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Sample records for min max aromatics

  1. Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the Target-Matrix Paradigm. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method...

  2. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Max Schulze Max Schulze-Extreme unicycling The unicycle that Los Alamos student intern Max Schulze and his brother had given their dad for Father's Day in 2005 did not get much use until Schulze tried it and got hooked. Today, he is a three-time unicycling world champion, with world wins in New Zealand in 2010, Italy in 2012 and Canada in 2014. June 9, 2015 Max Schulze Max Schulze "I really thrive in competitive and demo environments, often performing better there than I do otherwise."

  3. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Max Schulze June 9, 2015 Extreme unicycling The unicycle that Los Alamos student intern Max Schulze and his brother had given their dad for Father's Day in 2005 did not get much use until Schulze tried it and got hooked. Today, he is a three-time unicycling world champion, with world wins in New Zealand in 2010, Italy in 2012 and Canada in 2014. "My main competitive unicycling event is 'trials,'" Schulze explains, "which requires riders to navigate technically challenging obstacle

  4. Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov....

  5. via Spence St 39 min

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    via Spence St 39 min

  6. min-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Model-Predicted Total Shortwave with Measurements Under Overcast Cloud Conditions Q. Min and L. C. Harrison Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York at Albany Albany, New York Abstract We use surface measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site made with the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and microwave radiometer (MWR) to obtain time-series of cloud optical depths and mean effective droplet

  7. min-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Statistics of Photon Pathlength and Cloud Optical Depth Q.-L. Min and L. C. Harrison Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Abstract A mean pressure- and temperature-weighted photon pathlength in the atmosphere can be inferred from moderate resolution measurements in the O 2 A-band. We show a pathlength retrieval method and calibration results for measurements from a Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS), and present the joint statistics of

  8. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Docket No....

  9. Summary Max Total Units

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  10. Min Chen | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Min Chen Min Chen Min Chen Min Chen Research Affiliate E-mail: min.chen@sydney.edu.au Phone: +61 2 9036 5006 Fax: +61 2 9351 4119 Website: University of Sydney Research Affiliate Dr. Chen's research interests include elucidating the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of the energy-storing reactions and photo-regulatory processes in photosynthetic organisms, particularly the function of red-shifted chlorophylls in photosynthetic cyanobacteria and algae. Techniques employed by Dr. Chen include

  11. Xiao-Min Lin | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Xiao-Min Lin Scientist & Joint Staff, James Franck Institute, University of Chicago Postdoc, James Franck Institute, University of Chicago (2000-2002) Ph.D. Condensed Matter...

  12. ARM - VAP Product - mfrsrcldod1min

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsmfrsrcldodmfrsrcldod1min Documentation Technical Report Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027296 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : MFRSRCLDOD1MIN Derived: Cloud Optical Properties from MFRSR, MWR, Langley Analysis Active Dates 1997.08.21 - 2015.12.08 Originating VAP Process Cloud Optical Properties from MFRSR

  13. Max Ambiental S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ambiental S A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Max Ambiental S.A. Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 01452-938 Sector: Carbon Product: Max Ambiental is a company involved in the...

  14. MaxWest Environmental Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MaxWest Environmental Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: MaxWest Environmental Systems Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77057 Product: MaxWest Environmental Systems designs,...

  15. Make aromatics from LPG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doolan, P.C. ); Pujado, P.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) consists mainly of the propane and butane fraction recovered from gas fields, associated petroleum gas and refinery operations. Apart from its use in steam cracking and stream reforming, LPG has few petrochemical applications. The relative abundance of LPG and the strong demand for aromatics - benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) - make it economically attractive to produce aromatics via the aromatization of propane and butanes. This paper describes the Cyclar process, which is based on a catalyst formulation developed by BP and which uses UOP's CCR catalyst regeneration technology, converts propane, butanes or mixtures thereof to petrochemical-quality aromatics in a single step.

  16. SolarMax Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea (Republic) Zip: 445-912 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer and engineer of solar heating systems and boilers. References: SolarMax Inc1 This article is a stub. You...

  17. Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition is an annual competition run by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) that challenges students to design...

  18. max kwh | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is likely due to users not understanding the meaning of "Max kWh"--often I see things like: "300, 700, 1000" (derived from "first 300, next 700, greater than 1000") which...

  19. runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" September 12, 2014 Symptom: User jobs with single or multiple apruns...

  20. MinWind I & II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I & II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name MinWind I & II Wind Farm Facility MinWind I & II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  1. Min-kota Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Min-kota Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Philip, South Dakota Coordinates 44.0394329, -101.6651441 Show Map Loading map......

  2. Rainer Held > Guest Researcher - Max-Planck Institute for Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rainer Held Guest Researcher - Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research heldrain@gmail.com Formerly a member of the Schlom Group, he joined the Max-Planck Institute for Solid...

  3. ARM - Evaluation Product - Cloud Optical Properties from MFRSR Using Min

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algorithm ProductsCloud Optical Properties from MFRSR Using Min Algorithm ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Cloud Optical Properties from MFRSR Using Min Algorithm Like the operational VAP run at other sites, MFRSRCLDOD is based on the algorithm by Min and Harrison (1996). Users are

  4. Neurton Damage and MAX Phase Ternary Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsoum, Michael; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Sindelar, Robert; Garcua-Duaz, Brenda; Kohse, Gordon

    2014-06-17

    The Demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron radiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ C) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the resonse of a new class of machinable, conductive, layered, ternary transition metal carbides and nitrides - the so-called MAX phases - to low and moderate neutron dose levels.

  5. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  6. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-MAX HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford C-MAX HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  7. SolarMax Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: SolarMax Technology Inc Place: City of Industry, California Zip: 91745 Product: PV module maker and residential and commercial PV...

  8. Paul Blom: Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PM Paul Blom Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Transport and Recombination in Polymer:fullerene bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells January 22, 2014 |...

  9. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and...

  10. University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer | Department of Energy University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer September 10, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Energy Department announced today that the University of Maryland won the second annual Max Tech and Beyond design competition for ultra-low energy use appliances and equipment for the second year in a row. The

  11. Subkilovolt response of Kodak T max XUV film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittmore, C.; Stoering, J.P. ); Gullikson, E. )

    1990-02-08

    A calibration of Kodak T max 100 XUV film at six x-ray energies ranging from 0.27 keV to 1.49 keV has been concluded. The primary purpose was to compare the sensitivity of this film to that of Kodak type 101-07 XUV film in order to appraise the feasibility of replacing the type 101-07 film with the type T max 100 film. In addition to being considerably less expensive, the T max 100 film is less disposed to abrasion from handling. A secondary objective was to provide a base for further response measurements should the T max 100 film prove to be an acceptable substitute for the type 101-07 film. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Zhejiang Max Solar Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang Max Solar Energy Co Ltd Place: Huzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 313009 Product: A Zhejiang-based PV module...

  13. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planck Society President Peter Gruss, and Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New York Busso von Alvensleben meet to sign an agreement launching the new Max...

  14. The Max Tech and Beyond Competition | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Max Tech and Beyond Competition The Max Tech and Beyond Competition Addthis 1 of 5 Team Cal Poly Solar is working to significantly reduce the cost and construction time on their solar concentrator for cooking. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 5 Professor Dale Dolan's students from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo Electrical Engineering department testing the placement of their Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic Panel for Pool Heating. Image: Lawrence Berkeley

  15. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  16. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  17. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    1993-09-01

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  18. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  19. The interactional foundations of MaxEnt: Open questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harr, Michael S.

    2014-12-05

    One of the simplest and potentially most useful techniques to be developed in the 20{sup th} century, a century noted for an ever more mathematically sophisticated formulation of the sciences, is that of maximising the entropy of a system in order to generate a descriptive, stochastic model of that system in closed form, often abbreviated to MaxEnt. The extension of MaxEnt to systems beyond the physics from which it originated is hampered by the fact that the microscopic physical interactions that are not justified or justifiable within the MaxEnt framework need to be falsifiably evaluated in each new field of application. It is not obvious that such justification exists for many systems in which the interactions are not directly based on physics. For example what is the justification for the use of MaxEnt in biology, climate modelling or economics? Is it simply a useful heuristic or is there some deeper connection with the foundations of some systems? Without further critical examination of the microscopic foundations that give rise to the success of the MaxEnt principle it is difficult to motivate the use of such techniques in other fields except through theoretically an practically unsatisfying analogical arguments. This article briefly presents the basis of MaxEnt principles as originally introduced in statistical mechanics in the Jaynes form, the Tsallis form and the Rnyi form. Several different applications are introduced including that of ecological diversity where maximising the different diversity measures is equivalent to maximising different entropic functionals.

  20. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  1. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  2. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  3. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  4. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  5. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  6. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  7. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huber, George W.

    2011-06-03

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysismass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450600 C). At low temperatures (450 C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include DielsAlder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e.g., furan forms CO and allene), oligomerization (allene forms olefins and aromatics plus hydrogen), and alkylation (e.g., furan plus olefins). The product distribution was far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  8. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M. 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 40 CHEMISTRY; COAL LIQUIDS;...

  9. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-Gonzlez, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  10. max walltime for "low" queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We have increased the...

  11. WPPI GreenMax-Scheller Residence: Near Zero Energy Monitoring Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-19

    This report describes results of GreenMax 2 monitoring project referred to as the GreenMax Net Zero Home, a demonstration home that can provide a wealth of information for the building community.

  12. Dehydrocyclodimerization, converting LPG to aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.A.; Hilder, G.K.

    1984-03-01

    British Petroleum (BP) recognized the potential need for ways of exploiting feedstocks with low opportunity cost and commenced a research program at its Sunbury Research Center to discover and develop a catalyst for the conversion of LPG to a liquid product. The successful outcome of this research program is the Cyclar /SUP SM/ process, a joint development of UOP Process Division and British Petroleum. The Cyclar process offers a single-step conversion of LPG to an aromatic product which has a highvalue, is easily transported and useful both to fuel and petrochemical applications. The LPG producer can invest in a single unit, avoiding the need to identify and develop markets for multiple C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ products. This catalytic process, which employs UOP Continuous Catalyst Regeneration (CCR) technology, can also be applied to refinery light ends to produce a high-quality gasoline. Aromatic and hydrogen yields from propane and butane feeds surpass those obtained from catalytic reforming of Light Arabian naphtha. This paper describes the principles of the Cyclar process and illustrates yields and economics for several interesting applications.

  13. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  14. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  15. Spin chains and Arnold's problem on the Gauss-Kuz'min statistics for quadratic irrationals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ustinov, Alexey V

    2013-05-31

    New results related to number theoretic model of spin chains are proved. We solve Arnold's problem on the Gauss-Kuz'min statistics for quadratic irrationals. Bibliography: 24 titles.

  16. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  17. Aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a laminar premixed n-butane flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Vincitore, A.M.; Castaldi, M.J.; Senkan, S.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1998-07-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane-oxygen-argon burner stabilized flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.6 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer technique. Measurements were made in the main reaction and post-reaction zones for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-fused aromatic rings. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis were used to help identify the important reaction sequences leading to aromatic and PAH growth and destruction in the n-butane flame. Reaction flux analysis showed the propargyl recombination reaction was the dominant pathway to benzene formation. The consumption of propargyl by H atoms was shown to limit propargyl, benzene, and naphthalene formation in flames as exhibited by the large negative sensitivity coefficients. Naphthalene and phenanthrene production was shown to be plausibly formed through reactions involving resonantly stabilized cyclopentadienyl and indenyl radicals. Many of the low molecular weight aliphatics, combustion by-products, aromatics, branched aromatics, and PAHs were fairly well simulated by the model. Additional work is required to understand the formation mechanisms of phenyl acetylene, pyrene, and fluoranthene in the n-butane flame. 73 refs.

  18. AtMIN7 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Sheng Yang (Okemos, MI); Nomura, Kinya (East Lansing, MI)

    2011-07-26

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein AtMIN7 mediated protection is enhanced and/or there is a decrease in activity of an AtMIN7 associated virulence protein such as a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1. Reagents of the present invention provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  19. Experimental and modeling investigation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a premixed ethylene flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldi, M.J.; Marinov, N.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling has been performed to investigate aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon formation pathways in a rich, sooting, ethylene-oxygen-argon premixed flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.5 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) technique. Measurements were made in the flame and post-flame zone for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-aromatic fused rings. The modeling results show the key reaction sequences leading to aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon growth involve the combination of resonantly stabilized radicals. In particular, propargyl and 1-methylallenyl combination reactions lead to benzene and methyl substituted benzene formation, while polycyclic aromatics are formed from cyclopentadienyl radicals and fused rings that have a shared C{sub 5} side structure. Naphthalene production through the reaction step of cyclopentadienyl self-combination and phenanthrene formation from indenyl and cyclopentadienyl combination were shown to be important in the flame modeling study. The removal of phenyl by O{sub 2} leading to cyclopentadienyl formation is expected to play a pivotal role in the PAH or soot precursor growth process under fuel-rich oxidation conditions.

  20. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  1. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert E. [557 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA 94550; Dolbeare, Frank A. [5178 Diane La., Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    City 6 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City 2006.03.03 - 2006.03.28 Lead Scientist : Jeffrey Gaffney For data sets, see below. Abstract A 4-week field campaign was conducted in and downwind of Mexico City during March 2006. The Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - MEXico City (MAX-MEX)

  3. max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2013 September 2012 August 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011

  4. runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" September 12, 2014 Symptom: User jobs with single or multiple apruns in a batch script may get this runtime error. "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc". This problem is intermittent, started in April, then mid July, and again since late August. Status: This problem is identified as a problem when Torque/Moab batch scheduler becomes out of sync with the

  5. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier5Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateDemandRateStructureTier5Max&oldid539754...

  6. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier1Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateEnergyRateStructureTier1Max&oldid539766...

  7. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateDemandRateStructureTier4Max&oldid539751...

  8. text in "Max kWh" fields | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it should as we are trying to prevent users from writing "less than X", "greater than Y", etc. and follow the intention of the "Max kWh" field. Also there should be a warning...

  9. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics By John Greenwald March 30, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (From left to right) Princeton University Professor of Astrophysical Sciences James Stone, Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman, Princeton University Dean for Research A. J. Stewart Smith, Max Planck Society President Peter Gruss, and Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New

  10. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but also for probes of cosmology. However, different mass measurement

  11. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 16_Sahara.dust.min.20070326.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Saharan dust layer suppress deep Saharan dust layer suppress deep convection and precipitation Qilong Min1, Rui Li1, Shuyu Wang1, Bing Lin2, Yong Hu2, Everette Joseph3, Vernon Morris3 Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York S i Di t i NASA L l R h C t Science Directories, NASA Langley Research Center NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Howard University Saharan dust and dry air effects: y On Hurricans and cloud systems: *The entrainment of dry air into tropical

  13. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longanbach, J. R.; Chan, L. K.; Levy, A.

    1982-11-15

    Samples of middle and heavy SRC-II distillates were distilled into 50 C boiling point range fractions. These were characterized by measurements of their molecular weight, elemental analysis and basic nitrogen content and calculation of average molecular structures. The structures typically consisted of 1 to 3 aromatic rings fused to alicyclic rings with short, 1 to 3 carbon aliphatic side chains. The lower boiling fractions contained significant amounts (1 atom/molecule) of oxygen while the heavier fractions contained so few heteroatoms that they were essentially hydrocarbons. Laboratory scale oxidative-pyrolysis experiments were carried out at pyrolysis temperatures of 500 to 1100 C and oxygen concentrations from 0 to 100 percent of stoichiometry. Analysis of liquid products, collected in condensers cooled with liquid nitrogen showed that aromatization is a major reaction in the absence of oxygen. The oxygen-containing materials (phenolics) seem to be more resistant to thermal pyrolysis than unsubstituted aromatics. Nitrogen converts from basic to nonbasic forms at about 500 C. The nonbasic nitrogen is more stable and survives up to 700 C after which it is slowly removed. A recently constructed 50,000 Btu/hr staged combustor was used to study the chemistry of the nitrogen and aromatics. SRC II combustion was studied under fuel-rich, first-stage conditions at air/fuel ratios from 0.6 to 1.0 times stoichiometric. The chemistry of the fuel during combustion calls for further investigation in order to examine the mechanism by which HCN is evolved as a common intermediate for the formation of the nitrogen-containing gaseous combustion products. 25 references, 45 figures, 25 tables.

  14. Characterization and analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breuer, G.M.; Smith, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Sampling and analytical procedures were developed for determining the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in animal-exposure chambers during studies on exposure to diesel exhaust, coal dust, or mixtures of these two pollutants. Fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene were used as representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. High-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for analysis. Coal-dust only samples revealed a broad, rising background in the chromatogram with small peaks superimposed corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo(a)anthracene, diesel exhaust only samples showed many peaks on a flat baseline including those corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene. In general, no polynuclear aromatics were noted in the clean air samples. The authors note that relatively minor changes in air/fuel ratio, lubricant, fuel, and load may have substantial effects on very minor components of the exhaust emission.

  15. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

    1994-04-26

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

  16. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN); Schulz, Amber L. (Bremerton, WA); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for ro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound.

  17. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  18. Band gap estimation from temperature dependent Seebeck measurementDeviations from the 2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max} relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Zachary M.; Kim, Hyun-Sik; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-01-12

    In characterizing thermoelectric materials, electrical and thermal transport measurements are often used to estimate electronic band structure properties such as the effective mass and band gap. The Goldsmid-Sharp band gap, E{sub g}?=?2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max}, is a tool widely employed to estimate the band gap from temperature dependent Seebeck coefficient measurements. However, significant deviations of more than a factor of two are now known to occur. We find that this is when either the majority-to-minority weighted mobility ratio (A) becomes very different from 1.0 or as the band gap (E{sub g}) becomes significantly smaller than 10 k{sub B}T. For narrow gaps (E{sub g}???6 k{sub B}T), the Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics applied by Goldsmid-Sharp break down and Fermi-Dirac statistics are required. We generate a chart that can be used to quickly estimate the expected correction to the Goldsmid-Sharp band gap depending on A and S{sub max}; however, additional errors can occur for S?

  19. Claire E. Max, 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Claire E. Max, 2004 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 2000's Claire E. Max, 2004 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Physics: For her contributions to

  20. Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2006-08-23

    Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories.

  1. Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization reactions of butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wen-Qing; Suib, S.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane by using a dual function catalyst has led to a significant enhancement of the yields (from 25 to 40%) and selectivities to aromatics (from 39 to 64%). Butane is converted to aromatics by using either zinc-promoted [Ga]-ZSM-5 or zinc and gallium copromoted [Fe]-ZSM-5 zeolite as a catalyst. However, the formation of aromatics is severely limited by hydrocracking of butane to methane, ethane, and propane due to the hydrogen formed during aromatization reactions. On the other hand, the oxidative dehydrogenation of butane to butene over molybdate catalysts is found to be accompanied by a concurrent undesirable reaction, i.e., total oxidation. When two of these reactions (oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane) are coupled by using a dual function catalyst they have shown to complement each other. It is believed that the rate-limiting step for aromatization (butane to butene) is increased by adding an oxidative dehydrogenation catalyst (Ga-Zn-Mg-Mo-O). The formation of methane, ethane, and propane was suppressed due to the removal of hydrogen initially formed as water. Studies of ammonia TPD show that the acidities of [Fe]-ZSM-5 are greatly affected by the existence of metal oxides such as Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3], MgO, ZnO, and MoO[sub 3]. 40 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lignin is a major component of non-edible biomass. It is a cheap byproduct of pulp and biofuel production and is one of the few naturally occurring sources of valuable aromatic ...

  3. ~max0006

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MANUAL Approved: 10-1 7-08 NNSA Line Oversight and Contractor Assurance System Supplemental Directive U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: Iink to NNSA Policicsisupplementa1 directives This page is intentionally blank. NNSA LINE OVERSIGHT AND CONTRACTOR ASSUWNCE SYSTEM SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE 1. PURPOSE. 'The Line Oversight and Contractor Assurance System (1,OCAS) is the National Nuclear Security Administration (NSSA) management system that

  4. Fast-ion transport in q{sub min}>2, high-? steady-state scenarios on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Collins, C.; Ferron, J. R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Bass, E. M.; Luce, T. C.; Pace, D. C.; Solomon, W. M.; Mueller, D.; Grierson, B.; Podesta, M.; Gong, X.; Ren, Q.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K.; Turco, F.

    2015-05-15

    Results from experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 828 (2005)] aimed at developing high ? steady-state operating scenarios with high-q{sub min} confirm that fast-ion transport is a critical issue for advanced tokamak development using neutral beam injection current drive. In DIII-D, greater than 11 MW of neutral beam heating power is applied with the intent of maximizing ?{sub N} and the noninductive current drive. However, in scenarios with q{sub min}>2 that target the typical range of q{sub 95}= 57 used in next-step steady-state reactor models, Alfvn eigenmodes cause greater fast-ion transport than classical models predict. This enhanced transport reduces the absorbed neutral beam heating power and current drive and limits the achievable ?{sub N}. In contrast, similar plasmas except with q{sub min} just above 1 have approximately classical fast-ion transport. Experiments that take q{sub min}>3 plasmas to higher ?{sub P} with q{sub 95}= 1112 for testing long pulse operation exhibit regimes of better than expected thermal confinement. Compared to the standard high-q{sub min} scenario, the high ?{sub P} cases have shorter slowing-down time and lower ??{sub fast}, and this reduces the drive for Alfvnic modes, yielding nearly classical fast-ion transport, high values of normalized confinement, ?{sub N}, and noninductive current fraction. These results suggest DIII-D might obtain better performance in lower-q{sub 95}, high-q{sub min} plasmas using broader neutral beam heating profiles and increased direct electron heating power to lower the drive for Alfvn eigenmodes.

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons - IL 30

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - IL 30 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS (IL.30 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1925 N. Kenmore Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.30-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 IL.30-2 Site Operations: Sample sized quantities of radioactive materials were shipped through this location; broker arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. IL.30-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  6. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light

  7. Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Garbesi, Karina

    2011-07-20

    It is well established that energy efficiency is most often the lowest cost approach to reducing national energy use and minimizing carbon emissions. National investments in energy efficiency to date have been highly cost-effective. The cumulative impacts (out to 2050) of residential energy efficiency standards are expected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.71:1. This project examined energy end-uses in the residential, commercial, and in some cases the industrial sectors. The scope is limited to appliances and equipment, and does not include building materials, building envelopes, and system designs. This scope is consistent with the scope of DOE's appliance standards program, although many products considered here are not currently subject to energy efficiency standards. How much energy could the United States save if the most efficient design options currently feasible were adopted universally? What design features could produce those savings? How would the savings from various technologies compare? With an eye toward identifying promising candidates and strategies for potential energy efficiency standards, the Max Tech and Beyond project aims to answer these questions. The analysis attempts to consolidate, in one document, the energy savings potential and design characteristics of best-on-market products, best-engineered products (i.e., hypothetical products produced using best-on-market components and technologies), and emerging technologies in research & development. As defined here, emerging technologies are fundamentally new and are as yet unproven in the market, although laboratory studies and/or emerging niche applications offer persuasive evidence of major energy-savings potential. The term 'max tech' is used to describe both best-engineered and emerging technologies (whichever appears to offer larger savings). Few best-on-market products currently qualify as max tech, since few apply all available best practices and components. The three primary analyses presented in this report are: Nevertheless, it is important to analyze best-on-market products, since data on truly max tech technologies are limited. (1) an analysis of the cross-cutting strategies most promising for reducing appliance and equipment energy use in the U.S.; (2) a macro-analysis of the U.S. energy-saving potential inherent in promising ultra-efficient appliance technologies; and (3) a product-level analysis of the energy-saving potential.

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons Inc - MD 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Inc - MD 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS, INC. (MD.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Maryland Alloys Corporation MD.04-1 Location: 5245 Fairlawn Avenue , Baltimore , Maryland MD.04-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 MD.04-1 MD.04-3 Site Operations: Scrap metals broker that arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. MD.04-2 MD.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote MD.04-3

  9. Max Phase Materials And Coatings For High Temperature Heat Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Olson, L.; Fuentes, R.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-10-19

    Molten salts have been used as heat transfer fluids in a variety of applications within proposed Gen IV nuclear designs and in advanced power system such as Concentrating Solar Power (CSP). However, operating at elevated temperatures can cause corrosion in many materials. This work developed coating technologies for MAX phase materials on Haynes-230 and characterized the corrosion of the coatings in the presence of commercial MgCl2-KCl molten salt. Cold spraying of Ti2AlC and physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Ti2AlC or Zr2AlC were tested to determine the most effective form of coating MAX phases on structural substrates. Corrosion testing at 850C for 100 hrs showed that 3.9 ?m Ti2AlC by PVD was slightly protective while 117 ?m Ti2AlC by cold spray and 3.6 ?m Zr2AlC by PVD were completely protective. None of the tests showed decomposition of the coating (Ti or Zr) into the salt

  10. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu-Shin (Central Islip, NY); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  11. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  12. Development of genetically engineered bacteria for production of selected aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Thomas E.; Watkins, Carolyn S.; Bulmer, Deborah K.; Johnson, Bruce F.; Amaratunga, Mohan

    2001-01-01

    The cloning and expression of genes in the common aromatic pathway of E. coli are described. A compound for which chorismate, the final product of the common aromatic pathway, is an anabolic intermediate can be produced by cloning and expressing selected genes of the common aromatic pathway and the genes coding for enzymes necessary to convert chorismate to the selected compound. Plasmids carrying selected genes of the common aromatic pathway are also described.

  13. Boride-based nano-laminates with MAX-phase-like behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telle, Rainer . E-mail: telle@ghi.rwth-aachen.de; Momozawa, Ai; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-09-15

    MAX-phases being usually composed of transition metals, group A elements and carbon/nitrogen are considered interesting materials for many applications because of their tremendous bulk modulus, 'reversible' plasticity, and machinability. This is mainly due to their unique kind of bonding comprising covalent, ionic as well as metallic bonds providing 'easy' planes of rupture and deformability due to the layered crystal structures. In transition metal boride systems, similar types of bonding are available. In particular the W{sub 2}B{sub 5}-structure type and its stacking variations allow the synthesis of strongly layered crystal structures exhibiting unique delamination phenomena. The paper presents ab initio calculations showing the similarities of bonding between the ternary carbides and the corresponding ternary or quaternary borides. Formation of boride-based nano-laminates from auxiliary liquid phases, from the melt as well as during sintering and precipitation from supersaturated solid solutions will be discussed by means of SEM and TEM studies. The role of impurities weakening the interlayer bonding will be addressed in particular. The pronounced cleavage parallel to the basal plane gives rise for crack deflection and pull-out mechanisms if the laminates are dispersed in brittle matrices such as boron carbide, silicon carbide or other transition metal borides. - Graphical abstract: Some transition metal borides crystallise in a layered structure of alternating stacks of metal and boron atoms giving rise for strongly anisotropic properties. Their preferred cleavage parallel and the deformability perpendicular to the basal plan are similar to the peculiar mechanical behaviour recently described for MAX-phases. Ab initio calculations of the crystal structure prove the weak bonds between the layers for a variety of borides which can be used to reinforce ceramic materials on a nano-scale level.

  14. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-11

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropocentrically impacted regions. Interspecies correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources for the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropocentrically impacted regions.

  15. Redox shuttles having an aromatic ring fused to a 1,1,4,4-tetrasubstituted cyclohexane ring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weng, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2015-12-01

    An electrolyte includes an alkali metal salt; an aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive including an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring fused with at least one non-aromatic ring, the aromatic ring having two or more oxygen or phosphorus-containing substituents.

  16. Amination of electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Alexander R. (Livermore, CA); Pagoria, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Schmidt, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process to aminate electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution of hydrogen using quaternary hydrazinium salts. The use of trialkylhydrazinium halide, e.g., trimethylhydrazinium iodide, as well as hydroxylamine, alkoxylamines, and 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole to produce aminated aromatic structures, such as 1,3-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (DATB), 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 3,5-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (DATNT), is described. DATB and TATB are useful insensitive high explosives. TATB is also used for the preparation of benzenehexamine, a starting material for the synthesis of novel materials (optical imaging devices, liquid crystals, ferromagnetic compounds).

  17. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2013-10-10

    The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

  18. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  19. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1993-01-19

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  20. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  1. Process for conversion of light olefins to LPG and aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martindale, D.C.; Andermann, R.E.; Mowry, J.R.

    1989-01-03

    A hydrocarbon conversion process is described which comprises passing a hydrocarbon feed stream comprising at least 30 mole percent olefins having 3 to 4 carbon atoms per molecule and also comprising at least 50 mole percent paraffins having 3 to 4 carbon atoms per molecule and containing less than 10 mole percent C/sub 5/-plus hydrocarbons into a catalytic reaction zone operated at low severity conditions and contacting the feed stream with a solid catalyst gallium. A reaction zone effluent stream is produced comprising C/sub 6/-C/sub 8/ aromatic hydrocarbons and C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ paraffins, with the reaction zone effluent stream containing less than 10 mole percent olefinic hydrocarbons. The low severity conditions include a combination of pressure, feed space velocity and temperature, including a temperature below 425/sup 0/C, which results in a partial conversion of the feed hydrocarbons into aromatic hydrocarbons whereby: (i) when the effluent is separated there are produced a first product stream, which first product stream is rich in C/sub 6/-C/sub 8/ aromatic hydrocarbons and is withdrawn from the process, with the second product stream, which second product stream is rich in C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ paraffins and is withdrawn from the process, with the second product stream having a flow rate equal to at least 30 wt. percent of the flow rate of the feed stream; and (ii) the mass flow rate of paraffinic hydrocarbons out of the reaction zone exceeds the mass flow rate of paraffinic hydrocarbons into the reaction zone.

  2. An In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth; Shapiro, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and lighting, appliance, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs) through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and LAMELs.

  3. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  4. Synthesis of condensed phases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons fullerenes and nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2004-10-19

    The invention relates to methods for producing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and nanotubes, comprising: a. heating at least one carbon-containing material to form a condensed phase comprising at least one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; b. collecting at least some of the condensed phase; c. reacting the condensed phase to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes.

  5. Lack of anti-tumor activity with the ?-catenin expression inhibitor EZN-3892 in the C57BL/6J Min/+ model of intestinal carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasson, Rian M.; Briggs, Alexandra; Rizvi, Hira; Carothers, Adelaide M.; Davids, Jennifer S.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Cho, Nancy L.

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: Wnt/?-catenin signaling is aberrantly activated in most colorectal cancers. Locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based antisense is a novel tool for cancer therapy. ?-Catenin inhibition was observed in mature intestinal tissue of LNA-treated mice. Further investigation of Wnt/?-catenin targeted therapies is warranted. - Abstract: Background: Previously, we showed that short-term inhibition of ?-catenin expression and reversal of aberrant ?-catenin subcellular localization by the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib is associated with adenoma regression in the C57BL/6J Min/+ mouse. Conversly, long-term administration resulted in tumor resistance, leading us to investigate alternative methods for selective ?-catenin chemoprevention. In this study, we hypothesized that disruption of ?-catenin expression by EZN-3892, a selective locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based ?-catenin inhibitor, would counteract the tumorigenic effect of Apc loss in Min/+ adenomas while preserving normal intestinal function. Materials and methods: C57BL/6J Apc{sup +/+} wild-type (WT) and Min/+ mice were treated with the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of EZN-3892 (30 mg/kg). Drug effect on tumor numbers, ?-catenin protein expression, and nuclear ?-catenin localization were determined. Results: Although the tumor phenotype and ?-catenin nuclear localization in Min/+ mice did not change following drug administration, we observed a decrease in ?-catenin expression levels in the mature intestinal tissue of treated Min/+ and WT mice, providing proof of principle regarding successful delivery of the LNA-based antisense vehicle. Higher doses of EZN-3892 resulted in fatal outcomes in Min/+ mice, likely due to ?-catenin ablation in the intestinal tissue and loss of function. Conclusions: Our data support the critical role of Wnt/?-catenin signaling in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and highlight the challenges of effective drug delivery to target disease without permanent toxicity to normal cellular function.

  6. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistentmore » tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  7. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gong, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN {nu}{sub max} AND AGE t FROM ZAMS TO RGB-TIP FOR LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y. K.; Gai, N. E-mail: ning.gai@hotmail.com

    2013-07-10

    Stellar age is an important quantity in astrophysics, which is useful for many fields both in the universe and galaxies. It cannot be determined by direct measurements, but can only be estimated or inferred. We attempt to find a useful indicator of stellar age, which is accurate from the zero-age main sequence to the tip of red giant branch for low-mass stars. Using the Yale Rotation and Evolution Code (YREC), a grid of stellar models has been constructed. Meanwhile, the frequency of maximum oscillations' power {nu}{sub max} and the large frequency separation {Delta}{nu} are calculated using the scaling relations. For the stars, the masses of which are from 0.8 M{sub Sun} to 2.8 M{sub Sun }, we can obtain the {nu}{sub max} and stellar age by combing the scaling relations with the four sets of grid models (YREC, Dotter et al., Marigo et al., and YY isochrones). We find that {nu}{sub max} is tightly correlated and decreases monotonically with the age of the star from the main sequence to the red giant evolutionary stages. Moreover, we find that the line shapes of the curves in the Age versus {nu}{sub max} diagram, which is plotted by the four sets of grid models, are consistent for red giants with masses from 1.1 M{sub Sun} to 2.8 M{sub Sun }. For red giants, the differences of correlation coefficients between Age and {nu}{sub max} for different grid models are minor and can be ignored. Interestingly, we find two peaks that correspond to the subgiants and bump of red giants in the Age versus {nu}{sub max} diagram. By general linear least-squares, we make the polynomial fitting and deduce the relationship between log(Age) and log({nu}{sub max}) in red giants' evolutionary state.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission in a z

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    > 4 submillimeter galaxy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission in a z > 4 submillimeter galaxy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission in a z > 4 submillimeter galaxy We report the detection of 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and rest-frame 4-7 μm continuum emission in the z = 4.055 submillimeter galaxy GN20, using the Infrared

  10. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lime spray dryer ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Sun; Panuwat Taerakul; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker

    2005-10-01

    Four lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples were collected from a spreader stoker boiler and measured for their concentrations of 16 U.S. EPA specified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results showed that the total measured PAH concentration correlated with the organic carbon content of the LSD ash. Each LSD ash sample was then separated using a 140 mesh sieve into two fractions: a carbon-enriched fraction ({gt}140 mesh) and a lime-enriched fraction ({lt}140 mesh). Unburned carbon was further separated from the carbon-enriched fraction with a lithiumheteropolytungstate (LST) solution. PAH measurements on these different fractions showed that unburned carbon had the highest PAH concentrations followed by the carbon-enriched fraction, indicating that PAHs were primarily associated with the carbonaceous material in LSD ash. However, detectable levels of PAHs were also found in the lime-enriched fraction, suggesting that the fine spray of slaked lime may sorb PAH compounds from the flue gas in the LSD process. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Selective aromatization of C[sub 3]- and C[sub 4]-paraffins over modified encilite catalysts: 2. Kinetics of n-butane aromatization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, A.K.; Rao, M.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The kinetics of the aromatization of n-butane over Zn-encilite catalyst was studied in a fixed bed reactor under steady-state conditions at atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range of 480--540 C. The experimental data were analyzed, and a dual-site mechanism was proposed. Six rate equations of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type were tested. The unknown parameters in the rate equations were estimated by a nonlinear regression method. A kinetic equation for n-butane aromatization is proposed.

  12. Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wear, J.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

  13. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  14. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  15. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  16. Fusing porphyrins with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocycles for optoelectronic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Mark E.; Diev, Viacheslav; Hanson, Kenneth; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-08-18

    A compound that can be used as a donor material in organic photovoltaic devices comprising a non-activated porphyrin fused with one or more non-activated polycyclic aromatic rings or one or more non-activated heterocyclic rings can be obtained by a thermal fusion process. The compounds can include structures of Formula I: ##STR00001## By heating the reaction mixture of non-activated porphyrins with non-activated polycyclic aromatic rings or heterocyclic rings to a fusion temperature and holding for a predetermined time, fusion of one or more polycyclic rings or heterocyclic rings to the non-activated porphyrin core in meso,.beta. fashion is achieved resulting in hybrid structures containing a distorted porphyrin ring with annulated aromatic rings. The porphyrin core can be olygoporphyrins.

  17. Borehole SASW testing to evaluate log(G{sub max}) - log({sigma}{prime}) relationships in situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinski, M.E.; Stokoe, K.H. II; Young, Y.L.; Roesset, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    A new method is being developed for the in-situ measurement of shear wave velocity, V{sub s}, in the soil surrounding a borehole. The method involves the measurement of axially propagating surface waves inside an uncased borehole using the Spectral-Analysis-of-Surface-Waves (SASW) approach. Testing if performed with instrumentation housed inside an inflatable tool. Inflation pressures applied by the tool are used to vary radial stresses in the soil surrounding the borehole. Surface wave velocities over a range of frequencies are measured at each inflation pressure. These measurements are then theoretically modeled so that the variation in V{sub s} (an hence small-strain shear module, G{sub max}) with distance behind the borehole wall is determined at each pressure. The results of field tests with the borehole SASW tool at two sites composed of unsaturated clayey soil are presented. These results are compared with independent field seismic measurements and with laboratory tests on intact specimens using the torsional resonant column to assess the validity of the new field method.

  18. Bent Diamond Crystals and Multilayer Based Optics at the new 5-Station Protein Crystallography Beamline 'Cassiopeia' at MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mammen, Christian B.; Als-Nielsen, Jens; Ursby, Thomas; Thunnissen, Marjolein

    2004-05-12

    A new 5-station beamline for protein crystallography is being commissioned at the Swedish synchrotron light source MAX-II at Lund University. Of the 2K/{gamma} = 14 mrad horizontal wiggler fan, the central 2 mrad are used and split in three parts. The central 1 mrad will be used for a station optimized for MAD experiments and on each side of the central fan, from 0.5 mrad to 1 mrad, there are two fixed energy stations using different energies of the same part of the beam. These, in total five stations, can be used simultaneously and independently for diffraction data collection. The two upstream monochromators for the side stations are meridionally bent asymmetric diamond(111) crystals in Laue transmission geometry. The monochromators for the downstream side stations are bent Ge(111) crystals in asymmetric Bragg reflection geometry. Curved multilayer mirrors inserted in the monochromatic beams provide focusing in the vertical plane. The first side station is under commissioning, and a preliminary test protein data set has been collected.

  19. Alternative descriptions of catalyst deactivation in aromatization of propane and butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshelev, Yu.N.; Vorob`ev, B.L.; Khvorova, E.P.

    1995-08-20

    Deactivation of a zeolite-containing catalyst has been studied in aromatization of propane and butane. Various descriptions of the dependence of the alkane conversion on the coke concentration on the catalyst have been considered, and using a statistical method of estimating the model validity, the most preferable form of the deactivation function has been proposed.

  20. Influence of temperature and process duration on composition of products of butane aromatization on zeolitic catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorob`ev, B.L.; Trishin, P.Yu.; Koshelev, Yu.N.

    1995-06-10

    A study has been made of the influence of catalyst deactivation in the course of its service. The composition of products of butane aromatization on zeolitic catalyst and on selectivity of formation of target products and by-products is reported.

  1. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng; Li Danzhen; Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi

    2012-06-15

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  2. Aromatic-Hydroxyl Interaction of a Lignin Model Compound on SBA-15, Present at Pyrolysis Temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kandziolka, III, Michael V.; Kidder, Michelle; Gill, Lance W.; Wu, Zili; Savara, Aditya Ashi

    2014-07-14

    An aromatic alpha-aryl ether compound (a benzyl phenyl ether analogue) was covalently grafted to mesoporous silica SBA-15, to create BPEa-SBA-15. The BPEa-SBA-15 was subjected to successive heating cycles up to 600 °C, with in situ monitoring by DRIFTS. It was found that the toluene moiety coordinates to SBA-15 surface silanol hydroxyl groups via an aromatic–hydroxyl interaction. This interaction is evidenced by a red-shift of the aromatic C–H stretches, as well as a red-shift and broadening of the surface hydroxyl O–H stretches, which are features characteristic of a hydrogen bond. These features remain present during heating until ~400 °C whereupon themore » ether linkage of BPEa-SBA-15 is cleaved, accompanied by loss of the toluene moiety.« less

  3. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion. First quarterly technical progress report, September 23-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Arthur; Longanbach, James R.; Chan, Lisa K.

    1981-01-28

    Synthetic liquid fuels, otherwise referred to as synfuels or coal-derived liquids, are probably best characterized from a combustion-environmental point of view as low in hydrogen, low in sulfur, high in nitrogen, and high in aromatics. As a consequence two of the more critical problems in synfuel combustion are NO/sub x/ formation and soot formation (and polycyclic organic matter). This program is directed to these two issues. At first hand the solutions to burning synfuels high in aromatics and fuel-bound nitrogen are diametrically opposed, i.e., high temperature and excess air keep soot levels down, low temperatures and vitiated air keep nitrogen oxide levels down. Staged combustion however offers a logical solution to the above. This program separates and analyzes the synfuel combustion problem via its component parts and then puts them together again phenomenologically via the stage combustion process.

  4. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  5. A study on the coagulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters to determine their collision efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj, Abhijeet; Sander, Markus; Janardhanan, Vinod; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the physical interaction between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their clusters of different sizes in laminar premixed flames. Two models are employed for this study: a detailed PAH growth model, referred to as the kinetic Monte Carlo - aromatic site (KMC-ARS) model [Raj et al., Combust. Flame 156 (2009) 896-913]; and a multivariate PAH population balance model, referred to as the PAH - primary particle (PAH-PP) model. Both the models are solved by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. PAH mass spectra are generated using the PAH-PP model, and compared to the experimentally observed spectra for a laminar premixed ethylene flame. The position of the maxima of PAH dimers in the spectra and their concentrations are found to depend strongly on the collision efficiency of PAH coagulation. The variation in the collision efficiency with various flame and PAH parameters is studied to determine the factors on which it may depend. A correlation for the collision efficiency is proposed by comparing the computed and the observed spectra for an ethylene flame. With this correlation, a good agreement between the computed and the observed spectra for a number of laminar premixed ethylene flames is found. (author)

  6. Determination of the Average Aromatic Cluster Size of Fossil Fuels by Solid-State NMR at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Kanmi; Kennedy, Gordon J.; Althaus, Stacey M.; Pruski, Marek

    2013-01-07

    We show that the average aromatic cluster size in complex carbonaceous materials can be accurately determined using fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR at a high magnetic field. To accurately quantify the nonprotonated aromatic carbon, we edited the 13C spectra using the recently reported MAS-synchronized spinecho, which alleviated the problem of rotational recoupling of 1H-13C dipolar interactions associated with traditional dipolar dephasing experiments. The dependability of this approach was demonstrated on selected Argonne Premium coal standards, for which full sets of basic structural parameters were determined with high accuracy.

  7. Compounds having aromatic rings and side-chain amide-functionality and a method for transporting monovalent anions across biological membranes using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jeffery T. (College Park, MD); Sidorov, Vladimir (Richmond, VA); Kotch, Frank W. (New Phila., PA)

    2008-04-08

    A compound containing at least two aromatic rings covalently bonded together, with each aromatic ring containing at least one oxyacetamide-based side chain, the compound being capable of forming a chloride ion channel across a lipid bilayer, and transporting chloride ion across the lipid bilayer.

  8. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-31

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilica convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  9. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the air along the niagara river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, R.M.; Chan, K.W.

    1987-06-01

    Two week-long studies in 1982-1983 have measure ambient concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and phthalate esters in air in both the particulate and gas phase along the US-Canadian border and the Niagara River. Concentrations of the PAH species monitored varied from 3 pg m/sup -3/ to 40 ng m/sup -3/. PAH's with three rings or less were found in significant proportions in the gas phase while larger molecules are almost solely in the particulate phase. Particulate components of the PAH loadings appear to originate locally with Buffalo, NY, Niagara Falls, NY, and Niagara Falls, Ontario, as probably sources. Gas-phase PAH components have a more regional character indicating regional or long-range transport. Levels of benzo(a)pyrene are consistent with previous particulate measurements made along the river since 1981.

  10. Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2013-09-15

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]·2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (3·4·5)(3{sup 2}·4·5·6{sup 2}·7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 1–3. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 1–3 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. • The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. • The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

  11. Applications of organo-calcium chemistry to control contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons in advanced coal gasification processes: Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longwall, J.P.; Chang, C.C.S.; Lai, C.K.S.; Chen, P.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Peters, W.A.

    1988-09-01

    The broad goal of this contract was to provide quantitative understanding of the thermal reactions of aromatics contaminants with calcium oxide under conditions pertinent to their in situ or out-board reduction or elimination from advanced coal gasification process and waste streams. Specific objectives were formalized into the following four tasks: cracking of fresh coal pyrolysis tar, benzene cracking, CaO deactivation behavior, and preliminary economic implications. The approach primarily involved laboratory scale measurements of rates and extents of feed conversion, and of quality indices or compositions of the resulting products, when pure aromatic compounds or newly formed coal pyrolysis tars undergo controlled extents of thermal treatment with CaO of known preparation history. 70 refs., 54 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Gas-phase reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and their nitrogen-containing analogs with H atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 215 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0215 (United States); Snow, Theodore P., E-mail: Nicholas.Demarais@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@ou.edu, E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Theodore.Snow@Colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We have studied the reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and their nitrogen-containing analogs with H atoms. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube. We have implemented the laser induced acoustic desorption technique to allow the study of large, non-volatile species in the gas phase. The extension of this work from previous studies shows that the reactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations with H atoms reaches a constant value for large cations. There is a small difference in reactivity when comparing molecules of different size and geometry; however, no difference in reactivity was found when nitrogen was incorporated into the ring.

  13. Variations in the structure of aromatic solvents under the influence of microadditives of the C{sub 60} fullerene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginzburg, B. M. Tuichiev, Sh.

    2007-02-15

    The structural ordering of aromatic solvents is investigated using wide-angle X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the degree of structural ordering of aromatic solvents at room temperature decreases in the following sequence: benzene, toluene, and n-xylene. The introduction of the C{sub 60} fullerene ({approx}0.001%) into these solvents leads to an increase in the degree of their ordering. Upon introduction of the fullerene, the degree of structural ordering increases significantly in n-xylene and only slightly in toluene and remains virtually unchanged in benzene. An analysis of the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns of C{sub 60} fullerene solutions in benzene likewise demonstrates that the introduction of the fullerene into benzene leads to an insignificant change in the degree of structural ordering of this solvent. The specific features of the structure and behavior of benzene upon interaction with C{sub 60} fullerene additives are discussed.

  14. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks to Aromatic Fuels and High Value Chemicals Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Upgrading of Thermochemical Intermediates to Hydrocarbons: Conversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks to Aromatic Fuels and High Value Chemicals 25 March, 2015 Technology Area Review: Thermochemical Conversion Randy Cortright PhD Virent, Inc WBS: 2.3.1.406 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information © Virent 2015 - Virent Slide 2 Goal Statement Project Goal -Develop and demonstrate integration of Virent's lignocellulosic biomass

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface waters of Alessandria District, South Eastern Piedmont (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trova, C.; Cossa, G.; Gandolfo, G.

    1992-10-01

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Because of the high toxicity of some polycyclic compounds, such as benzopyrenes, the determination of their levels in air, water, soil and aquatic organisms was the object of several papers. Anthropogenic pyrolitic and combustion processes, related to industrial plants, domestic heating, automobile traffic, are the major sources of these compounds; from these sources they enter atmospheric environment where their concentration is reduced by scavenging during precipitation events: rain, snow and fog in urban areas usually show high contents of PAHs. Dry and wet atmospheric polluted depositions effluents transport appreciable amounts of PAHs to aquatic environment, where they are rapidly taken up and accumulated by both fish and shellfish. Alessandria District, in South-Eastern Piedmont (Italy), lies in the middle of Torino-Milano-Genova industrial area: in addition to local sources, a relatively long range transport of polluted air masses may conduct to this region atmospheric contaminants, such as polynuclear compounds, that can enter fluvial environments through meteoric precipitation. The object of this work was to evaluate PAH content in surface waters flowing across the described territory. Samplings were carried on during winter season, when the concentration of these pollutants usually reaches the highest levels. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at selected burning grounds at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.W.; Minor, L.K.M.; Flucas, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    A commercial immunoassay field test (IFT) was used to rapidly assess the total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soil at selected burning grounds within the explosives corridor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results were compared with analyses obtained from LANL Analytical Laboratory and from a commercial laboratory. Both used the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Methods 8270 and 8310. EPA`s Method 8270 employs gas chromatography and mass spectral analyses, whereas EPA`s Method 8310 uses an ultraviolet detector in a high-performance liquid chromatography procedure. One crude oil sample and one diesel fuel sample, analyzed by EPA Method 8270, were included for references. On an average the IFT results were lower for standard samples and lower than the analytical laboratory results for the unknown samples. Sites were selected to determine whether the PAHs came from the material burned or the fuel used to ignite the burn, or whether they are produced by a high-temperature chemical reaction during the burn. Even though the crude oil and diesel fuel samples did contain measurable quantities of PAHs, there were no significant concentrations of PAHs detected in the ashes and soil at the burning grounds. Tests were made on fresh soil and ashes collected after a large burn and on aged soil and ashes known to have been at the site more than three years. Also analyzed were twelve-year-old samples from an inactive open burn cage.

  17. PAMAM dendrimers and graphene: Materials for removing aromatic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Geitner, Nicholas K.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Ding, Feng; Ke, Pu Chun; Sarupria, Sapna

    2015-04-07

    We present results from experiments and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on the association of naphthalene with polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers and graphene oxide (GrO). Specifically, we investigate 3rd-6th generation (G3-G6) PAMAM dendrimers and GrO with different levels of oxidation. The work is motivated by the potential applications of these materials in removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants from water. Our experimental results indicate that graphene oxide outperforms dendrimers in removing naphthalene from water. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the prominent factors driving naphthalene association to these seemingly disparate materials are similar. Interestingly, we find that cooperative interactions between the naphthalene molecules play a significant role in enhancing their association to the dendrimers and graphene oxide. Our findings highlight that while selection of appropriate materials is important, the interactions between the contaminants themselves can also be important in governing the effectiveness of a given material. The combined use of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations allows us to comment on the possible factors resulting in better performance of graphene oxide in removing naphthalene from water.

  18. Linkages and aromatic clusters in a bituminous coal: Final report, September 1, 1985--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, K.E.

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and arrangement of aromatic clusters, oxygen functional groups, and linkages in an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal were determined by controlled solubilization of the coal, followed by solvent fractionation of the soluble product and detailed analyses of the product fractions. The solubilization was carried out in reactions with NaOH/ethanol/H/sub 2/O at temperatures of 260/degree/, 300/degree/ and 320/degree/C. Elemental balance and spectroscopic data revealed that the oxygen functional groups of the coal were attacked selectively in the solubilization process, resulting in an orderly definable diminution of the complex coal structure. Also aliphatic linkages present in selected solubilized product fractions were subjected to a transalkylation reaction. A molecular structural model specific to the Illinois coal was constructed, and the hydroliquefaction behavior of the coal was evaluated in terms of potential product distribution and hydrogen consumption. The structural characteristics are compared with those of a Wyoming subbituminous coal in our previous study. 9 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U.; Burlage, R.

    1998-11-01

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  20. Separation, characterization and instrumental analysis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon ring classes in petroleum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmielowiec, J.; Beshai, J.E.; George, A.E.

    1980-08-01

    To develop effective utilization technology for heavy streams from conventional fuels and unconventional resources such as heavy oils and oilsand bitumens, detailed information on the chemical composition of the feedstocks is needed. Attempts were made during the seventies to modify the API Project 60 scheme of analysis or to develop chemically more efficient, and less time-consuming, separation and characterization methods. These attempts aimed to improve characterization by separating the samples into concentrates of different structural types. Samples throughput was increased by using pressure and higher performance chromatographic systems. Other valuable contributions, such as coal-liquid characterization in terms of different chemical functionalities have also been made. The separation of aromatic ring classes and characterization or identification of their major components was our primary objective in this study. A silica-R(NH/sub 2/)/sub 2/-based HPLC system was used in our laboratory to study the analytical potential of this approach; the work was described in a previous publication. In the present study, the applicability of HPLC separation by this system and instrumental spectrometric characterization of 3- and 4-ring PAHs isolated from two Canadian oils were investigated. The oils used, Medicine River and Lloydminster, are examples of hydrocarbon-dominated materials representing light and heavy processing feedstocks, respectively.

  1. Anaerobic cometabolic transformation of polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: evidence from laboratory and field studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Safinowski; Christian Griebler; Rainer U. Meckenstock

    2006-07-01

    The sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47 can grow on naphthalene or 2-methylnaphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. The study reported shows that the culture can furthermore cometabolically transform a variety of polycyclic and heteroaromatic compounds with naphthalene or methylnaphthalene as the auxiliary substrate. Most of the cosubstrates were converted to the corresponding carboxylic acids, frequently to several isomers. The mass spectra of specific metabolites that were extracted from supernatants of cultures containing the cosubstrates benzothiophene, benzofuran, and 1-methylnaphthalene resembled known intermediates of the anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene degradation pathways. This indicates that some of the tested compounds were first methylated and then transformed to the corresponding methylsuccinic acids by a fumarate addition to the methyl group. For some of the cosubstrates, a partial or total inhibition of growth on the auxiliary substrate was observed. This was caused by a specific combination of auxiliary substrate and cosubstrate. None of the cosubstrates tested could be utilized as the sole carbon source and electron donor by the enrichment culture N47. Field investigations at the tar-oil-contaminated aquifer (at a former gasworks in southwest Germany), where strain N47 originated, revealed the presence of metabolites similar to the ones identified in batch culture supernatants. The findings suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds can be converted by aquifer organisms and produce a variety of polar compounds that become mobile in groundwater. 51 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Mechanisms of photoinduced C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage in protonated aromatic amino acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, B.; Barat, M.; Fayeton, J. A.; Perot, M.; Jouvet, C.; Gregoire, G.; Broendsted Nielsen, S.

    2008-04-28

    Photoexcitation of protonated aromatic amino acids leads to C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage among other channels. There are two pathways for the C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage, one is a slow process (microseconds) that occurs after hydrogen loss from the electronically excited ion, whereas the other is a fast process (nanoseconds). In this paper, a comparative study of the fragmentation of four molecules shows that the presence of the carboxylic acid group is necessary for this fast fragmentation channel to occur. We suggest a mechanism based on light-induced electron transfer from the aromatic ring to the carboxylic acid, followed by a fast internal proton transfer from the ammonium group to the negatively charged carboxylic acid group. The ion formed is a biradical since the aromatic ring is ionized and the carbon of the COOH group has an unpaired electron. Breakage of the weak C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond gives two even-electron fragments and is expected to quickly occur. The present experimental results together with the ab initio calculations support the interpretation previously proposed.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission in a z > 4 submillimeter galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Pope, Alexandra; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Carilli, Christopher L.; Walter, Fabian; Hodge, Jacqueline; Morrison, Glenn E.; Dickinson, Mark; Dannerbauer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and rest-frame 4-7 μm continuum emission in the z = 4.055 submillimeter galaxy GN20, using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. This represents the first detection of PAH emission at z > 4. The strength of the PAH emission feature is consistent with a very high star formation rate of ∼1600 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We find that this intense starburst powers at least ∼1/3 of the faint underlying 6 μm continuum emission, with an additional, significant (and perhaps dominant) contribution due to a power-law-like hot dust source, which we interpret to likely be a faint, dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). The inferred 6 μm AGN continuum luminosity is consistent with a sensitive upper limit on the hard X-ray emission as measured by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory if the previously undetected AGN is Compton-thick. This is in agreement with the finding at optical/infrared wavelengths that the galaxy and its nucleus are heavily dust-obscured. Despite the strong power-law component enhancing the mid-infrared continuum emission, the intense starburst associated with the photon-dominated regions that give rise to the PAH emission appears to dominate the total energy output in the infrared. GN20 is one of the most luminous starburst galaxies known at any redshift, embedded in a rich protocluster of star-forming galaxies. This investigation provides an improved understanding of the energy sources that power such exceptional systems, which represent the extreme end of massive galaxy formation at early cosmic times.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh and smoked fish samples from three Nigerian cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akpan, V.; Lodovici, M.; Dolara, P. )

    1994-08-01

    Nigeria is a major producer of crude oil in sub-Saharan Africa. In-shore and off-shore wells are located in richly watered creeks in the southern part of the country. Although published data on environmental impact assessment of the petroleum industry in Nigeria are lacking, there is a growing concern about the possible contamination of estuarine and coastal waters and of marine species by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). PAHs are ubiquitous priority pollutants that occur naturally in crude oil, automobile exhaust emissions and smoke condensates from incomplete combustion of carbonaceous materials. PAHs with high molecular weight are less readily biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms in some regions, and given their marked hydrophobic characteristics, may persist in the aqueous environment, thus contaminating the food chain by bioaccumulating in aquatic species like fish and mussels. Major Nigerian oil wells are located in the vicinity of breeding and harvesting sites serving the fresh-water fishing industry. Large hauls of fresh fish are normally consumed cooked in soups or smoke cured in handcrafted traditional ovens using freshly cut red mangrove (Rhizophora racemosa) wood as fuel. Though smoke curing is economical and may ensure longer conservation of fish, it undoubtedly increases the burden of PAHs in finished products as a result of partial charring and from smoke condensates or mangroves that also contain PAHs in measurable quantities as reported by Asita et al. (1991). Apart from PAHs analyzed by Emerole (1980) in smoked food samples from Ibadan using simple analytical methods, those from industrial and other anthropogenic sources have rarely been analyzed in Nigeria. We tried therefore to update the data and address this discrepancy. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, L.C.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Harley, R.A.; Hammond, S.K.; Miguel, A.H.; Hering, S.V.

    1999-09-15

    Motor vehicles are a significant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions. Improved understanding of the relationship between fuel composition and PAH emissions is needed to determine whether fuel reformulation is a viable approach for reducing PAH emissions. PAH concentrations were quantified in gasoline and diesel fuel samples collected in summer 1997 in northern California. Naphthalene was the predominant PAH in both fuels, with concentrations of up to 2,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in gasoline and 1,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in diesel fuel. Particle-phase PAH size distributions and exhaust emission factors were measured in two bores of a roadway tunnel. Emission factors were determined separately for light-duty vehicles and for heavy-duty diesel trucks, based on measurements of PAHs, CO, and CO{sub 2}. Particle-phase emission factors, expressed per unit mass of fuel burned, ranged up to 21 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for benzo[ghi]perylene for light-duty vehicles and up to {approximately} 1,000 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for pyrene for heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Light-duty vehicles were found to be a significant source of heavier (four- and five-ring) PAHs, whereas heavy-duty diesel engines were the dominant source of three-ring PAHs, such as fluoranthene and pyrene. While no correlation between heavy-duty diesel truck PAH emission factors and PAH concentrations in diesel fuel was found, light-duty vehicle PAH emission factors were found to be correlated with PAH concentrations in gasoline, suggesting that gasoline reformulation may be effective in reducing PAH emissions from motor vehicles.

  6. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the Great Lakes atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Sun; Pierrette Blanchard; Kenneth A. Brice; Ronald A. Hites

    2006-10-15

    Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) concentrations were measured in both the vapor and particle phases at seven sites near the Great Lakes as a part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Lower molecular weight PAHs, including fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthrene, and pyrene, were dominant in the vapor phase, and higher molecular weight PAHs, including chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, and coronene, were dominant in the particle phase. The highest PAH concentrations in both the vapor and particle phases were observed in Chicago followed by the semiurban site at Sturgeon Point, NY. The major sources of PAHs in and around Chicago are vehicle emissions, coal and natural gas combustion, and coke production. The spatial difference of PAH concentrations can be explained by the local population density. Long-term decreasing trends of most PAH concentrations were observed in both the vapor and particle phases at Chicago, with half-lives ranging from 3-10 years in the vapor phase and 5-15 years in the particle phase. At Eagle Harbor, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and Sturgeon Point, total PAH concentrations in the vapor phase showed significant, but slow, long-term decreasing trends. At the Sturgeon Point site, which was impacted by a nearby city, particle-phase PAH concentrations also declined. However, most particle-phase PAH concentrations did not show significant long-term decreasing trends at the remote sites. Seasonal trends were also observed for particle-phase PAH concentrations, which were higher in the winter and lower in the summer. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GCMS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. - Highlights: Defined global mRNA expression changes induced by developmental exposure to PAHs Determined PAH body burdens following developmental exposure Genes uniquely induced by benz(a)anthracene included targets of the AHR and RELA Dibenzothiophene and pyrene perturbed a distinct RELA network Transcriptional networks reveal differential mechanisms of PAH toxicity.

  8. Direct production of hydrogen and aromatics from methane or natural gas: Review of recent U.S. patents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar

    2012-03-01

    Since the year 2000, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a dozen patents for inventions related to methane dehydroaromatization processes. One of them was granted to UOP LLC (Des Plaines). It relates to a catalyst composition and preparation method. Two patents were granted to Conoco Phillips Company (Houston, TX). One was aimed at securing a process and operating conditions for methane aromatization. The other was aimed at securing a process that may be integrated with separation of wellhead fluids and blending of the aromatics produced from the gas with the crude. Nine patents were granted to ExxonMobil Chemical Patents Inc. (Houston, TX). Most of these were aimed at securing a dehydroaromatization process where methane-containing feedstock moves counter currently to a particulate catalyst. The coked catalyst is heated or regenerated either in the reactor, by cyclic operation, or in annex equipment, and returned to the reactor. The reactor effluent stream may be separated in its main components and used or recycled as needed. A brief summary of those inventions is presented in this review.

  9. On-line instrumentation for the real-time monitoring of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the effluents from a fluidized bed combustor - a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Silva, A.P.; Iles, M.; Rice, G.; Fassel, V.A.

    1984-04-01

    When polynuclear aromatic hydrocargons in the vapor phase are diluted preferably in a rare gas and undergo supersonic jet expansion, rotationally cooled molecules with absorption bandwidths of the order of 0.01 nm (FWHM) are obtained. Selective excitation with a tunable dye laser into such narrow absorption bands leads to the observation of highly specific luminescence spectra. Such an approach has been utilized for the on-line, real-time monitoring of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the effluents from a fluidized bed combustor.

  10. The bonding, charge distribution, spin ordering, optical, and elastic properties of four MAX phases Cr{sub 2}AX (A = Al or Ge, X = C or N): From density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Neng; Mo, Yuxiang; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2013-11-14

    In this work, we assess a full spectrum of properties (chemical bonding, charge distribution, spin ordering, optical, and elastic properties) of Cr{sub 2}AC (A = Al, Ge) and their hypothetical nitride counterparts Cr{sub 2}AN (A = Al, Ge) based on density functional theory calculations. The calculated total energy values indicate that a variety of spin ordering of these four compounds depending on interlayer-interactions between M-A and M-X within the sublattice, which is supported by bonding analysis. MAX phase materials are discovered to possess exotic magnetic properties which indicates that these materials could serve as promising candidates for novel layered magnetic materials for various electronic and spintronic applications. Further analysis of optical properties for two polarization vectors of Cr{sub 2}AX shows that the reflectivity is high in the visible-ultraviolet region up to ∼15 eV suggesting Cr{sub 2}AX as a promising candidate for use as a coating material. The elastic coefficients (C{sub ij}) and bulk mechanical properties [bulk modulus (K), shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (E), Poisson's ratio (η), and Pugh ratio (G/K)] of these four Cr{sub 2}AX compounds are also calculated and analyzed, which pave the way to predict or design new MAX phases that are less brittle or tougher by having a lower G/K value or higher η.

  11. Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

    2005-07-01

    The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to higher order biological effects, e.g. toxicity, lesions, reproductive failure.

  12. Selective aromatization of C[sub 3] and C[sub 4] paraffins over modified encilite catalysts. 1. Qualitative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, A.K.; Rao, M.S. . Department of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    The catalytic activity of Zn-encilite in the aromatization of propane and n-butane has been studied by a comparative study of the yields of benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) using propane and n-butane as feeds. The results showed that n-butane had better activity and selectivity to BTX than propane. The effects of reaction temperature, contact time, inlet concentration, poisoning with ammonia on H-encilite, and different degrees of ion exchange with Zn[sup 2+] ion were studied in detail in order to obtain information on the reaction mechanism. The results indicated that the activity and the selectivity were dictated by the acidity and Zn loading on the catalyst.

  13. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1). Finally, the polarization P was calculated for the spectral intervals using the equation (I max -I min )(I max +I min ) with accuracy about 3% for the 1 and about 1.5%...

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in olive fruits as a measure of air pollution in the valley of Florence (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignesti, G.; Lodovici, M.; Dolara, P.; Lucia, P.; Grechi, D.

    1992-06-01

    Plants have often been used for monitoring air pollution, such as Tradescantia for detecting mutagenic chemicals, or mosses which are bio-accumulators of heavy metals. Mosses have also been used as indicators of pollution from hexachlorobenzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PAH are present in most crops, and are deposited on the foliar surface of plants exposed to polluted air. Plants grown in heavily polluted environments have a higher concentration of PAH than those growing in clean environments, and plants grown in cabinets with filtered air have a very low concentration of PAH. Alimentary oils have high concentrations of PAH due to crop exposure to air pollutants and a high solubility of PAH in oils. PAH are important initiators of some human cancers and their monitoring is believed to be important for public health. Most Italian towns are heavily polluted by car exhaust and industrial sources, and a high concentration of PAH has been reported in the air particulate of urban areas. On the basis of these premises we thought it of interest to determine the concentration of some PAH in the olive fruits of trees growing in the valley of Florence (Italy), to establish if this approach could be useful for monitoring air pollution by PAH. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Dispersion modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and production of coke in Tianjin, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu Tao; Xinrong Li; Yu Yang; Raymond M. Coveney, Jr.; Xiaoxia Lu; Haitao Chen; Weiran Shen

    2006-08-01

    A USEPA procedure, ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex Long-Term), was applied to model the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from various sources including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and biomass into the atmosphere of Tianjin, China. Benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) were calculated for risk assessment. Model results were provisionally validated for concentrations and profiles based on the observed data at two monitoring stations. The dominant emission sources in the area were domestic coal combustion, coke production, and biomass burning. Mainly because of the difference in the emission heights, the contributions of various sources to the average concentrations at receptors differ from proportions emitted. The shares of domestic coal increased from {approximately} 43% at the sources to 56% at the receptors, while the contributions of coking industry decreased from {approximately} 23% at the sources to 7% at the receptors. The spatial distributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs were similar, with higher concentrations occurring within urban districts because of domestic coal combustion. With relatively smaller contributions, the other minor sources had limited influences on the overall spatial distribution. The calculated average BaPeq value in air was 2.54 {+-} 2.87 ng/m{sup 3} on an annual basis. Although only 2.3% of the area in Tianjin exceeded the national standard of 10 ng/m{sup 3}, 41% of the entire population lives within this area. 37 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Aging of secondary organic aerosol from small aromatic VOCs. Changes in chemical composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-12-12

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form and transform SOA from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx. The effects of chemical aging on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state OSC) and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased during photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSmore » C ranged from -0.29 to 0.45 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  17. Source Contribution Analysis of Surface Particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Northeastern Asia by Source-receptor Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Kajino, Mizuo; Sato, Keiichi; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kurokawa, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Hiromasa; Tang, Ning; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed the sourceereceptor relationships for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in northeastern Asia using an aerosol chemical transport model. The model successfully simulated the observed concentrations. In Beijing (China) benzo[a]pyren (BaP) concentrations are due to emissions from its own domain. In Noto, Oki and Tsushima (Japan), transboundary transport from northern China (>40N, 40-60%) and central China (30-40N, 10-40%) largely influences BaP concentrations from winter to spring, whereas the relative contribution from central China is dominant (90%) in Hedo. In the summer, the contribution from Japanese domestic sources increases (40-80%) at the 4 sites. Contributions from Japan and Russia are additional source of BaP over the northwestern Pacific Ocean in summer. The contribution rates for the concentrations from each domain are different among PAH species depending on their particulate phase oxidation rates. Reaction with O3 on particulate surfaces may be an important component of the PAH oxidation processes.

  18. Electron correlations and two-photon states in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: A peculiar role of geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Shukla, Alok; Mazumdar, Sumit; College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721

    2014-03-14

    We present numerical studies of one- and two-photon excited states ordering in a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: coronene, hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene, and circumcoronene, all possessing D{sub 6h} point group symmetry versus ovalene with D{sub 2h} symmetry, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople model of interacting ?-electrons. The calculated energies of the two-photon states as well as their relative two-photon absorption cross-sections within the interacting model are qualitatively different from single-particle descriptions. More remarkably, a peculiar role of molecular geometry is found. The consequence of electron correlations is far stronger for ovalene, where the lowest spin-singlet two-photon state is a quantum superposition of pairs of lowest spin triplet states, as in the linear polyenes. The same is not true for D{sub 6h} group hydrocarbons. Our work indicates significant covalent character, in valence bond language, of the ground state, the lowest spin triplet state and a few of the lowest two-photon states in D{sub 2h} ovalene but not in those with D{sub 6h} symmetry.

  19. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.S.; Anh, D.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2008-08-15

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  20. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fly ash during coal and residual char combustion in a pressurized fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongcang Zhou; Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhaoping Zhong; Yaji Huang

    2009-04-15

    To investigate the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fly ash, the combustion of coal and residual char was performed in a pressurized spouted fluidized bed. After Soxhlet extraction and Kuderna-Danish (K-D) concentration, the contents of 16 PAHs recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in coal, residual char, and fly ash were analyzed by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence and diode array detection. The experimental results show that the combustion efficiency is lower and the carbon content in fly ash is higher during coal pressurized combustion, compared to the residual char pressurized combustion at the pressure of 0.3 MPa. Under the same pressure, the PAH amounts in fly ash produced from residual char combustion are lower than that in fly ash produced from coal combustion. The total PAHs in fly ash produced from coal and residual char combustion are dominated by three- and four-ring PAHs. The amounts of PAHs in fly ash produced from residual char combustion increase and then decrease with the increase of pressure in a fluidized bed. 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Pulmonary metabolism of dibenz(a,j)acridine: A carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic: Final report for period September 1, 1982-June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warshawsky, D.

    1987-07-01

    The metabolism of the carcinogenic N-heterocyclic aromatic, dibenz(a,j)-acridine (DBA) was investigated in the isolated perfused lung (IPL) preparation. A significantly increased rate of metabolism was observed for DBA in benzo(a)-pyrene (BaP) and DBA-pretreated animals. This resulted in marked increases in conjugation, in particular sulfates and thioethers, and the distribution of conjugates and total metabolites in blood and lung. When Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was coadministered with DBA to the IPL, the rate of metabolism was significantly decreased with respect to control experiments. This resulted in increased distributions of sulfate and thioether conjugates in blood. Spectroscopic analyses and microsomal enzyme analyses were used in the characterization of the four metabolites identified in the lung. The major nonconjugated metabolite was the 3,4 dihydrodiol of DBA and the three minor metabolites were the 4 and 3 phenol of DBA and a dihydroxy compound of DBA. The results indicate that in the lung DBA is metabolized in a manner similar to that of BaP but different from that of dibenzo-(c,g)carbazole. It is, therefore, apparent that the metabolism of N-heterocyclic aromatics are related to the aromaticity of the heteroatom-containing ring and the solubility of compound, as well as the specific enzymes responsible for activation of the compound. 115 refs., 78 figs., 24 tabs.

  2. MIN IMI IlI New Data Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change, Petroleum Products Supplied, and Ending Stocks ... 40 3.1b Imports, Exports, and Net Imports ... 41 3.2 Crude Oil Supply and...

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0001322 The University of Minnesota is developing a technically and economically viable membrane for carbon...

  4. Property:Incentive/TechMin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Standard (West Virginia) + At least 90% must come from eligible resources other than natural gas C City of Austin - Renewables Portfolio Standard (Texas) + 200 MW from solar by...

  5. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Fall 2010 Mtg Min.FINAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... waste will be disposed of on or offsite as Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) begins. ... Marcinowski presented an overview of internal policy discussions and status updates on ...

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    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... to blending LLW: status quo, constrain, ... to be disposed, due to the next round of power reactor decommissioning. ... such as research reactors around the country ...

  7. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_030316_min.docx

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    March 3, 2016 12:00 pm Eastern Time Participants (attendees in blue) Chair - Molly Kennedy (Clemson U.) Vice-Chair - Lane Martin (U. California, Berkeley) Secretary - Yang Zhang (U. Illinois) At-Large Members: Alex Belianinov (ORNL/CNMS); Kathrin Dörr, (MLU Halle-Wittenberg); Eric Formo (U. Georgia); Enrique Gomez (Penn State U.); Megan Robertson (U. Houston); Evgheni Strelcov (NIST); Rafael Verduzco (Rice U.) Past Chair, ex officio member - Nazanin Bassiri-Gharb (Georgia Tech) CNMS

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    (Imperial College, London); Megan Robertson (U. Houston); Ray Unocic (ORNLCNMS); Rafael Verduzco (Rice U.) Past Chair, ex officio member - Vivek Prabhu (NIST) CNMS...

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    (Imperial College, London); Megan Robertson (U. Houston); Ray Unocic (ORNLCNMS); Rafael Verduzco (Rice U.) Past Chair, ex officio member - Vivek Prabhu (NIST) CNMS...

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    (Imperial College, London); Megan Robertson (U. Houston); Ray Unocic (ORNLCNMS); Rafael Verduzco (Rice U.) Past Chair, ex officio member - Tony Hmelo (Vanderbilt U.) CNMS...

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    (Imperial College, London); Megan Robertson (U. Houston); Ray Unocic (ORNLCNMS); Rafael Verduzco (Rice U.) Past Chair, ex officio member - Tony Hmelo (Vanderbilt U.) CNMS...

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  2. SECTION J, APPENDIX Q - MIN STDS FOR CONTRACTORS' COI PLANS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  3. MaxPower Inc | Open Energy Information

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    Product: Pennsylvania-based firm offering research, development and production of lithium ion batteries. Coordinates: 40.281201, -75.393534 Show Map Loading map......

  4. T10K Change Max Capacity

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-08-16

    This command line utility will enable/disable the Oracle StorageTek T10000 tape drive's maximum capacity feature.

  5. Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

    2012-10-01

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

  6. Non-covalent interactions of nitrous oxide with aromatic compounds: Spectroscopic and computational evidence for the formation of 1:1 complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Qian; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 ; Gor, Gennady Y.; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2014-04-14

    We present the first study of intermolecular interactions between nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and three representative aromatic compounds (ACs): phenol, cresol, and toluene. The infrared spectroscopic experiments were performed in a Ne matrix and were supported by high-level quantum chemical calculations. Comparisons of the calculated and experimental vibrational spectra provide direct identification and characterization of the 1:1 N{sub 2}O-AC complexes. Our results show that N{sub 2}O is capable of forming non-covalently bonded complexes with ACs. Complex formation is dominated by dispersion forces, and the interaction energies are relatively low (about ?3 kcal mol{sup ?1}); however, the complexes are clearly detected by frequency shifts of the characteristic bands. These results suggest that N{sub 2}O can be bound to the amino-acid residues tyrosine or phenylalanine in the form of ? complexes.

  7. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Hao; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-04-28

    The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Greens function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  8. Properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the northwest photon dominated region of NGC 7023. II. Traditional PAH analysis using k-means as a visualization tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boersma, C.; Bregman, J.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2014-11-10

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in the Spitzer-IRS spectral map of the northwest photon dominated region (PDR) in NGC 7023 is analyzed using the 'traditional' approach in which the PAH bands and plateaus between 5.2-19.5 ?m are isolated by subtracting the underlying continuum and removing H{sub 2} emission lines. The spectra are organized into seven spectroscopic bins by using k-means clustering. Each cluster corresponds to, and reveals, a morphological zone within NGC 7023. The zones self-organize parallel to the well-defined PDR front that coincides with an increase in intensity of the H{sub 2} emission lines. PAH band profiles and integrated strengths are measured, classified, and mapped. The morphological zones revealed by the k-means clustering provides deeper insight into the conditions that drive variations in band strength ratios and evolution of the PAH population that otherwise would be lost. For example, certain band-band relations are bifurcated, revealing two limiting cases; one associated with the PDR, the other with the diffuse medium. Traditionally, PAH band strength ratios are used to gain insight into the properties of the emitting PAH population, i.e., charge, size, structure, and composition. Insights inferred from this work are compared and contrasted to those from Boersma et al. (first paper in this series), where the PAH emission in NGC 7023 is decomposed exclusively using the PAH spectra and tools made available through the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database.

  9. Microsoft Word - exposure_request_form.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (torr) Proximity Gap: (m) Min. Bottom Dose: (Jcm3) Max. Ratio of Top to Bottom Dose: Scan Length: (cm or inch)...

  10. Application of a fuzzy neural network model in predicting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-mediated perturbations of the Cyp1b1 transcriptional regulatory network in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larkin, Andrew; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Williams, David E.; Baird, William M.

    2013-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the environment as complex mixtures with components that have diverse carcinogenic potencies and mostly unknown interactive effects. Non-additive PAH interactions have been observed in regulation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) gene expression in the CYP1 family. To better understand and predict biological effects of complex mixtures, such as environmental PAHs, an 11 gene input-1 gene output fuzzy neural network (FNN) was developed for predicting PAH-mediated perturbations of dermal Cyp1b1 transcription in mice. Input values were generalized using fuzzy logic into low, medium, and high fuzzy subsets, and sorted using k-means clustering to create Mamdani logic functions for predicting Cyp1b1 mRNA expression. Model testing was performed with data from microarray analysis of skin samples from FVB/N mice treated with toluene (vehicle control), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), or 1 of 3 combinations of diesel particulate extract (DPE), coal tar extract (CTE) and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) using leave-one-out cross-validation. Predictions were within 1 log{sub 2} fold change unit of microarray data, with the exception of the DBC treatment group, where the unexpected down-regulation of Cyp1b1 expression was predicted but did not reach statistical significance on the microarrays. Adding CTE to DPE was predicted to increase Cyp1b1 expression, whereas adding CSC to CTE and DPE was predicted to have no effect, in agreement with microarray results. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (Ahrr) was determined to be the most significant input variable for model predictions using back-propagation and normalization of FNN weights. - Highlights: ? Tested a model to predict PAH mixture-mediated changes in Cyp1b1 expression ? Quantitative predictions in agreement with microarrays for Cyp1b1 induction ? Unexpected difference in expression between DBC and other treatments predicted ? Model predictions for combining PAH mixtures in agreement with microarrays ? Predictions highly dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor expression.

  11. Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different aromatic carboxylates: Assembly, structures, electrochemical and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Ju-Wen; Lu, Qi-Lin

    2013-02-15

    Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole (atrz) and three types of aromatic carboxylates, [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(DNBA){sub 6}] (1), [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(1,3-BDC){sub 3}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(SIP){sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (3) (HDNBA=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 1,3-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid and NaH{sub 2}SIP=sodium 5-sulfoisophthalate), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Complex 1 displays a single-molecular Cu{sup II}{sub 4} cluster structure, which is further connected by the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions to form a 2D supramolecular layer. In 2, there also exist tetranuclear Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters, which are linked by the 1,3-BDC anions to give a 3D NaCl-type framework. In 3, the Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters are connected by the carboxyl and sulfo groups of SIP anions to generate 3D (4,8)-connected framework with a (4{sup 10}{center_dot}6{sup 14}{center_dot}8{sup 4})(4{sup 5}{center_dot}6){sub 2} topology. The atrz ligand conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters and the carboxylates with different non-carboxyl substituent show important effects on the final structures of the title complexes. The electrochemical and magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes based on different carboxylates have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The carboxylate anions play a key role in the formation of three different structures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes have been obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The atrz conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carboxylates show important effect on the structures of title complexes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties and electrochemical behaviors have been reported.

  12. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  13. Real-time measurements of particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil and gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. w. Hahn; K. r. Hencken; H. A. Johnsen; J. R. Ross; P. M. Walsh

    1998-12-10

    Particulate matter emissions and some components of the particles were measured in the exhaust from combustion equipment used in oil and gas production operations near Bakersfield, California. The combustion sources included a 22.5 MW (electric) turbine generator, a 342-Bhp rich-burn spark ignition engine, and a 50 million Btu/h steam generator, all fired using natural gas. The particle components and measurement techniques were as follows: (1) Calcium, magnesium, sodium, silicon, and iron were measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), (2) particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were detected using the charge produced by photoionization, (3) particles having sizes between 0.1 and 7.5 {micro}m were counted using an instrument based on light scattering, and (4) total particulate matter was measured according to US EPA Method 5. Not all of the methods were applied to all of the sources. Measurements were also made in the ambient air near the combustion air inlets to the units, for comparison with the concentrations in the exhaust, but the inlet and outlet measurements were not done simultaneously. Calcium, sodium, and silicon were found in the exhaust from the steam generator at concentrations similar to those in the ambient air near the inlet to the burner. Sodium and silicon were observed in the engine exhaust at levels a factor of four higher than their concentrations in the air. The principal metal observed in the engine exhaust was calcium, a component of the lubricating oil, at a concentration of 11.6 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The air entering the gas turbine is filtered, so the average concentrations of metals in the turbine exhaust under steady operating conditions were even lower than in the air. During start-up following a shut-down to wash the turbine, silicon and iron were the major species in the stack, at concentrations of 6.4 and 16.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. A possible source of silicon is the water injected into the turbine for NO{sub x} control. Iron-containing particles are expected to be scale from ferrous metals. A commercial photoelectric aerosol sensor was used to measure PAH adsorbed on particles in the exhaust from the steam generator and the rich-burn engine. The conversion of the instrument readings to PAH concentrations is dependent upon the specific distribution of PAH species present. Using the typical calibration factor recommended by the instrument manufacturer, the estimated average concentration of particle-bound PAH was below the instrument detection limit (3--10 ng/m{sup 3}) in the stack gas from the steam generator, and was estimated to be 0.045--0.15 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in the exhaust from the rich-burn engine. Particle mass concentrations estimated from number concentrations determined using the particle counting and sizing instrument were only small fractions of the concentrations measured using Method 5. This is thought to be due primarily to the limited range over which size was quantified (0.1 to 7.5 {micro}m) and the poor efficiency with which the sampling system transferred large particles.

  14. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  15. Crivelli, Silvia; Kreylos, Oliver; Max, Nelson; Hamann, Bernd...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and steer a protein structure prediction process that may be running on a remote machine. ProteinShop was used to create initial configurations for a protein structure...

  16. Populations Voss, R.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Ajello...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    study the populations of X-ray sources in the Milky Way in the 15-55 keV band using a deep survey with the BAT instrument aboard the Swift observatory. We present the logN-logS...

  17. Property:Incentive/MaxInc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 20% of the annual C&I Standard Offer Program budget AEP SWEPCO - SMART Source Solar PV Program (Texas) + Residential: 15,000
    Non-residential: 30,000 AEP Texas Central...

  18. Property:Incentive/WindResPercMax | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I Independence Light & Power - Renewable Energy Rebates (Iowa) + 25% + L Local Small Wind Rebate Programs (Colorado) + 50% + M Maquoketa Municipal Electric Utility - Renewable...

  19. Property:Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    P Palmetto Clean Energy (PaCE) Program (South Carolina) + 6 + Preston Municipal Electric Utility - Renewable Energy Rebates (Iowa) + 20 + Progress Energy Carolinas - SunSense...

  20. Cover option 1 presentation title two lines max

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... high temperature water SCC testing systems for crack initiation and growth study 14 high temperature electrochemistry systems All stages of alloy processing capabilities, ...

  1. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. ... HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them ...

  2. Max Data Report Jet Stability versus Inlet Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Bremer, N.

    2015-09-01

    This document describes experiments investigating the effect of inlet geometry on the flow field within a glass tank where two jets mix and impinge upon the lid. The setup mimics the outlet plenum of a fast reactor where core exit flows of different temperatures can mix in ways that induce thermal cycling in neighboring structures.

  3. Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications: Small Device, Broad Impact in Power Electronics NormTurnquistecoROTRV ECO ROTR (Energy Capture Optimization by Revolutionary Onboard Turbine Reshape) - Making it...

  4. Microsoft Word - Draft Annncmnt of Max Aggregate Payments 11...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 Announcement of Estimated Maximum Amount of Aggregate Payments BPA will Accept for the 2012 Prepayment Program Background The Bonneville Power Administration ("BPA") issued...

  5. Cover option 1 presentation title two lines max

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    © 2015 General Electric Company - All rights reserved 2015 DOE-NEET: Environmental Cracking and Irradiation Resistant Stainless Steel by Additive Manufacturing (AM) Xiaoyuan Lou ( loux@ge.com ) Ceramics and Metallurgy Technologies GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY 2015 DOE AMM Workshop, Arlington, VA Sep. 29, 2015 This material was prepared with the internal support from General Electric Company. Additive Manufacturing for Nuclear Overview 3 © 2015 General Electric Company - All rights

  6. NREL's Min Zhang Keeps Her "Bugs" Happy, Leading to Biofuel Breakthrou...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    associate. Eventually, when it came time to look for a job, she searched the want ads in professional journals and discovered that an unfamiliar place called NREL was...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2006-04-lustre-future-40mins.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    network IO guarantees fast client & server side IO Routing enables multi-cluster, multi-network namespace Supports Multiple Network Protocols Lustre's failover...

  8. Microsoft Word - UEC-CC_010716_min_TEH_MSK.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 7, 2016 12:00 pm Eastern Time Participants (attendees in blue) Chair - Molly Kennedy (Clemson U.) Vice-Chair - Lane Martin (U. California, Berkeley) Secretary - Yang Zhang (U. Illinois) At-Large Members: Alex Belianinov (ORNL/CNMS); Kathrin Dörr, (MLU Halle-Wittenberg); Eric Formo (U. Georgia); Enrique Gomez (Penn State U.); Megan Robertson (U. Houston); Evgheni Strelcov (NIST); Rafael Verduzco (Rice U.) Past Chair, ex officio member - Nazanin Bassiri-Gharb (Georgia Tech) CNMS

  9. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-112 Changes to MFRSRCLDOD1MIN Datastream S McFarlane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Line of Sight (MWRLOS) datastream. Although this was originally intended to be a straightforward update of the code, it became more complicated due to the following factors: * a...

  10. International Relations Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    under DOE-HQ-IA-16-00197-MP Work Schedule Permanent Work Type Full Time Series 0131 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1314 Salary Min 90,823.00 Salary Max 139,523.00 Start Date...

  11. Policy Specialist | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    apply under the Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 1101 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1313 Salary Min 87,994.00 Salary Max 114,390...

  12. Deputy Director, EMCBC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Who May Apply All U.S Citizens Work Schedule Full Time Work Type Permanent Series 0340 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

  13. Senior Advisor, Chief Information Security Officer | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May Apply ALL U.S. CITIZENS Work Schedule FULL-TIME Work Type PERMANENT Series 2210 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

  14. Policy Specialist | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    apply under the Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 1101 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1212 Salary Min 73,998.00 Salary Max 96,203...

  15. Diversity and Inclusion Specialist | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 0301 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1313 Salary Min 87,994.00 Salary Max 114,390.00 Start Date...

  16. Program Support Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vacancy WAPA-16-MP-19. Work Schedule Full-Time Work Type Permanent Series 0301 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1111 Salary Min 62,850.00 Salary Max 81,706.00 Start Date...

  17. Director, Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from all U.S. Citizens. Work Schedule Full-Time Work Type Permanent Series 0340 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

  18. Personnel Security Specialist | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is a permanent position. Series 0080 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0202 Salary Min 48,403.00 Salary Max 93,022.00 Start Date Thursday, December 17, 2015 End Date Monday,...

  19. GaMin11 an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO? - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostertag-Henning, C. [Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resesources (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Risse, A. [Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resesources (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Thomas, B. [United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rosenbauer, R. [United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rochelle, C. [British Geological Survey, Nottinghamshire (United Kingdom); Purser, G. [British Geological Survey, Nottinghamshire (United Kingdom); Kilpatrick, A. [British Geological Survey, Nottinghamshire (United Kingdom); Rosenqvist, J. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Yardley, B. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Karamalidis, A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Griffith, C. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hedges, S. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Dilmore, R. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Goodman, A. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Black, J. [Univ. of Melbourne, (Austrialia); Haese, R. [Univ. of Melbourne, (Austrialia); Deusner, C. [hGEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Kiel (Germany); Bigalke, N. [hGEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Kiel (Germany); Haeckel, M. [hGEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Kiel (Germany); Fischer, S. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany); Liebscher, A. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany); Icenhower, J. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Daval, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Saldi, G. D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Knauss, K. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schmidt, M. [Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Mito, S. [Research Inst. of Innovative Tech. for the Earth (RITE), Kyoto (Japan); Sorai, M. [National Inst. of Advanced Science and Tech. (AIST) Tsukuba (Japan); Truche, L. [GeoRessources, Universite de Lorraine, Nancy (France)

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO?-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO? a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and if possible quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in composition of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.

  20. Momentum transport in the vicinity of q{sub min} in reverse shear tokamaks due to ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rameswar; Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex ; Singh, R; WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 ; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.; Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California, San Diego, California 92093; Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0424

    2014-01-15

    We present an analytic study of momentum transport of tokamak plasmas in the vicinity of minimum safety factor (q) position in reversed magnetic shear configuration. Slab ion temperature gradient modes with an equilibrium flow profile are considered in this study. Quasi-linear calculations of momentum flux clearly show the novel effects of q-curvature on the generation of intrinsic rotation and mean poloidal flow without invoking reflectional symmetry breaking of parallel wavenumber (k{sub ?}). This q-curvature effect originates from the inherent asymmetry in k{sub ?} populations with respect to a rational surface due to the quadratic proportionality of k{sub ?} when q-curvature is taken into account. Discussions are made of possible implications of q-curvature induced plasma flows on internal transport barrier formation in reversed shear tokamaks.

  1. Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year?...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    willing to learn.) Submitted by Bob Wallace on 15 June, 2013 - 00:23 1 answer Points: 0 Hi Bob- Thank you for posting your question. It seems that your question developed after...

  2. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford CMAX Energi (a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle).

  3. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_0001/MaxTech

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Size DIR Parent Directory - DIR Sim1 18-Apr-2012 11:06 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 653191376 Varnish...

  4. Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbesi, Karina; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Bolduc, Christopher; Burch, Gabriel; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Saltiel, Seth

    2011-05-06

    This study surveyed the technical potential for efficiency improvements in 150 categories of appliances and equipment representing 33 quads of primary energy use across the US economy in 2010 and (1) documented efficient product designs, (2) identified the most promising cross-cutting strategies, and (3) ranked national energy savings potential by end use. Savings were estimated using a method modeled after US Department of Energy priority-setting reports - simplified versions of the full technical and economic analyses performed for rulemakings. This study demonstrates that large savings are possible by replacing products at the end-of-life with ultra-efficient models that use existing technology. Replacing the 50 top energy-saving end-uses (constituting 30 quads of primary energy consumption in 2010) with today's best-on-market equivalents would save {approx}200 quads of US primary energy over 30 years (25% of consumption anticipated there from). For the 29 products for maximum feasible savings potential could be estimated, the savings were twice as high. These results demonstrate that pushing ultra-efficient products to market could significantly escalate carbon emission reductions and is a viable strategy for sustaining large emissions reductions through standards. The results of this analysis were used by DOE for new coverage prioritization, to identify key opportunities for product prototyping and market development, and will leverage future standards rulemakings by identifying the full scope of maximum feasible technology options. High leverage products include advances lighting systems, HVAC, and televisions. High leverage technologies include electronic lighting, heat pumps, variable speed motors, and a host of controls-related technologies.

  5. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and the correlation between quasars' variability amplitude and intrinsic luminosity. ... ANALYSIS; GALAXIES; GALAXY CLUSTERS; LUMINOSITY; MASS; QUASARS Word Cloud More Like ...

  6. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, ...

  7. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, ...

  8. Webinar: Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for Ultra-Low-Energy-Use Appliances & Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The competition invited twelve University faculty-led student engineering teams to participate in a year long effort to design, build and test their original energy savings technologies and prototypes.

  9. DOE-CX-00009_WiMAX_Upgrades_on_Gable_Mountain.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. P:\JODI\P393-396.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R ¯ Q ¯ R ¯ Q 1, R i,j Q i,j Xl l nx 2 . Q i,j R i,j D D min D max nx 2 D min D max µm Header 393 Simulation of Solar Radiative Transfer in Cumulus Clouds V. E. Zuev and G. A. Titov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Current radiation codes of general circulation models The stochastic geometry of cumulus clouds is, to date, (GCMs) are still largely based on plane-parallel models, poorly understood. To avoid expensive computations, we which

  11. EJ and EK Pay Table | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EJ and EK Pay Table EJ and EK Pay Table The 2014 EJ and EK pay table excludes locality pay. Refer to the General Schedule Complete Set of Locality Pay Tables to determine the locality pay for your applicable geographic area. INCORPORATING THE 1% GENERAL SCHEDULE INCREASE AND A LOCALITY PAYMENT OF 24.22% FOR THE LOCALITY PAY AREA OF WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE-NORTHERN VIRGINIA, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA Special Grade Min. base Min. Locality Max. Base Max. Locality GS Grade/Step Equivalent 01 $27,705 $34,415

  12. Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benkeser, Robert A.; Laugal, James A.; Rappa, Angela

    1985-01-01

    Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States) Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States) Laboratoire AIM, CEADSM-CNRS-Universit Paris ...

  14. Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

    1985-08-06

    Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

  15. Selective Conversion of Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lignin is a major component of non-edible biomass (15-30 percent by weight; 40 percent by energy). It is a cheap byproduct of pulp and biofuel production and is one of the few ...

  16. Microsoft Word - Document2

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    min, average, and max average CO 2 emissions by month for AZNM subregion (lbs CO 2 MWh load) 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 January 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 February 800 1,100 1,400 1,700...

  17. Section 27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( m) 0min 2 J 2 J max < +J,exp 1&2p 1&2 &H <4 Session Papers 109 Figure 1. Water vapor transmission spectra for solar zenith angle 2 60. From the top: from TOA...

  18. Cori Queues and Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physical Cores Max Walltime Run Limit Total Nodes Limit Submit Limit Relative Priority debug 1-128 1-4,096 30 min 1 128 5 2 regular 1-2 1-64 24 hrs 50 100 200 4 3-512 65-16,384 24...

  19. Queues and Scheduling Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cores Max Wallclock QOS1) Run Limit Submit Limit Relative Priority Charge Factor2) debug 1-512 1-12,288 30 mins - 1 10 2 2 regular 1-682 1-16,368 36 hrs normal 24 100 4 2...

  20. A=13N (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 13N) GENERAL: See also Table 13.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (LA55B, DA56G, FR58B, HA58D, SK58). 1. 13N(β+)13C Qm = 2.222 Recent determinations of the half-life give 10.05 ± 0.03 min (CH53C), 10.08 ± 0.04 min (WI55H), 10.07 ± 0.06 min (NO57A), 9.96 ± 0.03 min (AR58), 9.96 ± 0.03 min (DA58E); see also (DE57). Eβ(max) = 1.202 ± 0.005 MeV (HO50), 1.185 ± 0.025 MeV (GR54C), 1.190 ± 0.003 MeV (DA58E). The positron spectrum

  1. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Claire L.; Gregg, Jillian W.; Wilson, John K.

    2011-11-01

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We report on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3C difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5C) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5C, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2C). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.

  2. A general maximum entropy framework for thermodynamic variational principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewar, Roderick C.

    2014-12-05

    Minimum free energy principles are familiar in equilibrium thermodynamics, as expressions of the second law. They also appear in statistical mechanics as variational approximation schemes, such as the mean-field and steepest-descent approximations. These well-known minimum free energy principles are here unified and extended to any system analyzable by MaxEnt, including non-equilibrium systems. The MaxEnt Lagrangian associated with a generic MaxEnt distribution p defines a generalized potential ? for an arbitrary probability distribution p-hat, such that ? is a minimum at (p-hat) = p. Minimization of ? with respect to p-hat thus constitutes a generic variational principle, and is equivalent to minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between p-hat and p. Illustrative examples of min? are given for equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems. An interpretation of changes in ? is given in terms of the second law, although min? itself is an intrinsic variational property of MaxEnt that is distinct from the second law.

  3. On quantum Rnyi entropies: A new generalization and some properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mller-Lennert, Martin; Dupuis, Frdric; Szehr, Oleg; Fehr, Serge; Tomamichel, Marco

    2013-12-15

    The Rnyi entropies constitute a family of information measures that generalizes the well-known Shannon entropy, inheriting many of its properties. They appear in the form of unconditional and conditional entropies, relative entropies, or mutual information, and have found many applications in information theory and beyond. Various generalizations of Rnyi entropies to the quantum setting have been proposed, most prominently Petz's quasi-entropies and Renner's conditional min-, max-, and collision entropy. However, these quantum extensions are incompatible and thus unsatisfactory. We propose a new quantum generalization of the family of Rnyi entropies that contains the von Neumann entropy, min-entropy, collision entropy, and the max-entropy as special cases, thus encompassing most quantum entropies in use today. We show several natural properties for this definition, including data-processing inequalities, a duality relation, and an entropic uncertainty relation.

  4. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  5. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  6. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, George E. (West Chicago, IL); Dawson, John W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1983-01-01

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  7. DOE Excepted Service Pay Tables | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Excepted Service Pay Tables DOE Excepted Service Pay Tables Excepted Service EJ and EK Pay Table INCORPORATING THE 1% GENERAL SCHEDULE INCREASE AND A LOCALITY PAYMENT OF 24.22% FOR THE LOCALITY PAY AREA OF WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE-NORTHERN VIRGINIA, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA Special Grade Min. Base Min. Locality Max. Base Max. Locality GS Grade/Step Equiv. 01 $27,705 $34,415 $47,575 $59,098 5/1 to 9/5 02 $41,979 $52,146 $68,993 $85,703 9/1 to 12/5 03 $60,877 $75,621 $96,948 $120,429 12/1 to 14/5 04 $85,544

  8. Microsoft Word - S07834_2011 Ann Rpt_ag comment revs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Supplementary Time-Trend Sparkline Plots This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico January 2012 Doc. No. S07834 Page A-1 Legend In these sparkline diagrams, red markers denote maximum (max) concentrations and green markers denote minima (min); black markers denote the most recent (current) March 2011 measurement. The x-axis is hidden but corresponds to the Feb-00 to Mar-11 date range noted above each plot. Vertical (y-) axis

  9. Queues and Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Overview Jobs must be submitted to a valid submit queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate execution queue. Users can not directly access the execution queues. Submit Queue Execution Queue Nodes Available Cores Max Wallclock Relative Priority Run Limit Eligible Limit Charge Factor* interactive interactive 1-8 1-64 30 mins 1 2 1 1.5 debug debug 1-32 1-256 30 mins 2 2 1 1.5 regular reg_short 1-16 1-128 4 hrs 3 8 4 1.5 reg_small 1-16 1-128

  10. A=11C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 11C) GENERAL: See also Table 11.8 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (KU56, KU57A, FR58B). 1. 11C(β+)11B Qm = 1.981 The spectrum is simple; Eβ+(max) = 968 ± 8 keV (WO54A). The mean of half-lives reported in (55AJ61) is 20.36 ± 0.05 min. Recent values of the half-lives are 20.26 ± 0.1 min (BA55E), 20.8 ± 0.2 min (PR57B) and 20.11 ± 0.13 min (AR58); log ft = 3.62 (WO54A). The ratio of K-capture to positron emission is 0.19 ± 0.03

  11. Pretreatment of solid carbonaceous material with dicarboxylic aromatic acids to prevent scale formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a pretreating agent selected from the group consisting of phthalic acid, phthalic anhydride, pyromellitic acid and pyromellitic anhydride. The pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding phthalate and/or pyromellitate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1 to about 2 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 5.degree. to about 80.degree. C.

  12. Selective aerobic alcohol oxidation method for conversion of lignin into simple aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahl, Shannon S; Rahimi, Alireza

    2015-03-03

    Described is a method to oxidize lignin or lignin sub-units. The method includes oxidation of secondary benzylic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit to a corresponding ketone in the presence of unprotected primarily aliphatic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit. The optimal catalyst system consists of HNO.sub.3 in combination with another Bronsted acid, in the absence of a metal-containing catalyst, thereby yielding a selectively oxidized lignin or lignin sub-unit. The method may be carried out in the presence or absence of additional reagents including TEMPO and TEMPO derivatives.

  13. Highly Fluorescent Group 13 Metal Complexes with Cyclic, Aromatic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Michael; Moore, Evan G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-11

    The neutral complexes of two ligands based on the 1-oxo-2-hydroxy-isoquinoline (1,2-HOIQO) motif with group 13 metals (Al, Ga, In) show bright blue-violet luminescence in organic solvents. The corresponding transition can be attributed to ligand-centered singlet emission, characterized by a small Stokes shifts of only a few nm combined with lifetimes in the range between 1-3 ns. The fluorescence efficiency is high, with quantum yields of up to 37% in benzene solution. The crystal structure of one of the indium(III) complexes (trigonal space group R-3, a = b = 13.0384(15) {angstrom}, c = 32.870(8) {angstrom}, ? = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}, V = 4839.3(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 6) shows a six-coordinate geometry around the indium center which is close to trigonal-prismatic, with a twist angle between the two trigonal faces of 20.7{sup o}. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations (Al and Ga: B3LYP/6-31G(d)); In: B3LYP/LANL2DZ of the fac and mer isomers with one of the two ligands indicate that there is no clear preference for either one of the isomeric forms of the metal complexes. In addition, the metal centers do not have a significant influence on the electronic structure, and as a consequence, on the predominant intraligand optical transitions.

  14. Final Report for Grant "Direct Writing via Novel Aromatic Ladder Polymer Precursors"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. B. Gorman

    2010-10-29

    This report describes activities and findings under the above entitled grant. These pertain to the development of new synthetic routes to novel precursor polymers and oligomers that are applicable for conversion from electrical insulators to electrical conductors under the application of light (e.g. direct photolithographic writing)

  15. Investigation of chlorinated aromatic compounds in the environment: Methods development and data interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Wanghsien.

    1989-01-01

    Detection of low levels of chlorinated benzene compounds (CLBZ) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil samples has been investigated with respect to potential sources in an industrial area of western New York state. The extract obtained by steam distillation was used directly with minimal additional cleanup steps for high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HRGC/MS) and high resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection (HRGC/ECD) analysis. The Nielson-Kryger steam distillation technique was used to extract CLBZ compounds and PCB congeners from soil samples. The recoveries of the CLBZ compounds in soil samples were monitored by comparison of the response for the {sup 13}C-labelled analogues in each isomeric group. The mean recoveries from field samples ranged from 63% to 76%. The recoveries of PCB congeners were measured using four air-dried subsurface soils which were spiked with Aroclors standard mixture. The mean recoveries of most PCB congeners ranged from 80% to 99%. Using HRGC/MS in the selected ion monitoring mode (SIM), a detection limit below 10 pg/g (10 pptr, parts per trillion) of the CLBZ compounds was achieved. For GC/ECD, an Apiezon L-coated glass capillary column was used to determine PCB congeners at background levels. More than 69 PCB congeners were separated on this column. The detection limit for an individual congener was about 0.01 ng/g. Application of SIMCA (SImple Modeling by Chemical Analogy) pattern recognition and multiple discriminant analysis showed that the pattern of CLBZ compounds in soil samples collected near Love Canal was similar to the patterns from the other areas in the Niagara Falls area. The highest concentrations of CLBZ compounds were detected in the area which is near and downwind from an industrial center with many potential sources of airborne emissions.

  16. Introduction of ?-Complexation into Porous Aromatic Framework for Highly Selective Adsorption of Ethylene over Ethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Baiyan; Zhang, Yiming; Krishna, Rajamani; Yao, Kexin; Han, Yu; Wu, Zili; Ma, Dingxuan; Shi, Zhan; Pham, Tony; Space, Brian; Liu, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Liu, Jun; Matthew, Chrzanowski; Ma, Shengqian

    2014-06-05

    We report herein a strategy of incorporating air stable Ag(I) ions into water stable, high surface area porous organic polymer (POP) affording significant increase in ethylene uptake capacity and extremely high Qst for ethylene (over 100 kJ/mol at low ethylene load-ing) as illustrated in the context of Ag(I) ion functionalized PAF-1, PAF-1-SO3Ag. IAST calculations using single-component-isotherm data and equimolar ethylene/ethane ratio at 296 K reveal PAF-1-SO3Ag shows exceptionally high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivi-ty (Sads: 27 to 125), far surpassing benchmark zeolite and any other MOF reported in literature. This alongside excellent water/air stability, high ethylene uptake capacity, and mild regeneration requirements make PAF-1-SO3Ag hold promise for adsorption-based eth-ylene/ethane separations, paving a way to develop Ag(I) ion function-alized POPs as a new platform for highly selective adsorption of eth-ylene over ethane.

  17. The effect of sorption on the degradation of aromatic acids and bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Smith, S.C.

    1992-10-01

    The availability and degradation of selected ionizable organic compounds sorbed to pure mineral phases are discussed. Substrates sorbed to mineral surfaces may or may not be protected from microbial attack; the degree of protection appears to be dependent on the type and cell density of the microorganism involved. The currently available data, however, demonstrate that there is little, if any, consensus on the types of reactions or interactions that facilitate sorbed substrate utilization. Rates of degradation of organic bases and cations that sorb to clay minerals via an exchange reaction are suggested to be directly related to substrate binding intensity and conformation on the clay surface. Similarly, rates of degradation of organic acids sorbed to the surface of oxides are suggested to be related to their interaction with the surface and the type of oxide sorbent. Although the rate-limiting step in microbial utilization of sorbed acids and bases is apparently a desorption process, the rate of desorption is itself linked to the compound's binding intensities on a given sorbent. Thus, as the binding intensities of compounds increase, chemical kinetic reactions, rather than mass-transfer processes, appear to limit the rate of desorption.

  18. The effect of sorption on the degradation of aromatic acids and bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Smith, S.C.

    1992-10-01

    The availability and degradation of selected ionizable organic compounds sorbed to pure mineral phases are discussed. Substrates sorbed to mineral surfaces may or may not be protected from microbial attack; the degree of protection appears to be dependent on the type and cell density of the microorganism involved. The currently available data, however, demonstrate that there is little, if any, consensus on the types of reactions or interactions that facilitate sorbed substrate utilization. Rates of degradation of organic bases and cations that sorb to clay minerals via an exchange reaction are suggested to be directly related to substrate binding intensity and conformation on the clay surface. Similarly, rates of degradation of organic acids sorbed to the surface of oxides are suggested to be related to their interaction with the surface and the type of oxide sorbent. Although the rate-limiting step in microbial utilization of sorbed acids and bases is apparently a desorption process, the rate of desorption is itself linked to the compound`s binding intensities on a given sorbent. Thus, as the binding intensities of compounds increase, chemical kinetic reactions, rather than mass-transfer processes, appear to limit the rate of desorption.

  19. SU-E-T-61: Capabilities and Considerations for the Clinical Use of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) Beams for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J; Zhang, Y; Duhon, M; Smith, K; McNutt, T; Wong, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Machines with FFF beams are becoming more prevalent. As technology evolves, guidelines for its use need to be developed. FFF beams have the potential for much greater dose rates and lower out-of-field dose. The use of VMAT with FFF adds additional complexity. This work attempts to define the capabilities and limitations of FFF when applied to VMAT fields and characterize the situations which this technology is best suited. Methods: The total monitor units of a VMAT delivery is modified to determine the minimum deliverable dose rate for FFF and non-FFF beams on an Elekta VersaHD linear accelerator. The minimum dose rate limits the minimum dose per segments, thus reducing the available modulation. Time is assessed by recording the beam-on time for FFF and non-FFF beams. For 10 plans with standard fraction sizes (180212 cGy/Fx) maximum dose rate per control point and number of control points exceeding 400 MU/min are recorded. Results: VMAT minimum dose rate is related to the pulse rate. The minimum deliverable dose rate is ?36 MU/min (0.12 MU/deg) for 6x-FFF (max 1400 MU/min) and ?75 MU/min (0.27 MU/deg) for 10x-FFF (max 2400 MU/min) beams. Delivery time is independent of dose rate for dose rates below 1500 MU/min as it is limited by gantry speed. The maximum dose rate across in all plans according to Pinnacle is 1170 MU/min for FFF plans and 800 MU/min for non-FFF plans. The percentage of control points exceeding 400 MU/min is 13.3% for FFF and 9% for non-FFF beams. Conclusion: FFF does not improve delivery time of VMAT fields for conventional fraction sizes, since the dominant factor is gantry speed instead of dose rate. However, there may be potential for speed improvement for very large fraction sizes. Due to pulse rate dependency, FFF beams require a higher minimum dose rate.

  20. mpimemu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mpimemu mpimemu Description The code mpimemu is a simple tool that helps approximate MPI library memory usage as a function of scale. It takes samples of /proc/meminfo (node level) and /proc/self/status (process level) and outputs the min, max and avg values for a specified period of time. More information can be found in the README and README.QUICKSTART files. Download mpimemu tar file (updated July 5, README only) How to Build ./configure CC=mpicc (or your appropriate MPI C compiler) make How

  1. 2012 Underlying Data for Wind Technologies Market Report for Distributed Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications" "Section 10. Data Tables" "Table 8. Megawatts By Year By Sector",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Table 10. 2012 Cost Per Kilowatt" ,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,"Cumulative",,,,,"Sample Size",,"Average $/kW","Min $/kW","Max $/kW" "Small Wind Turbines",3,5,3,9,10,17,20,26,19,18,130,,"Small Wind Turbines - New

  2. ARM - Measurement - Extreme event time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsExtreme event time ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Extreme event time The time of extreme meteorological events such as min/max temperature and wind gusts. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all

  3. Evolution of the macromolecular structure of sporopollenin during thermal degradation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bernard, S.; Benzerara, K.; Beyssac, O.; Balan, E.; G. E. Brown, Jr.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructing the original biogeochemistry of organic microfossils requires quantifying the extent of the chemical transformations they experienced during burial and maturation processes. In the present study, fossilization experiments have been performed using modern sporopollenin chosen as an analogue for the resistant biocompounds possibly constituting the wall of many organic microfossils. Sporopollenin powder has been processed thermally under argon atmosphere at different temperatures (up to 1000 °C) for varying durations (up to 900 min). Solid residues of each experiment have been characterized using infrared, Raman and synchrotron-based XANES spectroscopies. Results indicate that significant defunctionalisation and aromatization affect the molecular structure ofmore » sporopollenin with increasing temperature. Two distinct stages of evolution with temperature are observed: in a first stage, sporopollenin experiences dehydrogenation and deoxygenation simultaneously (below 500 °C); in a second stage (above 500 °C) an increasing concentration in aromatic groups and a lateral growth of aromatic layers are observed. With increasing heating duration (up to 900 min) at a constant temperature (360 °C), oxygen is progressively lost and conjugated carbon–carbon chains or domains grow progressively, following a log-linear kinetic behavior. Based on the comparison with natural spores fossilized within metasediments which experienced intense metamorphism, we show that the present experimental simulations may not perfectly mimic natural diagenesis and metamorphism. Moreover, performing such laboratory experiments provides key insights on the processes transforming biogenic molecules into molecular fossils.« less

  4. Evolution of the macromolecular structure of sporopollenin during thermal degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, S.; Benzerara, K.; Beyssac, O.; Balan, E.; G. E. Brown, Jr.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructing the original biogeochemistry of organic microfossils requires quantifying the extent of the chemical transformations they experienced during burial and maturation processes. In the present study, fossilization experiments have been performed using modern sporopollenin chosen as an analogue for the resistant biocompounds possibly constituting the wall of many organic microfossils. Sporopollenin powder has been processed thermally under argon atmosphere at different temperatures (up to 1000 C) for varying durations (up to 900 min). Solid residues of each experiment have been characterized using infrared, Raman and synchrotron-based XANES spectroscopies. Results indicate that significant defunctionalisation and aromatization affect the molecular structure of sporopollenin with increasing temperature. Two distinct stages of evolution with temperature are observed: in a first stage, sporopollenin experiences dehydrogenation and deoxygenation simultaneously (below 500 C); in a second stage (above 500 C) an increasing concentration in aromatic groups and a lateral growth of aromatic layers are observed. With increasing heating duration (up to 900 min) at a constant temperature (360 C), oxygen is progressively lost and conjugated carboncarbon chains or domains grow progressively, following a log-linear kinetic behavior. Based on the comparison with natural spores fossilized within metasediments which experienced intense metamorphism, we show that the present experimental simulations may not perfectly mimic natural diagenesis and metamorphism. Moreover, performing such laboratory experiments provides key insights on the processes transforming biogenic molecules into molecular fossils.

  5. Application of /sup 13/C, /sup 2/H, /sup 1/H NMR and GPC to the study of structural evolution of subbituminous coal in tetralin at 427/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, J.A.; Camaioni, D.M.; Skiens, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The products from the treatment of subbituminous coal at 427/sup 0/C in tetralin or 1,1-d/sub 2/-tetralin for times varying from 2.5 to 120 min were examined by /sup 13/C, /sup 2/H, and /sup 1/H Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FTNMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and elemental and hydroxyl group analysis. NMR and elemental analysis revealed that the flash hydroliquefaction products contained about 10% of aromatic ether carbon and phenolic carbon in roughly equal amounts, but no aliphatic ether, carboxyl, or quinine carbon. The combined asphaltenes and preasphaltenes from a 10-min reaction exhibited 68% carbon, 30% hydrogen, and 30% deuterium aromaticity, with aromaticity slowly increasing at longer reaction times. GPC analysis revealed that approximately 10% of the products were greater than 1500 mol wt, with number-average molecular weights reduced from 840 to 500 over a 2-hr reaction. Deuterium NMR revealed that the majority of deuterium transferred to coal appeared at benzylic carbons.

  6. Observed 1970-2005 cooling of summer daytime temperatures in coastal California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebassi, B.; Gonzalez, J.; Fabris, D.; Maurer, E.; Miller, N.; Milesi, C.; Bornstein, R.

    2009-05-15

    The study evaluated 1948-2004 summer (JJA) mean monthly air temperatures for two California air basins: SoCAB and SFBA. The study focuses on the more rapid post-1970 warming period, and its daily T{sub min} and T{sub max} values were used to produce average monthly values and spatial distributions of trends for each air basins. Additional analyses included T{sub D} values at two NWS sites, SSTs, NCEP reanalysis sea-level pressures, and GCM T{sub ave}-values. Results for all California COOP sites together showed increased JJA T{sub ave}-values; asymmetric warming, as T{sub min}-values increase faster than T{sub max}-values; and thus decreased DTR values. The spatial distribution of observed SoCAB and SFBA T{sub max} values exhibited a complex pattern, with cooling in low-elevation coastal-areas open to marine air penetration and warming at inland areas. Results also showed that decreased DTR values in the valleys arose from small increases at 'inland' sites combined with large decreases at 'coastal' sites. Previous studies suggest that cooling JJA T{sub max}-values in coastal California were due to increased irrigation, coastal upwelling, or cloud cover, while the current hypothesis is that they arises from GHG-induced global-warming of 'inland' areas, which results in increased sea breeze flow activity. Sea level pressure trends showed increases in the oceanic Pacific High and decreases in the central-California Thermal Low. The corresponding gradient thus showed a trend of 0.02 hPa 100-km{sup -1} decade{sup -1}, supportive of the hypothesis of increased sea breeze activity. Trends in T{sub D} values showed a larger value at coastal SFO than at inland SEC, which indicative of increased sea breeze activity; calculated SST trends (0.15 C decade{sup -1}) could also have increase T{sub D}-values. GCM model Tave-values showed warming that decreases from 0.13 C decade{sup -1} at inland California to 0.08 C decade{sup -1} at coastal areas. Significant societal impacts may result from this observed 'reverse-reaction' to GHG-warming, i.e., the decreased JJA T{sub max}-values in coastal areas. Possible beneficial effects include decreased: maximum O{sub 3} levels, human thermal-stress, and energy requirements for cooling.

  7. Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soils and Terrestrial Biota After a Spill of Crude Oil in Trecate, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, Charles A. ); Becker, James M. ); Porta, Augusto C.

    2001-12-01

    Following a large blowout of crude oil in northern Italy in 1994, the distribution of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was examined over time and space in soils, uncultivated wild vegetation, insects, mice, and frogs in the area. Within 2 y of the blowout, PAH concentrations declined to background levels over much of the area where initial concentrations were within an order of magnitude above background, but had not declined to background in areas where starting concentrations exceeded background by two orders of magnitude. Octanol-water partitioning and extent of alkylation explained much of the variance in uptake of PAHs by plants and animals. Lower Kow PAHs and higher-alkylated PAHs had higher soil-to-biota accumulation factors (BSAFs) than did high-Kow and unalkylated forms. BSAFs for higher Kow PAHs were very low for plants, but much higher for animals, with frogs accumulating more of these compounds than other species.

  8. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Philip M.; Sears, Trevor J.

    2015-07-28

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7–12 thousand cm⁻¹ of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T₁ states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) of the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics.

  9. Estimating the in situ sediment-porewater distribution of PAHs and chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons in anthropogenic impacted sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Peter H. Arp; Gijs D. Breedveld; Gerard Cornelissen

    2009-08-15

    It has become increasingly apparent that the in situ sediment-porewater distribution behavior of organic compounds within anthropogenic impacted sediments is quite diverse, and challenging to generalize. Traditional models based on octanol-water partitioning generally overestimate native porewater concentrations, and modern approaches accounting for multiple carbon fractions, including black carbon, appear sediment specific. To assess the diversity of this sorption behavior, we collected all peer-reviewed total organic carbon (TOC)-normalized in situ sediment-porewater distribution coefficients, K{sub TOC}, for impacted sediments. This entailed several hundreds of data for PAHs, PCBs, PCDD/Fs, and chlorinated benzenes, covering a large variety of sediments, locations, and experimental methods. Compound-specific KTOC could range up to over 3 orders of magnitude. Output from various predictive models for individual carbonaceous phases found in impacted sediments, based on peer-reviewed polyparameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs), Raoult's Law, and the SPARC online-calculator, were tested to see if any of the models could consistently predict literature K{sub TOC} values within a factor of 30 (i.e. about 1.5 orders of magnitude, or half the range of K{sub TOC} values). The Raoult's Law model and coal tar PP-LFER achieved the sought-after accuracy for all tested compound classes, and are recommended for general, regional-scale modeling purposes. As impacted sediment-porewater distribution models are unlikely to get more accurate than this, this review underpins that the only way to accurately obtain accurate porewater concentrations is to measure them directly, and not infer them from sediment concentrations. 86 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Philip M.; Sears, Trevor J.

    2015-07-28

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7–12 thousand cm⁻¹ of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T₁ states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) ofmore » the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics.« less

  11. Laser photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated heterocyclic compounds. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Partial Contents: Laser Desorption-Laser Photoionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry; Basic Principles of TOFMS; Factors Affecting Flight Time; Source of Broadening; Laser Desorption; Theory of Multiphoton Ionization: Application to Mass Spectrometry; Quantum Theory of MPI; Time-Dependent Perturbation Theory; Time-Dependent Coefficients; Probability of a Two-Photon Process; and Attributes of R2PI.

  12. Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A.; Alvarez-Gallego, C.; Sales, D.; Romero Garcia, L.I.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

  13. Process Limits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited unlimited pending signals 4199424 4199424 max locked memory (kbytes) 32 32 max memory size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited open files 1024 1024 pipe...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gunzburger, Max (1) Hesse, Marc A. (1) Hoffman, Mattew (1) Hohenester, Ulrich (1) Ju, ... Salinger, Andrew G. ; Perego, Mauro ; Hoffman, Mattew ; Leng, Wei ; Gunzburger, Max ; ...

  15. Rates and Mechanisms of Oil Shale Pyrolysis: A Chemical Structure Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Three pristine Utah Green River oil shale samples were obtained and used for analysis by the combined research groups at the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Oil shale samples were first demineralized and the separated kerogen and extracted bitumen samples were then studied by a host of techniques including high resolution liquid-state carbon-13 NMR, solid-state magic angle sample spinning 13C NMR, GC/MS, FTIR, and pyrolysis. Bitumen was extracted from the shale using methanol/dichloromethane and analyzed using high resolution 13C NMR liquid state spectroscopy, showing carbon aromaticities of 7 to 11%. The three parent shales and the demineralized kerogens were each analyzed with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Carbon aromaticity of the kerogen was 23-24%, with 10-12 aromatic carbons per cluster. Crushed samples of Green River oil shale and its kerogen extract were pyrolyzed at heating rates from 1 to 10 K/min at pressures of 1 and 40 bar and temperatures up to 1000C. The transient pyrolysis data were fit with a first-order model and a Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM). The demineralized kerogen was pyrolyzed at 10 K/min in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 525C, and the pyrolysis products (light gas, tar, and char) were analyzed using 13C NMR, GC/MS, and FTIR. Details of the kerogen pyrolysis have been modeled by a modified version of the chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model that has been widely used to model coal combustion/pyrolysis. This refined CPD model has been successful in predicting the char, tar, and gas yields of the three shale samples during pyrolysis. This set of experiments and associated modeling represents the most sophisticated and complete analysis available for a given set of oil shale samples.

  16. System, apparatus and methods to implement high-speed network analyzers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ezick, James; Lethin, Richard; Ros-Giralt, Jordi; Szilagyi, Peter; Wohlford, David E

    2015-11-10

    Systems, apparatus and methods for the implementation of high-speed network analyzers are provided. A set of high-level specifications is used to define the behavior of the network analyzer emitted by a compiler. An optimized inline workflow to process regular expressions is presented without sacrificing the semantic capabilities of the processing engine. An optimized packet dispatcher implements a subset of the functions implemented by the network analyzer, providing a fast and slow path workflow used to accelerate specific processing units. Such dispatcher facility can also be used as a cache of policies, wherein if a policy is found, then packet manipulations associated with the policy can be quickly performed. An optimized method of generating DFA specifications for network signatures is also presented. The method accepts several optimization criteria, such as min-max allocations or optimal allocations based on the probability of occurrence of each signature input bit.

  17. Ocean Carbon Cycle Models from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    \tPacific data-model intercomparison from Patrick Wetzel (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany)

  18. 3D electromagnetic inversion for environmental site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1997-04-01

    A 3-D non-linear electromagnetic inversion scheme has been developed to produce images of subsurface conductivity structure from electromagnetic geophysical data. The solution is obtained by successive linearized model updates where full forward modeling is employed at each iteration to compute model sensitivities and predicted data. Regularization is applied to the problem to provide stability. Because the inverse part of the problem requires the solution of 10`s to 100`s of thousands of unknowns, and because each inverse iteration requires many forward models to be computed, the code has been implemented on massively parallel computer platforms. The use of the inversion code to image environmental sites is demonstrated on a data set collected with the Apex Parametrics {open_quote}MaxMin I-8S{close_quote} over a section of stacked barrels and metal filled boxes at the Idaho National Laboratory`s {open_quote}Cold Test Pit{close_quote}. The MaxMin is a loop-loop frequency domain system which operates from 440 Hz up to 56 kHz using various coil separations; for this survey coil separations of 15, 30 and 60 feet were employed. The out-of phase data are shown to be of very good quality while the in-phase are rather noisy due to slight mispositioning errors, which cause improper cancellation of the primary free space field in the receiver. Weighting the data appropriately by the estimated noise and applying the inversion scheme is demonstrated to better define the structure of the pit. In addition, comparisons are given for single coil separations and multiple separations to show the benefits of using multiple offset data.

  19. Photoluminescence spectroscopy of YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles with aromatic linker molecules: A precursor to biomedical functionalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senty, T. R.; Yalamanchi, M.; Cushing, S. K.; Seehra, M. S.; Bristow, A. D.; Zhang, Y.; Shi, X.

    2014-04-28

    Photoluminescence spectra of YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles are presented, with and without the attachment of organic molecules that are proposed for linking to biomolecules. YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles with 5% dopant concentration were synthesized via wet chemical synthesis. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show the expected wakefieldite structure of tetragonal particles with an average size of 17?nm. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy determines that metal-carboxylate coordination is successful in replacing native metal-hydroxyl bonds with three organic linkers, namely, benzoic acid, 3-nitro 4-chloro-benzoic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, in separate treatments. UV-excitation photoluminescence spectra show that the position and intensity of the dominant {sup 5}D{sub 0} {sup 7}F{sub 2} electric-dipole transition at 619?nm are unaffected by the benzoic acid and 3-nitro 4-chloro-benzoic acid treatments. Attachment of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid produces an order-of-magnitude quenching in the photoluminescence, due to the presence of high-frequency vibrational modes in the linker. Ratios of the dominant electric- and magnetic-dipole transitions confirm infrared measurements, which indicate that the bulk crystal of the nanoparticle is unchanged by all three treatments.

  20. Use of aromatic salts for simultaneously removing SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x pollutants from exhaust of a combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levendis, Yiannis A. (Boston, MA); Wise, Donald L. (Belmont, MA)

    1994-10-04

    A method is disclosed for removing pollutants from the exhaust of combustion systems burning fuels containing substantial amounts of sulfur and nitrogen. An exemplary method of the invention involves the formation and reaction of a sorbent comprising calcium benzoate. The calcium benzoate is either dry-sprayed (in the form of a fine powder) or wet-sprayed in an aqueous solution in a high temperature environment such as a combustion chamber. The latter technique is feasible since calcium benzoate is a water-soluble form of calcium. When the dispersed particles of calcium benzoate are heated to a high temperature, the organic benzoate burns off and fine calcium oxide particles are formed. These particles are cenospheric (hollow) and have thin and highly porous walls, thus, affording optimum external and internal accessibility for reacting with toxic gaseous emissions such as SO.sub.2. Further, the combustion of the organic benzoate portion of the sorbent results in the conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2.

  1. Pulmonary metabolism of dibenz(a,j)acridine: a carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic. Technical progress report, September 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warshawsky, D.

    1983-10-31

    Dibenz(a,j)acridine (D(a,j)A) is metabolized by rat liver microsomes which results in the formation of seven major metabolites. Under the present conditions of the microsomal assay, 55% of D(a,j)A is metabolized by corn oil induced microsomes in 30 minutes, whereas 80% of D(a,j)A is metabolized by 3MC induced microsomes in 60 minutes. In the presence of the 3MC induced microsomes, a metabolite in fraction 19 is produced very rapidly and disappears linearly over 60 minutes. Of the major metabolites of D(a,j)A produced by microsomal incubations metabolites in fractions 11-12, 13 and 19 are possibly the 5,6-dihydrodiol of D(a,j)A, definitely the 3,4-dihydrodiol of D(a,j)A and a phenol or epoxide respectively. BaP pretreatment of the New Zealand white rabbits doubles the rate of appearance of the metabolites of D(a,j)A in the blood in the IPL. With or without pretreatment, the major metabolites are found in fractions 13 and 19 with 70 to 80% of the activity present in the nonextractable fraction. At the end of the perfusion 50% of the D(a,j)A remains in the IPL following BaP pretreatment as compared to 72% without pretreatment. This increased rate of metabolism due to BaP pretreatment results in the appearance of more conjugated metabolites at the end of the perfusion in the mercaptan fraction.

  2. Numerical analysis of the effect of acetylene and benzene addition to low-pressure benzene-rich flat flames on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunioshi, Nilson; Komori, Seisaku; Fukutani, Seishiro

    2006-10-15

    A modification of the CHEMKIN II package has been proposed for modeling addition of an arbitrary species at an arbitrary temperature to an arbitrary distance from the burner along a flat flame. The modified program was applied to the problem of addition of acetylene or benzene to different positions of a 40-Torr, {phi}=2.4 benzene/O{sub 2}/40%-N{sub 2} premixed flame to reach final equivalence ratios of {phi}=2.5 and 2.681. The results obtained showed that acetylene addition to early positions of the flame led to significant increase in pyrene production rates, but pyrene concentrations were lower in the flames with acetylene addition in both the {phi}=2.5 and 2.681 cases. Addition of benzene to the flame did not alter pyrene production rates in either the {phi}=2.5 or 2.681 cases; however, for {phi}=2.5, pyrene concentrations increased with benzene addition, while for {phi}=2.681, pyrene contents decreased in comparison to the correspondent flames with no addition. Acetylene addition led to a significant increase in pyrene production rates, but the pyrene levels dropped due to increase in the flow velocity. Pyrene production rates were not sensitive to benzene addition, but pyrene contents increased with benzene addition when the flow velocity decreased. These results show that PAH concentration changes accompanying species addition to flames should be interpreted carefully, because an increase or decrease in the content of a PAH species does not necessarily reflect an effect on its formation rate or mechanism. (author)

  3. Ga, Ca, and 3d transition element (Cr through Zn) partitioning among spinel-lherzolite phases from the Lanzo massif, Italy: Analytical results and crystal chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogelius, R.A.; Fraser, D.G.

    1994-06-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed in Lanzo massif, Italy is a record of mantle geochemistry, melting, sub-solidus re-equilibration. Plagioclase(+ spinel)-lherzolite samples were analyzed by Scanning Proton Microscopy, other techniques. Previous work postulated partial melting events and a two-stage sub-solidus cooling history; this paper notes Ga enrichment on spinel-clinopyroxene grain boundaries, high Ga and transition element content of spinel, and pyroxene zonation in Ca and Al. Trace element levels in olivine and orthopyroxene are also presented. Zoning trends are interpreted as due to diffusion during cooling. Olivine-clinopyroxene Cr and Ca exchange as well as clinopyroxene and spinel zonation trends indicate that the massif experienced at least two sub-solidus cooling episodes, one at 20 kbar to 1000 C and one at 8 kbar <750C. Ga levels in cores of Lanzo high-Cr spinels are high (82-66 ppM) relative to other mantle spinels (66-40 ppM), indicating enrichment. Ga content of ultramafic spinels apparently increases with Cr content; this may be due to: increased Ga solubility stemming from crystal chemical effects and/or higher Ga activities in associated silicate melts. Thus, during melting, high-Cr residual spinel may tend to buffer solid-phase Ga level. These spinels are not only rich in Ga and Cr (max 26.37 el. wt %), but also in Fe (max 21.07 el. wt %), Mn (max 3400 ppM), and Zn (max 2430 ppM). These enrichments are again due to melt extraction and partitioning into spinel structure. Low Ni (min 1050 ppM) levels are due to unsuccessful competition of Ni with Cr for octahedral structural sites caused by crystal field. Comparisons of change in partitioning vs Cr content among several 3d transition elements for spinels from Lanzo, other localities allow us to separate crystal field effects from bulk chemical effects and to show that in typical assemblages, inversion of olivine-spinel partition coefficient for Ni from <1 to >1 should occur at 11% el. wt. Cr in spinel.

  4. Characterization of chars from coal-tire copyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Murillo, R.; Alvarez, R.; Clemente, C.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this work is the characterization of the solid conversion product from coal-tire copyrolysis because, nowadays, any new process should be faced without resolving the problem of the subproducts generated. A low-rank coal and a nonspecific mixture of scrap automotive tires, 50/50 w/w, have been coprocessed at 400 C for 30 min at different H{sub 2} pressures and atmospheres. Once the most valuable conversion products, the liquids, were recovered by tetrahydrofuran extraction, a complementary battery of analytical techniques was applied to characterize the solids or chars, looking for their possible use. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, immediate and ultimate analyses, ASA, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were performed on them. By X-ray diffractometry the presence of sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and anhydrite was detected. Thermogravimetric studies demonstrated that the combustion induction temperature is 400 C. Char combustion tests at 900 C with discussion of NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions are included. Mineral matter behaves as if only coal is processed with the Zn exception, from ZnO in the tire, which is converted into ZnS. It is shown that the char organic component has a higher aromaticity than the one from coal.

  5. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kang, Hakmook; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, BlandAltman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.430.9 min), which was significantlybut not completelyreduced by the linear correction method. SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} were significantly lower than supine in both original and uptake time-adjusted data across a range of index times (P < < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Before correcting for uptake time differences, BlandAltman analyses revealed proportional bias between prone and supine measurements (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}) that increased with higher levels of FDG uptake. After uptake time correction, this bias was significantly reduced (P < 0.01). Significant prone-supine differences, with regard to the spatial distribution of lesions relative to isocenter, were observed between the two scan positions, but this was poorly correlated with the residual (uptake time-corrected) prone-supine SUV{sub peak} difference (P = 0.78). Conclusions: Quantitative 18F-FDG-PET/CT of the breast in the prone position is not deleteriously affected by the support device but yields SUV that is consistently lower than those obtained in the standard supine position. SUV differences between scans arising from FDG uptake time differences can be substantially reduced, but not removed entirely, with the current correction method. SUV from the two scan orientations is quantitatively different and should not be assumed equivalent or interchangeable within the same subject. These findings have clinical relevance in that they underscore the importance of patient positioning while scanning as a clinical variable that must be accounted for with longitudinal PET measurement, for example, in the assessment of treatment response.

  6. Arylene-fluorinated-sulfonimide ionomers and membranes for fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teasley, Mark F. (Landenberg, PA)

    2011-11-15

    The preparation of aromatic sulfonimide polymers useful as membranes in electrochemical cells is described.

  7. Fact #812: January 13, 2014 The Number of Models Achieving 40...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Hybrid 44 Midsize Ford Fusion Energi 58** Midsize Lincoln MKZ Hybrid 45 Midsize Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid 45 Compact Ford C-MAX Hybrid 43 Large Ford C-MAX Energi 58** Midsize ...

  8. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Madejski, G.M. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Gehrels, N. ; NASA, Goddard ; Burlon, D. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE Publication Date: 2012-04-02...

  9. Microsoft Word - ITSI award doc 06-D0008 conformed to P00001...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    87 Section B - Supplies or Services and Prices ITEM NO SUPPLIESSERVICES MAX QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE MAX AMOUNT 0001 1 Lump Sum 226,000,000.00 226,000,000.00 EST Firm Fixed...

  10. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Germany). Research funding: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES); the National Research Foundation of Korea; the Max...

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    ... stochastic identificationcontrol for problems constrained ... Max D Accurate predictive simulations of complex ... associated with numerous model executions needed for ...

  12. Open Issues

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    September 2014 runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" September 1

  13. Microsoft Word - Final Industrial Documentation AEO2008 _6-12...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    factors are multiplicative for all fuels which have values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) - - - max...

  14. TU-F-12A-04: Differential Radiation Avoidance of Functional Liver Regions Defined by 99mTc-Sulfur Colloid SPECT/CT with Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, S; Miyaoka, R; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G; Vesselle, H; Nyflot, M; Apisarnthanarax, S; Saini, J; Wong, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients is conventionally planned without consideration of spatial heterogeneity in hepatic function, which may increase risk of radiation-induced liver disease. Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton radiotherapy (pRT) plans were generated to differentially decrease dose to functional liver volumes (FLV) defined on [{sup 99m}Tc]sulfur colloid (SC) SPECT/CT images (functional avoidance plans) and compared against conventional pRT plans. Methods: Three HCC patients underwent SC SPECT/CT scans for pRT planning acquired 15 min post injection over 24 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM following scatter, collimator, and exhale CT attenuation correction. Functional liver volumes (FLV) were defined by liver:spleen uptake ratio thresholds (43% to 90% maximum). Planning objectives to FLV were based on mean SC SPECT uptake ratio relative to GTV-subtracted liver and inversely scaled to mean liver dose of 20 Gy. PTV target coverage (V{sub 95}) was matched between conventional and functional avoidance plans. PBS pRT plans were optimized in RayStation for single field uniform dose (SFUD) and systematically perturbed to verify robustness to uncertainty in range, setup, and motion. Relative differences in FLV DVH and target dose heterogeneity (D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D50 were assessed. Results: For similar liver dose between functional avoidance and conventional PBS pRT plans (D{sub mean}?5% difference, V{sub 18Gy}?1% difference), dose to functional liver volumes were lower in avoidance plans but varied in magnitude across patients (FLV{sub 70%max} D{sub mean}?26% difference, V{sub 18Gy}?8% difference). Higher PTV dose heterogeneity in avoidance plans was associated with lower functional liver dose, particularly for the largest lesion [(D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D{sub 50}=13%, FLV{sub 90%max}=50% difference]. Conclusion: Differential avoidance of functional liver regions defined on sulfur colloid SPECT/CT is feasible with proton therapy. The magnitude of benefit appears to be patient specific and dependent on tumor location, size, and proximity to functional volumes. Further investigation in a larger cohort of patients may validate the clinical utility of functional avoidance planning of HCC radiotherapy.

  15. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2012 high thruput queue now available on Hopper August 30, 2012 by Helen He A new batch queue named "thruput" has been implemented on Hopper to support the increased high throughput computing needs from the user community. The queue limits for this queue are as follows: -- max wall time is 168 hrs -- max node count is 2 (max core count is 48) -- max queue-able jobs per user is 500 -- max running jobs from all users in this queue is 500 -- has same priority as of the

  16. high thruput queue now available on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high thruput queue now available on Hopper high thruput queue now available on Hopper August 30, 2012 by Helen He A new batch queue named "thruput" has been implemented on Hopper to support the increased high throughput computing needs from the user community. The queue limits for this queue are as follows: -- max wall time is 168 hrs -- max node count is 2 (max core count is 48) -- max queue-able jobs per user is 500 -- max running jobs from all users in this queue is 500 -- has same

  17. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  18. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beammore » remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.« less

  19. Bandwidth provisioning in infrastructure-based wireless networks employing directional antennas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasiviswanthan, Shiva; Zhao, Bo; Vasudevan, Sudarshan; Yrgaonkar, Bhuvan

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the widespread proliferation of wireless networks employing directional antennas, we study the problem of provisioning bandwidth in such networks. Given a set of subscribers and one or more access points possessing directional antennas, we formalize the problem of orienting these antennas in two fundamental settings: (1) subscriber-centric, where the objective is to fairly allocate bandwidth among the subscribers and (2) provider-centric, where the objective is to maximize the revenue generated by satisfying the bandwidth requirements of subscribers. For both the problems, we first design algorithms for a network with only one access point working under the assumption that the number of antennas does not exceed the number of noninterfering channels. Using the well-regarded lexicographic max-min fair allocation as the objective for a subscriber-centric network, we present an optimum dynamic programming algorithm. For a provider-centric network, the allocation problem turns out to be NP-hard. We present a greedy heuristic based algorithm that guarantees almost half of the optimum revenue. We later enhance both these algorithms to operate in more general networks with multiple access points and no restrictions on the relative numbers of antennas and channels. A simulation-based evaluation using OPNET demonstrates the efficacy of our approaches and provides us further in insights into these problems.

  20. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |?| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of ?-?space; toward, away, and transverse. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the underlying event. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam remnant and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  1. Anisotropic hot deformed magnets prepared from Zn-coated MRE-Fe-B ribbon powder (MRE?=?Nd?+?Y?+?Dy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, W; Zhou, L; Sun, K W; Dennis, K W; Kramer, M J; Anderson, I E; McCallum, R W

    2014-05-07

    Milled melt-spun ribbon flake of MRE-Fe-B coated with Zn coating using a vapor transport technique was found to have significant increase in coercivity without degrading the magnetization when the Zn thickness and heat treatment were optimized. Magnetic measurements show that 0.51?wt.?% Zn coating increases the coercivity about 1?kOe over the initial ribbon powder. After vacuum hot deformation (VHD), the VHD magnet with Zn coating of 0.5?wt.?% results in a nearly 3?kOe higher coercivity than an un-coated alloy magnet. An optimized VHD magnet with 0.5?wt.?% Zn coating obtains a coercivity of 11.2?kOe and (BH)max of 23.0 MGOe, respectively. SEM and TEM microstructures analysis demonstrates that the Zn coating on the surface of ribbon powder has diffused along the intergranular boundaries after the ribbon powder was annealed at 750?C for 30?min or was hot deformed at 700750?C.

  2. Arylene fluorinated sulfonimide compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teasley, Mark F. (Landenberg, PA)

    2010-11-23

    Described herein are aromatic sulfonimide compositions that can be used to prepare polymers useful as membranes in electrochemical cells.

  3. Process Limits

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    Process Limits Process Limits Limit Hard Soft core file size (blocks) 0 unlimited data seg size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited scheduling priority 0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited unlimited pending signals 4199424 4199424 max locked memory (kbytes) 32 32 max memory size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited open files 1024 1024 pipe size (512 bytes) 8 8 POSIX message queues (bytes) 819200 819200 real-time priority 0 0 stack size (kbytes) 10240 unlimited cpu time (seconds) unlimited unlimited max user

  4. Projection imaging of photon beams by the Cerenkov effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, Adam K.; Davis, Scott C.; McClatchy, David M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W.; Gladstone, David J.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: A novel technique for beam profiling of megavoltage photon beams was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cerenkov emission in water, as a potential surrogate for the imparted dose in irradiated media. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire 2D projection images of Cerenkov emission from a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 cm{sup 2} 6 MV linear accelerator (LINAC) x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 400 MU/min incident on a water tank with transparent walls. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the LINAC sync pulse to reduce background light artifacts, and the measurement quality was investigated by evaluating the signal to noise ratio and measurement repeatability as a function of delivered dose. Monte Carlo simulations were used to derive a calibration factor for differences between the optical images and deposited dose arising from the anisotropic angular dependence of Cerenkov emission. Finally, Cerenkov-based beam profiles were compared to a percent depth dose (PDD) and lateral dose profile at a depth of d{sub max} from a reference dose distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system (TPS). Results: The signal to noise ratio was found to be 20 at a delivered dose of 66.6 cGy, and proportional to the square root of the delivered dose as expected from Poisson photon counting statistics. A 2.1% mean standard deviation and 5.6% maximum variation in successive measurements were observed, and the Monte Carlo derived calibration factor resulted in Cerenkov emission images which were directly correlated to deposited dose, with some spatial issues. The dose difference between the TPS and PDD predicted by Cerenkov measurements was within 20% in the buildup region with a distance to agreement (DTA) of 1.5-2 mm and {+-}3% at depths beyond d{sub max}. In the lateral profile, the dose difference at the beam penumbra was within {+-}13% with a DTA of 0-2 mm, {+-}5% in the central beam region, and 2%-3% in the beam umbra. Conclusions: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cerenkov emission imaging to profile x-ray photon LINAC beams in water. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method.

  5. SSRL HEADLINES - October 2000

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    Laser Workshop Held in Arcidosso, Italy 1. BESAC Votes to Move Forward on LCLS ... Laser Workshop Held in Arcidosso, Italy (contacts: Max Cornacchia - ...

  6. Reciprocating Engines in Support of Grid Modernization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines Lean Burn Rich Burn GE (Waukesha, Jenbacher), ... Grid Services - CAISO Grid Service Description NG Recips Frequency Regulation >500kW, max ...

  7. Verification of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic response at rational...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New Jersey 08543, USA Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Greifswald 17491, Germany Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA Publication Date:...

  8. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$ (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U. ; Kluth, Stefan ; Munich, Max Planck Inst. ; Schieck, Jochen ; Munich U. ; Stewart, Iain W. ; Aoki, S. ; Beneke, M. ; Bethke, S. ; Blumlein, J. ; Brambilla, N. ;...

  9. IN-VEHICLE, HIGH-POWER ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

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    Engineering advisor C.Y. Wang - Battery and fuel cell research * Max Ripepi - Masters Engineering Mechanics advisor Charles Bakis - Self levitating flywheel design...

  10. Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States) Technische Universitt Wien, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria) Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmanstrae 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany) ...

  11. Apply: Funding Opportunity - Buildings University Innovators...

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    The BUILD FOA consolidates two previous pilot projects, the Max Tech and Beyond program ... The lead institution must be an institution of higher education, which includes, but is ...

  12. Stimulated X-Ray Emission for Spectroscopy | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    Room 108A Speaker: Clemens Weninger, Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems Program Description The recent advance of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs)...

  13. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic...

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    B. Van Waeyenberge (Ghent University, Belgium), K.W. Chou, H. Stoll, M. Curcic, G. Schutz (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Germany), T. Tyliszczak (ALS), G....

  14. 140627_GE-map-tech-eng

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    Energy Management Electrical driver for LNG compression. Integrated Compressor Line Oil & ... LNG Max Reliability Oil & Gas A service that guarantees superior reliability on GE ...

  15. Accelerated Aging Studies

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    Accelerated Aging Studies LA-UR -15-27339 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property ...

  16. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

  17. BPA-2010-00492-FResponse.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DAVID A FILER DAVID A. FILER, ATTORNEY US POSTMASTER USPS CENTRALIZED ACCOUNT PROCESSING SYSTEM RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATES WIND SITE MAINTENANCE SUPPORT (MAX HOLDER) RESOURCE...

  18. Three years of Swift/BAT Survey of AGN: Reconciling Theory and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE Muenchen, Tech. U. Universe ; Gehrels, N. ; NASA, Goddard Publication Date: 2011-02-07 OSTI Identifier: 1004918 Report Number(s):...

  19. NuSTAR Detection of the Blazar B2 1023+25 at Redshift 5.3 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Schady, P. ; Sudilovsky, V. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Urry, C.M. ; Yale U. NASA, Goddard ; , less Publication Date: 2013-11-14 OSTI Identifier: 1105891 Report...

  20. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    order stochastic collocation method for Bayesian inference in groundwater reactive transport modeling Zhang Guannan ORNL Webster Clayton G ORNL Gunzburger Max D ORNL Although...

  1. An adaptive sparse-grid high-order stochastic collocation method...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    stochastic collocation method for Bayesian inference in groundwater reactive transport modeling Zhang, Guannan ORNL; Webster, Clayton G ORNL; Gunzburger, Max D ORNL...

  2. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_1234

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MaxTech 21-May-2012 23:38 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 99456974...

  3. Burlington Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency...

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    Lighting Air conditioners Compressed air Tankless Water Heater Maximum Rebate 3200 max incentive for air compressors Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Burlington...

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

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    during the CLASIC and CHAPS field campaigns. The meeting took place at Max Westheimer Airport Terminal in Norman, Oklahoma. Joining Pete at the meeting was Mr. Chuck Greenwood,...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kalashnikova, Irina (4) Price, Stephen (4) Bochev, Pavel B. (2) Hoffman, M. (2) Kim, ... Perego, Mauro ; Salinger, Andrew G. ; Guzburger, Max ; Hoffman, M. ; Stadler, G. Abstract ...

  6. HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    -14 days and +13 days with respect to the time of maximum B-band luminosity (B-max). ... ASTROPHYSICS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; LUMINOSITY; PHOTOSPHERE; SILICON IONS; SUPERNOVAE; ...

  7. Porterfield named ASTM Fellow

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    the Nuclear Fuel Cycle International Committee may bestow on an individual; and the Max Hecht Award, the highest award the Water International Committee can bestow on an - 2 -...

  8. Porterfield named ASTM Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Nuclear Fuel Cycle International Committee may bestow on an individual; and the Max Hecht Award, the highest award the Water International Committee can bestow on an...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPEMuenchen, Tech. U. Universe" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program...

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    Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.Tokyo U., ICRR" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software...

  11. A hyper-spherical adaptive sparse-grid method for high-dimensional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the approach. Authors: Zhang, Guannan 1 ; Webster, Clayton G 1 ; Gunzburger, Max D 1 ; Burkardt, John V 1 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date:...

  12. Detection of a Spectral Break in the Extra Hard Component of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U., Phys. Dept. ; Bhat, P.N. ; Alabama U., Huntsville ; Bissaldi, E. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Blandford, R.D. ; Stanford U., HEPL KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC...

  13. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  14. An adaptive sparse-grid-based iterative ensemble Kalman filter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ensemble Kalman filter approach for parameter field estimation Authors: Gunzburger, Max D 1 ; Webster, Clayton G 1 ; Zhang, Guannan 1 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL...

  15. DIRECTIONS AND TIPS FOR USING INTEGRITY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DIRECTIONS AND TIPS FOR USING INTEGRITY When you go to the Integrity webpage, www.integrity.gov, click on the yellow box to log in. Integrity is connected to the OMB MAX Central Authentication Service. Employees who have previously used OMB MAX should use their MAX user ID and password. If you are not already a user of OMB MAX, your user ID is your official email address and at the login prompt for password, click on "Forgot or set password" and follow the on-screen instructions.

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Kluz, Thomas ; Costa, Max The skin cancer enhancing effect of chromium (in male ... Both chromium and nickel significantly increased the UVR-inducedmore skin cancer yield ...

  17. Alchemix Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Hydro Product: Alchemix Corporation is a development stage company which has as its principal asset the HydroMax technology. References: Alchemix Corporation1 This...

  18. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster

  19. Task force appendix cover.indd

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    Doug Mercer, CRESP Max Power, Ecology Chuck Powers, CRESP Jamie Zeisloft, DOE-RL John Price, Ecology Steve Smith, CRESP Joy Turner, Ecology Stuart Harris, CTUIR Craig...

  20. NuSTAR Detection of the Blazar B2 1023+25 at Redshift 5.3 (Journal...

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    U. more ; Giommi, P. ; ASDC, Frascati Rome Observ. ; Greiner, J. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE ; Hailey, C.J. ; Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys. ; Harrison, F. ; Hovatta, ...

  1. Contact | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

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  3. Management Council - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

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    Organization  MANAGEMENT COUNCIL Peter Green, Dir. MSE Rachel Goldman MSE Ctirad Uher Physics Jamie Phillips EECS Max Shtein MSE Roy Clarke Physics Ted Goodson III Chemistry ...

  4. Why Is Static Electricity in Winter More Noticeable? | GE Global...

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    by Revolutionary Onboard Turbine Reshape) - Making it Real bowman2 Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? Luis-Felipe-WillcoxM&DV Monitoring and Diagnosis of Transformers...

  5. Evidence for Dark Energy | GE Global Research

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    by Revolutionary Onboard Turbine Reshape) - Making it Real bowman2 Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? Luis-Felipe-WillcoxM&DV Monitoring and Diagnosis of Transformers...

  6. A drone's-eye view of a wind turbine | GE Global Research

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    by Revolutionary Onboard Turbine Reshape) - Making it Real bowman2 Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? Luis-Felipe-WillcoxM&DV Monitoring and Diagnosis of Transformers...

  7. Wind Turbine Blade Design | GE Global Research

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    by Revolutionary Onboard Turbine Reshape) - Making it Real bowman2 Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? Luis-Felipe-WillcoxM&DV Monitoring and Diagnosis of Transformers...

  8. Why Do Atoms Explode When They Split? | GE Global Research

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    by Revolutionary Onboard Turbine Reshape) - Making it Real bowman2 Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? Luis-Felipe-WillcoxM&DV Monitoring and Diagnosis of Transformers...

  9. "Rip" Perkins, pioneering PPPL physicist and a design leader...

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    describe Rip," Hammett recalled. "He was dedicated to helping others in scientific enterprises and to working in fusion." Claire Max, a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at...

  10. Writing Effective Initial Summary Ratings Initial Summary Rating...

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    Writing an Effective ISR (max 8000 characters including spaces) Before writing: * Read definitions of rating levels and critical element targets carefully * Review Strategic Plan ...

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  12. An Iridate with Fermi Arcs

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    (Univ. of Michigan); and B.J Kim (Argonne National Laboratory, Univ. of Michigan, and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research). Research funding: National Science...

  13. --No Title--

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    some the revisions for both chapters includes DOE's annual reporting performance targets, MAX site quarterly reporting by the DOE Agency Coordinator, the requirement for 100%...

  14. One Direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting...

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    Matthieu Fortin-Deschenes, Pierre L. Levesque, Kyle M. McElhinny, Gerald J. Brady, Richard Rojas Delgado, Susmit Singha Roy, Andrew Mannix, Max G. Lagally, Paul G....

  15. FELIX: advances in modeling forward and inverse icesheet problems...

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    icesheet problems. Authors: Perego, Mauro ; Eldred, Michael S. ; Gunazburger, Max ; Salinger, Andrew G. ; Kalashnikova, Irina ; Ju, L. ; Hoffman, M. ; Leng, W. ; Price, S ;...

  16. Posters

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    San Diego La Jolla, California H. Grassl Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg, Germany A. Heymsfield National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado J. Spinhirne...

  17. Markus Mezger | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

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    Presently: Project leader, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany Email: mezger at mpip-mainz.mpg.de Diploma in Physics, Stuttgart University,...

  18. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the complex compounds...

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    by Dr. Hoyoung Jang, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany In condensed matter physics, in particular a field of complex oxide materials, most...

  19. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 more ; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching 3 ; Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain and Laboratoire d'Optique...

  20. Metagenomic and Metaproteomic Analyses of Symbioses between Bacteria and Gutless Marine Worms (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubilier, Nicole

    2014-03-19

    Nicole Dubilier of the Max Planck Institute speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  1. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  2. Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms andbathrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, B.C.; Hodgson, A.T.; Hotchi, T.; Ming, K.Y.; Sextro,R.G.; Wood, E.E.; Brown, N.J.

    2005-01-05

    Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential bedrooms (n=4), bathrooms (n=2), and a furnished test chamber. Rooms were studied ''as-is'' with material surfaces and furnishings unaltered. Surface materials were characterized and areas quantified. Experiments included rapid volatilization of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with the room closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase, followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. The mixture included n-alkanes, aromatics, glycol ethers, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, dichlorobenzene, and organophosphorus compounds. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at one surface sink and one potential embedded sink. The 2-parameter sink model tracked measurements for most compounds, but improved fits were obtained for some VOCs with a 3-parameter sink-diffusion or a 4-parameter two-sink model. Sorptive partitioning and initial adsorption rates increased with decreasing vapor pressure within each chemical class.

  3. Instructions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 value in eV 2 sin 2 2 e,max (90% CL): upper limit in sin 2 2 e , at 90% confidence level sin 2 2 e,max (3 CL): upper limit in sin 2 2 e , at 3 confidence...

  4. Evaluation of Automatic Atlas-Based Lymph Node Segmentation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapleford, Liza J.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Perkins, Charles; Edelman, Scott; Davis, Lawrence

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate if automatic atlas-based lymph node segmentation (LNS) improves efficiency and decreases inter-observer variability while maintaining accuracy. Methods and Materials: Five physicians with head-and-neck IMRT experience used computed tomography (CT) data from 5 patients to create bilateral neck clinical target volumes covering specified nodal levels. A second contour set was automatically generated using a commercially available atlas. Physicians modified the automatic contours to make them acceptable for treatment planning. To assess contour variability, the Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm was used to take collections of contours and calculate a probabilistic estimate of the 'true' segmentation. Differences between the manual, automatic, and automatic-modified (AM) contours were analyzed using multiple metrics. Results: Compared with the 'true' segmentation created from manual contours, the automatic contours had a high degree of accuracy, with sensitivity, Dice similarity coefficient, and mean/max surface disagreement values comparable to the average manual contour (86%, 76%, 3.3/17.4 mm automatic vs. 73%, 79%, 2.8/17 mm manual). The AM group was more consistent than the manual group for multiple metrics, most notably reducing the range of contour volume (106-430 mL manual vs. 176-347 mL AM) and percent false positivity (1-37% manual vs. 1-7% AM). Average contouring time savings with the automatic segmentation was 11.5 min per patient, a 35% reduction. Conclusions: Using the STAPLE algorithm to generate 'true' contours from multiple physician contours, we demonstrated that, in comparison with manual segmentation, atlas-based automatic LNS for head-and-neck cancer is accurate, efficient, and reduces interobserver variability.

  5. International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO and DOE December 16th 2013 1 Partner: Timetable * Introduction to the Webinar (2 min) Erika Sutherland * Remarks (10 min) Sunita Satyapal, Klaus Bonhoff, Eiji Ohira * Speaker Introduction (3 min) Erika Sutherland * General country overview (15 min) Hanno Butsch * H2-Fueling (15 min) Jesse Schneider * H2 Quality (15 min) Jesse Schneider on behalf of Georgios Tsotridis * H2-Metering (15 min) Tetsuji Nakamura *

  6. Complex basis functions revisited: Implementation with applications to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carbon tetrafluoride and aromatic N-containing heterocycles within the static-exchange approximation (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Complex basis functions revisited: Implementation with applications to carbon tetrafluoride and aromatic N-containing heterocycles within the static-exchange approximation « Prev Next » Title: Complex basis functions revisited: Implementation with applications to carbon tetrafluoride and aromatic N-containing heterocycles within the static-exchange

  7. Process for detoxifying coal tars

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longwell, John P. (Cambridge, MA); Peters, William A. (Arlington, MA)

    1983-01-01

    A process for treating liquid hydrocarbons to remove toxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons comprises feeding the hydrocarbons into a reactor where vapors are thermally treated in contact with a catalyst consisting essentially of calcium oxide or a calcium oxide containing mineral. Thermally treating liquid hydrocarbons in contact with calcium oxide preferentially increases the cracking of aromatics thus producing a product having a reduced amount of aromatic compounds.

  8. Understanding Thin Film Structure for the Rational Design of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transistors (OTFT) can be achieved through molecular design by selective placement of electron-rich, electron-withdrawing, and aromatic groups in different parts of the molecule. ...

  9. advanced-fuels-synthesis-index | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of power, aromatic, olefin, and industrial chemical markets to assess the best products to target in a polygeneration approach; performance and techno-economic assessments...

  10. Substituted 1,2-azaborine heterocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Shih-Yuan; Lamm, Ashley

    2014-12-30

    Aromatic heterocycles incorporating boron and nitrogen atoms, in particular, 1,2-azaborine compounds having the formula ##STR00001## and their use as synthetic intermediates.

  11. EERE Success Story-Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes at the University...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The research's overall focus has been to evaluate different aromatic hydrocarbon polymers and how they can improve the durability of these types of fuel cells, thereby increasing ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Yasuo The reduction of aromatic compounds into their dihydro derivatives by dissolving metalalcohol systems (the Birch reduction) is a useful methodology in organic synthesis. ...

  13. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydrocarbons (PAHs) are hydrocarbons-organic compounds containing only carbon and hydrogen-that are composed of multiple aromatic rings (organic rings in which the...

  14. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    purification, absorption, separation, sensing, and catalysis. Research Details A cross-linked 2D framework is assembled in water by joining triangular aromatic units with the...

  15. Facile One-Pot Synthesis of Porphyrin Based Porous Polymer Networks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the aromatic substitution reactions of pyrrole and aldehydes. PPN-24(Fe) shows high catalytic efficiency as a biomimetic catalyst in the oxidation reaction of...

  16. Structural Basis for the Promiscuous Biosynthetic Prenylation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic acceptors of synthetic, microbial and plant origin. This in vitro activity against plant derived natural products is the first demonstration of an...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    aromatics (1) composite materials (1) dilution (1) drying ... Dani, Keshav M OKINAWA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ... a self-assembled, ordered, nanocomposite silica thin film. ...

  18. A two-parameter model for the infrared/submillimeter/radio spectral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EMISSION; ENERGY SPECTRA; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; RED SHIFT; SPACE; STARS; TELESCOPES Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles...

  19. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids Yang Shiyong Stock L M COAL LIGNITE AND PEAT CHEMISTRY COAL LIQUIDS HYDROGENATION...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... important element in the cellular response to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzoapyrene, which can lead to reactive oxygenated metabolite-mediated oxidative stress. ...

  1. Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation: University of Delaware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. ... and hemicellulose, the production of green aromatics, the hydrodeoxygenation of ...

  2. PROBING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF z {approx} 1 ULTRALUMINOUS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The mid-IR spectra show strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, and our spectral decomposition suggests that the AGN makes a minimal contribution (<25%) to the ...

  3. DIRECTIONS AND TIPS FOR USING INTEGRITY Accessing Integrity:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DIRECTIONS AND TIPS FOR USING INTEGRITY Accessing Integrity: The website address for Integrity is www.integrity.gov. When you get to the website, click on the yellow box labeled "Login to Integrity." Integrity is connected to the OMB MAX Central Authentication Service. Employees who have previously used OMB MAX should use their MAX user ID and password. Do not use the CIC or PIV login option. This is not enabled for DOE Integrity filers. If you used Integrity last year, you have an OMB

  4. 2015 Feature Stories | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL's Min Zhang Keeps Her "Bugs" Happy, Leading to Biofuel Breakthroughs NREL's Min Zhang Keeps Her "Bugs" Happy, Leading to Biofuel Breakthroughs NREL researcher's partnership ...

  5. Appendix B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data This page intentionally left blank Infiltration Tests This page intentionally left blank 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 TIME (MIN) 200 250 TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 TIME (MIN) zoo 800 1000 TIME (MIN) 0 150 300 450 600 750 , 900 1050 1200 1350 1500 1650 1800 TIME (MIN) TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST I 300 400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST 2 200 250

  6. Disordered organic electronic materials based on non-benzenoid 1,6-methano[10]annulene rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tovar, John D; Streifel, Benjamin C; Peart, Patricia A

    2014-10-07

    Conjugated polymers and small molecules including the nonplanar aromatic 1,6-methano[10]annulene ring structure along with aromatic subunits, such as diketopyrrolopyrrole, and 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole, substituted with alkyl chains in a "Tail In," "Tail Out," or "No Tail" regiochemistry are disclosed.

  7. Past Events | Center for Energy Efficient Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectrolab, Inc. Jan 24, 2014 | 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Novel Semiconductor Materials for High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics Seminar Series Paul Blom: Research Director, Max...

  8. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Journal of Biophysics, Volume 45 February 1984 455-461. 7 YY max 1-e -E where; Ymax Incident light intensity Y Absorbed light intensity optical cross section in cm ...

  9. Frederic Laquai Seminar: Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laquai Seminar: Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap Polymer and Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells Apr 18, 2014 | 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Frederic Laquai Head, Max Planck...

  10. Sputnik Engineering AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: CH-2502 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer of SolarMax grid tie inverters for photovoltaic applications. References: Sputnik Engineering AG1 This article is a stub. You can...

  11. CAMD Nanofabrication Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure :: News :: Related sites National Nanotechnology Initiative Nano Technology Industries Advanced Materials Research Institute Institute of Physics Max-Planck Institute for Kohlenforschung The institute of nanotechnology Nanotechnology Now Nanotechnology - Education Nanojournals Chancellor's Distinguished Lectureship Series

  12. Project of the Month | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems...

  13. Ford Debuts Solar Energy Concept Car

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ford Motor Company unveiled the C-MAX Solar Energi Concept, a sun-powered vehicle with the potential to deliver what a plug-in hybrid offers without depending on the electric grid for fuel.

  14. X-ray imaging, spacecraft nuclear fission and cosmic ray contraband...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and its partners are among the honorees. July 8, 2013 MiniMAX is a battery powered, digital x-ray imaging system that is completely self-contained, lightweight, compact and...

  15. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_3941

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exist 22-May-2012 01:04 - DIR MaxTech 22-May-2012 01:04 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1006824916 Varnish...

  16. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_0332

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apr-2012 11:07 - DIR MaxTech 18-Apr-2012 11:07 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 979859487 Varnish cache...

  17. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_1506

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exist 21-May-2012 23:49 - DIR MaxTech 21-May-2012 23:49 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1006824909 Varnish...

  18. World War II

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    loved ones, viewing photographs and documents with Truman Library historians and listening to WWII veteran Max DeWeese reminisce about his experience in the war.

  19. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A screen shows multiple images of the first plasma in the W7-X control room. (Photo by Sam Lazerson) PPPL physicist Novimir Pablant and Andreas Langenberg, of the Max Planck...

  20. ALSNews Vol. 297

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    McKean, Hiroshi Nishimura, Bill Kelius. Row 5: Ryan Sprague, Tom Scarvie, Mike Kritscher, Max Vinco, Fernando Sannibale. Row 6: Warren Byrne, Mike Chin. Row 7: Jonathan Elkins,...

  1. BPA Visitor Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and is located at BPA headquarters in Portland, Oregon at 905 NE 11th Ave. (Public Transit @ the Lloyd Center MAX Station). Many of the publications available in the Visitor...

  2. American Chemical Society Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    related to the nuclear fuel cycle and to water quality standards. He received the Max Hecht Award, the Harlan J. Anderson Award and the Standards Development award, which are...

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for attenuation effects a) observed (i.e., attenuated) X-band radar reflectivity in rain b) for the same scene attenuation - corrected reflectivity max range is 40 km in this...

  4. Energy Tomorrow | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2011 Serena DeBeer of Cornell University and the Max Planck Institute for Bioinorganic Chemistry, led the the team that performed crucial experiments at SLAC. Dr. DeBeer is...

  5. Scientists use plasma shaping to control turbulence in stellarators...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    regions of the highest strength shown in yellow. The MPX design is named for coauthors Harry Mynick and Neil Pomphrey of PPPL and Pavlos Xanthopoulos of the Max Planck Institute...

  6. From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL, Bldg. 137, Rm 226 Dr. Frank Uwe Renner Max-Planck-Institut fr...

  7. tiers | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is likely due to users not understanding the meaning of "Max kWh"--often I see things like: "300, 700, 1000" (derived from "first 300, next 700, greater than 1000") which...

  8. Xie_Naguib_MXene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    theoretical capacity of MXenes? Technical Details: MXenes were produced by selective etching A atoms from MAX phases (Figure 1). The latter have composition of M n+1 AX n ; where...

  9. CX-012059: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Testing of Irradiated MAX Phase Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/13/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  10. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2011-04-25

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  11. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_3482

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Directory Base Exist MaxTech Wiki Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon Directory Listing This is a file-level view of datasets. Go...

  12. Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Sites National Nanotechnology Initiative Nano Technology Industries Advanced Materials Research Institute Institute of Physics Max-Planck Institute for Kohlenforschung The institute of nanotechnology Nanotechnology Now Nanotechnology - Education Nanojournals Chancellor's Distinguished Lectureship Series Patent Analytics and Patent Searching

  13. Property:Buildings/ModelType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minimum Cost Max Tech PV Takeoff Cost Neutral 30% Energy Savings 50% Energy Savings 70% Energy Savings Other Pages using the property "BuildingsModelType" Showing 12 pages using...

  14. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Citation Claire E. Max 2004 Physics: For her contributions to the theory of laser guide star adaptive optics and its application in ground-based astronomy to correct telescopic...

  15. Houses are Dumb without Smart Ventilation (Technical Report)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Walker, Iain ; Sherman, Max ; Less, Brennan Publication Date: 2014-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1163957 Report Number(s):...

  16. STR/ITS: Instrument Selection

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - 488 nm; 200 mW max power RoMack Inc. 20' fiber optic (6 around 1) on " VCR fitting Kaiser Optical Holospec- f1.8 I VIS w 488 grating Andor DV-420-OE CCD detector Detection...

  17. Tritium Instrument Demonstration Station (TIDS)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - 488 nm; 200 mW max power RoMack Inc. 20' fiber optic (6 around 1) on " VCR fitting Kaiser Optical Holospec- f1.8 I VIS w 488 grating Andor DV-420-OE CCD detector Detection...

  18. Posters Comparison Between General Circulation Model Simulation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GCM used for this study is from the Max-Planck Institute and the University of Hamburg, Germany (ECHAM3); it is described in detail by Roeckner et al. (1992). The simulation for...

  19. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northeast Plume | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    No Sulfates Present? No Isotope Name Concentration (pCil) Regulatory Driver Cleanup ... Gaseous Diffusion Plant. CONTAMINANTS: 78 pCiL Tc-99 is the max observed Tc-99 level ...

  20. Scientists use plasma shaping to control turbulence in stellarators...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics in Germany have devised a new method for minimizing...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The spurious center-of-mass components can be exactly removed only if the HO basis and the Nsub max hbarOmega truncation are employed. The minimal violation of the ...

  2. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology Matthias Scheffler Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin, Germany CNMS D D I I S S C C O O V V E E R R Y Y SEMINAR SERIES Abstract: Dispersive or van...

  3. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal,...

  4. Accelerated Aging Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerated Aging Studies LA-UR -15-27339 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property (time=0) Accelerated Aging Data Predicted Storage Aging Response log (predicted lifetime) Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property (time=0) Accelerated Aging Data Predicted Storage Aging Response log (predicted lifetime) Accelerated Aging Studies Factors such as temperature, pressure, or radiation

  5. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Primary tabs View High Resolution(active tab) Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." (From left to right) Princeton University Professor of Astrophysical Sciences James Stone, Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman, Princeton University Dean for Research A. J. Stewart Smith, Max Planck

  6. SLAC X-ray Identifies Mystery Atom Critical to Food Supply | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy X-ray Identifies Mystery Atom Critical to Food Supply SLAC X-ray Identifies Mystery Atom Critical to Food Supply November 18, 2011 - 10:05am Addthis Serena DeBeer of Cornell University and the Max Planck Institute for Bioinorganic Chemistry, led the the team that performed crucial experiments at SLAC. Dr. DeBeer is pictured above with Michael Roemelt and Frank Neese, also of the Max Planck Institute. <a href =

  7. Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition August 23, 2012 - 2:44pm Addthis The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of University of Maryland students -- designed and built a prototype for a wall unit air conditioner that showed more than 30 percent energy savings when tested in a lab. | Photo courtesy of Yunho Hwang, University of Maryland. The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of

  8. Frederic Laquai Seminar: Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap Polymer and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells | Center for Energy Efficient Materials Frederic Laquai Seminar: Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap Polymer and Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells Apr 18, 2014 | 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Frederic Laquai Head, Max Planck Research Group for Organic Optoelectronics Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Photocurrent Generation in Low-Bandgap Polymer and Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells April 18, 2014 | 3:30pm | Elings Hall (CNSI) 1605 Faculty host: Quyen

  9. Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition Maryland Heats Up Student Appliance Design Competition September 10, 2013 - 11:43am Addthis Students from the University of Maryland won the Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for their heat pump clothes dryer prototype, which achieved a 59 percent energy savings compared to standard U.S. electric dryers. | Photo courtesy of the University of Maryland. Students from the University of Maryland won the Max Tech and Beyond Design

  10. NSUF Research Highlights Fall 2015.pptx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NSUF Research Highlights 2015 James I. Cole, PhD Chief Scientist, NSUF Idaho National Laboratory 2 n NSUF Research Highlights * Irradiation experiments * PIE * RTE * Nuclear data measurement and instrumentation development 3 Motivation MAX (M n+1 AX stoichiometry) phase ceramics have properties of a mixture of traditional ceramics and metals (toughness and high temperature strength). The irradiation data for MAX phase ceramics is needed for their application in nuclear reactor systems.

  11. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Leonard; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

  12. Male Sterile2 Encodes a Plastid-Localized Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Required for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W.; Shanklin, J.; Yu, X.-H.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Zhang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Male Sterile2 (MS2) is predicted to encode a fatty acid reductase required for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transient expression of MS2 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves resulted in the accumulation of significant levels of C16 and C18 fatty alcohols. Expression of MS2 fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that an amino-terminal transit peptide targets the MS2 to plastids. The plastidial localization of MS2 is biologically important because genetic complementation of MS2 in ms2 homozygous plants was dependent on the presence of its amino-terminal transit peptide or that of the Rubisco small subunit protein amino-terminal transit peptide. In addition, two domains, NAD(P)H-binding domain and sterile domain, conserved in MS2 and its homologs were also shown to be essential for MS2 function in pollen exine development by genetic complementation testing. Direct biochemical analysis revealed that purified recombinant MS2 enzyme is able to convert palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein to the corresponding C16:0 alcohol with NAD(P)H as the preferred electron donor. Using optimized reaction conditions (i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30 C), MS2 exhibits a K{sub m} for 16:0-Acyl Carrier Protein of 23.3 {+-} 4.0 {mu}m, a V{sub max} of 38.3 {+-} 4.5 nmol mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency/K{sub m} of 1,873 m{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Based on the high homology of MS2 to other characterized fatty acid reductases, it was surprising that MS2 showed no activity against palmitoyl- or other acyl-coenzyme A; however, this is consistent with its plastidial localization. In summary, genetic and biochemical evidence demonstrate an MS2-mediated conserved plastidial pathway for the production of fatty alcohols that are essential for pollen wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  13. Nuclear data review and compilation for ATW systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzhovskii, B.; Gorelov, V.; Il`in, V.; Farafontov, G.; Grebennikov, A.

    1994-10-01

    In order to solve the problem of nuclear power waste transmutation in neutron flux it is necessary to know the characteristics of neutron interaction for a great number of nuclei in the energy range from 0 to hundreds of MeV. The authors distinguished the most important aspect of this problem that one of nuclear data for actinides, (from Th to Cm isotopes) They have given the overview of evaluations of characteristic of interaction between neutrons and these nuclei leading to transformation from target-nucleus to neighboring actinide-nucleus or fission fragments in the limited energy range from 0 to 14 MeV. The review was carried out by comparison of mentioned characteristics from the modern versions of ENDL-82, JENDL-3, ENDF/B-6 and BROND-2 neutron evaluated data among themselves and with recommended data of previous publications and, in some cases, with the measurement results. ENDL-82 and ENDF/B-6 versions were made in USA laboratories, JENDL-3 was made in the laboratories of Japan and BROND-2 version was made in the laboratories of former USSR. The comparison of nuclear data from various libraries was carried out by the most economic method permitting, nevertheless, fully judge of available uncertainties in the knowledge of competitive nuclear data which are important from the point of view of problem of transmutation in various energies neutron flux. The following characteristics were considered: (a) fission and capture cross-sections at thermal point (E{sub n}=0.0253 eV); (b) infinitely dilute resonance integrals of fission and capture designated by I{sub f} and I{sub {gamma}} (c) averaged on {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission neutron spectrum cross-sections of fission, capture and the (n,2n) reactions; (d) cross-sections of fission and the (n,2n), (n,3n) reactions at the point En = 14 MeV; (e) fission and capture resonance integrals for a interval of sets with the increasing upper (E {sub max}) and lower (E {sub min}) limits of integral.

  14. Inviscid evolution of large amplitude filaments in a uniform gravity field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angus, J. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-11-15

    The inviscid evolution of localized density stratifications under the influence of a uniform gravity field in a homogeneous, ambient background is studied. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible, and the stratification, or filament, is assumed to be initially isotropic and at rest. It is shown that the center of mass energy can be related to the center of mass position in a form analogous to that of a solid object in a gravity field g by introducing an effective gravity field g{sub eff}, which is less than g due to energy that goes into the background and into non-center of mass motion of the filament. During the early stages of the evolution, g{sub eff} is constant in time and can be determined from the solution of a 1D differential equation that depends on the initial, radially varying density profile of the filament. For small amplitude filaments such that ?{sub 0} ? 1, where ?{sub 0} is the relative amplitude of the filament to the background, the early stage g{sub eff} scales linearly with ?{sub 0}, but as ?{sub 0}??,?g{sub eff}?g and is thus independent of ?{sub 0}. Fully nonlinear simulations are performed for the evolution of Gaussian filaments, and it is found that the time t{sub max}, which is defined as the time for the center of mass velocity to reach its maximum value U{sub max}, occurs very soon after the constant acceleration phase and so U{sub max}?g{sub eff}(t=0)t{sub max}. The simulation results show that U{sub max}?1/t{sub max}??(?{sub 0}) for ?{sub 0} ? 1, in agreement with theory and results from previous authors, but that U{sub max} and t{sub max} both scale approximately with ?(?{sub 0}) for ?{sub 0} ? 1. The fact that U{sub max} and t{sub max} have the same scaling with ?{sub 0} for large amplitude filaments is in agreement with the theory presented in this paper.

  15. Pretreatment [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Tomography Maximum Standardized Uptake Value as Predictor of Distant Metastasis in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy: Rethinking the Role of Positron Emission Tomography in Personalizing Treatment Based on Risk Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, Vimoj J.; MacRae, Robert; Sirisegaram, Abby; Pantarotto, Jason R.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether the preradiation maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the primary tumor for [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has a prognostic significance in patients with Stage T1 or T2N0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative radiation therapy, whether conventional or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2007 and December 2011, a total of 163 patients (180 tumors) with medically inoperable histologically proven Stage T1 or T2N0 NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy (both conventional and SBRT) were entered in a research ethics board approved database. All patients received pretreatment FDG-PET / computed tomography (CT) at 1 institution with consistent acquisition technique. The medical records and radiologic images of these patients were analyzed. Results: The overall survival at 2 years and 3 years for the whole group was 76% and 67%, respectively. The mean and median SUV{sub max} were 8.1 and 7, respectively. Progression-free survival at 2 years with SUV{sub max} <7 was better than that of the patients with tumor SUV{sub max} ?7 (67% vs 51%; P=.0096). Tumors with SUV{sub max} ?7 were associated with a worse regional recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival. In the multivariate analysis, SUV{sub max} ?7 was an independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusion: In early-stage NSCLC managed with radiation alone, patients with SUV{sub max} ?7 on FDG-PET / CT scan have poorer outcomes and high risk of progression, possibly because of aggressive biology. There is a potential role for adjuvant therapies for these high-risk patients with intent to improve outcomes.

  16. Colloidal polypyrrole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armes, Steven P. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldissi, Mahmoud (Santa Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  17. IM

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    assumes percent of the total motor gasoline pool. Reformer product a reduction in fuel efficiency of 1.6 percent due to the use (reformate) contains about 66 percent aromatics...

  18. Redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amine, Khalil; Chen, Zonghai; Wang, Qingzheng

    2010-12-14

    The present invention is generally related to electrolytes containing novel redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium-ion batteries. The redox shuttles are capable of thousands hours of overcharge tolerance and have a redox potential at about 3-5.5 V vs. Li and particularly about 4.4-4.8 V vs. Li. Accordingly, in one aspect the invention provides electrolytes comprising an alkali metal salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive that is an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring with four or more electronegative substituents, two or more oxygen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring, and no hydrogen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring; and wherein the electrolyte solution is substantially non-aqueous. Further there are provided electrochemical devices employing the electrolyte and methods of making the electrolyte.

  19. This research was supported as part of the Catalysis Center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by going through benzofuran and allene as intermediates. RELEVANT PUBLICATION: 1Carlson, T.R.; Cheng, Y.T.; Jae, J.; Huber, G.W., "Production of green aromatics and olefins...

  20. I:PRCXFERZYSK9105691056R0F.PDF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... is reversed in the case of 2-tert-butylnaphthalene. ... Table 6 shows some examples of the work where different ... The method for calculating the conversion of the aromatic ...

  1. Simple and accurate correlation of experimental redox potentials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic hydrocarbons Authors: Mndez-Hernndez, D.D,, Tarakeshwar, P., Gust, D,. Moore,T.A., Moore, A.L., Mujica, V. Title: Simple and accurate correlation of experimental...

  2. System for analyzing coal liquefaction products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinsmore, Stanley R. (Norris, TN); Mrochek, John E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    A system for analyzing constituents of coal-derived materials comprises three adsorption columns and a flow-control arrangement which permits separation of both aromatic and polar hydrocarbons by use of two eluent streams.

  3. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.","Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.","1996-05-01T04:00:00Z",466864,"10.2172466864","DOEPC...

  4. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J.; Levit, M. Creon

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  5. Reactor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A reactor apparatus for hydrocracking a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous feedstock to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the hydrocarbonaceous feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst.

  6. University of Delaware | CCEI Faculty Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...j.apcata.2010.11.023 Carlson, T.R., Cheng, Y.-T., Jae, J. and Huber, G.W., "Production of Green Aromatics and Olefins by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Wood Sawdust," Energy Environ. ...

  7. University of Delaware | Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Green Aromatics Transition state for the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene in zeolite LiY Most polymers and plastics require six-carbon ring structures. Sugars ...

  8. Selvan Demir | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sdemir at berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-3832 PhD in Chemistry, University of Cologne, Germany Diplom in Chemistry, University of Cologne, Germany EFRC Research Porous aromatic...

  9. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  10. Decontamination performance of selected in situ technologies for jet fuel contamination. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesley, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    Specific study of jet fuel is warranted because of the quantitive and qualitative component differences between jet fuel and other hydrocarbon fuels. Quantitatively, jet fuel contains a larger aliphatic or saturate fraction and a smaller aromatic fraction than other fuels (i.e. heating oil and diesel oil) in the medium-boiling-point-distillate class of fuels. Since the aliphatic and aromatic fractions of fuel are not equally susceptible to biodegradation, jet fuel decontamination using biodegradation may be different from other fuels.

  11. Section 54

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eT ' A (z T &z b ) )s vT m zT zB wNsN v dz BIR' I z C z B (wNsN v ) dz I z T z C (wNsN v ) dz < BIR max , q wM z T z B q w s v )s vT s v w eB z c BIR max z B BIR max 2 q v Session Papers 227 Development of an Elevated Mixed Layer Model for Parameterizing Altocumulus Cloud Layers S. Liu and S. K. Krueger Department of Meteorology University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Altocumulus (Ac) clouds play an important role in the earth's energy budget through their effects on solar

  12. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a delta-Eddington approach or with the more exact code developed by Min (Min and Harrison 1996). In practice, the values obtained with the two approaches were very similar....

  13. Airports - Local Information - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Airports College Station is served locally by Easterwood Airport (5 min. drive), with airports in Austin (2 hr. drive) and Houston (1 hr 45 min. drive) not far away. Easterwood...

  14. NUG Training 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GPU codes on Dirac, Hemant Shukla, NERSC ( 30 min ) 15:50 - Debugging with DDT, Woo-Sun Yang, NERSC ( 45 min ) 16:35 - Hands On: Q&A with NERSC Consultants 17:00 - Adjourn...

  15. NUG 2013: Training - Getting Started at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( 30 min ) 14:05 - Break 14:20 - Using Python on Hopper, Carver and Edison - Woo-Sun Yang & Jack Deslippe, NERSC ( 15 Min ) 14:35 - Scripting for Complex Job Workflows - Doug...

  16. Office of Civil Rights NA-1.2 VIDEO LIBRARY Item Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and Long Term Services Department 1 DVD 60 min 2010 NNSA IT Division 8 EEO FWP "Breast Cancer Awareness" w Dr. William Thompson 1 DVD 60 min 2011 NNSA IT Division 9 EEO FWP...

  17. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  18. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  19. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  20. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.3.1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x

  1. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35

  2. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  3. RADIOLOGICAL DATA FOR ALARA PLANNING PURPOSES Rev. 1 Contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RADIOLOGICAL DATA FOR ALARA PLANNING PURPOSES Rev. 1 Contact 1 ft 3 ft 10 ft 25 ft 50 ft 125 ft 100 mR/hr line 5 mR/hr line (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (feet) (feet) Outside of Cask (max) *Unshielded Liner (max) Top of *Unshielded Liner after the cask lid is removed *Unshielded Liner Inside of Cask/Lid Outside of Cask Lifting rig or any other support equipment Does the cask have fixed contamination that may "leach out" during transport (Yes/No)? If yes, please list

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Data on Display at New Climate Research Facility Bookmark and Share Senator Stevens (second from left) and Max Ahgeak (far left) of the Ukpeagvik Iñupiat Corporation cut a red ribbon at the building's front door to commence the new science facility's opening ceremony. On June 1, Senator Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) joined Max Ahgeak of the Ukpeagvik Iñupiat Corporation to officially open the new Barrow Global Climate Change Research Facility in Alaska. ARM was represented by Mark Ivey, North

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Performance and Testing Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the plug-in hybrid electric version of the following vehicles is available: 2013 Ford Fusion Energi, 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet, 2013 Ford C-Max Energi, 2012 Chevrolet Volt, 2012 Toyota Prius, 2013 Toyota Prius, 2013 Chevrolet Volt, 2011 Chrysler Town & Country, 2010 Quantum Escape, and 2010 Ford Escape Advanced Research Vehicle.

  6. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2012 max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. Read the full post Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License Servers, most of the compilers (except GNU) and the DDT debugger on Hopper will not be available from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm on Wednesday, May 16. If there are any questions or concerns,

  7. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, science, and technology for the research community -- hosted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Agard, David (David Agard) - Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California at San Francisco Alekseyev, Max (Max Alekseyev) - Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of South Carolina Alexandraki, Despina (Despina Alexandraki) - Institute of Molecular

  8. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35

  9. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  10. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  11. Job Scheduling Policies on Cooley | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policies on Cooley There are six queues for general use on Cooley (default, nox11, pubnet, pubnet-nox11, debug, and pubnet-debug). The default and default-pubnet queues are for production use. The nox11 and pubnet-nox11 queues are analogous to the default and pubnet queues, except that the X server is disabled for runs in these queues in order to fully dedicate the GPUs for CUDA runs. The following policy applies to all 4 of these queues: Max. runtime: 12 hours Max. job size: 124 nodes (the

  12. Los Alamos/Tribogenics create highly portable imaging system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos/Tribogenics create highly portable imaging system Los Alamos/Tribogenics create highly portable imaging system A unique, lightweight, compact, low-cost X-ray system that uses the MiniMAX camera to provide real-time inspection of sealed containers and facilities. June 26, 2013 A hand-held calculator that was X-rayed by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers using the MiniMAX camera, a lightweight, portable X-ray machine that could revolution imaging of closed containers. A

  13. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnology --

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, science, and technology for the research community -- hosted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy Biotechnology Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Agard, David (David Agard) - Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California at San Francisco Alekseyev, Max (Max Alekseyev) - Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of

  14. Los Alamos wins three R&D 100 award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos wins three R&D 100 awards Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Los Alamos wins three R&D 100 awards A compact and portable x-ray imaging system was one of the awardees August 1, 2013 MiniMAX is a battery powered, digital x-ray imaging system that is completely self-contained, lightweight, compact and portable MiniMAX is a completely self-contained, lightweight,

  15. Microsoft Word - Y12GammaAppendicesAand B.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A: Distributions of Quarterly Gamma Doses by Year Note change in vertical scale, frequency or number of workers having dose of a given range. Vertical axis ranges 0 - 100 for 1952-60 and 0 - 4000 for 1961-79 corresponding to policy change in 1961 to monitoring all Y-12 workers for external radiation. Quarter= 1 N= 206 Zeros= 62 ( 30.1 %) Max Dose= 825 Dose(mrem) Frequency 0 200 400 600 800 0 20 40 60 80 Quarter= 2 N= 253 Zeros= 89 ( 35.2 %) Max Dose= 1702 Dose(mrem) Frequency 0 200 400 600 800 0

  16. Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? October 29, 2015 - 10:22am Addthis Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for

  17. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Government. i ~"~ t Departmknti of Energy,' me' tnorandu,m' .' ?' . .:. ,,' ,. cATE: APR 1 y ' 624 y;;J; EM-421,(W.'A.:Williams, 903-81'49)' ,I ' , c I v : ., -Elimination,o,f the Max,Zuckerman &,Sons'Company Sites, Il.l,inois and ~'SUSJECT: Mary, and .: '. I To The File I, 1 .' , ,,.I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendati,od ,;. _ 'for the Max Zuckerman ,& Sons Company sites'in Chicago (IL), .Owings I iills % I ,' (MD) @.Baltimore (MD). '.I have

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - 05_ARM 2007 Meeting.ppt [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vertical cells allow large 1 1.5 2 Mdlnr (gm 3 -dlnr) 20 min 35 min drops to sediment Condensation 2500 0 0.5 0.1 1 10 100 1000 Radius (m) dM 5 min 1000 1500 2000 2500...

  19. Layered zeolite materials and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsapatsis, Michael; Maheshwari, Sudeep; Bates, Frank S; Koros, William J

    2013-08-06

    A novel oxide material (MIN-I) comprising YO.sub.2; and X.sub.2O.sub.3, wherein Y is a tetravalent element and X is a trivalent element, wherein X/Y=O or Y/X=30 to 100 is provided. Surprisingly, MIN-I can be reversibly deswollen. MIN-I can further be combined with a polymer to produce a nanocomposite, depolymerized to produce predominantly fully exfoliated layers (MIN-2), and pillared to produce a pillared oxide material (MIN-3), analogous to MCM-36. The materials are useful in a wide range of applications, such as catalysts, thin films, membranes, and coatings.

  20. Office of Civil Rights NA-1.2 VIDEO LIBRARY Item Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Diversity in the Real World 1 CD 2002 Coastal Training Technologies Corp 2 Diversity: Face to Face 1 DVD 18 min 2008 ATS media 3 Diversity: Face to Face (Faciliator's Guide) 1 DVD 2008 ATS media 4 Freedom's Son, 100 years of African-American struggle and triumph 1 DVD 2 hr 8 min 2006 Farmers Insurance 5 Invisible Rules: Men, Women, and Teams 1 DVD 33 min 2005 NNSA IT Division 6 OpeningLines: Facing Diversity 1 DVD 8 min 2008 ATS media 7 That's What I'm Talking About 1 DVD 2 hr 45 min 2006 TV

  1. Model-based feasibility assessment and evaluation of prostate hyperthermia with a commercial MR-guided endorectal HIFU ablation array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A. Hsu, I-C.; Diederich, Chris J.; Prakash, Punit; Rieke, Viola; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Kurhanewicz, John; Plata, Juan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Feasibility of targeted and volumetric hyperthermia (40–45 °C) delivery to the prostate with a commercial MR-guided endorectal ultrasound phased array system, designed specifically for thermal ablation and approved for ablation trials (ExAblate 2100, Insightec Ltd.), was assessed through computer simulations and tissue-equivalent phantom experiments with the intention of fast clinical translation for targeted hyperthermia in conjunction with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: The simulations included a 3D finite element method based biothermal model, and acoustic field calculations for the ExAblate ERUS phased array (2.3 MHz, 2.3 × 4.0 cm{sup 2}, ∼1000 channels) using the rectangular radiator method. Array beamforming strategies were investigated to deliver protracted, continuous-wave hyperthermia to focal prostate cancer targets identified from representative patient cases. Constraints on power densities, sonication durations and switching speeds imposed by ExAblate hardware and software were incorporated in the models. Preliminary experiments included beamformed sonications in tissue mimicking phantoms under MR temperature monitoring at 3 T (GE Discovery MR750W). Results: Acoustic intensities considered during simulation were limited to ensure mild hyperthermia (T{sub max} < 45 °C) and fail-safe operation of the ExAblate array (spatial and time averaged acoustic intensity I{sub SATA} < 3.4 W/cm{sup 2}). Tissue volumes with therapeutic temperature levels (T > 41 °C) were estimated. Numerical simulations indicated that T > 41 °C was calculated in 13–23 cm{sup 3} volumes for sonications with planar or diverging beam patterns at 0.9–1.2 W/cm{sup 2}, in 4.5–5.8 cm{sup 3} volumes for simultaneous multipoint focus beam patterns at ∼0.7 W/cm{sup 2}, and in ∼6.0 cm{sup 3} for curvilinear (cylindrical) beam patterns at 0.75 W/cm{sup 2}. Focused heating patterns may be practical for treating focal disease in a single posterior quadrant of the prostate and diffused heating patterns may be useful for heating quadrants, hemigland volumes or even bilateral targets. Treatable volumes may be limited by pubic bone heating. Therapeutic temperatures were estimated for a range of physiological parameters, sonication duty cycles and rectal cooling. Hyperthermia specific phasing patterns were implemented on the ExAblate prostate array and continuous-wave sonications (∼0.88 W/cm{sup 2}, 15 min) were performed in tissue-mimicking material with real-time MR-based temperature imaging (PRFS imaging at 3.0 T). Shapes of heating patterns observed during experiments were consistent with simulations. Conclusions: The ExAblate 2100, designed specifically for thermal ablation, can be controlled for delivering continuous hyperthermia in prostate while working within operational constraints.

  2. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

  3. Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiu, Henry; van Dam, Cornelis P.

    2013-08-22

    A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn family also had higher c{sub p,min} than equivalently thick ellipses, indicating less susceptibility to cavitation. Microtabs applied on yy foils demonstrated improved energy capture. A series of variable speed and constant speed rotors were developed with the yyb07cn family of hydrofoils. The constant speed yyb07cn rotor (yy-B02-Rcs,opt) captured 0.45% more energy than the equivalent rotor with ellipses (e-B02-Rcs,opt). With microtabs deployed (yyμt-B02-Rcs,opt), the energy capture increase over the rotor with ellipses was 1.05%. Note, however, that microtabs must be applied judiciously to bidirectional foils. On the 18% thick ellipse, performance decreased with the addition of microtabs. Details of hydrofoil performance, microtab sizing and positioning, rotor configurations, and revenue impacts are presented herein.

  4. A global scale mechanistic model of the photosynthetic capacity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ali, A. A.; Xu, C.; Rogers, A.; Fisher, R. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.; Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.; Muss, J. D.; Fisher, J. B.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Although plant photosynthetic capacity as determined by the maximum carboxylation rate (i.e., Vc, max25) and the maximum electron transport rate (i.e., Jmax25) at a reference temperature (generally 25 C) is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental conditions, it is typically parameterized in Earth system models (ESMs) with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. In this study, we developed a mechanistic model of leaf utilization of nitrogen for assimilation (LUNA V1.0) to predict the photosynthetic capacity at the global scale under different environmental conditions, based on the optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture,moreelectron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The LUNA model was able to reasonably well capture the observed patterns of photosynthetic capacity in view that it explained approximately 55 % of the variation in observed Vc, max25 and 65 % of the variation in observed Jmax25 across the globe. Our model simulations under current and future climate conditions indicated that Vc, max25 could be most affected in high-latitude regions under a warming climate and that ESMs using a fixed Vc, max25 or Jmax25 by plant functional types were likely to substantially overestimate future global photosynthesis.less

  5. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  6. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    bar (abs) 3 3 Max delivery pressure from storage system bar (abs) 12 12 Shock and Vibration Shock g 40 40 Vibration g 5@10Hz-0.75@200Hz 10@10Hz-1@200Hz ChargingDischarging ...

  7. Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Si SiC GaN In-direct band gap In-direct direct > LED Max. Temp. 125 C 200 C 250 C ... to do this in silicon Items 3-level FB w Si MOS @ 120kHZ resonant freq. 2-level FB w ...

  8. Hydroshear Simulation Lab Test 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Steve

    2014-08-01

    This data file is for test 2. In this test a sample of granite with a pre cut (man made fracture) is confined, heated and differential stress is applied. max temperature in this this system development test is 95C. test details on the spreadsheets--note thta there are 2 spreadsheets

  9. Pyrotechnic ignition studies using a gun tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    A gun tunnel is being used to investigate the ignition characteristics of center-hole iron/potassium perchlorate thermal battery discs. Details are given of the construction, operation, and data reduction method for the gun tunnel. To simulate an igniter, this system can readily produce a pulse of hot argon at maximum pressures and temperatures up to P/sub max/ = 8 MPa and T/sub max/ = 4000K, respectively, with flow times of the order of 3 msec. For a single battery disc, a segment of the ignition boundary was found to lie in the region of T/sub max/ = 1200 to 1300K and 0.7 MPa < P/sub max/ < 2.0 MPa. The results also showed two types of ignition: prompt ignition, requiring an average delivered enthalpy /ovr /Delta/H//sub ig/ = 6 cal during an average flow time /ovr /Delta/t//sub ig/ = 0.7 msec, and delayed ignition, with /ovr /Delta/H//sub ig/ = 16 cal and /ovr /Delta/t//sub ig/ = 2.4 msec. In addition, near an ignition boundary, high speed motion photography showed the ignition delay increased to 6 msec with significant spatial non-uniformity. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  10. A=12Be (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is rendered uncertain by the discovery of 11Li (PO66H). A calculation by Kurath (see ref 8 in (PO65B)) suggests log ft 3.5 for the ground state; E-(max) is then 11.7 MeV...

  11. Hydroshear Simulation Lab Test 2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bauer, Steve

    This data file is for test 2. In this test a sample of granite with a pre cut (man made fracture) is confined, heated and differential stress is applied. max temperature in this this system development test is 95C. test details on the spreadsheets--note thta there are 2 spreadsheets

  12. New asteroseismic scaling relations based on the Hayashi track relation applied to red giant branch stars in NGC 6791 and NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, T.; Li, Y.; Hekker, S. E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-01-20

    Stellar mass M, radius R, and gravity g are important basic parameters in stellar physics. Accurate values for these parameters can be obtained from the gravitational interaction between stars in multiple systems or from asteroseismology. Stars in a cluster are thought to be formed coevally from the same interstellar cloud of gas and dust. The cluster members are therefore expected to have some properties in common. These common properties strengthen our ability to constrain stellar models and asteroseismically derived M, R, and g when tested against an ensemble of cluster stars. Here we derive new scaling relations based on a relation for stars on the Hayashi track (?(T{sub eff})?g{sup p}R{sup q}) to determine the masses and metallicities of red giant branch stars in open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819 from the global oscillation parameters ?? (the large frequency separation) and ?{sub max} (frequency of maximum oscillation power). The ?? and ?{sub max} values are derived from Kepler observations. From the analysis of these new relations we derive: (1) direct observational evidence that the masses of red giant branch stars in a cluster are the same within their uncertainties, (2) new methods to derive M and z of the cluster in a self-consistent way from ?? and ?{sub max}, with lower intrinsic uncertainties, and (3) the mass dependence in the ?? - ?{sub max} relation for red giant branch stars.

  13. From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL, Bldg. 137, Rm 226 Dr. Frank Uwe Renner Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

  14. CX-007656: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operation of Extrel MAX300LG Mass Spectrometer and VICI Metronics Dynacalibrator Calibration Gas Generator at 999-1W CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/30/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  15. CX-003351: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Convert CargoMAX Vehicles to Run on Compressed Natural GasCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 08/09/2010Location(s): Okarche, OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  16. A=6He (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that J(6He) 0. Theory: See (BA55S, SK58). 1. 6He(-)6Li Qm 3.536 The -spectrum is simple, with an end point E(max) 3.50 0.05 (WU52), 3.50 0.02 MeV...

  17. Appendix D.1 Hanford Sitewide SSHAC Level 3 PSHA Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Max Observed (c) M 4.79 1918-11-17 M 7.06 (d) 1872-12-15 Lake Chelan M 5.98 1936-07-16 Milton- Freewater M 4.8 1893-03-06 Seismicity Association Assoc with faults 0.2 Not assoc....

  18. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photonssec Resolving power (EE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 m...

  19. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photonssec Resolving power (EE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.5 (v) mrad Measured spot size (FWHM) 100 m Endstations...

  20. Update on electron-cloud power deposition for the LHC arcdipoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, Miguel A.; Chaplin, Vernon H.

    2006-01-30

    We revisit the estimation of the power deposited by the electron cloud (EC) in the arc dipoles of the LHC by means of simulations. We adopt, as simulation input, a set of electron-related parameters closely resembling those used in recent simulations at CERN [1]. We explore values for the bunch population Nb in the range 0.4 x 10^11 <= Nb <=1.6 x 10^11, peak secondary electron yield (SEY) delta max in the range 1.0 <= delta max <= 2.0, and bunch spacing tb either 25 or 75 ns. For tb=25 ns we find that the EC average power deposition per unit length of beam pipe, dPbar/dz, will exceed the available cooling capacity, which we take to be 1.7 W/m at nominal Nb [2], if delta max exceeds ~1.3, but dPbar/dz will be comfortably within the cooling capacity if delta max <= 1.2. For tb =75 ns dPbar/dz exceeds the cooling capacity only when delta max > 2 and Nb > 1.5 x 10^11 taken in combination. The rediffused component of the secondary electron emission spectrum plays a significant role: if we artificially suppress this component while keeping delta max fixed, dPbar/dz is roughly cut in half for most values of Nb explored here, and in this case we find good agreement with the results in Ref. 1, as expected. We provide a fairly detailed explanation of the mechanism responsible for such a relatively large effect. We assess the sensitivity of our results to numerical simulation parameters, and to physical parameters such as the photoelectric yield, bunch train length, etc. Owing to the lack of detailed knowledge of the electron emission spectrum, the sensitivity of dPbar/dz to the rediffused component appears to be the most significant source of uncertainty in our results. Nevertheless, taking our results as a whole, the condition delta max <= 1.2 seems to be a conservative requirement for the cooling capacity not to be exceeded.