yield a submanifold that maximizes the Lagrangian function. We discuss examples where the number of slack variable constraints (M) is two or more.

  4. IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 31 Price-Based Max-Min Fair Rate Allocation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Lachlan

    of the max- imum utility rate allocations is max-min fair. This approach is applied to wireless in [5

  5. a min-max regret robust optimization approach for large scale full ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    admin

    2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    the full-factorial scenario design of data uncertainty. The proposed algorithm is shown to be efficient for solving large-scale min-max regret robust optimization ...

  6. Max-min Fair Rate Allocation and Routing in Energy Harvesting Networks: Algorithmic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Max-min Fair Rate Allocation and Routing in Energy Harvesting Networks: Algorithmic Analysis Jelena@ee}.columbia.edu ABSTRACT This paper considers max-min fair rate allocation and rout- ing in energy harvesting networks energy profile and focus on the design of efficient and opti- mal algorithms that can serve as benchmarks

  7. An Approximation Algorithm for Max-Min Fair Allocation of Indivisible Goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saberi, Amin

    Saberi Abstract In this paper, we give the first approximation algorithm for the problem of max-min fair 94305. Email:{asadpour,saberi}@stanford.edu. 1 #12;1 Introduction Fair division, also known as the cake

  8. MinMax Control of LQ Systems under the H1 Norm Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Satoshi

    ** Abstract: Satisfactory optimal control of linear systems under the existence of distur­ bance is studiedMin­Max Control of LQ Systems under the H1 Norm Constraint Kiyotaka Shimizu* and Satoshi Ito. The satisfactory optimal control minimizes a quadratic maximal­valued objective functional subject to the H1 norm

  9. Large-Scale Patent Classification with Min-Max Modular Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bao-Liang

    Large-Scale Patent Classification with Min-Max Modular Support Vector Machines Xiao-Lei Chu, Chao Ma, Jing Li, Bao-Liang Lu Senior Member, IEEE, Masao Utiyama, and Hitoshi Isahara Abstract-- Patent-world patent classification typically exceeds one million, and this number increases every year. An effective

  10. Prediction of Protein Subcellular Multi-locations with a Min-Max Modular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bao-Liang

    -location problem. In addition, there are a large portion of proteins lack the information like GO and FunPrediction of Protein Subcellular Multi-locations with a Min-Max Modular Support Vector Machine subcellular multi-locations of proteins with machine learning techniques is a challenging problem

  11. Using min-max of torque to resolve redundancy for a mobile manipulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reister, D.B.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have considered the problem of determining the time trajectories of the joint variables of a mobile manipulator with many redundant degrees of freedom that will minimize the maximum value of the torque during a large scale motion by the manipulator. To create a well defined problem, we will divide the problem into two components: path planner and surveyor. The path planner will choose a path (between two points in Cartesian space) that will minimize the maximum value of the torque along the path. The input to the path planner is a network of path segments with the maximum value of the torque on each segment. The surveyor will find the points in joint space that are local minimums for the maximum value of the torque at each Cartesian position and define the network of path segments. In this paper, our focus will be on the surveyor and not on the path planner. Our min-max problem has an extra constraint on the joint variables. We seek a min-max at each Cartesian position rather than a global min-max. We have used the Kuhn-Tucker conditions to derive necessary conditions for the solution of our min-max problem. We find that the necessary conditions require that at one or more of the joints the magnitude of the normalized torques will be equal to the min-max value. We have explored the torque surfaces for two mobile manipulators: a planar manipulator and the CESARm. The CESARm is a manipulator with three joint angles controlling the height of the arm. The paths with three equal torques have low values for the torque but they only cover part of the workspace and do not join together. Paths with two equal torques cover the workspace and bridge between the disjoint path segments. We have evaluated the necessary conditions for both the paths with three equal torques and the paths with two equal torques. In most cases, the paths satisfy the necessary conditions.

  12. Min-max control design for large angle maneuvers of flexible spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Cheolho

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    usiug the ICF approxiusation method is [M]J = (4. 7) Define the A[M] is 6[M] = e([i1~I] ? [M] J) 0 M, ] (4. 8) where e is the scaling factor to control the magnitude of A[M]. In this case, the state space fornr is z=Az+Bu (4. 9) where 0 I ? M... ( ber) gP Shankar P. Bhattacharyy (Member) Srinivas R. Vadali (Member) /Ye~- gc'g Walter E. Haisler (Head of Department) December 1991 ABSTRACT Min-Max Control Design for Large Angle Maneuvers of Flexible Spacecraft(December 1991) Cheolho I...

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. XX, NO. XX, MONTH 2008 1 Redefinition of Max-Min Fairness in Multi-hop Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hai

    -Min Fairness in Multi-hop Wireless Networks Ping Wang, Member, IEEE, Hai Jiang, Member, IEEE, Weihua Zhuang that it is challenging to evaluate service fairness in multi-hop wireless networks due to intra-flow contention as an alternative criterion. Based on this criterion, a new definition of max-min fairness for wireless networks

  14. Min-max-min robustness - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    or the minimum spanning tree problem turn NP-hard in the new approach. Keywords: robust ... In recent decades, both robust and stochastic optimization ...

  15. 1268 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 56, NO. 3, MARCH 2008 Quality of Service and Max-Min Fair Transmit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidiropoulos, Nikolaos D.

    state is known at the transmitter and from two viewpoints: mini- mizing total transmission power while.g., in the context of the emerging WiMAX and UMTS-LTE wireless networks. The joint problem also contains single-BROAD and by National and Community Funds (75% from E.U.-European Social Fund and 25% from the Greek Ministry

  16. Renewable Forecast Min-Max2020.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/)RenewableRenewable EnergyForecast of

  17. Min-Max Theorems Related to Geometric Representationsof Graphs ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcel K. de Carli Silva and Levent Tuncel

    2011-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 27, 2010 ... 1. Introduction. Geometric representations of graphs is a beautiful area where combina- ..... We shall use the following construction to get hypersphere ...... This is not surprising, as SDP duality theory is more complex than LP.

  18. Higher dimensions Max flow min cut in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duval, Art

    -negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex is zero; and |xe| e. Value of flow is x0. Duval: net flow at each vertex is zero; and |xe| e. Value of flow is x0. Definition Cut is minimal set

  19. Higher dimensions Max flow min cut in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duval, Art

    , and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe| e. Value-negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe of flow xe (non-negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex is zero

  20. Max-min separability: incremental approach and application to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    supervised data classification problems in many large scale data sets. ...... [11] Chih-Chung Chang and Chih-Jen Lin, (2001) LIBSVM: a library for support vector

  1. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew Cuneo MatthewEnergyMauroMauryMax

  2. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition |MaterialsMatt DozierWaltherMattyMax

  3. Publications -- Min Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Min Chen and Alejandro Clausse, Applied Mathematics and Computation, Vol 248, 2014, pp 28-46 .... with R. Temam, Advances in computer methods for partial differential equations VII, pp. ... Thesis for Master of Science in Engineering.

  4. School: MIN Department: CUI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    School: MIN Department: CUI Pending funding, Universität Hamburg invites applications barrier. Due to the relativistic energies we find a minimal velocity mismatch between the pump beam (laser/2 Universität Hamburg is certified by the family-friendly higher education audit Severely disabled applicants

  5. On The Analysis of Spatially-Coupled GLDPC Codes and The Weighted Min-Sum Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Yung-Yih

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    system that can approach the channel capacity using iterative HDD. The optimality of a codeword returned by the weighted min-sum (WMS) algorithm, an iterative decoding algorithm which is widely used in practice, is studied as well. The attenuated max...

  6. 97055-97044 Revision C May 2007 Ion Max and Ion Max-S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    97055-97044 Revision C May 2007 Ion Max and Ion Max-S API Source Hardware Manual #12;Š 2007 Thermo, it meets all pertinent electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and safety standards as described below. EMC/23/EEC and harmonized standard EN 61010-1:2001. Changes that you make to your system may void compliance

  7. Analysis on the energy efficiency of variable-frequency air conditioners (Hitachi models as an example) Jim Jr-Min Lin 2014.09.26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis on the energy efficiency of variable-frequency air conditioners (Hitachi models (Max) Energy Efficiency @min load Energy Efficiency @Max load kW kW kW kW W/W W/W RAS-22NB 1.00 3.20 0 Efficiency @min load Energy Efficiency @Max load kW kW kW kW W/W W/W RAM-5FNS(B) - 12.5 - 2.91 - 4.3 RAM-6FNS

  8. Min-max control design for large angle maneuvers of flexible spacecraft 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Cheolho

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vector a is a =a, b, ! 1 j ff 0 dsi ? J u;dm ? eij ka j fikdm 1 . f 1 ? e;. kib J ukdm ? e e kiv ia ukdm M''J M B B B B + ui + e|jkivjuk + eqk~j (&k + uk) + eigpep Jkaga~j(~k + uk) bi (2. 1. 15) where ds, is obtained from Eq. (2. 1. 10) os...) into the form l P aP =a, i2; = Bftqd?+ + eijkdkpq + Nspq(lp (2. 1. 18) Np ? Np (tt' M )rj +2 . sq~s (tt M )rj MB B Np (ql M )1v 9 + e 's*r1v B Np ? )(iv;1vs ? 6, sa1, 1v?)qlq+ xr(a1;a1s ? b;ra1?a2?) b, with (1j = 1, 2, . . . , M). From the Newton...

  9. Real-Time Volumetric Shadows using 1D Min-Max Mipmaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiawen

    Light scattering in a participating medium is responsible for several important effects we see in the natural world. In the presence of occluders, computing single scattering requires integrating the illumination scattered ...

  10. Min-Max Congestion in Interference-Prone Wireless Mesh Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    can prevent further deployment if the network performance does not meet users' expectations in environmental noise. Therefore, developing efficient algorithms to enhance the network uti- lization: which paths should the packets follow? What is the impact on on-going data transmissions? What

  11. NETWORK FLOWS AND THE MAX-FLOW MIN-CUT AL STAPLES-MOORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    travels from one point to another, e.g. the spread of data in a network, traffic along roads, water about flows to define an edge's residual capacity as the difference between an edge's maximum allowed to define the residual capacity along a path from s to t. Definition 1.3. The residual capacity of an edge

  12. WPICSTR9937 Dec. 1999 MinMax Trees: Efficient Relational Operation Support for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract This paper presents a new method for implementing hierarchical navigation operations in relational. Keywords: Hierarchy Encoding, Hierarchical Drill­Down and Roll­Up, Recursive Query Processing, Relational Databases. 1 Introduction Recently, we have introduced a new technique for visual exploration and analysis

  13. MIN-MAX THEORY AND THE WILLMORE CONJECTURE FERNANDO C. MARQUES AND ANDRE NEVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, AndrĂŠ Arroja

    . Canonical family: First properties 13 4. Definitions from Geometric Measure Theory 19 5. Canonical family of a closed surface immersed in Euclidean three-space are the Gauss curvature K and the mean curvature H of the Gauss curvature is a topological invari- ant by the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. The integral of the square

  14. Max-Min optimization problem for Variable Annuities pricing Christophette BLANCHET-SCALLIET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    introduced in the 1970s in the United States (see Sloane [16]). These insurance products provide, during for an insurer. We concentrate on two types of these contracts that are the guaranteed minimum death benefits indifference approach to determine this fee and, in particular, we consider the indifference fee rate

  15. "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" September 12, 2014 (0 Comments) Symptom: User jobs with single or...

  16. aromatic hydrocarbon components: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS 2005 April 19 ABSTRACT Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) infrared emission features 26 Dehydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic...

  17. Min Ouyang, April. 2011 Department of Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Min Ouyang, April. 2011 1 Min Ouyang Department of Economics 3151 Social Science Plaza B University.D. University of Maryland at College Park, Economics, August 2005, Dissertation title "Productivity Dynamics Vincent. M.A. University of Maryland at College Park, Economics, December 2003 B.A. Beijing University

  18. Video Visualization Gareth Daniel Min Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, P. W.

    Video Visualization Gareth Daniel Min Chen University of Wales Swansea, UK Abstract Video data, generated by the entertainment industry, security and traffic cameras, video conferencing systems, video a novel methodology for "summarizing" video sequences using volume visualization techniques. We outline

  19. Cloud Security by Max Garvey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolmach, Andrew

    Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

  20. Max-Planck-Institut fr biologische Kybernetik Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering (Aeronautics) The Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany launches

  1. A Novel, Green Technology for the Production of Aromatic Thiol from Aromatic Sulfonyl Chloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Bradley R.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogenation of aromatic sulfonyl chloride to produce aromatic thiol is an important industrial reaction. The aromatic thiol is a critical intermediate in the production of many pharmaceuticals as well as several agrochemicals. Density...

  2. Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems. Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems. Abstract: Aromaticity is an important concept in chemistry...

  3. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  4. Calculate the solubility of aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Like naphthenes and paraffins, aromatics are an important hydrocarbon component of fossil fuels. Their physical and thermodynamic property data are valuable to engineers in the chemical process industries. In particular, their solubility in water is becoming more important in engineering and environmental studies because of increasingly stringent regulations regarding health, safety and the environment. In this article the authors present water-solubility data and correlations for aromatics (benzenes) as a function of temperature. These results can be useful for engineers conducting various types of initial studies.

  5. Min Chen | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowCDevelopment33.0 8.0 3.4 5.933.0Min

  6. Min Shih | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised:7, at 3:00MilitaryMimickingtriadMin

  7. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Huber, George W. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?–C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 °C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450–600 °C). At low temperatures (450 °C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include Diels–Alder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e.g., furan forms CO and allene), oligomerization (allene forms olefins and aromatics plus hydrogen), and alkylation (e.g., furan plus olefins). The product distribution was far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  8. ITALY DAILY, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2001 PAGE 3 temp min c/f max c/f

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frischer, Bernard

    Hunting for Horace's Humble Home Did the Poet Live as Modestly as He Said He Did? An Archaeological Team in Lazio Takes Him to Task By John Moretti john.moretti@rcs.it T he Roman poet Horace once wrote: "Let him at the way the poet actually lived, casting doubt on Horace's accuracy. But these days, a privately funded

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 60, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2012 1 Max-Min SINR Coordinated Multipoint Downlink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chee Wei

    , we study the multiple-input-single-output (MISO) transmit beamforming and power control problem. We links to enhance the reliability of the links between mobile users and the serving base station

  10. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe DistrictIndependentDepartment4.docfrom

  11. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,Official FileEnergyAERMOD-PRIME, Units 3, 1, 2for 12 hours

  12. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  13. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  14. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  15. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  16. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  17. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  18. Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition is an annual competition run by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) that challenges students to design...

  19. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Nihat Ay Preprint no.: 60 2013 #12;#12;Information-driven intrinsic motivation in reinforcement learning Keyan Zahedi1 , Georg Martius1 , and Nihat Ay1,2 1 Information Theory of Cognitive Systems, Max Planck

  20. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information by Nils Bertschinger, Johannes Rauh, Eckehard Olbrich, J¨urgen Jost, and Nihat Ay Preprint no1 , J¨urgen Jost1,2 , Nihat Ay1,2 1Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig

  1. MaxPlanckInstitut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of strongly interacting Markov chains by Nihat Ay and Thomas Wennekers Preprint no.: 107 2001 #12; #12; Dynamical Properties of Strongly Interacting Markov Chains Nihat Ay and Thomas Wennekers Max

  2. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Approximation Errors of Restricted Boltzmann Machines by Guido Mont´ufar, Johannes Rauh, and Nihat Ay Preprint F. Montufar1 , Johannes Rauh1 , Nihat Ay1,2 1 Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences

  3. Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stochastic interaction in directed acyclic networks (revised version: March 2002) by Nihat Ay Preprint no.: 54 2001 #12; #12; Locality of Global Stochastic Interaction in Directed Acyclic Networks Nihat Ay Max

  4. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Universal Approximation in Embodied Systems by Guido Mont´ufar, Nihat Ay, and Keyan Ghazi-Zahedi Preprint no Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences montufar@mis.mpg.de Nihat Ay Max Planck Institute

  5. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on complexity and stochastic interaction by Nihat Ay Preprint no.: 95 2001 #12; #12; Information Geometry on Complexity and Stochastic Interaction Nihat Ay Max-Planck-Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences Inselstr

  6. Convergence of Weighted Min-Sum Decoding Via Dynamic Programming on Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Yung-Yih

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying the max-product (and belief-propagation) algorithms to loopy graphs is now quite popular for best assignment problems. This is largely due to their low computational complexity and impressive performance in practice. Still, there is no general understanding of the conditions required for convergence and/or the optimality of converged solutions. This paper presents an analysis of both attenuated max-product (AMP) decoding and weighted min-sum (WMS) decoding for LDPC codes which guarantees convergence to a fixed point when a weight parameter, {\\beta}, is sufficiently small. It also shows that, if the fixed point satisfies some consistency conditions, then it must be both the linear-programming (LP) and maximum-likelihood (ML) solution. For (dv,dc)-regular LDPC codes, the weight must satisfy {\\beta}(dv-1) \\leq 1 whereas the results proposed by Frey and Koetter require instead that {\\beta}(dv-1)(dc-1) 1 is also given. Finally, connections are explored with recent work by Arora et al. on the threshold of...

  7. Polycyclic Aromatic Triptycenes: Oxygen Substitution Cyclization Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanVeller, Brett

    The cyclization and planarization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with concomitant oxygen substitution was achieved through acid catalyzed transetherification and oxygen-radical reactions. The triptycene scaffold ...

  8. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key indus- trial

  9. All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in Chemistry. All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in...

  10. Gas and Particulate Sampling of Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, D.A.; Gundel, L.A.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The denuder surfaces of the gas and particle (GAP) sampler (developed at the Atmospheric Environment Service of Environment Canada) have been modified by coating with XAD-4 resin, using techniques developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the lower capacity integrated organic vapor/particle sampler (IOVPS). The resulting high capacity integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS) has been operated in ambient air at 16.7 L min{sup -1} for a 24-hour period in Berkeley, California, USA. Simultaneous measurements were made at the same collection rate with a conventional sampler that used a filter followed by two sorbent beds. Gas and particle partition measurements were determined for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from 2-ring to 6-ring species. The IOGAPS indicated a higher particle fraction of these compounds than did the conventional sampler, suggesting that the conventional sampler suffered from 'blow-off' losses from the particles collected on the filter.

  11. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  12. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  13. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Congress on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences and Engineering (ECCOMAS 2012) Corresponding author Dimensions $ L. Banjaia,1 , M. Kachanovskab, aDepartment of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS,UK bMax Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Inselstr. 22, 04103 Leipzig

  14. Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physics are con­ sistent with the Moyal product of noncommutative field theory. An example­Witten noncommutative gauge theories by Friedemann Brandt, Carmelo P. Martin, and Fernando Ruiz Ruiz Preprint no.: 70­Witten noncommutative gauge theories Friedemann Brandt Max­Planck­Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Inselstra�e

  15. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    18 1 Introduction Noncommutative quantum field theories (NCQFT) enjoy wide popularity among theoret. Quantum field theory on a noncommutative Minkowski spacetime was rigorously realised in [8]. The quantumJun2012 Wedge-Local Quantum Fields on a Nonconstant Noncommutative Spacetime A. Much Max

  16. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -organization of complex robotic behaviors by Georg Martius, Ralf Der, and Nihat Ay Preprint no.: 15 2013 #12;#12;Information driven self-organization of complex robotic behaviors Georg Martius1, Ralf Der1, Nihat Ay1,2 1Max

  17. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Conditional Probability Polytopes by Guido Mont´ufar, Johannes Rauh, and Nihat Ay Preprint no.: 87 2014 #12 , and Nihat Ay1,2,3 {montufar, jrauh, nay}@mis.mpg.de 1 Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences

  18. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Conditional Restricted Boltzmann Machines for Sensorimotor Control by Guido Mont´ufar, Nihat Ay, and Keyan for Sensorimotor Control Guido Mont´ufar1 , Nihat Ay1,2,3 , and Keyan Zahedi1 1 Max Planck Institute

  19. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Information Inequalities by Nihat Ay, and Walter Wenzel Preprint no.: 16 2011 #12;#12;On Solution Sets of Information Inequalities Nihat Ay1,2 & Walter Wenzel1,3 {nay, wenzel}@mis.mpg.de 1Max Planck Institute

  20. Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard reference material 1649a (urban dust) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) and 9 oxygenated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs aromatic hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic

  1. Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naspinski, Christine S.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment and are generated by many sources. Though the potential of PAH-rich mixtures to cause health effects has been known for almost a century, there are still unanswered...

  2. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  3. Miniature penetrator (MinPen) acceleration recorder development test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, R.J.; Platzbecker, M.R.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Telemetry Technology Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories actively develops and tests acceleration recorders for penetrating weapons. This new acceleration recorder (MinPen) utilizes a microprocessor-based architecture for operational flexibility while maintaining electronics and packaging techniques developed over years of penetrator testing. MinPen has been demonstrated to function in shock environments up to 20,000 Gs. The MinPen instrumentation development has resulted in a rugged, versatile, miniature acceleration recorder and is a valuable tool for penetrator testing in a wide range of applications.

  4. Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the equations: (1.1) (# t +D)u = 0, u(x; 0) = #, and Bu = 0. The specific heat # is a section to the dual bundle V # . Let #(#, #, D, B)(t) := # M u# be the total heat energy content. As t # 0, there is a completeMax-Planck-Institut fË? ur Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften Leipzig Heat content asymptotics

  5. Experimental and modeling investigation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a premixed ethylene flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldi, M.J.; Marinov, N.M.; Melius, C.F. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling has been performed to investigate aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon formation pathways in a rich, sooting, ethylene-oxygen-argon premixed flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.5 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) technique. Measurements were made in the flame and post-flame zone for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-aromatic fused rings. The modeling results show the key reaction sequences leading to aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon growth involve the combination of resonantly stabilized radicals. In particular, propargyl and 1-methylallenyl combination reactions lead to benzene and methyl substituted benzene formation, while polycyclic aromatics are formed from cyclopentadienyl radicals and fused rings that have a shared C{sub 5} side structure. Naphthalene production through the reaction step of cyclopentadienyl self-combination and phenanthrene formation from indenyl and cyclopentadienyl combination were shown to be important in the flame modeling study. The removal of phenyl by O{sub 2} leading to cyclopentadienyl formation is expected to play a pivotal role in the PAH or soot precursor growth process under fuel-rich oxidation conditions.

  6. Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two;2 Abstract The size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH derivatives of compounds. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated

  7. Sampling precautions for the measurement of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Sampling precautions for the measurement of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and of their oxidation products, such as nitrated and oxygenated PAHs hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Sampling

  8. Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two aromatic hydrocarbons, 17 nitrated PAHs (NPAHs) and 8 oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) were carried out during hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  9. Estimation method for the thermochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Joanna

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic molecules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have attracted considerable attention in the past few decades. They are formed during the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and are ...

  10. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  11. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert E. [557 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA 94550; Dolbeare, Frank A. [5178 Diane La., Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  12. Neurton Damage and MAX Phase Ternary Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsoum, Michael; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Sindelar, Robert; Garcua-Duaz, Brenda; Kohse, Gordon

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron radiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ C) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the resonse of a new class of machinable, conductive, layered, ternary transition metal carbides and nitrides - the so-called MAX phases - to low and moderate neutron dose levels.

  13. SolarMax Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore Jump to:Voltaic MalaysiaSolarLab Jump to:SolarMax

  14. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-MAX HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford C-MAX HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  15. Max-Planck-Institut fr biologische Kybernetik Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and analysis of human psychophysical experiments. ˇ Good understanding of the English language in speaking Position in Human Motion Simulation The Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen laws of perception will be implemented into the control framework of motion-based simulators. Human

  16. Plasmonics and Electron Optics in Graphene Min Seok Jang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Plasmonics and Electron Optics in Graphene Thesis by Min Seok Jang In Partial Fulfillment novice. He, Seyoon Kim, Josue Lopez and I have been working as a team on the graphene plasmonics project young scientists in Atwater group. Hyungjun Kim and I have been working on graphene electron optics more

  17. Module name: Computer Graphics and Interaction Abbreviation: MIN-CGI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Volker - Fakultät IV

    Module name: Computer Graphics and Interaction Abbreviation: MIN-CGI Study Semester: 1 st Semester, module in specialization Computer Graphics Teaching methods/SWS: 2 SWS lecture, 2 SWS exercise Work acc. to exam regulations: None Recommended prerequisites: Introductory computer graphics lecture

  18. Smart Homes, Families, and Control Min Kyung Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, John

    Smart Homes, Families, and Control Min Kyung Lee School of Design Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 paper Conference Themes: Space and environment, emotion and culture #12;Smart Homes, Families a smart home that will provide the appropriate assistance to improve human experience. While technology

  19. Aromaticity of Polycyclic Conjugated Hydrocarbons Milan Randic*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Aromaticity of Polycyclic Conjugated Hydrocarbons Milan Randic´* National Institute of Chemistry Chemistry 3462 G. Clar 6n Rule versus Hu¨ckel 4n + 2 Rule 3464 H. Hydrocarbons versus Heteroatomic Systems Ordering 3476 VI. On Enumeration of Benzenoid Hydrocarbons 3477 VII. Kekule´ Valence Structures Count 3479

  20. Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, UniversitĂŠ de

    Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in snow and ice sampled at Colle designed, built and tested. Melt water from inner part of ice core section was pumped to an ICP-SFMS and ICP-OES. Melt water from outer section was on-line extracted by solid-phase cartridges for semi

  1. 6 MaxPlanckForschung 4 | 09 PERSPEKTIVEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ", zu dem die Max- Planck-Gesellschaft und Siemens über 400 Wissenschaftler, Politiker und Manager müsse. Siemens setze bereits ganz auf grüne Technologien, so Siemens-Chef Peter Löscher. Max-Planck-Gesellschaft und Siemens laden zum Future Dialogue Unter dem Titel ,,The Evolution of Me- dicine" fand vom 14. bis

  2. MIND-DEPENDENT CONFORMATIONAL CHANGES IN MINE REGULATE THE MIN OSCILLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Kyung-Tae

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The min system comprised of MinC, MinD, and MinE in Escherichia coli ensures that cell division occurs at the midcell position by preventing the assembly of FtsZ into a Z-ring at the poles. MinD is a member of the deviant walker A motif family...

  3. Effect of irradiance spectra on the photoinduced toxicity of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, S.A.; Mount, D.R.; Burkhard, L.P.; Ankley, G.T.; Makynen, E.A.; Leonard, E.N.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is dependent on the concentration of compounds present and the dose of light received. Of the light present, only those wavelengths absorbed by the compound have the potential to initiate the photochemical events underlying phototoxicity. This suggests that variation in light spectra present in natural waters, arising from variation in dissolved organic carbon composition, is an important determinant of phototoxicity risk in specific, PAH-contaminated waterbodies. To quantify the effect of environmentally realistic variation in light spectra on toxicity, brine shrimp (Artemia salina) assays were conducted under various light spectra and with three PAHs (pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene) of known phototoxicity potential. In these spectral assays, the total ultraviolet light present was equivalent; only the spectral characteristics varied. Based on the absorbance spectra of these PAHs, it was predicted that toxicity, quantified using immobilization as the endpoint, would vary significantly among light spectra in pyrene assays, but not in anthracene assays, and that variation in toxicity in fluoranthene assays would be intermediate. The results supported these assumptions. In the pyrene exposures, the glass filter time to 50% population immobilization (IT50) (39.5 min) was 117% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (18.2 min). In the fluoranthene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (49.5 min) was 27% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (39.1 min). In the anthracene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (62.2 min) was not statistically different from the KCr filter IT50 (63.8 min). Comparison of these results with the results of assays conducted under neutral-density filters (that change intensity but not spectral distribution) demonstrate that multiplying spectral intensity by wavelength-specific absorbance accurately predicts relative photoinduced toxicity among the experimental treatments. These results indicate that quantifying the spectral characteristics of PAH-contaminated aquatic environments may be an important component of risk assessment at these sites.

  4. Modcomp MAX IV System Processors reference guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A user almost always faces a big problem when having to learn to use a new computer system. The information necessary to use the system is often scattered throughout many different manuals. The user also faces the problem of extracting the information really needed from each manual. Very few computer vendors supply a single Users Guide or even a manual to help the new user locate the necessary manuals. Modcomp is no exception to this, Modcomp MAX IV requires that the user be familiar with the system file usage which adds to the problem. At General Atomics there is an ever increasing need for new users to learn how to use the Modcomp computers. This paper was written to provide a condensed Users Reference Guide'' for Modcomp computer users. This manual should be of value not only to new users but any users that are not Modcomp computer systems experts. This Users Reference Guide'' is intended to provided the basic information for the use of the various Modcomp System Processors necessary to, create, compile, link-edit, and catalog a program. Only the information necessary to provide the user with a basic understanding of the Systems Processors is included. This document provides enough information for the majority of programmers to use the Modcomp computers without having to refer to any other manuals. A lot of emphasis has been placed on the file description and usage for each of the System Processors. This allows the user to understand how Modcomp MAX IV does things rather than just learning the system commands.

  5. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  6. ARM - Evaluation Product - Cloud Optical Properties from MFRSR Using Min

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi1-min (NAVBE1M)

  7. Property:GBIG/MinHeight | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation, search PropertyCalculatedCenter Jump to:MinHeight Jump to:

  8. Property:Incentive/TechMin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation,ProjectStartDate JumpAuth3LinkTechMin Jump to: navigation,

  9. Min County Longwangtai Hydropower Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers Inc Jump to:JumpMidwestMillenniumMin

  10. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J; Sioutas, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coupled out- door/polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration in combustionbound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons K. A. , Morris, J. ,

  11. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN); Schulz, Amber L. (Bremerton, WA); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for ro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound.

  12. aromatic aldehyde production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    virtual product and production Lemurell, Stefan 291 Production of 18F-Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: One carbon Two carbon Aromatic ...

  13. aromatic diamine curing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hawaii 96822 University. University of Hawai'i at Manoa. (1) Ramdahl, T.; Bjorseth, J. Handbook of Polycyclic Aromatic Kaiser, Ralf I. 178 Photofragmentation spectroscopy of...

  14. aromatic nitro compounds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

  15. aromatic hydrocarbon formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Formation, Hamersley Group, and were collected in mines near Tom Price mature gas condensates. The aromatic fraction predominantly consists of unsubstituted two and...

  16. aromatic methoxy groups: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Formation, Hamersley Group, and were collected in mines near Tom Price mature gas condensates. The aromatic fraction predominantly consists of unsubstituted two and...

  17. aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogenesis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: ), and there are oil refineries on the shore. In this environment, input of aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum and the Yarra River Estuary J. David...

  18. aromatic hydrocarbon tracers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: ), and there are oil refineries on the shore. In this environment, input of aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum and the Yarra River Estuary J. David...

  19. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planck Society President Peter Gruss, and Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New York Busso von Alvensleben meet to sign an agreement launching the new Max...

  20. Centerfor Genome Bas Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Be rlin Centerfor Genome Bas ed Bioinform a tics Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics109/209 and 01GR0455 of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. In addition X

  1. Centerfor Genome Bas Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Be rlin Centerfor Genome Bas ed Bioinform a tics Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics of Education. 2 #12;Chapter 2 Implemented functions 2.1 twilight.pval: Testing effect sizes twilight

  2. LINEAR-PROGRAMMING DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF FAST ALGORITHMS FOR MAX 2-CSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Alexander Alexander

    LINEAR-PROGRAMMING DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF FAST ALGORITHMS FOR MAX 2-CSP ALEXANDER D. SCOTT AND GREGORY B. SORKIN Abstract. The class Max (r, 2)-CSP (or simply Max 2-CSP) consists of constraint(G) (13/75 + o(1))m, which gives a faster Max 2-CSP algorithm that uses exponential space: running in time

  3. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, Tom; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Anderberg, Mary; Kutchenreiter, Mark

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  4. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  5. Characterization of Min-K TE-1400 Thermal Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King, James [ORNL

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Min-K 1400TE insulation material was characterized at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in structural applications under gradient temperature conditions. Initial compression testing was performed at room temperature at various loading rates ranging between 5 and 500 psi/hour (?35 and 3500 kPa/hour) to determine the effect of sample size and test specimen geometry on the compressive strength of Min-K. To determine the loading rates that would be used for stress relaxation testing, compression tests were next carried out at various levels followed by stress relaxation under constant strain at temperatures of 650, 850, and 900oC. Additional high temperature compression testing was performed with samples loaded at a rate of 53 psi/hour (365 kPa/hour) in three load steps of 50, 100 and 200 psi (345, 690, and 1380 kPa) with quick unload/load cycles between steps and followed by a hold period in load control (3 to 100 hours) to allow for sample creep. Testing was carried out at 190, 382, 813, and 850oC. Isothermal stress relaxation testing was performed at temperatures of 190, 382, 813, and 850oC and initial loads of 100 and 200 psi (690 and 1380 kPa). Gradient stress relaxation testing was intended to be performed at temperatures of 850/450oC and 450/190oC with initial loads of 100 or 200 psi (690 and 1380 kPa) performed under constant strain utilizing a twelve-step loading scheme with loading every half hour at a rate of 5.56% strain/hour.

  6. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify, and to confirm or determine rate constants for, the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize soot and fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics. Stable and radical species profiles in the aromatics oxidation study are measured using molecular beam sampling with on-line mass spectrometry. The rate of soot formation measured by conventional optical techniques is found to support the hypotheses that particle inception occurs through reactive coagulation of high molecular weight PAH in competition with destruction by OHattack, and that the subsequent growth of the soot mass occurs through addition reactions of PAH and C[sub 2]H[sub 2] with the soot particles. During the first year of this reporting period, fullerenes C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] in substantial quantities were found in the flames being studied. The fullerenes were recovered, purified and spectroscopically identified. The yields of C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] were then determined over ranges of conditions in low-pressure premixed flames of benzene and oxygen.

  7. Synthesis of Aliphatic-Aromatic Copolyesters by a High Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    -aromatic polyesters. #12;Full Paper: Reverse-selective polymer membranes exhibiting high CO2 affinity can be used for purification of H2 in industrial gasification processes. In this work, the phy- sical properties of CO2Synthesis of Aliphatic-Aromatic Copolyesters by a High Temperature Bulk Reaction Between Poly

  8. Nutritional Status of some Aromatic Plants Grown to Produce Volatile Oils under Treated Municipal Wastewater irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalifa, Ramadan Khalifa Mohamed

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used for growing aromatic plants in the arid area to produceoil for five aromatic plants , 2) evaluation of TMW assource for the tested plants and study its nutritional

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic rings synthesis Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... - ent aromatic hydrocarbons (ZIKTO and CARSON 1970r NEFF and ANDERSON ... Source:...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons resulting Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Summary: fuel. (d) Lubricating oil. - 300 400 Wavelength (nm) Results Concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons... Aust. J....

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Summary: fuel. (d) Lubricating oil. - 300 400 Wavelength (nm) Results Concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons... Bay...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Summary: fuel. (d) Lubricating oil. - 300 400 Wavelength (nm) Results Concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons... Bay...

  13. Spatial Regulation of Cell Division by the Min System in E. coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bang

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Z-WT and FtsZ-N280D assayed at different protein concentrations.......................................................................................................................113 Fig. 25. FtsZ-N280D is insensitive to the action of MinC N in vitro... live cell as revealed by GFP-MinD (Hu & Lutkenhaus, 2001). In this experiment, gfp-minD/minE was induced in a ?min strain, time-lapse microscopy was used to track the localization of GFP- MinD over time, and cells were photographed every 25 seconds. B...

  14. Eigenvalues And Eigenvectors In The Max-Plus Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    By Misoo; Misoo Chung; William E. Cherowitzo; David C. Fisher; David C. Fisher

    The max-plus algebra defined in the set ! [ f\\Gamma1g is an algebra with two binary operations \\Phi and\\Omega where a \\Phi b is the maximum of a and b, and a\\Omega b is the sum of a and b. These operations form a monoid-field (there is no inverse under \\Phi). This paper implements algorithms for solving linear systems and computing eigenvalues and eigenvectors including the first known polynomial-time algorithm for finding eigenvalues of matrices in the max-plus algebra. Analogs to the characteristic equation and the Cayley-Hamilton theorem are presented. This abstract accurately represents the content of the candidate's thesis. I recommend its publication. Signed David C. Fisher iii Contents 1 The Max-Plus Algebra 1 1.1 Matrix Multiplication in (! max ) n\\Thetan : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 1.2 An Application : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5 2 Systems of Linear Equations in (! max ) n 8 2.1 Solving Ax \\Phi b = Cx \\Phi d : : : : : : : : : : : ...

  15. Detoxification of aromatic pollutants by fungal enzymes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollag, J.M.; Dec, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fungal enzymes, such as laccase, peroxidase, and tyrosinase, play a prominent role in catalyzing the transformation of various aromatic compounds in the environment. The enzyme-mediated oxidative coupling reaction results in covalent binding of chlorinated phenols and anilines to soil organic matter or polymerization of the substrates in aquatic systems. Both of these processes are accompanied by a detoxification effect. Therefore, it has been postulated that they be exploited for the treatment of polluted soil and water. The mechanism and efficiency of oxidative coupling in pollutant removal were studied by incubation of chlorinated phenols and anilines with various humic substances or soil and analysis of the reaction products by chromatography and mass and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. The decontamination effect could be enhanced by optimization of the reaction conditions and immobilization of enzymes on solid materials. The results obtained strongly support the concept of using enzymes for control of environmental pollution.

  16. Max-Plus Stochastic Control and Risk-Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Wendell H., E-mail: whf@dam.brown.ed [Brown University, Division of Applied Mathematics and Lefschetz Center for Dynamical Systems (United States); Kaise, Hidehiro, E-mail: kaise@is.nagoya-u.ac.j [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Information Science (Japan); Sheu, Shuenn-Jyi, E-mail: sheusj@math.sinica.edu.t [Academia Sinica, Institute of Mathematics (China)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Maslov idempotent probability calculus, expectations of random variables are defined so as to be linear with respect to max-plus addition and scalar multiplication. This paper considers control problems in which the objective is to minimize the max-plus expectation of some max-plus additive running cost. Such problems arise naturally as limits of some types of risk sensitive stochastic control problems. The value function is a viscosity solution to a quasivariational inequality (QVI) of dynamic programming. Equivalence of this QVI to a nonlinear parabolic PDE with discontinuous Hamiltonian is used to prove a comparison theorem for viscosity sub- and super-solutions. An example from mathematical finance is given, and an application in nonlinear H-infinity control is sketched.

  17. 10 to 70% methanol in 50 mM KH2PO4 over 25 min, 10 ml/min, monitor at 380 nm). Next, the HPLC-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    10 to 70% methanol in 50 mM KH2PO4 over 25 min, 10 ml/min, monitor at 380 nm). Next, the HPLC- purified mixture was desalted on the same column (methanol was removed on a rotary evaporator, and the sample loaded in H2O and eluted with 90% methanol) and lyophilized, yielding the purified Nvoc

  18. DOE FY10_Svc_Cont_Inv 122910 v2 MAX.xlsx | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    MAX.xlsx DOE FY10SvcContInv 122910 v2 MAX.xlsx More Documents & Publications Service Contract Inventory ClassWaiverWC-1982-001-FormerlyWA-1982-017.pdf...

  19. aromatic hydrocarbon emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Detection of mid-infrared Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features from the Small Magellanic Cloud Astrophysics...

  20. aromatic heterocyclic compounds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and Their Ions. 6....

  1. aromatic hydrocarbon cations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NITROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CATIONS FROM 0.7 TO 2.5...

  2. aromatic hydrocarbon emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Detection of mid-infrared Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features from the Small Magellanic Cloud Astrophysics...

  3. aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 14 through March 7, 2014 Opening Reception: Friday, February 14, 5-8PM TRI-COUNTY HIGH Berdichevsky, Victor 443 The Behavior of the Aromatic Features in M101 HII...

  4. Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Anuradha M.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered...

  5. Modeling the biodegradability and physicochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitriou-Christidis, Petros

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The biodegradability and physicochemical properties of unsubstituted and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated. The focus was on the development of models expressing the influence of molecular structure and properties...

  6. Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Anuradha M.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered...

  7. Guidelines for Residential Commissioning Craig Wray, Iain Walker, Max Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-48767 Guidelines for Residential Commissioning Craig Wray, Iain Walker, Max Sherman Berkeley, CA 94720 January 2003 This report describes work supported by the California Energy Commission-76SF00098. This report was prepared as a result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission

  8. Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension Veterinarian University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Water is an essential nutrient for humans and livestock and drinking water is the primary source of water for most cattle. The most important aspect of water

  9. Iain S. Walker1 and Max H. Sherman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 50189 1 Iain S. Walker1 and Max H. Sherman1 Sealant Longevity for Residential Ducts Reference by LBNL is being used as a basis for an ASTM Standard under sub-committee E6.41. LBNL tests found sealants. LBNL has also tested advanced tape products being developed by major manufacturers. The results

  10. Curriculum Vitae Arne Max Erich Winguth, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winguth, Arne

    in an earth system model", two months summer salary, 2005. [9] Visiting Scientist, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany, "Development of marine carbon cycle in an earth system model", two months summer salary of marine carbon cycle in an earth system model", two months summer salary, 2003. [12] University

  11. Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science Pressand features are hardly noticeable when the whole face is inverted (rotated 180°), but strikingly grotesque are still important. "Although we look at the eyes first our neural functions still grasp the whole picture

  12. New correlation accurately calculates water solubilities of aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new correlation calculates reliable aromatics solubilities in water down to very low concentrations. The correlation, based on boiling point, can be used for initial engineering studies. The importance of hydrocarbon solubility in water is increasing because of health, safety, and environmental issues. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of solubility, even at low concentrations. The new correlation is described, aromatics are compared with paraffins, and the new correlation is compared with the API correlation.

  13. Catalytic hydrogenation of an aromatic sulfonyl chloride into thiophenol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouckout, Nicolas Julien

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to the facile oxidation by air into disulfides [3]. Many aliphatic thiols are important starting materials for the synthesis of crop- protection agents, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and polysulfides. They are also widely used as polymerization regulators... for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, dyes, pigments, rubber, plastics and metal finishing [3]. The current market volume for aromatic thiols was determined to be more than 10 million pounds per year [4]. Aromatic thiols are commonly synthesized...

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in Mississippi Fan sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandberg, William Allan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DISTRIBUTIONS IN MISSISSIPPI FAN SEDIMENTS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALLAN SANDBERG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Oceanography POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DISTRIBUTIONS IN MISSISSIPPI FAN SEDIMENTS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALLAN SANDBERG Approved as to style and content by: James M. Brooks (Chairman of Committee) Leis M...

  15. Participants EWASS 2012 Symposium 2 Albertsson, T., Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinton, Jim

    Occhiogrosso, A., University College London Parise, B., Max-Planck-Institut f¨ur Radioastronomie 1 #12;Pilbratt

  16. System-level Max Power (SYMPO) -A Systematic Approach for Escalating System-level Power Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    System-level Max Power (SYMPO) - A Systematic Approach for Escalating System-level Power a computer system for the worst case power consumption scenario, system architects often use hand-crafted max SYMPO, an automatic SYstem level Max POwer virus generation framework, which maximizes the power

  17. Sugar++: A SAT-Based MAX-CSP/COP Solver Tomoya Tanjo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    Sugar++: A SAT-Based MAX-CSP/COP Solver Tomoya Tanjo1 , Naoyuki Tamura2 , and Mutsunori Banbara2 1 describes some features of Sugar++, a SAT-based MAX- CSP/COP solver entering the Third International CSP Solver Competition. In our approach, a MAX-CSP is translated into a Constraint Optimization Problem (COP

  18. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Long-range transport of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at Cape Hedo remote island site in the East China Sea between 2005 and 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for 2004. Atmos.of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air throughpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban air of Hong Kong.

  20. Elastic properties of superconducting MAX phases from first principles calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. R. Shein; A. L. Ivanovskii

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first-principles density functional calculations, a systematic study on the elastic properties for all known superconducting MAX phases (Nb2SC, Nb2SnC, Nb2AsC, Nb2InC, Mo2GaC and Ti2InC) was performed. As a result, the optimized lattice parameters, independent elastic constants, indicators of elastic anisotropy and brittle/ductile behavior as well as the so-called machinability indexis were calculated. We derived also bulk and shear moduli, Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio for ideal polycrystalline MAX aggregates. The results obtained were discussed in comparison with available theoretical and experimental data and elastic parameters for other layered superconductors.

  1. Discrete and Continuous Min-Energy Schedules for Variable Voltage Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Minming

    Discrete and Continuous Min-Energy Schedules for Variable Voltage Processors Minming Li Andrew C to be set dynamically in order to save energy consumption, which is a major concern in microprocessor design. A theoretical model for min-energy job scheduling was first proposed a decade ago, and it was shown that for any

  2. Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments by providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments to simulate the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic contaminated sediments was investigated as the sole electron acceptor. Providing graphite electrodes as an electron acceptor in hydrocarbon

  3. UV RESONANCE W A N SPECTROSCOPY: A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR SPECIATION OF AROMATICS IN COMPLEX MATRICES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    UV RESONANCE W A N SPECTROSCOPY: A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR SPECIATION OF AROMATICS IN COMPLEX MATRICES resonance Raman spectroscopy ( 1). appears to be uniquely suited for studies of aromatic species in fuels

  4. Development of genetically engineered bacteria for production of selected aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Thomas E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Carolyn S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bulmer, Deborah K. (Henderson, NV); Johnson, Bruce F. (Scotia, NY); Amaratunga, Mohan (Clifton Park, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cloning and expression of genes in the common aromatic pathway of E. coli are described. A compound for which chorismate, the final product of the common aromatic pathway, is an anabolic intermediate can be produced by cloning and expressing selected genes of the common aromatic pathway and the genes coding for enzymes necessary to convert chorismate to the selected compound. Plasmids carrying selected genes of the common aromatic pathway are also described.

  5. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  6. Isomer discrimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite by resonant ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Vries, Mattanjah S.

    Isomer discrimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite by resonant between isomers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite. We measured the 2C-R2PI: Resonant ionization; Jet cooling; Mass spectrometry; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Murchison meteorite

  7. Toxicity cutoff of aromatic hydrocarbons for luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Toxicity cutoff of aromatic hydrocarbons for luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri So Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons a b s t r a c t Effects of individual petroleum hydrocarbons hydrocarbons, including benzene and its derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were chosen

  8. Prediction of Solid Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubility in Water with the NRTL-PR Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Prediction of Solid Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubility in Water with the NRTL-PR Model of solid polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water. For this purpose, we first validate our methodology for fluid phase equilibria predictions of aromatic hydrocarbons and gas (CO2, C2H6) mixtures. Finally, we

  9. Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents Rahoma S. Mohamed* and Anto. The results indicated possible asphaltene aggregation as well as the probable existence of critical micelle fraction. Average molecular areas for asphaltenes adsorbed at different interfaces estimated from surface

  10. UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Clemett,3 Richard N. Zare3 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water ice were exposed to ultra meteorites. Hydrogen and deu- terium atoms exchange readily between the PAHs and the ice, which may explain abundant and widespread class of carbon-car- rying gaseous species is believed to be PAHs (3­5). In dense

  11. Desorption Kinetics for Field-Aged Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    Harbor Estuary. Desorption kinetics for PAHs with a log octanol- water partition coefficient greater than This study considers desorption kinetics for 12 field-aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) desorbing 6 were well- described by a one-domain diffusion model that assumes that PAHs are initially

  12. Biodegradation of Bicyclic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    solubility of oxygen in water. Therefore, our present understanding of PAH degradation in aerobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to be biodegraded under aerobic conditions, most contaminated sediments are anaerobic. With recent results demonstrating that some bicyclics and PAHs can

  13. The Max Tech and Beyond Competition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest for PumpingThe Facts on GasThe Importance TheThe Max Tech

  14. SolarMax Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolar Energy sroWiki Page SolarSolarMax

  15. Property:Incentive/MaxInc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid JumpEligSysSize Jump to: navigation, searchFundSrcMaxInc

  16. MaxWeber,"ScienceasaVocation" 'WissenschaftalsBeruf,'fromGesammlteAufsaetzezurWissenschaftslehre(Tubingen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldreich, Oded

    MaxWeber,"ScienceasaVocation" 'Wissenschaftals a sort of moral right to expect some consideration. He also #12;Weber,"ScienceasVocation" 2

  17. MinChem: A Prototype Petrologic Database for Hanford Site Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Serkowski, John A.; Middleton, Lisa A.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype petrologic database (MinChem) has been under continual development for several years. MinChem contains petrologic, mineralogical, and bulk-rock geochemical data for Hanford Site sediments collected over multiple decades. The database is in relational form and consists of a series of related tables modeled after the Hanford Environmental Information System HEIS (BHI 2002) structures. The HEIS-compatible tables were created in anticipation of eventual migration into HEIS, or some future form of HEIS (e.g. HEIS-GEO). There are currently a total of 13,129 results in MinChem from 521 samples collected at 381 different sampling sites. These data come from 19 different original source documents published and unpublished (e.g. letter reports) between 1976 and 2009. The data in MinChem consist of results from analytical methods such as optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, and electron probe microanalysis.

  18. ARM: Short Wave Flux Analysis: 15-min resolution on SIRS data, Long algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, Tom; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Anderberg, Mary; Kutchenreiter, Mark

    Short Wave Flux Analysis: 15-min resolution on SIRS data, Long algorithm. Measurements began in January, 1994, and have continued to the present time. Data collected are from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) location.

  19. MinISO: A Minimal Independent System Operator Pravin Varaiya and Felix Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a hindrance to structural reform. By separating those functions, MinISO maxi- mizes consumer choice savings and economic growth through a broad range of structural reform of the elec- tric utility industry

  20. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /CCAPP; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Evrard, August E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; Hansen, Sarah M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Hao, Jia; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Northwestern U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Sheldon, Erin S.; /Brookhaven; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  1. Automated Spacecraft Docking Using a Vision-Based Relative Navigation Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jeffery C.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . 131 4. Test Case 3: Max-Max-Max Inertia Uncertainty . . . 140 5. Test Case 4: Min-Min-Min Inertia Uncertainty . . . . 149 6. Test Case 5: Max-Min-Min Inertia Uncertainty . . . . 158 7. Test Case 6: Min-Max-Max Inertia Uncertainty . . . . 167 8. Test... Case 7: Max-Max-Max Initial Attitude Error . . 176 9. Test Case 8: Min-Min-Min Initial Attitude Error . . . 185 10.Test Case 9: Max-Min-Min Initial Attitude Error . . . 194 11.Test Case 10: Min-Max-Max Initial Attitude Error . . 207 12.Test Case 11: Max...

  2. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropocentrically impacted regions. Interspecies correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources for the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropocentrically impacted regions.

  3. Living and working in Germany A guide for international scientists at Max Planck Institutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Living and working in Germany A guide for international scientists at Max Planck Institutes #12 and the hospitality in your town. You will quickly find that Germany is a country of many facets ­ a country Planck Society is Germany's most successful scientific or- ganisation in basic research. Max Planck

  4. The Max Planck Society At home in Germany -present throughout the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Max Planck Society At home in Germany - present throughout the world Internationalisation ­ the Max Planck Society's role in safeguarding Germany's future Cooperation across national borders is one the internationalisation of science, both on its own behalf and also on behalf of Germany as a research location. To do

  5. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Max Sherman, Iain Walker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Max Sherman, Iain Walker Environmental thereof or the Regents of the University of California. #12;Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Max Sherman and Iain Walker, Lawrence Berkeley Lab ABSTRACT Ventilation dilutes or removes indoor

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL 1 Max-Plus Control Design for Temporal Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    constraints, timed event graph (TEG). I. INTRODUCTION Many manufacturing systems are subject to tight time with Timed Event Graphs (TEG), that permit to take time constraints explicitely into account. The problem). As is well-known from [5], TEG give rise to Max-Plus algebraic models, which are linear over the dioid max

  7. The use and misuse of Vc,max in Earth System Models Alistair Rogers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    REVIEW The use and misuse of Vc,max in Earth System Models Alistair Rogers Received: 18 November Dordrecht (outside the USA) 2013 Abstract Earth System Models (ESMs) aim to project global change. Central Á Vc,max Á Leaf nitrogen Á Earth System Models Introduction The primary goal of Earth System Models

  8. 07. September 2007 Julia Ducke 1 Max-Planck-Institut fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    07. September 2007 Julia Ducke 1 Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik HalleWeb 2.0-Workshop Wiki Erfahrungen mit Web 2.0 Erfahrungsbericht aus der Bibliothek des MPI für Mikrostrukturphysik #12;07. September 2007 Julia Ducke 2 Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik HalleWeb 2.0-Workshop #12

  9. Efficient SIMD technique with parallel Max-Log-MAP Algorithm for Turbo Decoders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, UniversitĂŠ de

    Efficient SIMD technique with parallel Max-Log-MAP Algorithm for Turbo Decoders David Gnaedig Turbo on a DSP a parallel Max-Log-MAP algorithm for turbo decoders. It consists in using SIMD instructions by the use of an adapted two-dimensional turbo code and its parallel interleaver structure. After a brief

  10. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricca, Alessandra [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr. [Entry Systems and Technology Division, Mail Stop 230-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Allamandola, Louis J., E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca-1@nasa.gov, E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Mail Stop 245-6, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

  11. Analytic technique measures aromatics in soil and water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a technique for detecting aromatic compounds in soil and water. The technique traces its roots to a chemical reaction discovered in 1877. The reaction is an organic synthesis process that has been harnessed for the production of high-octane gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics and synthetic detergents. More than a century later the same chemistry is used as the basis for an analytical technique that quantifies contamination caused by products.

  12. Stability trends of MAX phases from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlqvist, M.; Alling, B.; Rosen, J. [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, IFM, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a systematic method to investigate the phase stability of M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} phases, here applied for M=Sc, Ti, V, Cr, or Mn, A=Al, and X=C or N. Through a linear optimization procedure including all known competing phases, we identify the set of most competitive phases for n=1-3 in each system. Our calculations completely reproduce experimental occurrences of stable MAX phases. We also identify and suggest an explanation for the trend in stability as the transition metal is changed across the 3d series for both carbon- and nitrogen-based systems. Based on our results, the method can be used to predict stability of potentially existing undiscovered phases.

  13. Bringing ATLAS production to HPC resources - A use case with the Hydra supercomputer of the Max Planck Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluth, Stefan; The ATLAS collaboration; Mazzaferro, Luca; Walker, Rodney

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bringing ATLAS production to HPC resources - A use case with the Hydra supercomputer of the Max Planck Society

  14. Maximal heart rates of 130140beats min-1 have been measured in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) (Brill, 1987;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    , skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) have maximum heart rates of 154­191 beats min-1 (Brill, 1987; Farrell et

  15. AtMIN7 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Sheng Yang (Okemos, MI); Nomura, Kinya (East Lansing, MI)

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein AtMIN7 mediated protection is enhanced and/or there is a decrease in activity of an AtMIN7 associated virulence protein such as a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1. Reagents of the present invention provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  16. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  17. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  18. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  19. Thermoelectric Rotating Torus for Fusion A. B. Hassam and Yi-Min Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassam, Adil

    Thermoelectric Rotating Torus for Fusion A. B. Hassam and Yi-Min Huang Institute for Plasma power maintains the rotation and also heats the plasma. The thermoelectric effect from the resultingRevLett.91.195002 PACS numbers: 52.58.­c, 52.30.­q, 52.55.­s In magnetized plasma, thermoelectric currents

  20. Progress on Earthquake Rapid Reporting and Early Warning Systems Yih-Min Wu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Progress on Earthquake Rapid Reporting and Early Warning Systems in Taiwan Yih-Min Wu1 , Ta (RRS) and earthquake early warning (EWS) systems developed at the Central Weather Bureau (CWB), using a significant step towards a more realistic earthquake early warning capability. This early warning system has

  1. MinErAl prEpArAtion EnginEEring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    MinErAl prEpArAtion EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines Department of Mining ­ 36 credits The mineral preparation engineering program offers specialization in the processes used to concentrate target minerals and remove undesir- able material from mined ore. Interdisciplinary study

  2. "Dark Web: Exploring and Min-ing the Dark Side of the Web"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelsen, Claus

    in the internationally re- nowned Dark Web project will be reviewed, including: deep/dark web spider- ing (web sitesTitle: "Dark Web: Exploring and Min- ing the Dark Side of the Web" Speaker: Director, Prof will review the emerging research in Terrorism Informatics based on a web mining perspective. Recent progress

  3. Optical signature of topological insulators Ming-Che Chang1,* and Min-Fong Yang2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ming-Che

    Optical signature of topological insulators Ming-Che Chang1,* and Min-Fong Yang2, 1Department 16 September 2009 The axion coupling in topological insulators couples electric polarization, 73.20. r, 78.20. e I. INTRODUCTION A distinctive property of topological insulators is the ex

  4. Dynamic Treatment Regimes Min Qian1,, Inbal Nahum-Shani2 and Susan A. Murphy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Susan A.

    to improve patient care the type of treatment and the dosage should vary by patients. Additionally, in many the chapter. Addiction management example: Suppose in planning the treatment for alcohol dependent patients weDynamic Treatment Regimes Min Qian1,, Inbal Nahum-Shani2 and Susan A. Murphy1 1 Department

  5. Research Profile Particles are everywhere: from the earth and its mineral min-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoghdar, Vahid

    Research Profile Particles are everywhere: from the earth and its mineral min- ing to the air we aiming for new catalysts, sensors, nanocomposites,fuel cells,batteries,phosphors,CO2 sorbents, dental, orthopedic and even nutritional applications. Competences / Infrastructure Mixed ceramic/metal nanoparticle

  6. Labeling energy cost on light bulbs lowers implicit discount rates Jihoon Min a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    Analysis Labeling energy cost on light bulbs lowers implicit discount rates Jihoon Min a , Inęs L considerably. To quantify the influence of factors that drive consumer choices for light bulbs, we conducted incandescent bulbs. About half of the total lighting service (in terms of lumens) was provided by incandes

  7. Min-entropy and quantum key distribution: Nonzero key rates for ''small'' numbers of signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratzik, Sylvia; Mertz, Markus; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruss, Dagmar [Institute for Theoretical Physics III, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate an achievable secret key rate for quantum key distribution with a finite number of signals by evaluating the quantum conditional min-entropy explicitly. The min-entropy for a classical random variable is the negative logarithm of the maximal value in its probability distribution. The quantum conditional min-entropy can be expressed in terms of the guessing probability, which we calculate for d-dimensional systems. We compare these key rates to previous approaches using the von Neumann entropy and find nonzero key rates for a smaller number of signals. Furthermore, we improve the secret key rates by modifying the parameter estimation step. Both improvements taken together lead to nonzero key rates for only 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} signals. An interesting conclusion can also be drawn from the additivity of the min-entropy and its relation to the guessing probability: for a set of symmetric tensor product states, the optimal minimum-error discrimination (MED) measurement is the optimal MED measurement on each subsystem.

  8. Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location MinHo Kwon,1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location Tim Li,1 MinHo Kwon,1,3 Ming Zhao,3 Jong) is used to investigate the change of tropical cyclone frequency in the North Pacific under global warming, and W. Yu (2010), Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L

  9. Sub-wavelength nanofluidics in photonic crystal Min Huang,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sub-wavelength nanofluidics in photonic crystal sensors Min Huang,1,2 Ahmet Ali Yanik,1,2 , Tsung: We introduce a novel sensor scheme combining nano-photonics and nano-fluidics on a single platform and mechanical approaches to biomolecular detection at the nanoscale." Microfluid. Nanofluid. 4(1­2), 33­52 (2007

  10. aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soil Microcosms: A Review CiteSeer Summary: Copyright 2001 Kansas State University Key words: bioremediation, denitrification, PAHs, sulfidogenesis...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds progress Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major types...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic blending compounds Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ring aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic organic compounds Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major types...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds effects Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major types...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous polar aromatic Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Summary: is diffusion of the aqueous amine into the oil phase, then the polyurea formed early should be rich in aromatic... diisocyanate...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major types...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds part Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ring aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds derived Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ring aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major...

  19. Bimetallic cleavage of aromatic C-H bonds by rare-earth-metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, W; Huang, W; Dulong, F; Khan, SI; Cantat, T; Diaconescu, PL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aromatic C-H Bonds by Rare Earth Metal Complexes Wenliangone week prior to use. Rare earth metal oxides (scandium,

  20. aromatic hydrocarbon water-soluble: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    naturally into the environment by (more) Bobak, Deanna M. 2010-01-01 12 Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Open Access Theses and...

  1. aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated 212 Conversion of polycyclic...

  2. aromatic amine 2-amino-3-methyl-9h-pyrido: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

  3. aromatic amine p-anilinoaniline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

  4. Occurrence of chlorinated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in tap water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiraishi, H.; Pilkington, N.H.; Otsuki, A.; Fuwa, K.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic compounds in tap waters were extracted by a modified continuous liquid-liquid extractor and analyzed by computerized gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a fused silica capillary column. The results indicate the presence of monochlorinated derivatives of naphthalene, dibenzofuran, fluorene, fluorenone, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene and dichlorinated derivatives of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene. The parent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated derivatives such as fluorenone and anthraquinone were also found. It was demonstrated that chlorinated PAHs (Cl-PAHs) were really present in tap waters at 10/sup -1/-10/sup -2/ ng/L levels.

  5. The relative reactivity of formic esters with aromatic amines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markley, Max C.

    1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .MARKLEY I Vies* S ma y c . l k f c V i M t s RDQOSS 38M30 PREFACE. The purpose of this thesis was to determine the relative reactivity between aromatic amines and the esters of formic acid.It was proposed to first: deter­ mine the reactivity... be given Br .Ray Q,.Brewster , the director of this work, for his help and directions for carrying out this work, and to Br.Prank B.Bains for his kind assistance in many ways. 1.Broil,Journal fur Practische Chemie,1875,vol. 12,page 208. ( 2 ) TABLE...

  6. University of Delaware | Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation | Aromatics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSite Map SiteResearch Thrust Green Aromatics

  7. Keynote speakers Susan E. Trumbore -Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry Jena, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Keynote speakers Susan E. Trumbore - Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry Jena, Germany http for Landscape Biogeochemistry, Germany http://www.arthur-gessler.de/ PhillippeTortell, University of British

  8. A Connectionist model of Planning via Back-chaining Search Max Garagnani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shastri, Lokendra

    A Connectionist model of Planning via Back-chaining Search Max Garagnani Department of Computing+1 World state ObservableEpisodic Memory ECALL Figure 1: A block diagram showing the basic compo

  9. The NanoMax-TSTM three-axis stage offers an unmatched combination of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    555 Spacer Block to Raise Optical- Axis Height to 125-mm 17 AMA 554 Š2002 MELLES GRIOT MCE 1042 03 holes threaded M2 on 20 centers dimensions: millimeters 17 MAX 302 3-axis stage MELLES GRIOT

  10. Spring 2010 ME GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR (Note if MS student with 20 min presentation, two seminars will be scheduled on the same day)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    4/30/10 Beytullah Erdogan Buoy-Mounted Wind Turbine Technology 40 Mins Luncheon Date- TBA #12; Mins 2/19/10 Nikolay Timoshchuk Nano Indentation of Carbon/Carbon Composites 20 Mins Michael Buck 20-kinetic Turbine Testing 20 Mins Alex Johnston Investigation of Hydrokinetic Turbines 20 Mins 4/9/10 Benjamin

  11. A two-stage 100 l/min circumferential slot virtual impactor system for bioaerosol concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCroix, Daniel Edward

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A TWO-STAGE 100 L/min CIRCUMFERENTIAL SLOT VIRTUAL IMPACTOR SYSTEM FOR BIOAEROSOL CONCENTRATION A Thesis by DANIEL EDWARD LACROIX Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Andrew McFarland Committee Members, Yassin Hassan...

  12. Ambient aerosol sampling inlet for flow rates of 100 and 400 l/min

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baehl, Michael Matthew

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    tunnel, where three different speeds were employed; namely 2, 8, and 24 km/hr. The aerosol particles used in these tests were generated from ethanol dilutions of a master solution containing 90% ethanol, 9% oleic acid and 1% sodium fluorescein... AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLING INLET FOR FLOW RATES OF 100 AND 400 L/MIN A Thesis by MICHAEL MATTHEW BAEHL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  13. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  14. Aust. J. Mar. Freshw. Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    Aust. J. Mar. Freshw. Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Port Phillip Bay of aromatic hydrocarbons in coastal waters, using solvent extraction and fluorescence emission analysis, shows and the Yarra River estuary. Introduction Pollution of the marine environment by petroleum hydrocarbons

  15. Synthesis of condensed phases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons fullerenes and nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods for producing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and nanotubes, comprising: a. heating at least one carbon-containing material to form a condensed phase comprising at least one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; b. collecting at least some of the condensed phase; c. reacting the condensed phase to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes.

  16. Interfacial effects in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor: degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Interfacial effects in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor: degradation of polycyclic aromatic) was examined in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB). TPPBs are characterized by a cell Bioreactor; Hydrophobicity 1. Introduction Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), many of which possess

  17. FALL 2009 ME GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR (Note if MS student with 20 min presentation, two seminars will be scheduled on the same day)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Ducted Wind Turbine Optimization Studies 40 Mins 10/16/09 Borys Drach Carbon/Carbon Composites 40 Mins 10 Factor in Analytical Stress Based Forming Limit Criterion. 20 Mins Ivaylo Nedyalkov Redesign

  18. The Climate of EasternThe Climate of Eastern ColoradoColorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flagler min Lamar max Lamar min Goodland, KS max Goodland, KS min Denver max Denver min Sterling max May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Precipitation(inches) Flagler Lamar Goodland, KS Denver Rocky Ford #12

  19. ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cook, David

    The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  20. Policy Flash 2015-04 - Class Deviation: Min Wage | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmount for Individual Executive4 - Class Deviation: Min

  1. Simulated transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in artificial streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartell, S.M.; Landrum, P.F.; Giesy, J.P.; Leversee, G.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was constructed to predict the pattern of flow and accumulation of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (anthracene, naphthalene, and benzo(a)pyrene) in artificial streams located on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Predictions were based upon the premise that the fundamental chemistry of individual PAH contains useful information for predictive purposes. Model processes included volatilization, photolysis, sorption to sediments and particulates, and net accumulation by biota. Simulations of anthracene transport were compared to results of an experiment conducted in the streams. The model realistically predicted the concentration of dissolved anthracene through time and space. Photolytic degradation appeared to be a major pathway of anthracene flux from the streams.

  2. EMAG2: A 2arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    grid for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2EMAG2: A 2­arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, I-19020 Fezzano, Italy [1] A global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from

  3. Statistical properties of superflares on solar-type stars based on 1-min cadence data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Yuta; Notsu, Shota; Honda, Satoshi; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for superflares on solar-type stars using Kepler data with 1 min sampling in order to detect superflares with short duration. We found 187 superflares on 23 solar-type stars whose bolometric energy ranges from the order of $10^{32}$ erg to $10^{36}$ erg. Some superflares show multiple peaks with the peak separation of the order of $100$-$1000$ seconds which is comparable to the periods of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares. Using these new data combined with the results from the data with 30 min sampling, we found the occurrence frequency ($dN/dE$) of superflares as a function of flare energy ($E$) shows the power-law distribution ($dN/dE \\propto E^{-\\alpha}$) with $\\alpha \\sim -1.5$ for $10^{33}

  4. Diesel fuel aromatic and cetane number effects on combustion and emissions from a prototype 1991 diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, E.J.; Jass, R.E.; Slodowske, W.J.; McCarthy, C.I.; Krodel, A.L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book reports on a prototype 1991-model diesel engine that was tested using EPA transient emissions procedures to determine the effect of fuel properties on combustion characteristics and exhaust emissions. The eleven test fuel set focused primarily on total aromatic content, multi-ring aromatic content, and cetane number, but other fuel variables were also studied. Hydrotreating was used to obtain reductions in fuel sulfur and aromatic content. Increasing cetane number and reducing aromatic content resulted in lower emissions of hydrocarbons and NO{sub x}. Particulate emission were best predicted by sulfur content, aromatic content and 90% distillation temperature. Multi-ring aromatics showed a greater significance that total aromatics on hydrocarbon and particulate emissions. combustion parameters were highly dependent on fuel cetane number.

  5. Using a MaxEnt Classifier for the Automatic Content Scoring of Free-Text Responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukkarieh, Jana Z. [Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, Princeton NJ 08541 (United States)

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticisms against multiple-choice item assessments in the USA have prompted researchers and organizations to move towards constructed-response (free-text) items. Constructed-response (CR) items pose many challenges to the education community - one of which is that they are expensive to score by humans. At the same time, there has been widespread movement towards computer-based assessment and hence, assessment organizations are competing to develop automatic content scoring engines for such items types - which we view as a textual entailment task. This paper describes how MaxEnt Modeling is used to help solve the task. MaxEnt has been used in many natural language tasks but this is the first application of the MaxEnt approach to textual entailment and automatic content scoring.

  6. Black carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) ...

  7. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N nature of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) they are mostly bound to the sludge and escape aerobic

  8. Photoinduced Hydrogen Abstraction from Phenols by Aromatic Ketones. A New Mechanism for Hydrogen Abstraction by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, William J.

    Photoinduced Hydrogen Abstraction from Phenols by Aromatic Ketones. A New Mechanism for Hydrogen carried out of the kinetics of inter- and intramolecular phenolic hydrogen abstraction phenolic hydrogen, which yields the corresponding phenoxyl-hemipinacol biradical. The biradicals have also

  9. Chemisorption of Aromatic Compounds on Well-Defined Palladium Surfaces: Studies by Electron Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ding

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemisorption of aromatic compounds, derivatized with different functional groups, on well-defined Pd(111) surfaces was studied by a combination of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution...

  10. Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onufrock, Amy Mildred

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , coal, and oil shale vary widely in the amount and nature of potentially carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, potential carcinogenicity varies widely between representative PAH fractions derived from complex mixtures. PAH fractions...

  11. MaxNet: Faster Flow Control Convergence Bartek P. Wydrowski, Lachlan L. H. Andrew, Iven M. Y. Mareels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Lachlan

    MaxNet: Faster Flow Control Convergence Bartek P. Wydrowski, Lachlan L. H. Andrew, Iven M. Y of Melbourne, Vic, 3010, Australia Ph. +61 3 8344 3816 Fax. +61 3 8344 6678 Abstract. MaxNet is a distributed generates the congestion signal that controls the source rate. This is unlike SumNet networks

  12. Evidence of Reactive Aromatics As a Major Source of Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate over China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yuhang; Gu, Dasa; Zhao, Chun; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, Robert; Liao, Jin; Shao, Min; Zhu, T.; Zeng, Limin; Liu, Shaw C.; Chang, Chih-Chung; Amoroso, Antonio; Costabile, Francesa

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the observations of near-surface peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) and its precursors in Beijing, China in August of 2007. The levels of PAN are remarkably high (up to 14 ppbv), surpassing those measured over other urban regions in recent years. Analyses employing a 1-D version of a chemical transport model (Regional chEmical and trAnsport Model, REAM) indicate that aromatic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are the dominant (55-75%) PAN source. The major oxidation product of aromatics that produces acetyl peroxy radicals is methylglyoxal (MGLY). PAN and O3 in the observations are correlated at daytime; aromatic NMHCs appear to play an important role in O3 photochemistry. Previous NMHC measurements indicate the presence of reactive aromatics at high levels over broad polluted regions of China. Aromatics are often ignored in global and (to a lesser degree) regional 3D photochemical transport models; their emissions over China as well as photochemistry are quite uncertain.Our findings suggest that critical assessments of aromatics emissions and chemistry (such as the yields of MGLY) are necessary to understand and assess ozone photochemistry and regional pollution export in China.

  13. Polycylcic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH's) in dense cloud chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentine Wakelam; Eric Herbst

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtually all detailed gas-phase models of the chemistry of dense interstellar clouds exclude polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). This omission is unfortunate because from the few studies that have been done on the subject, it is known that the inclusion of PAH's can affect the gas-phase chemistry strongly. We have added PAH's to our network to determine the role they play in the chemistry of cold dense cores. In the models presented here, we include radiative attachment to form PAH-, mutual neutralization between PAH anions and small positively-charged ions, and photodetachment. We also test the sensitivity of our results to changes in the size and abundance of the PAH's. Our results confirm that the inclusion of PAH's changes many of the calculated abundances of smaller species considerably. In TMC-1, the general agreement with observations is significantly improved contrary to L134N. This may indicate a difference in PAH properties between the two regions. With the inclusion of PAH's in dense cloud chemistry, high-metal elemental abundances give a satisfactory agreement with observations. As a result, we do not need to decrease the observed elemental abundances of all metals and we do not need to vary the elemental C/O ratio in order to produce large abundances of carbon species in TMC-1 (CP).

  14. A Multiscale Study of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Properties in Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Galliano

    2008-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present contribution, I summarize a systematic study of ISO and Spitzer mid-IR spectra of Galactic regions and star forming galaxies. This study quantifies the relative variations of the main aromatic features inside spatially resolved objects as well as among the integrated spectra of 50 objects. Our analysis implies that the properties of the PAHs are remarkably universal throughout our sample and at different spatial scales. In addition, the relative variations of the band ratios, as large as one order of magnitude, are mainly controled by the fraction of ionized PAHs. In particular, I show that we can rule out both the modification of the PAH size distribution and the mid-IR extinction, as an explanation of these variations. High values of the I(6.2)/I(11.3) ratio are found to be associated with the far-UV illuminated surface of PDRs, at the scale of an interstellar cloud, and associated with star formation activity, at the scale of a galaxy. Using a few well-studied Galactic regions, we provide an empirical relation between the I(6.2)/I(11.3) ratio and the ionization/recombination ratio G0/ne. Finally, I show that these trends are consistent with the detailed modeling of the PAH emission within photodissociation regions, taking into account the radiative transfer, the stochastic heating and the charge exchange between gas and dust.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.M.; Beer, J.M.; Biermann, K.; Chiu, K.S.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) have been determined in the gas and particulate effluents from fluidized bed combustion of coal, lignite, and oil shale by a number of investigators. A bibliography of the reports of these investigations is contained in a paper by Chiu, Walsh, Beer, and Biemann (1983). The concentrations of PAC in the effluents are often quite low, but depend upon the combustor configuration and operating conditions. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a mechanism consistent with measured rates of formation and destruction of PAC in atmospheric pressure fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), so that a rational approach may be taken to adjustment of conditions for minimization of PAC in the effluents. PAC are determined in samples taken from the freeboard (space above the bed), rather than from the exhaust, to observe the evolution of the PAC distribution within the combustor. Mass fractions of the most abundant PAC observed in the freeboard during AFBC of high volatile bituminous coal were reported by Chiu, et al (1983). Some correlation of the rates of disappearance of PAC with particle concentration was noted by Dutta, Chiu, Walsh, Beer, and Biemann (1983). In the present paper theoretical estimates of the rates at which PAC might be consumed by heterogeneous reactions are compared with experimental rates estimated from PAC profiles determined by Chiu et al (1983).

  16. Social science in forestry Paul Tabbush, Liz O'Brien, Max Hislop and Suzanne Martin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Social science in forestry Paul Tabbush, Liz O'Brien, Max Hislop and Suzanne Martin The Social on the idea that sustainable forestry, derived from the 1993 Helsinki Conference, is the result of economic development that is positive in its implications for the environment and for society (Forestry Commission

  17. A Power-Law Formulation of Laminar Flow in Short Pipes Max Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Power-Law Formulation of Laminar Flow in Short Pipes Max Sherman Indoor Environment Program ABSTRACT This report develops a theoretical description of the hydrodynamic relationship based on a power pipes can be described with a simple power law dependence on pressure, but that the exponent

  18. Bayesian Learning via Stochastic Gradient Langevin Dynamics Max Welling welling@ics.uci.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Bayesian Learning via Stochastic Gradient Langevin Dynamics Max Welling welling@ics.uci.edu D. Bren on iterative learning from small mini-batches. By adding the right amount of noise to a standard stochastic" and collects sam- ples after it has been surpassed. We apply the method to three models: a mixture of Gaussians

  19. Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Iain S. Walker and Max H. Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-59889 Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Climates Iain S. Walker and Max H. Sherman residential ventilation standard, ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Meeting this standard in new construction requires the use of mechanical ventilation, which in turn can often significantly increase the latent load faced

  20. HEAT RECOVERY IN BUILDING ENVELOPES Max H. Sherman and Iain S. Walker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL 47329 HEAT RECOVERY IN BUILDING ENVELOPES Max H. Sherman and Iain S. Walker Energy formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building physical model has been developed and used to predict the infiltration heat recovery based on the Peclet

  1. Efficient Cross-Layer Negotiation Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Bryan

    Efficient Cross-Layer Negotiation Bryan Ford Max Planck Institute for Software Systems baford toward a more evolvable Internet. 1. INTRODUCTION The Internet's power and generality rests on its archi-studied [4, 5, 16]. Layering connection-oriented protocols can also increase connection setup delay, however

  2. AmbiMax: Autonomous Energy Harvesting Platform for Multi-Supply Wireless Sensor Nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Pai H.

    of multiple energy harvesting sources including solar, wind, thermal, and vibration, each with a different as the operating lifetime. Unfortunately, Fig. 1. Photo of AmbiMax Hardware with a Solar Panel, Wind Generator power efficiently. As a result, they must use a much larger solar panel than necessary to yield the same

  3. Adaptation of Organizational Models for Multi-Agent Systems based on Max Flow Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    Adaptation of Organizational Models for Multi-Agent Systems based on Max Flow Networks Mark Amsterdam, The Netherlands mhoogen@cs.vu.nl http://www.cs.vu.nl/~mhoogen Abstract Organizational models of the organizational model can be essential to ensure a continuous success- ful function of the system. This paper

  4. Special Publication 800-127 Guide to Securing WiMAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padgette of Booz Allen Hamilton. The authors would also like to thank the WiMAX Forum of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Cyrus Tibbs and Matthew Sexton of Booz Allen Hamilton, wish to thank their colleagues who reviewed drafts of this document and contributed to its

  5. DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY AS EFFECTS OF QUANTUM GRAVITY Max I. Fomitchev1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY AS EFFECTS OF QUANTUM GRAVITY Max I. Fomitchev1 Submitted March 12th of high matter density expected in the early Universe I show that primordial inflation and dark energy (i , 2004 ABSTRACT I present a theory of quantum gravity based on the principle of gravitational energy

  6. High Speed Max-Log-MAP Turbo SISO Decoder Implementation Using Branch Metric Normalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Tughrul

    High Speed Max-Log-MAP Turbo SISO Decoder Implementation Using Branch Metric Normalization J. H.Erdogan@ee.ed.ac.uk, Tughrul.Arslan@ee.ed.ac.uk Abstract The authors present a turbo soft-in soft-out (SISO) decoder based. The turbo decoder with the proposed technique has been synthesized to evaluate its power consumption

  7. Virtual Test Tubes: A New Methodology for Computing Max Garzon, Evan Drumwright

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deaton, Russell J.

    with conventional solid-state based computers. Here, we explore an alter- native approach to exploiting and complexity, comparing it with the standard symbolic-based solid-state approach. It is becoming increasinglyVirtual Test Tubes: A New Methodology for Computing Max Garzon, Evan Drumwright Computer Science

  8. Max-Weight Scheduling in Queueing Networks With Heavy-Tailed Traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markakis, Mihalis G.

    We consider the problem of scheduling in a single-hop switched network with a mix of heavy-tailed and light-tailed traffic and analyze the impact of heavy-tailed traffic on the performance of Max-Weight scheduling. As a ...

  9. An Object-Oriented Method for ASCET Max Fuchs and Dieter Nazareth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98MF19 BMW-ROOM An Object-Oriented Method for ASCET Max Fuchs and Dieter Nazareth BMW AG, 80788 Munich Maximilian.Fuchs,Dieter.Nazareth@bmw.de Dirk Daniel and Bernhard Rumpe Department of Computer kitchen without a cooking book. Plans to employ the tool for BMW vehicle software sparked off demand

  10. Computing Reliability Distributions of Windowed Max-log-map (MLM) Detectors : ISI Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavcic, Aleksandar

    Computing Reliability Distributions of Windowed Max-log-map (MLM) Detectors : ISI Channels Fabian-log-map (MLM) detector has well-known appli- cations to the intersymbol interefence (ISI) channel [1, ¡ ¡ ¡ , is trans- mitted across the ISI channel. Let the following random This work was performed when F. Lim

  11. Beef Cow Management Survey USDA NAHMS 2007-2008 Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    identification survey results (USDA NAHMS 2007-2008) Beef cow management practices Percent of Operations by typeBeef Cow Management Survey USDA NAHMS 2007-2008 Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension-calf operations. The Beef 2007-08 study focused on health and management practices on U.S. beef operations from 24

  12. Comparative analysis of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles isolated from four shale oils. [Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles; thiophenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, C.; Pelroy, R.; Stewart, D.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the isolation of sulfur heterocycle fractions from four shale oils (Paraho, Geokinetics, Occidental, and Rio Blanco), the use of capillary column gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for the identification of individual mixture components, and a reverse (Ames) and forward mutation assay with Salmonella typhimurium to screen for possible health hazards. The major components of the Polycyclic Aromatic Sulfur Heterocycles (PASH) fractions for all four shale oils were found to be two- to three-ringed parent and alkylated thiophene compounds. In all cases the PASH fractions showed no more specific mutagenic response than the neutral PAC fractions from which they were isolated. The only mutagenic response which was detected in the PASH fractions was for the Rio Blanco shale oil and showed specific mutagenic response similar to the neutral PAC fraction from which it was isolated. Finally, the forward mutation 8-azaguanine test was apparently more sensitive than the Ames histidine reversion test in detecting mutagenic activity for the chemical fractions from the shale oils.

  13. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  14. Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  16. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  17. Characterization of Min-K TE-1400 Thermal Insulation (Two-Year Gradient Stress Relaxation Testing Update)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King, James [ORNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Min-K 1400TE insulation material was characterized at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in structural applications under gradient temperature conditions. A previous report (ORNL/TM-2008/089) discusses the testing and results from the original three year duration of the project. This testing included compression testing to determine the effect of sample size and test specimen geometry on the compressive strength of Min-K, subsequent compression testing on cylindrical specimens to determine loading rates for stress relaxation testing, isothermal stress relaxation testing, and gradient stress relaxation testing. This report presents the results from the continuation of the gradient temperature stress relaxation testing and the resulting updated modeling.

  18. FALL 2010 ME GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR (Note if MS student with 20 min presentation, two seminars will be scheduled on the same day)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    NO CLASSES 10/22/10 Adam Kaplan Design of a Laboratory Tube Hydroforming Machine 20 Mins 10/29/10 Dr. Tom Characteristics of Cross-Flow Axis Hydrokinetic Turbines 20 Mins Peter Bachant Experimental Study of Hydrokinetic Turbines 20 Mins #12;

  19. Evaluation of a new chromatographic method for aromatics in diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.W.; Fuhr, B.J.; Glavincevski, B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new analytical method using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with flame ionization detection (FID) was evaluated for the determination of the aromatics in diesel fuels. The method utilizes high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a packed silica column and supercritical CO/sub 2/ as the carrier fluid. Performance evaluation was carried out using diesel fuels and secondary standards with a wide range of chemical composition. The aromatic content in the fuels was verified by the fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 1/H NMR) methods. With the exception of initial moderate cost of the instrument, the method is simple, fast (less than 20 minutes per sample) and applicable to coloured samples and samples with final boiling points of about 450/sup 0/C. Aromatic concentrations in diesels showed good correlation with FIA data. It is well suited to petroleum refinery applications as an alternate for standard FIA methods.

  20. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Signal of the maxBCG SDSS Galaxy Clusters in WMAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draper, Patrick [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hao, Jiangang [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rozo, Eduardo [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Planck Collaboration measured the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrement of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, finding that it falls significantly below expectations based on existing mass calibration of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Resolving this tension requires either the data to go up, or the theoretical expectations to come down. Here, we use data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) to perform an independent estimate of the SZ decrement of maxBCG clusters. The recovered signal is consistent with that obtained using Planck, though with larger error bars due to WMAP's larger beam size and smaller frequency range. Nevertheless, this detection serves as an independent confirmation of the magnitude of the effect, and demonstrates that the observed discrepancy must be theoretical in origin.

  1. Piezoelectric Micro/Nano-Pillars for Energy Harvesting & Medical Ultrasound Applications Max Lifson, Dartmouth College, SURF 2010 Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Piezoelectric Micro/Nano-Pillars for Energy Harvesting & Medical Ultrasound Applications Max Lifson these pillars are actually hollow nanotubes, the purpose of this study is to verify a process that can be used

  2. Queue length asymptotics for generalized max-weight scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan

    We investigate the asymptotic behavior of the steady-state queue length distribution under generalized max-weight scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic. We consider a system consisting of two parallel queues, ...

  3. Dutch gas plant uses polymer process to treat aromatic-saturated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-processing plant in Harlingen, The Netherlands, operated by Elf Petroland has been running a porous-polymer extraction process since 1994 to remove aromatic compounds from water associated with produced natural gas. In the period, the unit has removed dispersed and dissolved aromatic compounds to a concentration of <1 ppm with energy consumption of only 17% that of a steam stripper, according to Paul Brooks, general manager for Akzo Nobel`s Macro Porous Polymer-Extraction (MPPE) systems. The paper describes glycol treatment the MPPE separation process, and the service contract for the system.

  4. QSAR model of the phototoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Fabiana Alves de Lima Ribeiro, Marcia Miguel Castro Ferreira*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    QSAR model of the phototoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Fabiana Alves de Lima Ribeiro of 67 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is performed and a prediction rule for the phototoxicity be produced from saturated hydrocarbons under oxygen-deficient conditions. Hydrocarbons with very low

  5. Origin and significance of aromatic hydrocarbons in giant iron ore deposits of the late Archean Hamersley Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brocks, Jochen J.

    Origin and significance of aromatic hydrocarbons in giant iron ore deposits of the late Archean extractable saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons. The host rocks belong to the $2.5 billion years (Ga) old Mt and Newman (Mt Whaleback). The saturated hydrocarbons in the rock extracts have the composition of highly

  6. Energetics of C-H Bond Activation of Fluorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using a [TpRh(CNneopentyl)] Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    Energetics of C-H Bond Activation of Fluorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using a [Tp activation of fluorinated aromatic hydrocarbons by [TpRh(CNneopentyl)] resulted in the formation of products of homogeneous transition-metal catalysts to activate and functionalize C-H bonds of hydrocarbons for industrial

  7. Kinetics and Reaction Pathways for Propane Dehydrogenation and Aromatization on Co/H-ZSM5 and H-ZSM5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Kinetics and Reaction Pathways for Propane Dehydrogenation and Aromatization on Co/H-ZSM5 and H Co/H-ZSM5 catalyzes propane dehydrogenation and aromatization reactions. Initial product selectivities, product site-yields, and the 13C content and distribution in the products of 2-13C-propane show

  8. Rubbing-Induced Molecular Reorientation on an Alignment Surface of an Aromatic Polyimide Containing Cyanobiphenyl Side Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Xiaowei

    Rubbing-Induced Molecular Reorientation on an Alignment Surface of an Aromatic Polyimide Containing to study the molecular orientation and conformation changes at a rubbed polyimide alignment-layer surface. This aromatic polyimide containing pendent cyanobiphenyl mesogens was synthesized via a polycondensation of 2

  9. PUBLICATIONS 2001 * Amode M., S. Pawson, A.A. Scaife, W. Lahoz, U. Langematz, Ding Min Li, and P.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    PUBLICATIONS 2001 * Amodeď M., S. Pawson, A.A. Scaife, W. Lahoz, U. Langematz, Ding Min Li, and P. Simon, 2001 : SAO and Kelvin waves in the EuroGRIPS GCMSs and the UK Meteorological Office analyses, Annales Geophysicae, vol 19, n°1. * Bechtold, P. and E. Bazile, 2001: The 12-13 november flush flood

  10. To appear in IEEE Trans. on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems Min-Cut Floorplacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markov, Igor

    determined manually. Moreover, this step is generally performed only once and separate from cell placement, which includes cell placement, floorplanning, mixed-size placement and achieving routability. At every step of min-cut placement, either partitioning or wirelength- driven, fixed-outline floorplanning

  11. Stepping Stone Detection at The Server Side Ruei-Min Lin, Yi-Chun Chou, and Kuan-Ta Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Stepping Stone Detection at The Server Side Ruei-Min Lin, Yi-Chun Chou, and Kuan-Ta Chen Institute@iis.sinica.edu.tw Abstract--Proxy server was originally invented to enhance the performance of web browsing; however, it has, there is no general method available for detecting the use of stepping stones from the server's perspective

  12. GEO-LOCATION ESTIMATION FROM ELECTRICAL NETWORK FREQUENCY SIGNALS Ravi Garg, Adi Hajj-Ahmad, and Min Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Min

    GEO-LOCATION ESTIMATION FROM ELECTRICAL NETWORK FREQUENCY SIGNALS Ravi Garg, Adi Hajj-Ahmad, and Min Wu {ravig, adiha, minwu}@umd.edu University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA. ABSTRACT Electric data collected across different locations in the eastern grid of the United States to understand

  13. One-Step Synthesis of FePt Nanoparticles with Tunable Size Min Chen,, J. P. Liu, and Shouheng Sun*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J. Ping

    One-Step Synthesis of FePt Nanoparticles with Tunable Size Min Chen,, J. P. Liu, and Shouheng SunPt is coated over the seeds. Although size distribution of the particles prepared from all these methods can of the stabilizers and metal precursors, heating rate, heating temperature, and heating duration. Further, core

  14. Transition Time Bounded Low-power Clock Tree Construction Min Pan, Chris Chong-Nuen Chu and J. Morris Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Chris C.-N.

    Transition Time Bounded Low-power Clock Tree Construction Min Pan, Chris Chong-Nuen Chu and J is the signal with the highest frequency in the whole system, which makes the transition time bound of the clock signal extremely tight. Hence, it is necessary to have transition time bounds to construct low

  15. 220,000-r/min, 2-kW Permanent Magnet Motor Drive for Turbocharger Toshihiko Noguchi, Yosuke Takata *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    motor (PMSM) drive, into the turbochargers, and describes computer simulation and experimental results such as 220,000 r/min at over 2-kW inverter output with the PMSM and how to raise power density of the motor

  16. Photochemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons: implications for ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inseon

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -toluene reaction. The branching ratios of OH addition to ortho, para, meta, and ipso positions are predicted to be 0.52, 0.34, 0.11, and 0.03, respectively, significantly different from a recent theoretical study of the same reaction system. Aromatic peroxy...

  17. Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Contaminated Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic is known about the mechanisms of PAH and other hydrophobic organic compound sequestration and aging microspectroscopy at the NSLS beamline U10B and ALS beamline 1.4 were used to identify organic carbon location

  18. Enumeration and phylogenetic analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria from Puget Sound sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiselbrecht, A.D.; Herwig, R.P.; Deming, J.W.; Staley, J.T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are primarily released into the environment through anthropomorphic sources. PAH degradation has been known to occur in marine sediments. This paper describes the enumeration, isolation, and preliminary characterization of PAH-degrading strains from Puget Sound sediments. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, recalcitrant, and potentially carcinogenic pollutants. Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are less hydro- phobic (log Kow 3­5) and more water soluble than the high Mm PAHs; thus, they are fairly1461 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, recalcitrant, and potentially carcinogenic pollutants. Plants and their associated rhizosphere microbes can promote PAH dissipation, offering

  20. QSPR models of boiling point, octanolwater partition coefficient and retention time index of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    QSPR models of boiling point, octanol­water partition coefficient and retention time index Structure­Property Relationship (QSPR) analysis and study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (bp), octanol­ water partition coefficient đlog KowŢ and retention time index (RI) for reversed

  1. Elimination Rate Constants of 46 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Unionid Mussel, Elliptio complanata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cope, W. Gregory

    contaminants, such as PAHs (James 1989; Neff 1979), as well as the large quantity of water that mussels individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocar- bons (PAHs) including both parent and alkyl homologues, t1/2, and t95 values reported in the literature for PAHs and other classes of hydrophobic organic

  2. Tenax as sorption sink for in vitro bioaccessibility measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    & Environment, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China d Soil and Water Science Department, University and maintain the desorption gradient between soil and GI solution. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were method. Inclusion of Tenax in GI solution increased bioaccessibility of PAHs in five spiked soils from 8

  3. Amine a-heteroarylation via photoredox catalysis: a homolytic aromatic substitution pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, David W. C.

    Amine a-heteroarylation via photoredox catalysis: a homolytic aromatic substitution pathway accomplished via photoredox catalysis to generate valuable benzylic amine pharmacophores. A variety of five substitution (SNAr)3 or transi- tion metal-catalyzed approaches,4 have been extensively studied and applied

  4. Aromatic measurements of diesel fuel - A CRC round-robin study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seizinger, D.E.; Hoekman, S.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A round robin study to measure the aromatic levels in diesel fuels was conducted by the Chemical Characterization Panel of the Coordinating Research Council Air Pollution Research Advisory Committee (CRC-APRAC) In-house Program Group, CAPI-1-64. The fuels for this study consisted of a jet fuel, a No. 2 diesel reference fuel, and three fuels used in a CRC-sponsored diesel emission project (CAPE-32). These fuels had 90% distillation temperatures which ranged from 472/sup 0/ to 642/sup 0/ F and aromaticity levels from approximately 18 to 55% by volume. All participants used the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D1319 or modified D1319 methods to measure the aromatic levels in the selected fuels. Some participants concurrently analyzed the same fuels using other methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and elution chromatography (ASTM D2549). One non-participating laboratory analyzed the fuels using supercritical fluid chromatography. The results of nine participants using the D1319 methodology and other methods showed good agreement for fuels with 90% distillation temperatures less than 600/sup 0/ F. However, this round robin study showed that: 1) there is no standard method to measure aromatic levels in full boiling range diesel fuels, and 2) there are inadequacies when using the D1319 and modified D1319 methods for fuels outside of the specified property ranges.

  5. Aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism by Rhodococcus sp. I24 : computational, biochemical and transcriptional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Jefferson A. (Jefferson Alexander), 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhodococcus sp. 124 is a Gram-positive soil bacterium being developed for the manufacture of (-)cis-(1S,2R)-1-aminoindan-2-ol, a key precursor in the production of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor CrixivanTM, from the aromatic ...

  6. Rediscovering the Wheel. Thermochemical Analysis of Energetics of the Aromatic Diazines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    calorimetry and vapor pressure measurements. The gas and condensed phase enthalpies of formation of the parent not the case for diazabenzenes. The previous comprehensive experimental study of both the condensed and gasRediscovering the Wheel. Thermochemical Analysis of Energetics of the Aromatic Diazines Sergey P

  7. J. Mol. Biol. (1988) 201, 751-754 Aromatic Rings Act as Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    J. Mol. Biol. (1988) 201, 751-754 Aromatic Rings Act as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors Michael Levitt that there is a significant interaction between a hydrogen bond donor (like the > NH group) and the centre of a benzene ring, which acts as a hydrogen bond acceptor. This interaction, hvdrogen bond, which is about half as strong

  8. Low temperature formation of naphthalene and its role in the synthesis of PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    Hydrocarbons) in the interstellar medium Dorian S. N. Parkera , Fangtong Zhanga , Y. Seol Kima , Ralf I, and approved October 26, 2011 (received for review August 24, 2011) Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs finding challenges conventional wisdom that PAH-formation only occurs at high temperatures

  9. Kinetics of hydrogenation of aromatics determined by carbon-13 NMR for Athabasca bitumen-derived middle distillates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yui, S.M.; Sanford, E.C. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High aromatics content in middle distillates is detrimental to fuel quality, as shown in such properties as smoke point of jet fuel and cetane number of diesel fuel. In the petroleum and petrochemical industries the yields from fluid catalytic cracking or steam cracking units are adversely affected by high aromatics content in the feedstock. Distillates obtained from oil sand bitumen, heavy oils, or coal liquefaction products are particularly high in aromatics. Reducing the concentration of this class of compounds is important. Aromatics hydrogenation (AHYD) is one option to achieve this result. In the current Syncrude operation a primary objective of hydrotreating is to reduce product sulfur and nitrogen contents; reducing aromatics content is an incidental result. However, the expansion plan currently under study by Syncrude includes further AHYD to improve cetane number. Predicting the product aromatics content is an important issue for this study. In the present study, hydrotreating of five Athabasca-bitumen-derived gas oils was conducted in pilot scale trickle-bed reactors using alumina-based commercial NiMo catalysts. Feedstocks originated from the distillation of virgin bitumen, and from distillates derived from treating bitumen in a fluid coker and hydrocracking pilot plant. Aromatics content was determined by the {sup 13}C NMR method. The previously developed rate equation for AHYD was modified by including power terms for space velocity and hydrogen partial pressure. The data were analyzed using the modified equation.

  10. Tsien_Supplementary Figure 1 ISO(min) 0 0 1.5 1.5 5 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Tsien_Supplementary Figure 1 ISO(min) 0 0 1.5 1.5 5 5 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 Insulin 1000 1200 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 Normalizedemissionratio Time (sec) ISO control Insulin CREB phosphorylation. #12;-120 0 120 240 360 480 1.00 1.02 1.04 1.06 1.08 +Ht31p ISO

  11. ~max0006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO1) 1Metal

  12. Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Garbesi, Karina

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well established that energy efficiency is most often the lowest cost approach to reducing national energy use and minimizing carbon emissions. National investments in energy efficiency to date have been highly cost-effective. The cumulative impacts (out to 2050) of residential energy efficiency standards are expected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.71:1. This project examined energy end-uses in the residential, commercial, and in some cases the industrial sectors. The scope is limited to appliances and equipment, and does not include building materials, building envelopes, and system designs. This scope is consistent with the scope of DOE's appliance standards program, although many products considered here are not currently subject to energy efficiency standards. How much energy could the United States save if the most efficient design options currently feasible were adopted universally? What design features could produce those savings? How would the savings from various technologies compare? With an eye toward identifying promising candidates and strategies for potential energy efficiency standards, the Max Tech and Beyond project aims to answer these questions. The analysis attempts to consolidate, in one document, the energy savings potential and design characteristics of best-on-market products, best-engineered products (i.e., hypothetical products produced using best-on-market components and technologies), and emerging technologies in research & development. As defined here, emerging technologies are fundamentally new and are as yet unproven in the market, although laboratory studies and/or emerging niche applications offer persuasive evidence of major energy-savings potential. The term 'max tech' is used to describe both best-engineered and emerging technologies (whichever appears to offer larger savings). Few best-on-market products currently qualify as max tech, since few apply all available best practices and components. The three primary analyses presented in this report are: Nevertheless, it is important to analyze best-on-market products, since data on truly max tech technologies are limited. (1) an analysis of the cross-cutting strategies most promising for reducing appliance and equipment energy use in the U.S.; (2) a macro-analysis of the U.S. energy-saving potential inherent in promising ultra-efficient appliance technologies; and (3) a product-level analysis of the energy-saving potential.

  13. Claire E. Max, 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma ofTopDepartment ofDepartmentClaire E. Max,

  14. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier2Max | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County,NumberOfNonCorporateOrganizationsInformation Tier2Max Jump to: navigation,

  15. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Max | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County,NumberOfNonCorporateOrganizationsInformation Tier2Max Jump

  16. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Max | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County,NumberOfNonCorporateOrganizationsInformation Tier2Max

  17. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng [School of Resources and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Li Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  18. Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Carey

    We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model’s ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

  19. Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffit, Alfred Edward

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated...

  20. Assessing the Influence of Secondary Organic versus Primary Carbonaceous Aerosols on Long-Range Atmospheric Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, J. R.

    We use the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to evaluate the hypothesis that atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are trapped in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) as it forms. We test the ability of three ...

  1. Channeling 5-min photospheric oscillations into the solar outer atmosphere through small-scale vertical magnetic flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; R. Centeno; M. Collados; J. Trujillo Bueno

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report two-dimensional MHD simulations which demonstrate that photospheric 5-min oscillations can leak into the chromosphere inside small-scale vertical magnetic flux tubes. The results of our numerical experiments are compatible with those inferred from simultaneous spectropolarimetric observations of the photosphere and chromosphere obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) at 10830 A. We conclude that the efficiency of energy exchange by radiation in the solar photosphere can lead to a significant reduction of the cut-off frequency and may allow for the propagation of the 5 minutes waves vertically into the chromosphere.

  2. Effect of microstructure anisotropy on the deformation of MAX polycrystals studied by in-situ compression combined with neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guitton, A.; Joulain, A.; Thilly, L., E-mail: ludovic.thilly@univ-poitiers.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS-University of Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, 86962 Futuroscope (France); Van Petegem, S.; Tromas, C.; Van Swygenhoven, H. [Materials Science and Simulations, NUM/ASQ, CH5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ compression tests combined with neutron diffraction were performed on Ti{sub 2}AlN MAX polycrystals with lamellar anisotropic microstructure: the diffraction peak evolution (position and profile) with applied stress reveals that lamellar grains parallel to compression axis remain elastic while lamellar grains perpendicular to compression plastify, both families being subjected to strong variations of heterogeneous strains (types II and III). We demonstrate that this behavior originates from the complex response of the very anisotropic lamellar microstructure and explains the observation of reversible hysteretic loops when cycling MAX polycrystals even in the elastic regime.

  3. Estimated IR and phosphorescence emission fluxes for specific Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Red Rectangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mulas; G. Malloci; C. Joblin; D. Toublanc

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the tentative identification of the blue luminescence in the Red Rectangle by Vijh et al. (2005), we compute absolute fluxes for the vibrational IR emission and phosphorescence bands of three small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The calculated IR spectra are compared with available ISO observations. A subset of the emission bands are predicted to be observable using presently available facilities, and can be used for an immediate, independent, discriminating test on their alleged presence in this well-known astronomical object.

  4. New avenues in the directed deprotometallation of aromatics: recent advances in directed cupration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harford, Philip J.; Peel, Andrew J.; Chevallier, Floris; Takita, Ryo; Mongin, Florence; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Wheatley, Andrew E. H.

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    )–Li interactions. #1; Figure 1 The first solid-state evidence for lithium cyanocuprate structures was revealed by ion-separated 5 and the polymer of 6. #1; Scheme 1 Formation of the dimer of Lipshutz bis(amido)cuprate 7. The issue of cyanide... by which to effect the regioselective functionalization of aromatics.#2; Historically, bases such as organolithiums and lithium dialkylamides have typically been employed for this purpose. However, either because they are highly polar or because...

  5. Phototoxicity of non-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagan, J.; Kagan, E.D.; Kagan, I.A.; Kagan, P.A.; Quigley, S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene are phototoxic in Daphnia magna, Artemia salina, first instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, late embryonic forms of Rana pipiens, and fish (Pimephales promelas). Since polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are generated in the combustion processes held responsible for the damages of acid rain, and they are introduced into the environment through other means as well, the high phototoxicity of the major pollutants, which are not carcinogenic, suggests that greater attention must be given to their environmental significance.

  6. Broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes and the bioremediation of hazardous aromatic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonus, P.A.; Nies, L. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The release of aromatic compounds to the environment is a major source of global pollution. In particular, the contamination of soil and groundwater with benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) is the most ubiquitous form of aromatic pollution. The major source of BTX contamination is the release of gasoline and other petroleum products. This research focused on the improvement of bioremediation of BTX through a better understanding of broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes produced by soil and sediment bacteria. The investigation utilized pure bacterial strains isolated on biphenyl, naphthalene, or toluene. These isolated aerobic bacteria were then used to investigate the specificity of the initial enzymatic attack on aromatic compounds including BTX and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The enzymatic specificity and competency of the five isolates selected for study were determined through the use of growth tests and two rapid assay techniques. The growth tests were conducted on mineral agar plates or in liquid cultures, and they were used to determine substrate specificity. In addition, rapid assays for both BTX and PCBs were carried out using various growth substrates. These assays allowed further clarification of the specificity of the dioxygenase enzymes involved in aromatic degradation. Preliminary results of the PCB assay show that biphenyl and naphthalene isolated organisms grown on biphenyl, benzoate, naphthalene, and succinate maintain production of broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes able to degrade PCBs. Likewise, the BTX assay confirms that biphenyl and naphthalene selected organisms grown on their respective selection substrates completely degrade BTX including all three xylene isomers. In comparison, the toluene selected organism that was studied was unable to degrade PCBs, but it was able to degrade all BTX constituents.

  7. Catalytic oxidation of 2-aminophenols and ortho hydroxylation of aromatic amines by tyrosinase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toussaint, O.; Lerch, K.

    1987-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The usual substrates of tyrosinase, a copper-containing monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1), are monophenols and o-diphenols which are both converted to o-quinones. In this paper, the authors studied the reaction of this enzyme with two new classes of substrates: aromatic amines and o-aminophenols, structural analogues of monophenols and o-diphenols, respectively. They undergo the same catalytic reactions (ortho hydroxylation and oxidation), as documented by product analysis and kinetic studies. In the presence of tyrosinase, arylamines and o-aminophenols are converted to o-quinone imines, which are isolated as quinone anils or phenoxazones. As an example, in the presence of tyrosinase, 2-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (an o-aminophenol) is converted to cinnabarinic acid, a well-known phenoxazone, while p-aminotoluene (an aromatic amine) gives rise to the formation of 5-amino-2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone 1-(4-methylanil). Kinetic studies using an oxygen electrode show that arylamines and the corresponding monophenols exhibit similar Michaelis constants. In contrast, the reaction rates observed for aromatic amines are relatively slow as compared to monophenols. The enzymatic conversion of arylamines by tryosinase is different from the typical ones: N-oxidation and ring hydroxylation without further oxidation. This difference originates from the regiospecific hydroxylation (ortho position) and subsequent oxidation of the intermediate o-aminophenol to the corresponding o-quinone imine. Finally, the well-know monooxygenase activity of tyrosinase was also confirmed for the aromatic amine p-aminotoluene, with /sup 18/O/sub 2/.

  8. South Dakota DOT 1) Rural PCCP -0.0 Band California Profilograph and incentive for less than 25" per mile max incentive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Profilograph - Bonus paid for less than 5" per mile. Max bonus is 103.5% for 2.9" PI or less and lift) - Bonus paid for 50 IRI or less, Max Bonus is $180 per 0.1 mile per lane for 35 or less IRI. 2

  9. School: MIN Department: Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    of xylan derivatives in the pro- ject AEROWOOD - Wood based aerogels. The position is part time (19.5 hours with good gelling properties will be provided for eu- ropean project partners for the production of aerogels

  10. Min Chen (Resume)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ph.D. Indiana University, Bloomington, August 1991, Applied Mathematics ... teach various mathematics, computer science and engineering courses including real ... finite element method, numerical linear algebra, linear programing, calculus, ...

  11. min-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97 Upper

  12. min-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97 UpperJoint Statistics of Photon

  13. Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tbingen, Germany VSS 2002, #18.3 ID501 Spatial updating in virtual environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany VSS 2002, #18.3 ID501 Spatial: What are vestibular cues good for? MPI for Biological Cybernetics, Germany 2 "Voluntary" vs Cybernetics, Germany 3 Methods - Setup ˇ Vestibular stimuli: 6 dof Motion Platform ˇ Visual stimuli: LCD video

  14. In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, S.; Shapiro, C.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CARB partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and LAMELs through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and lighting, appliances, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs).

  15. Analysis, Modification, and Implementation (AMI) of Scheduling Algorithm for the IEEE 802.116e (Mobile WiMAX)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandiran, C; Vaidhyanathan, V

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) is being touted as the most promising and potential broadband wireless technology. And the popularity rate has been surging to newer heights as the knowledge-backed service era unfolds steadily. Especially Mobile WiMAX is being projected as a real and strategic boon for developing counties such as India due to its wireless coverage acreage is phenomenally high. Mobile WiMAX has spurred tremendous interest from operators seeking to deploy high-performance yet cost-effective broadband wireless networks. The IEEE 802.16e standard based Mobile WiMAX system will be investigated for the purpose of Quality of Service provisioning. As a technical challenge, radio resource management will be primarily considered and main is the costly spectrum and the increasingly more demanding applications with ever growing number of subscribers. It is necessary to provide Quality of Service (QoS) guaranteed with different characteristics. As a possible solution the sche...

  16. On the design of a 55 GHz Si/SiGe HBT frequency doubler operating close to f max

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the design of a 55 GHz Si/SiGe HBT frequency doubler operating close to f max S. Bruce, M. Kim. Abstract In this paper we present for the first time experimental results on a frequency doubler using a Si/SiGe GHz, for the Si/SiGe HBT, the conversion efficiency in a not completely optimised circuit was found

  17. 5782 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 55, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2007 Max-SINR ISI/ICI-Shaping Multicarrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schniter, Philip

    5782 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 55, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2007 Max-SINR ISI-symbol/inter-car- rier interference (ISI/ICI) subject to orthogonal or biorthogonal constraints. In doubly dispersive channels, however, complete sup- pression of ISI/ICI is impossible, and the ISI/ICI pattern gener- ated

  18. Phosphorylation events implicating p38 and PI3K mediate tungstate-effects in MIN6 beta cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piquer, Sandra [Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Medicine, Hospital Clinic/IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelo-Batllori, Silvia [Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Medicine, Hospital Clinic/IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: sbarcelo@clinic.ub.es; Julia, Marta [Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Medicine, Hospital Clinic/IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Marzo, Nuria [Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Medicine, Hospital Clinic/IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Nadal, Belen [Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Medicine, Hospital Clinic/IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Guinovart, Joan J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and IRB-Barcelona Science Park, University of Barcelona (Spain); Gomis, Ramon [Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Medicine, Hospital Clinic/IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: rgomis@clinic.ub.es

    2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. Several lines of evidence indicate the pancreatic beta cell as one of the targets of tungstate action. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism by which this compound exerts its effects on the beta cell line MIN6. Tungstate treatment induced phosphorylation and subsequent activation of p38 and PI3K which in turn are implicated in tungstate PDX-1 nuclear localization and activation. Although no effect was observed in glucose-induced insulin secretion we found that tungstate activates basal insulin release, a process driven, at least in part, by activation of p38. These results show a direct involvement of p38 and PI3K phosphorylation in the mechanism of action of tungstate in the beta cell.

  19. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  20. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons on the vegetation of a railroad right-of-way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, James Leonard

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the epicuticular leaf waxes of selected plant species growing along a railrcad right-of-way was conduct:ed near Bryan, Texas from October 1967 to February 1969, The objectives of the study were to correlate diesel... locomotive exhaust emissions to PAH on Lhe vege tation of the righL- of way and to compar'e PAH levels on right of way piants to levels on similar species growing in an area isolated from locomotive emissions, The PAH were isolated from leaf wax extracts...

  1. Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onufrock, Amy Mildred

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 8 Phenanthrene 8 9 2 6 3 5 4 Fluorene 7 6 Fluoranthene 3 10 I 9 H I, 8 7 I 6 Pyrene Il 2 111 Q 12 5 6 ltenzolclphenanthrene 2 I I 12 4 I H 5 8 7 6 Benz[ajanthracene 12 II 10 8 + ~ 5 7 6 Chrysene I 4 13 14 12 e... are associated with the coal utilization and petroleum refining industries. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can result as thermal degradative products of combustion, pyrolysis, and pyrosynthesis. They are also derived from a variety of petroleum refining...

  2. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames. Progress report, August 15, 1990--August 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify, and to confirm or determine rate constants for, the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize soot and fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics. Stable and radical species profiles in the aromatics oxidation study are measured using molecular beam sampling with on-line mass spectrometry. The rate of soot formation measured by conventional optical techniques is found to support the hypotheses that particle inception occurs through reactive coagulation of high molecular weight PAH in competition with destruction by OHattack, and that the subsequent growth of the soot mass occurs through addition reactions of PAH and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} with the soot particles. During the first year of this reporting period, fullerenes C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} in substantial quantities were found in the flames being studied. The fullerenes were recovered, purified and spectroscopically identified. The yields of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} were then determined over ranges of conditions in low-pressure premixed flames of benzene and oxygen.

  3. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans Some Inorganic Substances, Chlorinated Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Amines, N-Nitroso Compounds,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Inorganic Substances, Chlorinated Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Amines, N-Nitroso Compounds, and Natural Products 1973; 181 pages ISBN 92 832 1202 9 (out of print) Volume 3 Certain Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Acrolein 1979; 513 pages ISBN 92 832 1219 3 (out of print) Volume 20 Some Halogenated Hydrocarbons 1979

  4. Cardiac toxicity of 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is differentially dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 isoform during zebrafish development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardiac toxicity of 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is differentially dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 isoform during zebrafish development John P. Incardona , Tiffany L. Linbo, Nathaniel L aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), commonly occur as com- plex mixtures in the environment. Recent studies using

  5. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(00)01302-9 Release of bound aromatic hydrocarbons from late Archean and Mesoproterozoic kerogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brocks, Jochen J.

    doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(00)01302-9 Release of bound aromatic hydrocarbons from late Archean, and higher polyaromatic hydrocarbons and alkylated homologues were generated in low relative concentrations of the hydropyrolysates are very similar to aromatic hydrocarbons obtained by solvent extraction of the host rocks

  6. Adsorption of small aromatic molecules on the ,,111... surfaces of noble metals: A density functional theory study with semiempirical corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Adsorption of small aromatic molecules on the ,,111... surfaces of noble metals: A density 10 May 2010; published online 10 June 2010 The adsorption of benzene, thiophene, and pyridine on the 111 surface of gold and copper have been studied using density functional theory DFT . Adsorption

  7. 2094 J.Org. Chem. 1988,53, 2094-2099 Table 11. Bromination of Aromatic Hydrocarbons with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudlicky, Tomas

    Br,/aromatic = 5; solvent: carbon tetrachloride. *Chloro- benzene. tetrachloride and 1,4-dibromonaphthalenewas from ICN Biomedicals (WoelmN-Super 1). Carbon tetrachloride was dried with calcium chloride,26, 759. (10) Kovacic, P.; Wu, C. J. Org. Chem. 1961,26, 762. mmol), 2 (30 g), and carbon tetrachloride

  8. UNUSUAL STABILITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON RADICAL CATIONS IN AMORPHOUS WATER ICES UP TO 120 K: ASTRONOMICAL IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during warm-up above 120 K. Earlier we found that PAH ionization is quantitative in water ice and PAH studies of PAHs in water ice. These optical studies were undertaken to overcome the limitations of severeUNUSUAL STABILITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON RADICAL CATIONS IN AMORPHOUS WATER ICES UP

  9. Activated carbon and biochar amendments decrease pore-water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    and biochar are effective at reducing PAH pore-water concentrations, the more expensive and non contaminants including PAHs may be taken up by organ- isms or migrate to water basins. Methods that limitActivated carbon and biochar amendments decrease pore-water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic

  10. DO THE INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES NEED ULTRAVIOLET EXCITATION? THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MODEL IN UV-POOR REFLECTION NEBULAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draine, Bruce T.

    '' PAHs in reflection nebulae near stars as cool as Teff ź 3000 K can result in observable emis- sion at 6DO THE INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES NEED ULTRAVIOLET EXCITATION? THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MODEL IN UV-POOR REFLECTION NEBULAE Aigen Li and B. T. Draine Department of Astrophysical Sciences

  11. Anisotropy and Size Effects on the Optical Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caterina Cocchi; Deborah Prezzi; Alice Ruini; Marilia J. Caldas; Elisa Molinari

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic and optical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a strong dependence on their size and geometry. We tackle this issue by analyzing the spectral features of two prototypical classes of PAHs, belonging to D6h and D2h symmetry point groups and related to coronene as multifunctional seed. While the size variation induces an overall red shift of the spectra and a redistribution of the oscillator strength between the main peaks, a lower molecular symmetry is responsible for the appearance of new optical features. Along with broken molecular orbital degeneracies, optical peaks split and dark states are activated in the low-energy part of the spectrum. Supported by a systematic analysis of the composition and the character of the optical transitions, our results contribute in shedding light to the mechanisms responsible for spectral modifications in the visible and near UV absorption bands of medium-size PAHs.

  12. One-electron oxidation in the degradation of creosote polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysoporium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogan, B.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[USDA Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States); Lamar, R.T. [USDA Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The abilities of whole cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and P. chrysosporium manganese peroxidase-mediated lipid peroxidation reactions to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in creosote were studied. The disappearance of 12 three- to six-ring PAHs occurred in both systems. Both in vivo and in vitro, the disappearance of all PAHs was found to be very strongly correlated with ionization potential. This was true even for compounds beyond the ionization potential thresholds of lignin peroxidase and Mn{sup 3+}. Deviations from this correlation were seen in the cases of PAHs which are susceptible to radical addition reactions. These results thus begin to clarify the mechanisms of non-lignin peroxidase-labile PAH degradation in the manganese peroxidase-lipid peroxidation system and provide further evidence for the ability of this system to explain the in vivo oxidation of these compounds. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilic—a convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  14. Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

  15. On-line database of the spectral properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Malloci; C. Joblin; G. Mulas

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an on-line database of computed molecular properties for a large sample of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in four charge states: -1, 0, +1, and +2. At present our database includes 40 molecules ranging in size from naphthalene and azulene (C10H8) up to circumovalene (C66H20). We performed our calculations in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) and the time-dependent DFT to obtain the most relevant molecular parameters needed for astrophysical applications. For each molecule in the sample, our database presents in a uniform way the energetic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic properties. It is freely accessible on the web at http://astrochemistry.ca.astro.it/database/ and http://www.cesr.fr/~joblin/database/.

  16. Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]ˇ2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (3ˇ4ˇ5)(3{sup 2}ˇ4ˇ5ˇ6{sup 2}ˇ7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 1–3. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 1–3 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. • The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. • The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

  17. Why Is It Important to Look at NDF Digestibility in Dairy Nutrition? By Dr. Doo-Hong Min, Research and Extension Forage Specialist, MSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Why Is It Important to Look at NDF Digestibility in Dairy Nutrition? By Dr. Doo-Hong Min, Research to evaluate the neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFD) as well as NDF with acid detergent fiber (ADF). Although ADF and NDF are good indicators of fiber contents in forages, they do not measure how digestible

  18. Supersonic Jet Spectroscopic Study of p-Methoxybenzyl Alcohol Min-Chul Yoon, Sun Jong Baek, Hyeongjin Cho, Young S. Choi, and Sang Kyu Kim*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    Supersonic Jet Spectroscopic Study of p-Methoxybenzyl Alcohol Min-Chul Yoon, Sun Jong Baek0 excitation spectra of p-methoxybenzyl alcohol in a supersonic jet are reported. The long in the jet. The torsional barrier height of 316 cm-1 in the S1 ground-vibrational state is obtained from

  19. Conversion of Fly Ash into Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Hsiao-Lan Chang, Chang-Min Chun, Ilhan A. Aksay, and Wei-Heng Shih*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    and aluminum sources. Fly ash, which is a byproduct of coal burning, contains mostly aluminosilicates. Recently not only eliminates the disposal problem of fly ash but also turns an otherwise waste materialConversion of Fly Ash into Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Hsiao-Lan Chang, Chang-Min Chun, Ilhan A

  20. On the Capacity of k-MPR Wireless Networks Ming-Fei Guo, Member, IEEE, Xinbing Wang, Member, IEEE, Min-You Wu, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    1 On the Capacity of k-MPR Wireless Networks Ming-Fei Guo, Member, IEEE, Xinbing Wang, Member, IEEE, Min-You Wu, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--The capacity of wireless ad hoc networks is mainly the capacity of 2-D wireless networks wherein each node can decode at most k simultaneous transmis- sions

  1. Saturday: Lasagna and potato wedges prep time: 30mins Cooking time: 1 hr Items: 1 ice-cream container and 1 yoghurt container of white sauce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    of bean mixture (vegetarian option) 1 supermarket bag of potato wedges, pre-seasoned and cooked 3 boxes To cook: Put rice on to boil. Remember, 2cm of water above the level of the rice is a good ratio. FrySaturday: Lasagna and potato wedges prep time: 30mins Cooking time: 1 hr Items: 1 ice

  2. Reversible and Reproducible Conductance Transition in a Polyimide Thin Film Li Cai, Min Feng, Haiming Guo, Wei Ji, Shixuan Du, Lifeng Chi, Harald Fuchs, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Reversible and Reproducible Conductance Transition in a Polyimide Thin Film Li Cai, Min Feng of polyimide (PI) Langmuir-Blodgett film on Au (111) substrate with a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM material with structural bistablity in solution phase.12 Polyimide (PI) polymer material, which has been

  3. Large-Scale Context in Protein Folding: Villin Headpiece Ariel Fernandez,*,, Min-yi Shen,| Andres Colubri, Tobin R. Sosnick,, R. Stephen Berry,| and Karl F. Freed*,|

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Large-Scale Context in Protein Folding: Villin Headpiece Ariel Ferna´ndez,*,,§ Min-yi Shen,| Andre but that are predicted to affect the folding rates and dynamics dramatically. The problem of protein folding breaks the protein folding process that has to date made it difficult to develop an ab initio approach to describe

  4. 1D-8 Duo-Binary Circular Turbo Decoder Based on Border Metric Encoding for WiMAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji-hoon Kim; In-cheol Park

    Abstract- This paper presents a duo-binary circular turbo decoder based on border metric encoding. With the proposed method, the memory size for branch memory is reduced by half and the dummy calculation is removed at the cost of the small-sized memory which holds the encoded border metrics. Based on the proposed SISO decoder and the dedicated hardware interleaver, a duo-binary circular turbo decoder is designed for the WiMAX standard using a 0.13 ?m CMOS process, which can support 24.26 Mbps at 200MHz. I.

  5. Emissions of C6-C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower1 and aircraft measurements2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlllet, Dylan B.

    6, 7 5 6 1. Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA [Ahmadov et al.,18 2014; Jaars et al., 2014; Xue et al., 2014]. These aromatic VOCs (so-called BTEX

  6. Biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure in northwest Gulf of Mexico marine fish and invertebrates: indicators of offshore petroleum contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Cynthia Marie

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher molecular weight Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) associated with crude oil induce CYPIAI gene expression, and this response has been utilized as a biomarker of exposure to PAHs in aquatic and marine environments. Several benthic...

  7. Two-stage hydrotreating of a bitumen-derived middle distillate to produce diesel and jet fuels, and kinetics of aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yui, S.M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The middle distillate from a synthetic crude oil derived from Athabasca bitumen was further hydrotreated in a downflow pilot unit over a typical NiMo catalyst at 330 to 400 C, 7 to 11 MPa and 0.63 to 1.39 h{sup {minus}1} LHSV. Feed and liquid products were characterized for aromatics, cetane index (CI) and other diesel specification items. Aromatics were determined by a supercritical fluid chromatography method, while CI was determined using the correlation developed at Syncrude Canada Ltd. Also feed and selected products were distilled into a jet fuel cut (150/260 C) by spinning band distillation for the determination of smoke point and other jet fuel specification items. A good relationship between aromatics content and CI was obtained. Kinetics of aromatics hydrogenation were investigated, employing a simple-first order reversible reaction model.

  8. Batch and Flow Photochemical Benzannulations Based on the Reaction of Ynamides and Diazo Ketones. Application to the Synthesis of Polycyclic Aromatic and Heteroaromatic Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willumstad, Thomas P.

    Highly substituted polycyclic aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds are produced via a two-stage tandem benzannulation/cyclization strategy. The initial benzannulation step proceeds via a pericyclic cascade mechanism ...

  9. NolanNolan DoeskenDoesken Colorado Climate CenterColorado Climate Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sep Oct Nov Dec Temperature(degreesF) Flagler max Flagler min Lamar max Lamar min Goodland, KS max.0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Precipitation(inches) Flagler Lamar Goodland, KS

  10. Effect of High-Voltage Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Collector Design on f(T) and f(MAX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Chang, P.C.; Hietala, V.M.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) for high-voltage circuit applications have been investigated. In order to obtain ideal IV characteristics, a lightly doped (N{sub DC} = 7.5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3}) thick (W{sub C} = 3.5 {micro}m) layer of GaAs was used as the collector layer. The devices fabricated have shown breakdown voltage exceeding 65 V. Device operated at up to a 60V bias, which is the highest operating voltage reported up to date for single heterojunction HBTs. Peak {line_integral}{sub T} and {line_integral}{sub MAX} values of 18 GHz and 29 GHz, respectively, have been achieved on a device with emitter area of 4x 12.5 {micro}m{sup 2}. Both {line_integral}{sub T} and {line_integral}{sub Max} degrades with higher bias, which is related to the elongation of the collector depletion width.

  11. Effects of partial charge-transfer solute -- solvent interactions in absorption spectra of aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous and alcoholic solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Ar'ev; N. I. Lebovka; E. A. Solovieva

    2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for study of charge-transfer interactions between solute molecules and solvent based on the comparison of the ratios of spectral shifts of different electronic transitions in solute molecules in chemically inert solvent is proposed. The method is applicable to molecules that do not change their dipole moment on excitation. As an example, a presence of charge transfer interactions in higher electronic states of aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, phenanthrene, and naphthalene) dissolved in water and alcohols was demonstrated.

  12. A correlation of water solubility in jet fuels with API gravity: aniline point percent aromatics, and temperature.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byington, Alonzo

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CORRELATION OF WATER SOLUBILITY IN JET FUELS WITH API GRAVITY, ANILINE POINT PERCENT AROMATICS, AND TEMPERATURE A Thesis By ALONZO B YINGTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1964 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A CORRELATION OF MATER SOLUBILITT IH JET FUELS WITS API GEAVITT, ANILINE POINT, PERCENT ARONATICS, AND TENPERATURE A Thesis By ALOHZO BYIHGTOH Approved...

  13. Capillary chromatography of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on glass and quartz capillary columns coated with stationary polysiloxane phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, B.A.; Bulycheva, Z.Y.; Kutenev, V.F.; Topunov, V.N.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper resports a technique for analyzing automobile exhausts for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) by means of a new Biokhrom-1 chromatograph designed to operate with capillary glass and quartz columns. The method is assessed for performance and is shown to be useful in monitoring the PAH content in the environment. The detection limit for benz(a)pyrene was 0.05 ug with a relative standard deviation of 0.08 to 0.12.

  14. Influence of low and high temperature coking of H-GaMFI propane aromatization catalyst on its surface and catalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhary, V.R.; Kinage, A.K.; Devadas, P. [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India)] [and others] [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India); and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H-Gallosilicate (MFI) (i.e., H-GaMFI) zeolite shows high activity/selectivity in the aromatization of lower alkanes, which is processes of treat practical importance. The high aromatization activity of this catalyst is attributed to its high dehydrogenation activity due to the presence of high dispersed nonframework Ga-oxide species (which are formed during hydrothermal synthesis and/or pretreatments to the zeolite) along with the zeolitic acid sites (or framework Ga), resulting in a bifunctional catalyst. However, this zeolite undergoes fast catalyst deactivation in the propane aromatization. The catalyst deactivation is attributed mainly to the coke formation on the zeolite. Earlier, a few studies have been reported on the deactivation of H-GaMFI zeolite in the propane aromatization. The catalyst deactivation is attributed mainly to the coke formation on the zeolite. Earlier, a few studies have been reported on the deactivation of H-GaMFI zeolite in the propane aromatization at 500-550{degrees}C for a short time-on-stream (10 h). It is interesting to know the effect of catalyst deactivation due to coking in the propane aromatization for much longer periods both at low (at 400{degrees}C) and high (at 550{degrees}C) temperatures on the product selectivity and also on the surface (viz., sorption capacity, acidity/acid strength distribution) and catalytic properties of the zeolite. The present investigation was undertaken for this purpose. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from wastewater by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a coagulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1995-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from industrial wastewater by tyrosinase was investigated. A color change from colorless to dark brown was observed, but no precipitate was formed. Colored products were found to be easily removed by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant containing amino group, such as hexamethylenediamine-epichlorohidrin polycondensate, polyethleneimine, or chitosan. The first two coagulants, synthetic polymers, were more effective than chitosan, a polymer produced in crustacean shells. Phenols and aromatic amines are not precipitated by any kind of coagulants, but their enzymatic reaction products are easily precipitated by a cationic polymer coagulant. These results indicate that the combination of tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant is effective in removing carcinogenic phenols and aromatic amines from an aqueous solution. Immobilization of tyrosinase on magnetite gave a good retention of activity (80%) and storage stability i.e., only 5% loss after 15 days of storage at ambient temperature. In the treatment of immobilized tyrosinase, colored enzymatic reaction products were removed by less coagulant compared with soluble tyrosinase.

  16. Properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in local elliptical galaxies revealed by the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kaneda; T. Onaka; I. Sakon; T. Kitayama; Y. Okada; T. Suzuki

    2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of 18 local dusty elliptical galaxies by using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board Spitzer. We have significantly detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features from 14 out of the 18 galaxies, and thus found that the presence of PAHs is not rare but rather common in dusty elliptical galaxies. Most of these galaxies show an unusually weak 7.7 um emission feature relative to 11.3 um and 17 um emission features. A large fraction of the galaxies also exhibit H2 rotational line and ionic fine-structure line emissions, which have no significant correlation with the PAH emissions. The PAH features are well correlated with the continuum at 35 um, whereas they are not correlated with the continuum at 6 um. We conclude that the PAH emission of the elliptical galaxies is mostly of interstellar origin rather than of stellar origin, and that the unusual PAH interband strength ratios are likely to be due to a large fraction of neutral to ionized PAHs.

  17. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION IN THE PROPLYD HST10: WHAT IS THE MECHANISM BEHIND PHOTOEVAPORATION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicente, S.; Kamp, I. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands); Berne, O. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Huelamo, N. [CAB (INTA-CSIC), LAEFF, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Pantin, E. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM - CNRS - Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAP, F-91191 sur Yvette (France); Carmona, A. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Proplyds are photodissociation-region-(PDR)-like cometary cocoons around young stars which are thought to originate through photoevaporation of the central protoplanetary disk by external UV radiation from the nearby OB stars. This Letter presents spatially resolved mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of the proplyd HST10 obtained with the Very Large Telescope/VISIR instrument. These observations allow us to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in the proplyd PDR and to study the general properties of PAHs in proplyds for the first time. We find that PAHs in HST10 are mostly neutral and at least 50 times less abundant than typical values found for the diffuse interstellar medium or the nearby Orion Bar. With such a low PAH abundance, photoelectric heating is significantly reduced. If this low abundance pertains also to the original disk material, gas heating rates could be too low to efficiently drive photoevaporation unless other processes can be identified. Alternatively, the model behind the formation of proplyds as evaporating disks may have to be revised.

  18. The importance of snow scavenging of polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wania, F. [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mackay, D. [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies] [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies; Hoff, J.T. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science] [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, experimental data on the scavenging of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the atmosphere by snow were interpreted assuming that the distribution of chemical between particles and dissolved phase measured in the meltwater reflects the state of the chemical during the scavenging process. A consequence of this assumption is that vapor scavenging is found to be unimportant relative to particle scavenging. An alternative interpretation is presented that during melting repartitioning occurs from the dissolved phase to the particle-sorbed phase. Further, it is argued that a constant particle scavenging ratio may apply to all chemicals of the same class in the same precipitation event, and its value can be estimated from the scavenging characteristics of predominantly particle-sorbed, high molecular mass chemicals. This analysis suggests that for more volatile PCBs and PAHs vapor scavenging is an important, if not the dominating, snow scavenging process. Gas scavenging ratios obtained with this method are, as expected, negatively correlated with the vapor pressure of a substance, indicating that adsorption to the air-ice interface is the process responsible for vapor scavenging.

  19. Hydrogenation of aromatics in synthetic crude distillates catalyzed by platinum supported in molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbara, N.; Charland, J.P. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Wilson, M.F. [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada)] [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic hydrogenation of synthetic crude distillates from Canadian oil sands was carried out over platinum metal supported in pillared interlayered clay (PILC) and Y-zeolite. The molecular sieve supports were employed to modify the properties of dispersed platinum particles and improve their resistance to poisoning by sulfur. The objective was to reduce the distillate aromatic content to meet diesel emission control standards and cetane number requirements. Catalysts were prepared in a series of steps, and metal precursor was loaded using ion-exchange procedures. Characterization was done using X-ray diffraction, hydrogen chemisorption, and proton-induced X-ray emission elemental analysis. Catalytic hydrogenation reactions were carried out by processing distillate feedstocks both high (>100 ppm) and low (<10 ppm) in sulfur using a continuous-flow automated microreactor system. Experimental runs were performed to determine the reaction kinetics and Arrhenius parameters as a means of evaluating and comparing catalyst performance. Significant differences in catalyst activity were found. The Pt/Y-zeolite-alumina catalyst showed a much superior hydrogenation performance under conditions of high sulfur content. The extent of cracking and ring opening was also evaluated and was shown to be minimal under the operating conditions employed.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in marine sediments near Kitimat, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, C.D.; Harrington, C.F.; Cullen, W.R. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Chemistry Dept.] [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Chemistry Dept.; Bright, D.A.; Reimer, K.J. [Royal Roads Military College, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). Environmental Sciences Group] [Royal Roads Military College, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). Environmental Sciences Group

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), like many other hydrophobic organic contaminants, are rapidly sorbed to particles and incorporated within sediments in aquatic systems. The PAH composition within the sediments reflects the source(s) from which the PAHs were derived. However, the ``source signature`` may be altered by postdepositional weathering or biodegradation. In the present study, variation in PAH composition was investigated in size-fractionated sediments and depth-fractionated sediments collected from a Canadian fjord contaminated with aluminum smelter derived PAHs. Multivariate analyses of PAH compositional data consistently showed that different sampling sites could be discriminated on the basis of their PAH composition, but smaller versus larger size fractions within a site could not. The composition of unsubstituted and alkyl-substituted PAHs in a sediment core primarily showed changes with depth that were attributable to enhancement of anthropogenic inputs in the upper core segments. No trends with sediment depth, associated with compound-specific weathering or biotransformation, were noted in the composition of anthropogenically generated PAHs. This may indicate a limited chemical and biological availability of the aluminum smelter derived PAHs.

  1. GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON ANIONS WITH MOLECULES OF INTERSTELLAR RELEVANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 215 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0215 (United States); Snow, Theodore P., E-mail: Nicholas.Demarais@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@Colorado.edu, E-mail: OMartinez@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: Nadine.Wehres@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Theodore.Snow@Colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C{sub 6}H{sup -}{sub 5}), naphthalenide (C{sub 10}H{sup -}{sub 7}), and anthracenide (C{sub 14}H{sup -}{sub 9}) with atomic H, H{sub 2}, and D{sub 2} using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}CN, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 3}Cl, and (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

  2. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Burlage, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  3. Shock processing of interstellar dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the supernova remnant N132D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tappe; J. Rho; W. T. Reach

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the oxygen-rich Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) supernova remnant N132D (SNR 0525-69.6), using all instruments onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, IRS, IRAC, and MIPS (Infrared Spectrograph, Infrared Array Camera, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer). The 5-40 micron IRS spectra toward the southeastern shell of the remnant show a steeply rising continuum with [NeIII] and [OIV] as well as PAH emission. We also present the spectrum of a fast moving ejecta knot, previously detected at optical wavelengths, which is dominated by strong [NeIII] and [OIV] emission lines. We interpret the continuum as thermal emission from swept-up, shock-heated dust grains in the expanding shell of N132D, which is clearly visible in the MIPS 24 micron image. A 15-20 micron emission hump appears superposed on the dust continuum, and we attribute this to PAH C-C-C bending modes. We also detect the well-known 11.3 micron PAH C-H bending feature, and find the integrated strength of the 15-20 micron hump about a factor of seven stronger than the 11.3 micron band in the shell of the remnant. IRAC 3-9 micron images do not show clear evidence of large-scale, shell-like emission from the remnant, partly due to confusion with the ambient ISM material. However, we identified several knots of shocked interstellar gas based on their distinct infrared colors. We discuss the bright infrared continuum and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features with respect to dust processing in young supernova remnants.

  4. Phototransformation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) on a Non-Semi Conductive Surface Such as Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabestani, R., Sigman, M.E.

    1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), by products of fossil fuel production and consumption, constitute a large class of environmental pollutants. These toxic and sometimes carcinogenic compounds are also found in coal tar and fly ash. When released into the air, they can be sorbed onto particulates present in the atmosphere where they find their way into soil and ground water upon being washed by rain. During their residence time in the environment, PAHs will be exposed to solar radiation and may undergo phototransformation to other products. Thus, light induced photodegradation of PM`s at the solid/air interfaces can play a significant role in their depletion. Light-induced processes have been claimed to enhance transformation of these PM`s in the environment. However, detailed studies on the nature and identities of photoproducts formed during the transformation of these compounds on solid surfaces is scarce. Since insulators such as silica, alumina,silicoaluminates and calcium carbonate are believed to constitute up 20-30% of inorganic particulates present in the atmosphere, they serve as environmentally relevant model surfaces to study the photophysical and photochemical behavior of PM`s. Although photochemistry of organic compounds adsorbed on solid surfaces has received much attention in recent years, the specific properties of the interface which influence photoprocesses and the exact mechanism of interaction between a surface and a substrate are often not well understood. We have investigated the photochemistry of many PAHs including eight that are on Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) sixteen priority pollutant PAH list shown in Table 1 at silica/air interface.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh and smoked fish samples from three Nigerian cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akpan, V.; Lodovici, M.; Dolara, P. (Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Florence (Italy))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nigeria is a major producer of crude oil in sub-Saharan Africa. In-shore and off-shore wells are located in richly watered creeks in the southern part of the country. Although published data on environmental impact assessment of the petroleum industry in Nigeria are lacking, there is a growing concern about the possible contamination of estuarine and coastal waters and of marine species by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). PAHs are ubiquitous priority pollutants that occur naturally in crude oil, automobile exhaust emissions and smoke condensates from incomplete combustion of carbonaceous materials. PAHs with high molecular weight are less readily biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms in some regions, and given their marked hydrophobic characteristics, may persist in the aqueous environment, thus contaminating the food chain by bioaccumulating in aquatic species like fish and mussels. Major Nigerian oil wells are located in the vicinity of breeding and harvesting sites serving the fresh-water fishing industry. Large hauls of fresh fish are normally consumed cooked in soups or smoke cured in handcrafted traditional ovens using freshly cut red mangrove (Rhizophora racemosa) wood as fuel. Though smoke curing is economical and may ensure longer conservation of fish, it undoubtedly increases the burden of PAHs in finished products as a result of partial charring and from smoke condensates or mangroves that also contain PAHs in measurable quantities as reported by Asita et al. (1991). Apart from PAHs analyzed by Emerole (1980) in smoked food samples from Ibadan using simple analytical methods, those from industrial and other anthropogenic sources have rarely been analyzed in Nigeria. We tried therefore to update the data and address this discrepancy. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. EXTINCTION AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INTENSITY VARIATIONS ACROSS THE H II REGION IRAS 12063-6259

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E.; Otaguro, J. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bik, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial variations in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band intensities are normally attributed to the physical conditions of the emitting PAHs, however in recent years it has been suggested that such variations are caused mainly by extinction. To resolve this question, we have obtained near-infrared (NIR), mid-infrared (MIR), and radio observations of the compact H II region IRAS 12063-6259. We use these data to construct multiple independent extinction maps and also to measure the main PAH features (6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 {mu}m) in the MIR. Three extinction maps are derived: the first using the NIR hydrogen lines and case B recombination theory; the second combining the NIR data with radio data; and the third making use of the Spitzer/IRS MIR observations to measure the 9.8 {mu}m silicate absorption feature using the Spoon method and PAHFIT (as the depth of this feature can be related to overall extinction). The silicate absorption over the bright, southern component of IRAS 12063-6259 is almost absent while the other methods find significant extinction. While such breakdowns of the relationship between the NIR extinction and the 9.8 {mu}m absorption have been observed in molecular clouds, they have never been observed for H II regions. We then compare the PAH intensity variations in the Spitzer/IRS data after dereddening to those found in the original data. It was found that in most cases, the PAH band intensity variations persist even after dereddening, implying that extinction is not the main cause of the PAH band intensity variations.

  7. Differential toxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines and their mixture in metabolically competent HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumont, Julie, E-mail: Julie.Dumont@pasteur-lille.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Josse, Rozenn, E-mail: Rozenn.Josse@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Lambert, Carine, E-mail: Carine.Lambert45@gmail.co [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Antherieu, Sebastien, E-mail: Sebastien.Antherieu@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Le Hegarat, Ludovic, E-mail: l.lehegarat@afssa.f [Agence Francaise de Securite Sanitaire des Aliments, F-35300 Fougeres (France); Aninat, Caroline, E-mail: Caroline.Aninat@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Robin, Marie-Anne, E-mail: Marie-Anne.Robin@inserm.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane, E-mail: Christiane.Guillouzo@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) usually occurs through mixtures rather than individual compounds. However, the toxic effects and related mechanisms of co-exposure to HAA in humans remain unknown. We compared the effects of two of the most common HAA, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), individually or in combination, in the metabolically competent human hepatoma HepaRG cells. Various endpoints were measured including cytotoxicity, apoptosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage by the comet assay. Moreover, the effects of PhIP and/or MeIQx on mRNA expression and activities of enzymes involved in their activation and detoxification pathways were evaluated. After a 24 h treatment, PhIP and MeIQx, individually and in combination, exerted differential effects on apoptosis, oxidative stress, DNA damage and cytochrome P450 (CYP) activities. Only PhIP induced DNA damage. It was also a stronger inducer of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and activity than MeIQx. In contrast, only MeIQx exposure resulted in a significant induction of CYP1A2 activity. The combination of PhIP with MeIQx induced an oxidative stress and showed synergistic effects on apoptosis. However, PhIP-induced genotoxicity was abolished by a co-exposure with MeIQx. Such an inhibitory effect could be explained by a significant decrease in CYP1A2 activity which is responsible for PhIP genotoxicity. Our findings highlight the need to investigate interactions between HAA when assessing risks for human health and provide new insights in the mechanisms of interaction between PhIP and MeIQx.

  8. Polyphenoloxidases immobilized in organic gels: Properties and applications in the detoxification of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crecchio, C.; Ruggiero, P.; Pizzigallo, M.D.R. [Univ. di Bari (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Agraria

    1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Gelatine gels originate from water in oil microemulsions in which the ternary system consists of isooctane/sulfosuccinic acid bis [2-ethyl hexyl] ester/water; the solubilization of gelatin in the water pool of these microemulsions transforms them into viscous gels in which it is possible to cosolubilize various reactive molecules. These gels were used to immobilize two phenoloxidases, a laccase from Trametes versicolor and a tyrosinase from mushroom. The best balance between gel retention and catalytic activity was reached at a gelatine concentration of 2.5% (w/v) in the case of tyrosinase, while laccase immobilization was independent of gelatine concentration. Both enzymes kept the same optimum pH as the corresponding soluble controls, while a partial loss of activity was observed when they were immobilized. Immobilized enzymes showed an increased stability when incubated for several days at 4 C with a very low release from the gels in the incubation solutions. The immobilization of tyrosinase and of laccase enhanced stability to thermal inactivation. Furthermore, gel-entrapped tyrosinase was almost completely preserved from proteolysis: more than 80% of the activity was maintained, while only 25% of the soluble control activity was detected after the same proteolytic treatments. A column packed with gel-immobilized tyrosinase was used to demonstrate that enzymes immobilized with this technique may be reused several times in the same reaction without loosing their efficiency. Finally, gel-entrapped tyrosinase and laccase were capable of removing naturally occurring and xenobiotic aromatic compounds from aqueous suspensions with different degrees of efficiency.

  9. [10] K. Mehlhorn and C. Uhrig. The Minimum Cut Algorithm of Stoer and Wagner. Unpublished manuscript, Max Planck Institute for Computer Science. Available at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fegaras, Leonidas

    [10] K. Mehlhorn and C. Uhrig. The Minimum Cut Algorithm of Stoer and Wagner. Unpublished manuscript, Max Planck Institute for Computer Science. Available at http://www.mpi­sb.mpg.de/guide/staff/uhrig, pp 238--248, May 1997. [15] P. Selinger, M. Astrahan, D. Chamberlin, R. Lorie, and T. Price. Access

  10. Name e-mail position Institution 1 Arndt, Max m.arndt@ged.rwth-aachen.de PhD RWTH-Aachen University, Geologie Endogene Dynamik, Aachen, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesare, Bernardo

    Name e-mail position Institution 1 Arndt, Max m.arndt@ged.rwth-aachen.de PhD RWTH-Aachen University, Geologie Endogene Dynamik, Aachen, Germany 2 Billia, Marco marco.billia@alumni.ethz.ch PhD Department of Geology, University of Otago, New Zealand 3 Boutonnet, Emmanuelle emmanuelle.boutonnet@ens-lyon.fr PhD

  11. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, M.R.; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, B.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rozo, E.; /Ohio State U.; Evrard, A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Johnston, D.; /Caltech, JPL; Sheldon, E.; /New York U.; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Lau, E.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Nichol, R.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Miller, C.; /Michigan U.

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster catalog identified from imaging data obtained in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we study the BCG--galaxy velocity correlation function. By modeling its non-Gaussianity, we measure the mean and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness. The mean velocity dispersion increases from 202 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1} for small groups to more than 854 {+-} 102 km s{sup -1} for large clusters. We show the scatter to be at most 40.5{+-}3.5%, declining to 14.9{+-}9.4% in the richest bins. We test our methods in the C4 cluster catalog, a spectroscopic cluster catalog produced from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR2 spectroscopic sample, and in mock galaxy catalogs constructed from N-body simulations. Our methods are robust, measuring the scatter to well within one-sigma of the true value, and the mean to within 10%, in the mock catalogs. By convolving the scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness with the observed richness space density function, we measure the velocity dispersion function of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Although velocity dispersion and richness do not form a true mass--observable relation, the relationship between velocity dispersion and mass is theoretically well characterized and has low scatter. Thus our results provide a key link between theory and observations up to the velocity bias between dark matter and galaxies.

  12. Liquid-liquid equilibria for mixtures of an alkane + an aromatic hydrocarbon + 1,4-dicyanobutane at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letcher, T.M.; Naicker, P.K.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of pure aromatic and aliphatic compounds from their mixtures is an important goal in chemical operations (e.g., Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) that produce both types of compounds. In this work the authors have used 1,4-dicyanobutane (DCB) as a potential solvent for this separation. Liquid-liquid equilibrium results for mixtures of an alkane + an aromatic hydrocarbon + 1,4-dicyanobutane at 298.15 K are reported, where the alkane is hexane or nonane or dodecane or hexadecane and the aromatic hydrocarbon is benzene or methylbenzene or 1,2-dimethylbenzene, or 1,3-dimethylbenzene, or 1,4-dimethylbenzene or 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene or ethylbenzene. The results show that there is a small increase in the two-phase region as the chain length of the alkane is increased. The type of aromatic hydrocarbon present in the mixture has a noticeable effect on the slopes of the tie lines. There is also an increase in the area of the two phase-region with increasing substitution of methyl groups on the benzene ring. NRTL and UNIQUAC models were correlated to the data. The results show that 1,4-dicyanobutane may be used as a solvent for the separation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons.

  13. Reaction mechanisms in aromatic hydrocarbon formation involving the C{sub 5}H{sub 5} cyclopentadienyl moiety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, C.F.; Colvin, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Senkan, S.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum chemical BAC-MP4 and BAC-MP2 methods have been used to investigate the reaction mechanisms leading to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ring formation. In particular the authors have determined the elementary reaction steps in the conversion of two cyclopentadienyl radicals to naphthalene. This reaction mechanism is shown to be an extension of the mechanism occurring in the H atom-assisted conversion of fulvene to benzene. The net reaction involves the formation of dihydrofulvalene, which eliminates a hydrogen atom and then rearranges to form naphthalene through a series of ring closures and openings. The importance of forming the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety, which can undergo rearrangement to form three-carbon-atom ring structures, is illustrated with the C{sub 4}H{sub 7} system. The ability of hydrogen atoms to migrate around the cyclopentadienyl moiety is illustrated both for methyl-cyclopentadiene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}, and dihydrofulvalene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 5}, as well as for their radical species, C{sub 6}H{sub 7} and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}. The mobility of hydrogen in the cyclopentadienyl moiety plays an important role both in providing resonance-stabilized radical products and in creating the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety for ring formation. The results illustrate the radical pathway for converting five-membered rings to aromatic six-membered rings. Furthermore, the results indicate the important catalytic role of H atoms in the aromatic ring formation process.

  14. RTG_12 6 07_min

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Welcome and Introductions - A. Thrower List of Attendees and Callers: Alex Thrower, DOEOLM Paul Johnson, ORNL Kevin Blackwell, DOTFRA Doug Osborn, SNL Mel Massaro, DOTFRA Jane...

  15. Min Matematiske Rejse Christian Berg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Christian

    Sandved mellem Nćstved og Slagelse, i det man idag vil kalde udkants-Danmark. Dengang var der stort set

  16. UNIVERSITY OF HAMBURG Faculty: MIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    qualification. Experience with electron- and ion-imaging, high-voltage and high vacuum equipment, and with short, or in a related field, is required. Preference will be given to disabled applicants with equal qualifications

  17. UNIVERSITY OF HAMBURG Faculty: MIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    qualification. Experience with laser spectroscopy, high vacuum equipment and molecular beams would be beneficial. Preference will be given to disabled applicants with equal qualifications. Application dossiers (application

  18. via Spence St 39 min

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO FVehicle Technologiesveterans |via

  19. Direct production of hydrogen and aromatics from methane or natural gas: Review of recent U.S. patents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the year 2000, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a dozen patents for inventions related to methane dehydroaromatization processes. One of them was granted to UOP LLC (Des Plaines). It relates to a catalyst composition and preparation method. Two patents were granted to Conoco Phillips Company (Houston, TX). One was aimed at securing a process and operating conditions for methane aromatization. The other was aimed at securing a process that may be integrated with separation of wellhead fluids and blending of the aromatics produced from the gas with the crude. Nine patents were granted to ExxonMobil Chemical Patents Inc. (Houston, TX). Most of these were aimed at securing a dehydroaromatization process where methane-containing feedstock moves counter currently to a particulate catalyst. The coked catalyst is heated or regenerated either in the reactor, by cyclic operation, or in annex equipment, and returned to the reactor. The reactor effluent stream may be separated in its main components and used or recycled as needed. A brief summary of those inventions is presented in this review.

  20. LC-1H NMR characterization studies of tricyclic aromatics and olefins in diesel fuels. Final report, September 1982-31 December 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blass, T.E.; Bebout, W.R.; Caswell, K.A.; Allen, L.; Dorn, H.C.

    1986-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New analytical approaches for determination of 1) tricyclic aromatics, 2) alkenes, and weight % data in Naval diesel fuels are described. Tricyclic aromatics are detected and characterized at concentrations as low as approx. 0.25% in diesel fuels. Various analytical approaches for characterizing alkenes in diesel fuels are also explored, including: 1) chromatographic separation of the alkene fraction in diesel fuels by AgNO/sub 3/ impregnated chromatographic columns, and 2) a /sup 19/F NMR tagging method characterizing alkenes. Finally, a calculative method for conversion of LC-1H NMR molar data to weight % data for each chromatographic fraction in a fuel is described.

  1. Measuring the mean and scatter of the X-ray luminosity -- optical richness relation for maxBCG galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Rykoff; T. A. McKay; M. R. Becker; A. Evrard; D. E. Johnston; B. P. Koester; E. Rozo; E. S. Sheldon; R. H. Wechsler

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the scaling relations between galaxy cluster observables requires large samples of uniformly observed clusters. We measure the mean X-ray luminosity--optical richness (L_X--N_200) relation for an approximately volume-limited sample of more than 17,000 optically-selected clusters from the maxBCG catalog spanning the redshift range 0.1

  2. Scaling Towards 300 GHz fT/fMAX SiGe Transistors Basanth Jagannathan, Jae-Sung Rieh, and Greg Freeman, Semiconductor Research and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieh, Jae-Sung

    Scaling Towards 300 GHz fT/fMAX SiGe Transistors Basanth Jagannathan, Jae-Sung Rieh, and Greg access points. SiGe technology is a proven market place leader at application frequencies below 10Gb/s and there have been many recent 40Gb/s circuits demonstrated in SiGe as well [1]. From a SiGe HBT perspective

  3. Spatial and temporal variation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls in Crassostrea virginica and sediments from Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard George

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with a Hewlett- Packard (HP) 5996 GC/MS and/or a HP 5880 GC with an HP 5970 MSD Mass Selective Detector. The selected ion mode (SIM) operating conditions are shown in Table II. The GC/MS was initially calibrated by duplicate 15 Table II. Typical GC...-perylene dibenzanthracenes (*internal standards) Gas Chromato ra h Injector: 300 C, splitless mode Total Run Time: 36 min Column: 50 m, 0. 52 p film, 0. 31 mm i. d. , cross-linked methyl silicone (HP) Temp Time Rate Temp Time 40 C 0 min 10 C/min 300 C 10 min...

  4. An in situ intercomparison exercise on passive samplers for the monitoring of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pesticides in surface water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, UniversitĂŠ de

    hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides in surface waters. Various PSs were used and compared at 2 rivers sites aromatic hydrocarbons and pesticides in surface water C. Miège1* , N. Mazzella2 , S. Schiavone1 , A. Dabrin, the interlaboratory variability of field blanks, time weighted average water concentrations and its uncertainties

  5. NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic (phenolic) compounds that are unique in the plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, LĂŠonie

    NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic elucidated the key step in the production of these compounds in Ectocarpus siliculosus, a small brown alga phlorotannins from brown algae for use in industry was a complex process, and the biosynthesis pathways

  6. Time-dependent density functional study of the electronic excited states of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirata, So; Head-Gordon, Martin P.; Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin

    2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniform, comprehensive theoretical interpretation of spectroscopic data is presented for 53 radical ion species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s) with the aid of (Tamm–Dancoff) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). TDDFT is capable of predicting the transition energies to the low-lying excited states of PAH ions with quantitative accuracy (the standard deviation from experimental results being less than 0.3 eV) and their intensity patterns qualitatively correctly. The accuracy is hardly affected by the sizes of PAH ions (azulene through dinaphthocoronene), the types of transitions (Koopmans or satellite transitions), the types of orbi-tals involved (*←, *←, or *← transitions), the types of ions (cations or anions), or other geometrical or electronic perturbations (non-planarity, sp3 carbons, or heterocyclic or non-benzenoid rings)

  7. Influence of co-attached aromatics on the thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of model compound immobilization by covalent surface attachment is being employed to investigate the potential impact of restricted diffusional mobility on the thermal reactivity of coal. This restricted mobility may be imposed in coal as a consequence of its cross-linked, macromolecular structure. Thermolysis studies at 345--400{degree}C of model coal structures covalently attached to a silica surface have shown that significant perturbations in free-radical reaction mechanisms can occur, and result in altered reaction rates and product distributions compared with corresponding fluid phase behavior. In the current study, we are beginning to probe the influence of the structure of co-attached aromatic molecules such as biphenyl and diphenylmethane on the reaction rate and regioselectivity in the thermolysis of surface-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Summary Max Total Units

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -Blueprint | DepartmentExcellenceGuidanceS EM Pr ETR R UnSummary

  9. Manganese peroxidase mRNA and enzyme activity levels during bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil with Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogan, B.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schoenike, B.; Lamar, R.T.; Cullen, D. [Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mRNA extraction from soil and quantitation by competitive reverse transcription-PCR were combined to study the expression of three manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes during removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium grown in presterilized soil. Periods of high mnp transcript levels and extractable MnP enzyme activity were temporally correlated, although separated by a short (1- to 2-day) lag period. This time frame also coincided with maximal rates of fluorene oxidation and chrysene disappearance in soil cultures, supporting the hypothesis that high ionization potential polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are oxidized in soil via MnP-dependent mechanisms. The patterns of transcript abundance over time in soil-grown P. chrysosporium were similar for all three of the mnp mRNAs studied, indicating that transcription of this gene family may be coordinately regulated under these growth conditions. 47 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. H-gallosilicate (MFI) propane aromatization catalyst: Influence of Si/Ga ratio on acidity, activity and deactivation due to coking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhary, V.R.; Kinage, A.K.; Sivadinarayana, C. [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India)] [and others] [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India); and others

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Influence of bulk Si/Ga ratio of H-gallosilicate (MFI) on its degalliation (during calcination for removal of template and deammoniation of NH{sub 4} form), acidity/acid strength distribution (measured by stepwise thermal desorption and chemisorption of pyridine at 50-400{degrees}C using GC techniques and also by acid catalyzed model reactions viz. iso-octane cracking and toluene disproportionation) and initial activity/product selectivity and catalyst deactivation in propane aromatization (at 550{degrees}C) has been investigated. Framework Si/Ga ratio was measured by {sup 29}Si MAS NMR. Information on the external acid sites is obtained by isooctane cracking. The influence of poisoning of strong acid sites (by pyridine) on acid catalyzed model reactions and the effect of deactivation on the product distribution in the propane aromatization have also been studied. 21 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Analysis of Nitro-Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Conventional Diesel and Fischer--Tropsch Diesel Fuel Emissions Using Electron Monochromator-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havey, C. D.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Dane, A. J.; Voorhees, K. J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) in diesel fuel emissions has been studied for a number of years predominantly because of their contribution to the overall health and environmental risks associated with these emissions. Electron monochromator-mass spectrometry (EM-MS) is a highly selective and sensitive method for detection of NPAHs in complex matrixes, such as diesel emissions. Here, EM-MS was used to compare the levels of NPAHs in fuel emissions from conventional (petroleum) diesel, ultra-low sulfur/low-aromatic content diesel, Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel/synthetic diesel blend. The largest quantities of NPAHs were detected in the conventional diesel fuel emissions, while the ultra-low sulfur diesel and synthetic diesel fuel demonstrated a more than 50% reduction of NPAH quantities when compared to the conventional diesel fuel emissions. The emissions from the blend of conventional diesel with 30% synthetic diesel fuel also demonstrated a more than 30% reduction of the NPAH content when compared to the conventional diesel fuel emissions. In addition, a correlation was made between the aromatic content of the different fuel types and NPAH quantities and between the nitrogen oxides emissions from the different fuel types and NPAH quantities. The EM-MS system demonstrated high selectivity and sensitivity for detection of the NPAHs in the emissions with minimal sample cleanup required.

  12. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS, IONIZED GAS, AND MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES OF COOL-CORE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donahue, Megan; Mark Voit, G.; Hoffer, Aaron [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); De Messieres, Genevieve E.; O'Connell, Robert W. [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); McNamara, Brian R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Nulsen, Paul E. J., E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: voit@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: hofferaa@msu.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of 5-25 {mu}m emission features of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with strong optical emission lines in a sample of nine cool-core clusters of galaxies observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These systems provide a view of dusty molecular gas and star formation, surrounded by dense, X-ray-emitting intracluster gas. Past work has shown that BCGs in cool-core clusters may host powerful radio sources, luminous optical emission-line systems, and excess UV, while BCGs in other clusters never show this activity. In this sample, we detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), extremely luminous, rotationally excited molecular hydrogen line emission, forbidden line emission from ionized gas ([Ne II] and [Ne III]), and infrared continuum emission from warm dust and cool stars. We show here that these BCGs exhibit more luminous forbidden neon and H{sub 2} rotational line emission than star-forming galaxies with similar total infrared luminosities, as well as somewhat higher ratios of 70 {mu}m/24 {mu}m luminosities. Our analysis suggests that while star formation processes dominate the heating of the dust and PAHs, a heating process consistent with suprathermal electron heating from the hot gas, distinct from star formation, is heating the molecular gas and contributing to the heating of the ionized gas in the galaxies. The survival of PAHs and dust suggests that dusty gas is somehow shielded from significant interaction with the X-ray gas.

  13. Infrared spectra of methyl-, and nitrogen-modified void coronene; modeling a carrier of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ota, Norio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Void induced coronene C23H12++ was suggested to be a possible carrier of the astronomically observed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), which shows unique molecular structure with carbon two pentagons connected with five hexagons. Well observed astronomical infrared spectrum from 3-15 micron could be almost reproduced based on density functional theory. However, there remain several discrepancies with observed spectra, especially on 11-15 micron band weaker intensity. Observed 11.2 micron intensity is comparable to 7.6-7.8 micron one. Methyl-modified molecule C24H14++ revealed that calculated peak height of 11.4 micron show fairly large intensity up to 70-90% compared with that of 7.6-7.8 micron band. Also, nitrogen atom was substituted to peripheral C-H site of void coronene to be C22H11N1++. Pentagon site substituted case show 60% peak height. This molecule also reproduced well 12-15 micron peak position and relative intensity. Vibration mode analysis demonstrated that 11.3 micron mode comes from C-H ou...

  14. Spatial and temporal variation of freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban river undergoing Superfund remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aregory James Sower; Kim A. Anderson [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (USA). Environmental and Molecular Toxicology Department

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban rivers with a history of industrial use can exhibit spatial and temporal variations in contaminant concentrations that may significantly affect risk evaluations and even the assessment of remediation efforts. Concentrations of 15 biologically available priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured over five years along 18.5 miles of the lower Willamette River using passive sampling devices and HPLC. The study area includes the Portland Harbor Superfund megasite with several PAH sources including remediation operations for coal tar at RM 6.3 west and an additional Superfund site, McCormick and Baxter, at RM 7 east consisting largely of creosote contamination. Study results show that organoclay capping at the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site reduced PAHs from a precap average of 440 {+-} 422 ng/L to 8 {+-} 3 ng/L postcapping. Results also reveal that dredging of submerged coal tar nearly tripled nearby freely dissolved PAH concentrations. For apportioning sources, fluoranthene/pyrene and phenanthrene/anthracene diagnostic ratios from passive sampling devices were established for creosote and coal tar contamination and compared to published sediment values. 29 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Source Contribution Analysis of Surface Particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Northeastern Asia by Source-receptor Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Kajino, Mizuo; Sato, Keiichi; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kurokawa, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Hiromasa; Tang, Ning; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed the sourceereceptor relationships for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in northeastern Asia using an aerosol chemical transport model. The model successfully simulated the observed concentrations. In Beijing (China) benzo[a]pyren (BaP) concentrations are due to emissions from its own domain. In Noto, Oki and Tsushima (Japan), transboundary transport from northern China (>40°N, 40-60%) and central China (30-40°N, 10-40%) largely influences BaP concentrations from winter to spring, whereas the relative contribution from central China is dominant (90%) in Hedo. In the summer, the contribution from Japanese domestic sources increases (40-80%) at the 4 sites. Contributions from Japan and Russia are additional source of BaP over the northwestern Pacific Ocean in summer. The contribution rates for the concentrations from each domain are different among PAH species depending on their particulate phase oxidation rates. Reaction with O3 on particulate surfaces may be an important component of the PAH oxidation processes.

  16. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.S. [Corporate Research and Development Division, Hyundai-Kia Motors, Gyeonggi-do 445-706 (Korea); Anh, D.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea); Chung, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  17. Dispersion modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and production of coke in Tianjin, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu Tao; Xinrong Li; Yu Yang; Raymond M. Coveney, Jr.; Xiaoxia Lu; Haitao Chen; Weiran Shen [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A USEPA procedure, ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex Long-Term), was applied to model the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from various sources including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and biomass into the atmosphere of Tianjin, China. Benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) were calculated for risk assessment. Model results were provisionally validated for concentrations and profiles based on the observed data at two monitoring stations. The dominant emission sources in the area were domestic coal combustion, coke production, and biomass burning. Mainly because of the difference in the emission heights, the contributions of various sources to the average concentrations at receptors differ from proportions emitted. The shares of domestic coal increased from {approximately} 43% at the sources to 56% at the receptors, while the contributions of coking industry decreased from {approximately} 23% at the sources to 7% at the receptors. The spatial distributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs were similar, with higher concentrations occurring within urban districts because of domestic coal combustion. With relatively smaller contributions, the other minor sources had limited influences on the overall spatial distribution. The calculated average BaPeq value in air was 2.54 {+-} 2.87 ng/m{sup 3} on an annual basis. Although only 2.3% of the area in Tianjin exceeded the national standard of 10 ng/m{sup 3}, 41% of the entire population lives within this area. 37 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban and a suburban area of Korea from 2002 to 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, H.B.; Kannan, K.; Lee, S.J.; Ok, G. [National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Pusan (Republic of Korea)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric bulk samples (wet and dry) were collected monthly during 2002 to 2004 from an urban and a suburban area in Korea for assessment of depositional flux and seasonal variations in the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH depositional flux ranged from 64.1 to 610 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the urban area and from 65 to 460 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the suburban area. The fluxes of PAHs measured in this study were comparable with those reported for urban and suburban areas in other countries. The fluxes of particulates and PAHs were higher in winter than in summer, consistent with the greater per capita consumption of fossil fuel in winter than in summer. Ambient temperature played a major role in the seasonal variability in PAH fluxes. Photochemical degradation of PAHs appears to occur during the summer months. The relationship of PAH depositional fluxes with major air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and presence of particulate matter up to 10 {mu} m in size (PM10), was also investigated. Dominant PAH compounds in both the urban and the suburban locations were benzo(g,h,i)perylene, pyrene, and indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene. Based on the PAH diagnostic ratios and a factor analysis, the major sources of PAHs in the urban and the suburban regions were found to be similar. Diesel exhaust, coal combustion, and gasoline emissions contributed predominantly to atmospheric PAH contamination.

  19. Accumulation and effects of aluminum smelter-generated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on soft-bottom invertebrates and fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naes, K.; Hylland, K.; Oug, E.; Foerlin, L.; Ericson, G.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated study involving measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in bottom sediments, assessments of resident soft-bottom communities, the accumulation of PAHs in soft-bottom invertebrates, and biomarker responses in invertebrates and fish was conducted to assess the impact of an aluminum reduction plant in a Norwegian fjord. The fjord sediments were heavily contaminated by PAHs in the inner reaches near the aluminum smelter, where concentrations were well above levels elsewhere reported to induce biological effects. Nevertheless, the PAH contamination in the fjord did not seem to have severe effects on the benthic biota. This conclusion can be drawn from the soft-bottom communities as well as from biomarker analyses. Presumably, contaminant speciation is important for explaining the restricted biological effects. The results support the assumption that PAHs associated with soot-like structures have limited bioavailability. They also point to the need to link various single-species approaches to measurements of effects on higher levels of organization and with an understanding of the speciation of the chemical contaminant.

  20. The mid-infrared spectrum of the carbon star HD 38218 and its possible relation to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.H., Jr.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Snow, T.P. (NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA) Colorado, University, Boulder (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mid-infrared spectra of carbon giant stars with hot companions are investigated in order to search for infrared emission bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the envelopes of the C giants. A strong 8-micron emission band found in TU Tau = HD 38218 is attributed to the binary A star companion. It is argued that if the 8-micron feature in HD 38218 arises from PAHs, they seem to be important constituents of the C-giant shell, and they might be large compared with some interstellar PAHs. It is suggested that because no other IR spectra of C giants show clear PAH features, the greater flux of hard radiation in the binary HD 38218 seems likely to be responsible for the 8-micron feature and for its absence in many other C giants. Thus, PAHs could be present in the same amounts relative to SiC grains in the shells of similar single C giants, and the formation of carbonaceous grains could proceed through the formation of PAHs in C giant shells. 57 refs.

  1. How to Operate the Nu Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    the front of the big JULABO chiller (level should be between min and max). Switch on the chiller using

  2. Comparative potency approach based on H2AX assay for estimating the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Audebert, M., E-mail: marc.audebert@toulouse.inra.fr [INRA UMR1331, TOXALIM (Research Center in Food Toxicology), 180 chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, EIP, UPS, UMR1331, Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Zeman, F.; Beaudoin, R.; Péry, A. [Unité “Modčles pour l'écotoxicologie et la toxicologie” (METO), INERIS, BP2, F-60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)] [Unité “Modčles pour l'écotoxicologie et la toxicologie” (METO), INERIS, BP2, F-60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Cravedi, J.-P. [INRA UMR1331, TOXALIM (Research Center in Food Toxicology), 180 chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse (France) [INRA UMR1331, TOXALIM (Research Center in Food Toxicology), 180 chemin de Tournefeuille, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, EIP, UPS, UMR1331, Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) constitute a family of over one hundred compounds and can generally be found in complex mixtures. PAHs metabolites cause DNA damage which can lead to the development of carcinogenesis. Toxicity assessment of PAH complex mixtures is currently expressed in terms of toxic equivalents, based on Toxicity Equivalent Factors (TEFs). However, the definition of new TEFs for a large number of PAH could overcome some limitations of the current method and improve cancer risk assessment. The current investigation aimed at deriving the relative potency factors of PAHs, based on their genotoxic effect measured in vitro and analyzed with mathematical models. For this purpose, we used a new genotoxic assay (?H2AX) with two human cell lines (HepG2 and LS-174T) to analyze the genotoxic properties of 13 selected PAHs at low doses after 24 h treatment. The dose–response for genotoxic effects was modeled with a Hill model; equivalency between PAHs at low dose was assessed by applying constraints to the model parameters. In the two cell lines tested, we observed a clear dose–response for genotoxic effects for 11 tested compounds. LS-174T was on average ten times more sensitive than HepG2 towards PAHs regarding genotoxicity. We developed new TEFs, which we named Genotoxic Equivalent Factor (GEF). Calculated GEF for the tested PAHs were generally higher than the TEF usually used. Our study proposed a new in vitro based method for the establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment. -- Highlights: ? Examination of the genotoxic properties of 13 PAHs on two human cell lines. ? Modelization with a Hill model of the genotoxic dose–response. ? First investigation of the genotoxicity of benzo[c]fluorene on human cell lines. ? Establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment.

  3. Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

  4. Non-covalent interactions of nitrous oxide with aromatic compounds: Spectroscopic and computational evidence for the formation of 1:1 complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Qian [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland) [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Gor, Gennady Y., E-mail: ggor@princeton.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Khriachtchev, Leonid [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland)] [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first study of intermolecular interactions between nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and three representative aromatic compounds (ACs): phenol, cresol, and toluene. The infrared spectroscopic experiments were performed in a Ne matrix and were supported by high-level quantum chemical calculations. Comparisons of the calculated and experimental vibrational spectra provide direct identification and characterization of the 1:1 N{sub 2}O-AC complexes. Our results show that N{sub 2}O is capable of forming non-covalently bonded complexes with ACs. Complex formation is dominated by dispersion forces, and the interaction energies are relatively low (about ?3 kcal mol{sup ?1}); however, the complexes are clearly detected by frequency shifts of the characteristic bands. These results suggest that N{sub 2}O can be bound to the amino-acid residues tyrosine or phenylalanine in the form of ? complexes.

  5. Simple procedures for enrichment of chlorinated aromatic pollutants from fat, water and milk for subsequent analysis by high-resolution methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egestad, B.; Curstedt, T.; Sjoevall, J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Procedures for enrichment of non-volatile chlorinated aromatic pollutants from fat, water and milk are described. /sup 14/C-DDT was used as a model compound in recovery experiments. A several thousand-fold enrichment of DDT added to butter was achieved by two consecutive straight-phase chromatographies on Lipidex 5000. Trace amounts of DDT in liter volumes of water could be quantitatively extracted by rapid filtration through 2 ml beds of Lipidex 1000. A batch extraction procedure permitted enrichment of DDT from milk after addition of n-pentylamine, methanol and water. DDT could then be eluted from the gel with retention of more than 90% of the lipids. A reversed-phase system with Lipidex 5000 could be used for separation of TCDD from DDT and PCBs. The liquid-gel chromatographic procedures are simple and suitable for clean-up of samples prior to application of high-resolution methods. 5 tables.

  6. Effect of Soederberg smelting technology, anode paste composition, and work shift on the relationship between benzo(a)pyrene and individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric G. Sanderson; Peter J. Kelly; Jean-Pierre Farant [McGill University, Montreal (Canada). Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This follow-up of the Farant and Gariepy study investigates the relationship between benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in coal tar pitch volatiles in two types of Soederberg aluminum smelters horizontal and vertical stud. The study confirms the strong relationships between B(a)P and total PAHs, and that B(a)P was a good indicator for other PAHs in this industry. The PAH profiles were consistent within each smelter, but the smelter technology used and the changes in the raw material formulation resulted in significantly different profiles. B(a)P toxic equivalency factors for emitted PAH mixtures were greater in the horizontal stud smelter than in the vertical stud smelter. Overall, this study illustrates the potential usefulness of B(a)P relative abundance ratios to simplify exposure assessment in the workplace and reduce associated costs.

  7. e University of Min nthony Falls La

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    vortices generated by a miniature axialflow turbine and strong coherent motions present in the flow under subcritical conditions. A circular cylinder was placed upstream of the turbine to induce between energetic coherent motions and tip vortices in the wake of an axialflow marine turbine Daniel

  8. Min Morse Matching: Algorithms and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Rathore

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we resolve an open problem posed by Joswig et al. [49] by providing ...... H3B.1 Method 1 For each pair of N-edges Ei and Ej in H2 which share a ...

  9. ARM - VAP Product - mfrsrcldod1min

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap DocumentationProductsmwravgProductsaodmfrsraod1mich Documentation Technical Report

  10. Metabolic analysis of the soil microbe Dechloromonas aromatica str. RCB: indications of a surprisingly complex life-style and cryptic anaerobic pathways for aromatic degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salinero, Kennan Kellaris; Keller, Keith; Feil, William S.; Feil, Helene; Trong, Stephan; Di Bartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial interest in Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB arose from its ability to anaerobically degrade benzene. It is also able to reduce perchlorate and oxidize chlorobenzoate, toluene, and xylene, creating interest in using this organism for bioremediation. Little physiological data has been published for this microbe. It is considered to be a free-living organism. The a priori prediction that the D. aromatica genome would contain previously characterized 'central' enzymes involved in anaerobic aromatic degradation proved to be false, suggesting the presence of novel anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways in this species. These missing pathways include the benzyl succinyl synthase (bssABC) genes (responsible for formate addition to toluene) and the central benzoylCoA pathway for monoaromatics. In depth analyses using existing TIGRfam, COG, and InterPro models, and the creation of de novo HMM models, indicate a highly complex lifestyle with a large number of environmental sensors and signaling pathways, including a relatively large number of GGDEF domain signal receptors and multiple quorum sensors. A number of proteins indicate interactions with an as yet unknown host, as indicated by the presence of predicted cell host remodeling enzymes, effector enzymes, hemolysin-like proteins, adhesins, NO reductase, and both type III and type VI secretory complexes. Evidence of biofilm formation including a proposed exopolysaccharide complex with the somewhat rare exosortase (epsH), is also present. Annotation described in this paper also reveals evidence for several metabolic pathways that have yet to be observed experimentally, including a sulphur oxidation (soxFCDYZAXB) gene cluster, Calvin cycle enzymes, and nitrogen fixation (including RubisCo, ribulose-phosphate 3-epimerase, and nif gene families, respectively). Analysis of the D. aromatica genome indicates there is much to be learned regarding the metabolic capabilities, and life-style, for this microbial species. Examples of recent gene duplication events in signaling as well as dioxygenase clusters are present, indicating selective gene family expansion as a relatively recent event in D. aromatica's evolutionary history. Gene families that constitute metabolic cycles presumed to create D. aromatica's environmental 'foot-print' indicate a high level of diversification between its predicted capabilities and those of its close relatives, A. aromaticum str EbN1 and Azoarcus BH72.

  11. Max Planck Institute for Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experiment is to either establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino or push the relevant exclusion limits construction at Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy (Reference code: CRESST). MAGIC is the world with high precision UHE cosmic rays above the GZK energy and UHE neutrinos (Reference code: EUSO). H1

  12. Environmental dependence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission at z~0.8. Investigation by observing the RX J0152.7-1357 with AKARI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murata, Kazumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Matsuhara, Hideo; Kodama, Tadayuki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the environmental dependence of the strength of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission by AKARI observations of RX J0152.7-1357, a galaxy cluster at z=0.84. PAH emission reflects the physical conditions of galaxies and dominates 8 um luminosity (L8), which can directly be measured with the L15 band of AKARI. L8 to infrared luminosity (LIR) ratio is used as a tracer of the PAH strength. Both photometric and spectroscopic redshifts are applied to identify the cluster members. The L15-band-detected galaxies tend to reside in the outskirt of the cluster and have optically green colour, R-z'~ 1.2. We find no clear difference of the L8/LIR behaviour of galaxies in field and cluster environment. The L8/LIR of cluster galaxies decreases with specific-star-formation rate divided by that of main-sequence galaxies, and with LIR, consistent with the results for field galaxies. The relation between L8/LIR and LIR is between those at z=0 and z=2 in the literature. Our data also shows that starburst galaxie...

  13. Directed metalation of N,N-diethylbenzamides. Silylated benzamides for the synthesis of naturally occurring peri-methylanthraquinones and peri-methyl polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, R.J.; Snieckus, V. (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient methodologies based on directed ortho metalation, fluoride-induced carbodesilylation, and metal-halogen exchange processes (Scheme I) are reported for the synthesis of peri-methyl-substituted anthraquinone natural products 5 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons 6, 7. Benzamide 8 (Scheme II) is converted in a one-pot sequence into the disilylated derivative 10, which upon metalation, condensation with 3,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde, CsF desilylation, and TsOH cyclization leads to the key phthalide 11. Compound 11 is transformed into deoxyerythrolaccin tris(methyl ether) 5c, which has been previously converted into the natural product 5a. For the synthesis of erythrolaccin tetrakis(methyl ether) 5d, the silyl and bromo benzamides 14 and 15 (Scheme III) are condensed with 3,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde by CsF-induced carbodesilylation and metal-halogen exchange expedients, respectively, to give the phthalide 16, which is transformed into the target anthraquinone 55d by methods identical with those used in 5c. Along similar lines, the synthesis of 11-methyl-7,12-benz(a)anthraquinone (6a, Scheme IV), 8-methyl-7,12-benz(a)anthraquinone (6b), and 10-methyl-9,14-dibenz(a,c)anthraquinone (7) is described.

  14. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices and caged mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in relation to water column phase distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axelman, J.; Naes, K.; Naef, C.; Broman, D.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) were deployed at a site contaminated by discharges of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an aluminium reduction plant, and at a reference site. The accumulation of PAHs in SPMDs versus mussels, along with the ability of the two matrices to predict contaminant concentrations in the ambient environment, were evaluated through concurrent measurements of particulate, dissolved, and colloidal PAHs in the water column. Analysis of the results showed that blue mussels were more efficient at sequestering PAHs than were SPMDs. The PAH profile (i.e,, the relative abundance of individual PAHs) in the two matrices were similar, but differed significantly from the profile in the dissolved phase. Further, back-calculation of the ambient dissolved concentrations from SPMDs indicated systematic overtrapping with increasing hydrophobicity. Calculation of in situ bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for the blue mussels at the smelter site indicated that uptake via particles or from colloids dominated over direct uptake from the dissolved phase, as opposed to the reference site. The in situ BCFs differed markedly from literature values, which implies that the use of mussels to predict ambient concentrations would require that site-specific BCFs be applied.

  15. Adequacy of benzo(a)pyrene and benzene soluble materials as indicators of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a Sderberg aluminum smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, M.C.; Demers, P.A.; Spinelli, J.J.; Le, N.D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). School of Occupational & Environmental Hygiene

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational and environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) occurs as a complex mixture that is evaluated using specific components, such as benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and benzene soluble materials (BSM). Factors that influence the relationship between BaP, BSM, and other PAHs within an aluminum smelter were investigated. Personal samples collected from 1978 to 2001 were used. Differences in the log-transformed ratios (PAH/BaP, BaP/BSM) due to anode paste composition, pot group, season, and job were examined using linear regression. In linear regression, 27% of the variability in the log-transformed BaP/BSM ratio was explained by coal tar pitch, work area, and job; no seasonal or pot group differences were observed. Within the potrooms, BaP was very strongly correlated with other PAHs (majority 0.9). Depending on the PAH, between 23% and 89% of the variability in the log-transformed PAH/BSM was explained by season, coal tar pitch, pot group, and job. The BaP toxic equivalency factors of the mixture varied more across job (2.1-3.5) than across coal tar pitch source (1.8-2.8) or pot group (2.3-2.5). Seasonal and work area differences in the relationship between BaP and other PAHs have not been reported previously.

  16. Glaubtenstrasse Schauenbergstrasse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imamoglu, Atac

    . Quantenstrukturen FIRST-Lab (max. 16 Personen) HCI Atomare Analytik EMEZ-Lab (max. 18 Personen) HPT D9, HPF, HPM Electromicroscopy.Weg zur nächsten Station. 15 Min. HPM A: Cs Corrected analytical Scanning Transmission Electron

  17. 6.854 Advanced Algorithms Lecture 16: 10/11/2006 Lecturer: David Karger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Shafi

    (t, s) = mU and c(t, s) = -(C + 1)n. The minimum cost circulation in the new graph will use on the section from s to t, which makes the max-flow also min-cost. Another reduction from min-cost max circulation is the difference between the costs of the two max-flows. Given f, the initial max-flow, and f

  18. Preferential induction of the AhR gene battery in HepaRG cells after a single or repeated exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumont, Julie, E-mail: Julie.Dumont@pasteur-lille.fr; Josse, Rozenn, E-mail: Rozenn.Josse@univ-rennes1.fr; Lambert, Carine, E-mail: Carine.Lambert45@gmail.com; Antherieu, Sebastien, E-mail: Sebastien.Antherieu@univ-rennes1.fr; Laurent, Veronique, E-mail: Veronique.Laurent@univ-rennes1.fr; Loyer, Pascal, E-mail: Pascal.Loyer@univ-rennes1.fr; Robin, Marie-Anne, E-mail: Marie-Anne.Robin@inserm.fr; Guillouzo, Andre, E-mail: Andre.Guillouzo@univ-rennes1.f

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are two of the most common heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) produced during cooking of meat, fish and poultry. Both HAA produce different tumor profiles in rodents and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. In order to better understand the molecular basis of HAA toxicity, we have analyzed gene expression profiles in the metabolically competent human HepaRG cells using pangenomic oligonucleotide microarrays, after either a single (24-h) or a repeated (28-day) exposure to 10 {mu}M PhIP or MeIQx. The most responsive genes to both HAA were downstream targets of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR): CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 after both time points and CYP1B1 and ALDH3A1 after 28 days. Accordingly, CYP1A1/1A2 induction in HAA-treated HepaRG cells was prevented by chemical inhibition or small interference RNA-mediated down-regulation of the AhR. Consistently, HAA induced activity of the CYP1A1 promoter, which contains a consensus AhR-related xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). In addition, several other genes exhibited both time-dependent and compound-specific expression changes with, however, a smaller magnitude than previously reported for the prototypical AhR target genes. These changes concerned genes mainly related to cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In conclusion, these results identify the AhR gene battery as the preferential target of PhIP and MeIQx in HepaRG cells and further support the hypothesis that intake of HAA in diet might increase human cancer risk.

  19. Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions data are often lacking or uncertain for many airborne contaminants. Chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), emitted from combustion sources, fall into this category. Currently available ambient-air emission inventories of PAHs either fail to account for population-based activities (such as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle activity) and/or report ''total PAH'' or particulate organic matter emissions instead of individual compounds. We measure the degree of overlap between predicted concentrations from estimated emissions with measured concentrations. Our analysis is, based on probabilistic analysis of measured outdoor air concentrations with those predicted from mass-balance models. Based on available information, we estimate the relative magnitude of emissions from four major sources of PAHs to outdoor air- (1) on-road motor vehicles, including light-duty gasoline vehicles and diesel-powered buses and medium and heavy duty trucks; (2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation from external combustion boilers. We use the CalTOX regional multimedia mass-balance model to evaluate our emissions estimates in rural and urban regions of the state of Minnesota, USA. We compare model estimates of outdoor PAH airborne concentrations with those reported by the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). With these measured concentrations we probabilistically evaluate our emissions and interpret the reliability of our emissions estimates for specific PAHs. The median estimates of our predicted outdoor air concentrations agree within an order of magnitude of measured concentrations. For four representative PAHs, we were able to obtain a reasonable degree of overlap between empirical and predicted distributions of outdoor air concentrations. Our combination of models, emissions estimates, and empirical concentration data estimate exposure in a manner that is more reliable than any of these tools alone. Thereby, we increase our confidence about our plausible ranges of emissions and predicted concentrations.

  20. Sequential Methods in Solving Economic Power Flow Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cańizares, Claudio A.

    to the primal LP problem: min. ctx 5 s.t. Ax = b; x 0 by nding the solution to the dual problem: max. bty 6 s

  1. Climate UpdateClimate Update Wendy RyanWendy Ryan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year Max Precip Min P #12;Division 4 ­ Del Norte Del Norte 2008 Water Year 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 O C

  2. Climate UpdateClimate Update Nolan DoeskenNolan Doesken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 2002 2009 Water Year Max Precip Min Precip #12;Division 4 ­ Del Norte Del Norte 2009 Water Year 0 2 4 6

  3. Climate Update Nolan DoeskenNolan Doesken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 Water Year Max Precip Min Precip #12;Division 4 ­ Del Norte Del Norte 2007 Water Year 0 2 4 6 8 10

  4. TEST OF THE PERFORMANCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF A PROTOTYPE INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolger, J.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V min. Trojan J 217 lead acid batteries, 14 84 max. Bridgea lead-acid battery pack consisting of 12, 6-V batteries in

  5. Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Min-Max Regret Robust Optimization Approach for Large Scale Full Factorial Scenario Design of Data Uncertainty Tiravat Assavapokee, Matthew Realff, Jane

  6. Optimization Online - Enter Your Password to Continue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update Entry. A Min-Max Regret Robust Optimization Approach for Large Scale Full Factorial Scenario Design of Data Uncertainty. Enter the Article Password:.

  7. Financial Sector Ups and Downs and the Real Sector: Up by the Stairs and Down by the Parachute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Pinto, Brian; Sushko, Vladyslav

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mean Max Min. Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Costamarkets, are: Argentina; Bolivia; Chile; Colombia; Costaholds in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Philippines, Singapore,

  8. Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different aromatic carboxylates: Assembly, structures, electrochemical and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Ju-Wen; Lu, Qi-Lin [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole (atrz) and three types of aromatic carboxylates, [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(DNBA){sub 6}] (1), [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(1,3-BDC){sub 3}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(SIP){sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (3) (HDNBA=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 1,3-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid and NaH{sub 2}SIP=sodium 5-sulfoisophthalate), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Complex 1 displays a single-molecular Cu{sup II}{sub 4} cluster structure, which is further connected by the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions to form a 2D supramolecular layer. In 2, there also exist tetranuclear Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters, which are linked by the 1,3-BDC anions to give a 3D NaCl-type framework. In 3, the Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters are connected by the carboxyl and sulfo groups of SIP anions to generate 3D (4,8)-connected framework with a (4{sup 10}{center_dot}6{sup 14}{center_dot}8{sup 4})(4{sup 5}{center_dot}6){sub 2} topology. The atrz ligand conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters and the carboxylates with different non-carboxyl substituent show important effects on the final structures of the title complexes. The electrochemical and magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes based on different carboxylates have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The carboxylate anions play a key role in the formation of three different structures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes have been obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The atrz conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carboxylates show important effect on the structures of title complexes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties and electrochemical behaviors have been reported.

  9. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  10. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  11. III. Zaklady matematicke statistiky, bodove odhady

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komarek, Arnost

    ); otec otec u porodu (0=ne, 1=ano); dudlik d´ite melo dudl´ik (0=ne, 1=ano); plan d´ite bylo podle matky Max. :78.00 Max. :1.0000 otec dudlik plan porodnice Min. :0.0000 Min. :0.0000 Min. :0.0000 Min. :0")), + fotec =factor(otec, levels=0:1, labels=c("ne", "ano")), + fdudlik =factor(dudlik, levels=0:1, labels

  12. Calculation of the thermodynamic properties at elevated temperatures and pressures of saturated and aromatic high molecular weight solid and liquid hydrocarbons in kerogen, bitumen, petroleum, and other organic matter of biogeochemical interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, L.; Helgeson, H.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To supplement the relatively sparse set of calorimetric data available for the multitude of high molecular weight organic compounds of biogeochemical interest, group additivity algorithms have been developed to estimate heat capacity power function coefficients and the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 C and 1 bar of high molecular weight compounds in hydrocarbon source rocks and reservoirs, including crystalline and liquid isoprenoids, steroids, tricyclic diterpenoids, hopanoids, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A total of ninety-six group contributions for each coefficient and property were generated from the thermodynamic properties of lower molecular weight reference species for which calorimetric data are available in the literature. These group contributions were then used to compute corresponding coefficients and properties for {approximately}360 representative solid and liquid high molecular weight compounds in kerogen, bitumen, and petroleum for which few or no experimental data are available. The coefficients and properties of these high molecular weight compounds are summarized in tables, together with those of the groups and reference species from which they were generated. The tabulated heat capacity power function coefficients and standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 C and 1 bar include selected crystalline and liquid regular, irregular and highly branched isoprenoids, tricyclic diterpanes, 17{alpha}(H)- and 17{beta}(H)-hopanes, 5{alpha}(H),14{alpha}(H)-, 5{beta}(H),14{alpha}(H)-, 5{alpha}(H),14{beta}(H)-, and 5{beta}(H),14{beta}(H)-steranes, double ether- and ester-bonded n-alkanes, and various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including methylated biphenyls, naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, anthracenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes. However, corresponding coefficients and properties for many more saturated and unsaturated high molecular weight hydrocarbons can be estimated from the equations of state group additivity algorithms. Calculations of this kind permit comprehensive thermodynamic description of the chemical evolution of organic matter with increasing depth in sedimentary basins.

  13. 2. Mthode du simplexe son analyse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, Jacques A.

    min ¡ ConsidÊrons le problème de maximisation max f(w) Sujet à w X Rn oÚ f : X R1. #12;Transformation de max en min ¡ ConsidÊrons le problème de maximisation max f(w) Sujet à w X Rn oÚ f : X R1. ¡ Soit w* un point de X oÚ le maximum est atteint. #12;Transformation de max en min ¡ ConsidÊrons le

  14. APPLICATION OF THE FUZZY MINMAX NEURAL NETWORK CLASSIFIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Likas, Aristidis

    . The fuzzy min­max classification network consti­ tutes a promisimg pattern recognition approach dimensions. Experi­ mental results using the modified model on a difficult pattern recognition problem of the fuzzy min­max classi­ fication neural network on a pattern recognition problem that involves both

  15. APPLICATION OF THE FUZZY MINMAX NEURAL NETWORK CLASSIFIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blekas, Konstantinos

    . The fuzzy min­max classification network constitutes a promisimg pattern recognition approach that is based. Experimental results us­ ing the modified model on a difficult pattern recognition prob­ lem establishes of the fuzzy min­max clas­ sification neural network on a pattern recognition problem that involves both

  16. Min Chen Department of Mathematics Purdue University 150 N ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    w = a1w + a2w2 + a3w3 + c = p(w). In order to show the existence of solutions to Abel's equation (16) we prescribe one of the three roots of the cubic polynomial ...

  17. Underpinning Mathematics/Science: (min 40 cr) Mathematics (16 cr)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Materials Science and Engineering BS Degree Requirements for students beginning in or after Fall 2011 04 324 Introductory Applied Statistics for Engineers Physics (10 cr) Phys 201 or Phys 207 or Phys 247 Modern Physics for Engineers Phys 235 Introduction to Solid State Electronics Phys 241 Intro to Modern

  18. Analysis of Dynamic Policies # A. Prasad Sistla, Min Zhou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sistla, A. Prasad

    of Computer Science, Chicago, USA Abstract The paper considers the problem of modeling and analyzing dynamic Trust management system. Key words: Dynamic Access Control Policies, Security Properties, Trust by the NSF grant CCR­0205365. Preprint submitted to Elsevier 11 December 2007 #12; dynamic systems modeled

  19. RTG_min_10-4-07_final

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EST Conference CallMeeting Notes Welcome and Introductions Chair: Alex Thrower, DOE-OLM Topic Group Participants: Melissa Bailey, CSG-NE Jane Beetem, CSG-MW Kevin Blackwell,...

  20. A Derandomization Using MinWise Independent Permutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charikar, Moses

    . 1 Introduction Carter and Wegman [6] introduced the concept of universal hashing in 1979 became of interest, up until the seminal paper of Carter and Wegman the premise of the theory, and the space needed to store a truly random hash function would dwarf the size of the table. Carter and Wegman

  1. annus mart min: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "miraculous year" (annus mirabilis) of Einstein. However, the influence of this great mind was not limited to science. As it is well known, his fingerprint remains engraved in...

  2. Min Chen Contact Information: Department of Mathematics tel: 765 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ”European Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics”. • ”Nonlinear ... Member of Computer Science Strategic planning committee;. • Promotion ... main Decomposition Methods in Scientific and Engineering Computing, Oct. 27-30,. 1993, Penn ...

  3. 1.85 Approximation for Min-Power Strong Connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calinescu, Gruia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a directed simple graph G=(V,E) and a nonnegative-valued cost function the power of a vertex u in a directed spanning subgraph H is given by the maximum cost of an arcs of H exiting u. The power of H is the sum of the power of its vertices. Power Assignment seeks to minimize the power of H while H satisfies some connectivity constraint. In this paper, we assume E is bidirected (for every directed edge e in E, the opposite edge exists and has the same cost), while H is required to be strongly connected. This is the original power assignment problem introduced by Chen and Huang in 1989, who proved that bidirected minimum spanning tree has approximation ratio at most 2 (this is tight). In Approx 2010, we introduced a Greedy approximation algorithm and claimed a ratio of 1.992. Here we improve the analysis to 1.85. The proof also shows that a natural linear programming relaxation, introduced by us in 2012, has the same 1.85 integrality gap.

  4. SA Murphy 1 90 min. Getting SMART about Adapting Interventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Susan A.

    are dynamic treatment regimes, treatment algorithms, stepped care models, expert systems, adaptive treatment abuse treatment otherwise low risk These are assessed monthly::: Noncompliance: is(1) falls below strategy, treatment protocols. Structured treatment interruptions in the treatment of AIDS are a form

  5. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_031015_min.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gai (ORNLCNMS); Enrique Gomez (Penn State U.); Martyn McLachlan (Imperial College, London); Megan Robertson (U. Houston); Ray Unocic (ORNLCNMS); Rafael Verduzco (Rice U.) Past...

  6. zeolite-membranes-min | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO1) 1Metal Monolithic

  7. MIN IMI IlI New Data Series

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14Biomass feedstocks and0216,July

  8. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_010615_min.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12

  9. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_020315_min_TEH.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12February 3, 2015

  10. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_030315_min_TEH.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12February 3,

  11. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_030514_min.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12February 3,March 5,

  12. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_040214_min_TEH.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12February 3,March

  13. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_040715_min_TEH.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12February

  14. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_050515_min_TEH.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12FebruaryMay 5, 2015

  15. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_050714_min_TEH.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12FebruaryMay 5,

  16. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_060414_min_TEH.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12FebruaryMay 5,June

  17. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_111714_min.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12FebruaryMay 5,Junead

  18. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_120314_min_TEH.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimization 9/27/12FebruaryMay

  19. SECTION J, APPENDIX Q - MIN STDS FOR CONTRACTORS' COI PLANS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andBHoneywell9/%2ARequest forMod 002;Q, Page

  20. Min-kota Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|Mililani Town,Millinocket,Milo,MilwaukeeEnergyEnergy

  1. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Fall 2010 Mtg Min.FINAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_Cost Estimating Panel1.doc Microsoft WordEnergyWestEERE February

  2. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Spring 2010 Mtg Min.063010

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_Cost Estimating Panel1.doc Microsoft WordEnergyWestEERE February

  3. On-site profiling and speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at manufactured gas plant sites by a high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe coupled to a photoionization detector and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Considine; Albert Robbat Jr. [Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States). Chemistry Department, Center for Field Analytical Studies and Technology

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe (HTTL-MIP) coupled to a photoionization detector (PID) and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) was used to rapidly profile and speciate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the subsurface. PID signals were in agreement with GC/MS results. Correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.99 were obtained for discrete and composite samples collected from the same exact location. Continuous probe advancement with PID detection found coal tar, a dense nonaqueous phase liquid, in soil channels and saturated media. When samples were collected conventionally, split, solvent extracted, and analyzed in the field and confirmation laboratory, GC/MS measurement precision and accuracy were indistinguishable; despite the fact the field laboratory produced data five times faster than the laboratory using standard EPA methods. No false positive/negatives were found. Based on these findings, increased confidence in site conceptual models should be obtained, since PID response indicated total PAH presence/absence in 'real-time', while GC/MS provided information as to which PAH was present and at what concentration. Incorporation of this tool into a dynamic workplan will provide more data at less cost enabling environmental scientists, engineers, and regulators to better understand coal tar migration and its impact on human health and the environment. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (of Rankine­Hugoniot type) expressing conservation, some kinetic rule g acts as a two­sided boundary expression that can be determined from derivatives of W and g at U A and U B . 1. Introduction In this paper) associated with (2), solutions (3) are required to satisfy an additional kinetic rule g((U - , V - ), (U

  5. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

  6. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    computational tasks. PACS numbers: 89.75.Hc, 05.45.-a, 05.65.+b, 89.75.-k In 1948, Alan Turing proposed several

  7. Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the compression of complex data (for storage or transmission), also introduced in many areas such as signal, the aim is to compress the best as possible the information or to extract a few modes representing some = X i#I a i d O j=1 b (j) i j , (1.1) where I = I 1 × . . . ×I d is a multi­index set with I j = {1

  8. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .H. Leo S. Muller y Abstract The elastic energy of a sequence of splitting particles is computed-measures with the calculation of Khachaturyan et al. 1] for the elastic energy of cuboidal particles, doublets and octets. In the in nite splitting limit, the elastic energy of particles that split in one spatial dimension (a sequence

  9. MaxPlanckInstitut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P.H. Leo \\Lambda S. M¨uller y Abstract The elastic energy of a sequence of splitting particles­measures with the calculation of Khachaturyan et al. [1] for the elastic energy of cuboidal particles, doublets and octets. In the infinite splitting limit, the elastic energy of particles that split in one spatial dimension (a sequence

  10. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -valued functions u in a suitable Sobolev class W1,2(, AQ(Rm)) minimizing a generalized Dirichlet energy (cp. [9 neighborhood of a given set E Rn of radius r. Theorem A. Let u : AQ(Rm) be a Dir-minimizing function, where(x))} is a smooth n-dimensional embedded submanifold (not necessarily connected). For every k {0, . . . , n}, we

  11. Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems and how to program these computers. The load balancing methods used in this article are introduced­Matrix Arithmetics on Shared Memory Systems by Ronald Kriemann Preprint no.: 29 2004 #12; #12; Parallel H­Matrix Arithmetics on Shared Memory Systems R. Kriemann # May 12, 2004 Abstract H­matrices, as they were introduced

  12. Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applications Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200, Australia chaudhur@maths.anu.edu.au and Stefan M

  13. Bovine Respiratory Disease Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    . The clinical signs are usually mild and involve coughing, nasal discharge, fever and a decreased appetite signs of BRD are nasal and eye discharges, coughing, fever, depressed appetite, varying degrees

  14. Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equations by Huijun Fan, Tyler Jarvis, and Yongbin Ruan Preprint no.: 40 2004 #12; #12; COMPACTNESS OF A r ­SPIN EQUATIONS HUIJUN FAN, TYLER JARVIS AND YONGBIN RUAN Abstract. We introduce the W ­spin structures­spin equations considered by E. Witten [W2]. If the number of the Ramond marked points on # is at least 1

  15. ATF Users Meeting 2002 Max.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the CAP Steering Committee and ATF Users Meeting January 31 - February 1, 2002 Accelerator and Fusion Research Division Center for Beam Physics e - Atom at rest Atom...

  16. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution to construct a nonintersecting lightlike transversal vector bun- dle of the tangent bundle. Since

  17. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciences, UAS-GKVK Campus, Bangalore 560065, India 6 School of Biotechnology, GGS Indraprastha University to survive un- der diverse environmental conditions. A key goal of systems biology is to unveil

  18. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , China University of Petroleum, 266580 Qingdao, China 3 College of Mathematics and Statistics, Hainan. Moreover, our lower bound of the Grothendieck constant of order three gives a refined bound for mixed states, the situation is more compli- cated. There are no general methods to judge whether a mixed

  19. MaxPlanckInstitut f ur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Science, China University of Petroleum, 266580 Qingdao, China 3 College of Mathematics and Statistics. Moreover, our lower bound of the Grothendieck constant of order three gives a refined bound­locality coincide. However for mixed states, the situation is more compli­ cated. There are no general methods

  20. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as in Schr¨odinger cat para- dox and quantum no-cloning theorem [3]. The existence of superposed quantum