Sample records for millivolt napl non-aqueous

  1. Smouldering Combustion of Organic Liquids in Porous Media for Remediating NAPL-contaminated Soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pironi, Paolo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research investigated the potential of smouldering combustion to be employed as a remediation approach for soil contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Small-scale (~15 cm), proof-of-concept experiments ...

  2. Inorganic non-aqueous cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, H. C.; Dey, A. N.; Foster, D. L.; Gopikanth, M. L.; Schlaikjer, C. R.

    1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel inorganic non-aqueous electrochemical cell having an alkali or alkaline earth metal anode, an inorganic electrolyte comprised of an SO/sub 2/ solvent with an alkali or alkaline earth metal halide salt of aluminum, tantalum niobium or antimony, dissolved in the SO/sub 2/ and a cathode comprised of a carbonaceous material having an apparent bulk density in excess of 5 lb/ft/sup 3/ (80 gm/1). Lower bulk density carbonaceous material may, however, be used in electrolytes having high salt concentrations. Ketjenblack EC (furnace black) carbonaceous material may be admixed with a solid cathode active material which is substantially insoluble in the SO/sub 2/ electrolyte to provide a high primary cell capacity and an effectively rechargeable cell. There is no SO/sub 2/ per se discharge in the cell.

  3. Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale in SITU Thermal NAPL Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butherus, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Ingle, David S. [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Juhlin, Randall [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Daniel, Joseph [S.M. Stoller Corporation; none,

    2004-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field-scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The Young-Rainey STAR Center is a former DOE facility that was previously known as the Pinellas Plant and the Pinellas STAR Center. The remediation project encompassed an area of 10,000 ft2 and depths extending to 35 ft below ground surface. Prior to the remediation, DOE evaluated technologies that had the potential to remove NAPLs from the subsurface at the site. Because of site conditions (clay lenses and an underlying clay layer that were thought to be contaminated), steam injection and electrical heating were considered to be the only technologies that had the potential to remove these NAPLs. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Remedial operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted during a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Additional confirmatory sampling was conducted 18 months after operations ended. Analytical results of the confirmatory sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects.

  4. A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phase. Residual NAPL is defined as immobile, nonwater entrapped NAPL that does not drain from the pore spaces and is conceptualized as being either continuous or...

  5. Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young-Rainey Star Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavaskar, A.R. [ed.; Chen, A.S.C. [ed.; none,

    2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a fieldscale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at a site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The STAR Center is a former DOE facility. The remediation project covered an area of 930 m2 (10,000 ft2) and depths extending to 10.5 m (35 ft) below ground surface. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract to SteamTech Environmental Services for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. McMillan-McGee Corporation implemented the process. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted over a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Results of the sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects

  6. NAPL Calculator - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events - Fermilab at Work -NALWOSept2011NAPL

  7. The Naples University 3 MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campajola, L.; Brondi, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ''Federico II'' Complesso Universitario di Monte S.Angelo via Cintia 80126 Napoli, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Napoli (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3 MV tandem accelerator of the Naples University is used for research activities and applications in many fields. At the beginning of operation (1977) the main utilization was in the field of nuclear physics. Later, the realization of new beam lines allowed the development of applied activities as radiocarbon dating, ion beam analysis, biophysics, ion implantation etc. At present, the availability of different ion sources and many improvements on the accelerator allow to run experiments in a wide range of subjects. An overview of the characteristics and major activities of the laboratory is presented.

  8. Naples, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOceanNanostellar Inc JumpNapaIllinois:Naples,

  9. FUTURE PERSPECTIVES IN MELANOMA RESEARCH. Meeting report from the "Melanoma Research: a bridge Naples-USA. Naples,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FUTURE PERSPECTIVES IN MELANOMA RESEARCH. Meeting report from the "Melanoma Research: a bridge.fondazionemelanoma.org Future perspectives in melanoma research. Meeting report from the "Melanoma Research: a bridge Naples Future perspectives in melanoma research. Meeting report from the "Melanoma Research: a bridge Naples

  10. Ribbon NAPL sampler. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FLUTE Hydrophobic Flexible Membrane is a sampling device that provides detailed delineation of Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPL) in a borehole. It is deployed via a reusable nylon liner, with a hydrophobic ribbon impregnated with dye, that when converted into a borehole creates a tight contact with the walls of the borehole. When deployed, the ribbon will absorb the DNAPL that is in contact with the membrane causing a color change in the dye. Upon removal, the membrane is turned inside out and the ribbon is retrieved into the membrane. The ribbon is then removed and examined. The presence of DNAPL is indicated by brilliant red marks on the hydrophobic ribbon. Sections of ribbon can also be sent for laboratory analysis to identify the specific NAPL compounds that are present.

  11. Electrochemical studies of moderately boron doped polycrystalline diamond in non-aqueous solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    Electrochemical studies of moderately boron doped polycrystalline diamond in non-aqueous solvent being marketed [83,84]. The first paper on the electrochemistry of boron doped polycrystalline diamond The electrochemistry of boron doped diamond is currently an active field of research. In the majority of studies

  12. Application of a NAPL partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) to support DNAPL remediation at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico chemical waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, J.E. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, P.; Jin, M. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated solvents as dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) are present at a large number of hazardous waste sites across the U.S. and world. DNAPL is difficult to detect in the subsurface, much less characterize to any degree of accuracy. Without proper site characterization, remedial decisions are often difficult to make and technically effective, cost-efficient remediations are even more difficult to obtain. A new non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) characterization technology that is superior to conventional technologies has been developed and applied at full-scale. This technology, referred to as the Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT), has been adopted from oil-field practices and tailored to environmental application in the vadose and saturated zones. A PITT has been applied for the first time at full-scale to characterize DNAPL in the vadose zone. The PITT was applied in December 1995 beneath two side-by-side organic disposal pits at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) RCRA Interim Status Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DNAPL, consisting of a mixture of chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and PCE oils, is known to exist in at least one of the two buried pits. The vadose zone PITT was conducted by injecting a slug of non-partitioning and NAPL-partitioning tracers into and through a zone of interest under a controlled forced gradient. The forced gradient was created by a balanced extraction of soil gas at a location 55 feet from the injector. The extracted gas stream was sampled over time to define tracer break-through curves. Soil gas sampling ports from multilevel monitoring installations were sampled to define break-through curves at specific locations and depths. Analytical instrumentation such as gas chromatographs and a photoacoustical analyzers operated autonomously, were used for tracer detection.

  13. Method and device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system includes a generally cylindrical push-rod defining an internal recess therein. The push-rod includes first and second end portions and an external liquid collection surface. A liquid collection member is detachably connected to the push-rod at one of the first and second end portions thereof. The method of the present invention for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a contaminated groundwater system includes providing a lance including an external hydrophobic liquid collection surface, an internal recess, and a collection chamber at the bottom end thereof. The lance is extended into the groundwater system such that the top end thereof remains above the ground surface. The liquid is then allowed to collect on the liquid collection surface, and flow downwardly by gravity into the collection chamber to be pumped upwardly through the internal recess in the lance.

  14. Preliminary analysis of NAPL behavior in soil-heated vapor extraction for in-situ environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; Phelan, J.M.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of soil-heated vapor extraction have been performed to evaluate the NAPL removal performance as a function of borehole vacuum. The possibility of loss of NAPL containment, or NAPL migration into the unheated soil, is also evaluated in the simulations. A practical warning sign indicating migration of NAPL into the unheated zone is discussed.

  15. Future Perspectives in melanoma research: Meeting report from the "Melanoma Research: a bridge Naples-USA. Naples, December 6th-7th 2010".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FUTURE PERSPECTIVES IN MELANOMA RESEARCH.Meeting report from the “Melanoma Research: a bridge Naples-Future perspectives in melanoma research. Meeting report

  16. Germany Picks Up Scent of In Solving Naples's Trash Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 Germany Picks Up Scent of Profit In Solving Naples's Trash Crisis By STACY MEICHTRY and ALMUT incinerators across Germany that have recently cut deals with the Italian government to burn up to 200,000 tons in northern Germany charge between 150 and 250 ($237 to $394) to incinerate one ton of waste, estimates

  17. A Non-Aqueous Reduction Process for Purifying 153Gd Produced in Natural Europium Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnsen, Amanda M.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gadolinium-153 is a low-energy gamma-emitter used in nuclear medicine imaging quality assurance. Produced in nuclear reactors using natural Eu2O3 targets, 153Gd is radiochemically separated from europium isotopes by europium reduction. However, conventional aqueous europium reduction produces hydrogen gas, a flammability hazard in radiological hot cells. We altered the traditional reduction method, using methanol as the process solvent to nearly eliminate hydrogen gas production. This new, non-aqueous reduction process demonstrates greater than 98% europium removal and gadolinium yields of 90%.

  18. From Propaganda to Science: Looking at the World of Academies in Early Seventeenth-century Naples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfrancesco, Lorenza

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Una Relazione Vicereale Sul Governo Del Regno Di Napoli Agliil settimo Anno del suo Governo (Naples: Beltrano, 1630), 51Paolo. Massime del governo spagnolo a Napoli, Introduzione

  19. The non-aqueous chemistry of uranium has been an active area of exploration in recent decades1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    -purity depleted uranium produced as a by-product of nuclear isotope enrichment programmes. The early actinideThe non-aqueous chemistry of uranium has been an active area of exploration in recent decades1 for uranium will be created in part by the quest of researchers to understand the properties and potential

  20. Prediction of the theoretical capacity of non-aqueous lithium-air Peng Tan, Zhaohuan Wei, W. Shyy, T.S. Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    metal-air batteries [1] or Li-ion batter- ies (4.2 Ã? 102 W h/kg) [2]. The second factor that rendersPrediction of the theoretical capacity of non-aqueous lithium-air batteries Peng Tan, Zhaohuan Wei of non-aqueous lithium-air batteries is predicted. Key battery design parameters are defined

  1. Highly Quantitative Electrochemical Characterization of Non-Aqueous Electrolytes & Solid Electrolyte Interphases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergiy V. Sazhin; Kevin L. Gering; Mason K. Harrup; Harry W. Rollins

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods to measure solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) electrochemical properties and SEI formation capability of non-aqueous electrolyte solutions are not adequately addressed in the literature. And yet, there is a strong demand in new electrolyte generations that promote stabilized SEIs and have an influence to resolve safety, calendar life and other limitations of Li-ion batteries. To fill this gap, in situ electrochemical approach with new descriptive criteria for highly quantitative characterization of SEI and electrolytes is proposed. These criteria are: SEI formation capacity, SEI corrosion rate, SEI maintenance rate, and SEI kinetic stability. These criteria are associated with battery parameters like irreversible capacity, self-discharge, shelf-life, power, etc. Therefore, they are especially useful for electrolyte development and standard fast screening, allowing a skillful approach to narrow down the search for the best electrolyte. The characterization protocol also allows retrieving information on interfacial resistance for SEI layers and the electrochemical window of electrolytes, the other important metrics of characterization. The method validation was done on electrolyte blends containing phosphazenes, developed at Idaho National Laboratory, as 1.2M LiPF6 [80 % EC-MEC (2:8) (v/v) + 20% Phosphazene variety] (v/v), which were targeted for safer electrolyte variations.

  2. An experimental study of horizontal barrier formation and containment of NAPLs by gelling liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durmusoglu, Ertan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of experimental laboratory studies on grouting technologies have been reported in the literature. However, most of these studies are not applicable to subsurface barrier containment of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS...

  3. Cross borehole induced polarization to detect subsurface NAPL at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Michael B. (Michael Brian), 1980-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral induced polarization measurements were acquired in six cross-borehole panels within four boreholes at the Savannah River Site. The investigation was performed to delineate the presence of dense non-aqueous phase ...

  4. Quantitative Chromatographic Determination of Dissolved Elemental Sulfur in the Non-aqueous Electrolyte for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Dong [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Zhang, Xuran [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Hubei (China); Dept. of Chemistry; Li, Chao [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; McKinnon, Meaghan E. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Sadok, Rachel G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Qu, Deyu [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Hubei (China); Dept. of Chemistry; Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Lee, Hung-Sui [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast and reliable analytical method is reported for the quantitative determination of dissolved elemental sulfur in non-aqueous electrolytes for Li-S batteries. By using high performance liquid chromatography with a UV detector, the solubility of S in 12 different pure solvents and in 22 different electrolytes was determined. It was found that the solubility of elemental sulfur is dependent on the Lewis basicity, the polarity of solvents and the salt concentration in the electrolytes. In addition, the S content in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S battery was successfully determined by the proposed HPLC/UV method. Thus, the feasibility of the method to the online analysis for a Li-S battery is demonstrated. Interestingly, the S was found super-saturated in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S cell.

  5. Quantitative Chromatographic Determination of Dissolved Elemental Sulfur in the Non-aqueous Electrolyte for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Xuran; Li, Chao; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Sadok, Rachel G.; Qu, Deyu; Yu, Xiqian; Lee, Hung-Sui; Qu, Deyang

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast and reliable analytical method is reported for the quantitative determination of dissolved elemental sulfur in non-aqueous electrolytes for Li-S batteries. By using high performance liquid chromatography with a UV detector, the solubility of S in 12 different pure solvents and in 22 different electrolytes was determined. It was found that the solubility of elemental sulfur is dependent on the Lewis basicity, the polarity of solvents and the salt concentration in the electrolytes. In addition, the S content in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S battery was successfully determined by the proposed HPLC/UV method. Thus, the feasibility ofmore »the method to the online analysis for a Li-S battery is demonstrated. Interestingly, the S was found super-saturated in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S cell.« less

  6. Electrical conductivity in Li2O2 and its role in determining capacity limitations in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thygesen, Kristian

    -O2 batteries V. Viswanathan, K. S. Thygesen, J. S. Hummelshøj, J. K. Nørskov, G. Girishkumar et al limitations in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries V. Viswanathan,1 K. S. Thygesen,2 J. S. Hummelshøj,3 J. K. Nørskov energy density battery couple. Such cells, however, show sudden death at capacities far below

  7. Non-Aqueous Solvation of n-Octanol and Ethanol: Spectroscopic and Computational Lori M. Levering, Carrigan J. Hayes, Karen M. Callahan, Christopher M. Hadad,* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-Aqueous Solvation of n-Octanol and Ethanol: Spectroscopic and Computational Studies Lori M-H bonds in n-octanol and ethanol with the organic solvents carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), cyclohexane populations of each ethanol complex and are consistent with the experimental results. Additional spectra were

  8. Refinement of the Kansas City Plant site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.E.; Hall, S.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, J.L. [AlliedSignal Corp., Kansas City, MO (United States). Dept. of Environmental Protection

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a refinement of the site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (KCP). This refinement was prompted by a review of the literature and the results of a limited study that was conducted to evaluate whether pools of DNAPL were present in contaminated locations at the KCP. The field study relied on the micropurge method of sample collection. This method has been demonstrated as a successful approach for obtaining discrete samples within a limited aquifer zone. Samples were collected at five locations across 5-ft well screens located at the base of the alluvial aquifer at the KCP. The hypothesis was that if pools of DNAPL were present, the dissolved concentration would increase with depth. Four wells with highly contaminated groundwater were selected for the test. Three of the wells were located in areas where DNAPL was suspected, and one where no DNAPL was believed to be present. The results demonstrated no discernible pattern with depth for the four wells tested. A review of the data in light of the available technical literature suggests that the fine-grained nature of the aquifer materials precludes the formation of pools. Instead, DNAPL is trapped as discontinuous ganglia that are probably widespread throughout the aquifer. The discontinuous nature of the DNAPL distribution prevents the collection of groundwater samples with concentrations approaching saturation. Furthermore, the results indicate that attempts to remediate the aquifer with conventional approaches will not result in restoration to pristine conditions because the tortuous groundwater flow paths will inhibit the efficiency of fluid-flow-based treatments.

  9. Acoustic detection of Immiscible Liquids in Sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Jil T.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Seifert, Patricia K.; Nihei, Kurt T.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory cross-well P-wave transmission at 90 kHz was measured in a 61 cm diameter by 76 cm tall water-saturated sand pack, before and after introducing a non-aqueous phase organic liquid (NAPL) (n-dodecane). In one experiment NAPL was introduced to form a lens trapped by a low permeability layer; a second experiment considered NAPL residual trapped behind the front of flowing NAPL. The NAPL caused significant changes in the travel time and amplitude of first arrivals, as well as the generation of diffracted waves arriving after the direct wave. The spatial variations in NAPL saturation obtained from excavation at the end of the experiment correlated well with the observed variations in the P-wave amplitudes and travel times. NAPL residual saturation changes from NAPL flow channels of 3 to 4% were detectable and the 40 to 80% NAPL saturation in the NAPL lens was clearly visible at acoustic frequencies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that small NAPL saturations may be more easily detected with amplitude rather than travel time data, but that the relationships between the amplitude changes and NAPL saturation maybe more complex than those for velocity.

  10. Non-aqueous solution preparation of doped and undoped lixmnyoz

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Timothy J. (5801 Eubank, N.E., Apt. #97, Albuquerque, NM 87111); Voigt, James A. (187 Aaramar La., Corrales, NM 87048)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generation of phase-pure doped and undoped Li.sub.x Mn.sub.y O.sub.z precursors. The method of this invention uses organic solutions instead of aqueous solutions or nonsolution ball milling of dry powders to produce phase-pure precursors. These precursors can be used as cathodes for lithium-polymer electrolyte batteries. Dopants may be homogeneously incorporated to alter the characteristics of the powder.

  11. Non-aqueous electrolyte for lithium-ion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present technology relates to stabilizing additives and electrolytes containing the same for use in electrochemical devices such as lithium ion batteries and capacitors. The stabilizing additives include triazinane triones and bicyclic compounds comprising succinic anhydride, such as compounds of Formulas I and II described herein.

  12. Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Rockward, Tommy Q. T.

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

  13. Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Yu Seung (Los Alamos, NM); Lee, Kwan-Soo (Blacksburg, VA); Rockward, Tommy Q. T. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

  14. Fluorinated Arylboron Oxalate for Non-Aqueous Battery Electrolytes - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProofWorking OutsideFluorescentbeam

  15. Methods Note/ NAPL Source Zone Depletion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    to evaluate groundwater contamination and cleanup times for four complex mixtures of concern in the railroad industry. Among the petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures considered, the cleanup time of diesel fuel was much LNAPLs adequately represent the economic risk of chemical spills. To assess the environmental risk

  16. Effect of immiscible liquid contaminants on P-wave transmission through natural aquifer samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Jil T.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed core-scale laboratory experiments to examine the effect of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants on P-wave velocity and attenuation in heterogeneous media. This work is part of a larger project to develop crosswell seismic methods for minimally invasive NAPL detection. The test site is the former DOE Pinellas Plant in Florida, which has known NAPL contamination in the surficial aquifer. Field measurements revealed a zone of anomalously high seismic attenuation, which may be due to lithology and/or contaminants (NAPL or gas phase). Intact core was obtained from the field site, and P-wave transmission was measured by the pulse-transmission technique with a 500 kHz transducer. Two types of samples were tested: a clean fine sand from the upper portion of the surficial aquifer, and clayey-silty sand with shell fragments and phosphate nodules from the lower portion. Either NAPL trichloroethene or toluene was injected into the initially water-saturated sample. Maximum NAPL saturations ranged from 30 to 50% of the pore space. P-wave velocity varied by approximately 4% among the water-saturated samples, while velocities decreased by 5 to 9% in samples at maximum NAPL saturation compared to water-saturated conditions. The clay and silt fraction as well as the larger scatterers in the clayey-silty sands apparently caused greater P-wave attenuation compared to the clean sand. The presence of NAPLs caused a 34 to 54% decrease in amplitudes of the first arrival. The central frequency of the transmitted energy ranged from 85 to 200 kHz, and was sensitive to both grain texture and presence of NAPL. The results are consistent with previous trends observed in homogeneous sand packs. More data will be acquired to interpret P-wave tomograms from crosswell field measurements, determine the cause of high attenuation observed in the field data and evaluate the sensitivity of seismic methods for NAPL detection.

  17. Charting the known chemical space for non-aqueous Lithium-air battery electrolyte solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husch, Tamara

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Li-Air battery is a very promising candidate for powering future mobility, but finding a suitable electrolyte solvent for this technology turned out to be a major problem. We present a systematic computational investigation of the known chemical space for possible Li-Air electrolyte solvents. It is shown that the problem of finding better Li-Air electrolyte solvents is not only - as previously suggested - about maximizing Li+ and O2- solubilities, but about finding the optimal balance of these solubilities with the viscosity of the solvent. As our results also show that trial-and-error experiments on known chemicals are unlikely to succeed, full chemical sub-spaces for the most promising compound classes are investigated, and suggestions are made for further experiments. The proposed screening approach is transferable and robust and can readily be applied to optimize electrolytes for other electrochemical devices. It goes beyond the current state-of-the-art both in width (considering the number of compoun...

  18. Microscopic Insights into the Electrochemical Behavior of Non-aqueous Electrolytes in Supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Wu, Jianzhong [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric double-layer capacitors (EDLC) are electrical devices that store energy by adsorption of ionic species at the inner surface of porous electrodes. Compared with aqueous electrolytes, ionic liquid and organic electrolytes have the advantage of larger potential windows, making them attractive for the next generation of EDLC with superior energy and power densities. The performance of both ionic liquid and organic electrolyte EDLC hinges on the judicious selection of the electrode pore size and the electrolyte composition that requires a comprehension of the charging behavior from a microscopic view. In this perspective, we discuss predictions from the classical density functional theory (CDFT) on the dependence of the capacitance on the pore size for ionic-liquid and organic-electrolyte EDLC. CDFT is applicable to electrodes with the pore size ranging from that below the ionic dimensionality to mesoscopic scales, thus unique for investigating the electrochemical behavior of the confined electrolytes for EDLC applications.

  19. Sonoluminescence from non-aqueous Kenneth S. Suallck & Edward B. Flint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    in the gas phase and - I.900 K in the liquid region surrounding the wllapscd bubble, when the total vapour pressures are much less than 5 torr) must be even higher. Second, carbon-carbon bond cleavage of alkanes. Atomic carbon and CH* can be crealcd through such mechan- isms. Indeed, the final productsobserred'6

  20. Non-aqueous formation of the calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite: astrophysical implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Sarah J; Parker, Julia E; Evans, Aneurin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation of calcium carbonate, through the solid-gas interaction of amorphous Ca-silicate with gaseous CO2, at elevated pressures, and link this to the possible presence of calcium carbonate in a number of circumstellar and planetary environments. We use in-situ synchrotron X-Ray powder diffraction to obtain detailed structural data pertaining to the formation of the crystalline calcium carbonate phase vaterite and its evolution with temperature. We found that the metastable calcium carbonate phase vaterite was formed alongside calcite, at elevated CO2 pressure, at room temperature and subsequently remained stable over a large range of temperature and pressure. We report the formation of the calcium carbonate mineral vaterite whilst attempting to simulate carbonate dust grain formation in astrophysical environments. This suggests that vaterite could be a mineral component of carbonate dust and also presents a possible method of formation for vaterite and its polymorphs on planetary surfaces.

  1. Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers reference to related application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim; Yu Seung (Los Alamos, NM), Lee; Kwan-Soo (Los Alamos, NM), Rockward; Tommy Q. T. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

  2. Investigation of the Rechargeability of Li-O2 Batteries in Non-aqueous Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Deyu; Hu, Dehong; Xu, Wu; Graff, Gordon L.; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the nature of the limited cycle life and poor energy efficiency associated with the secondary Li-O¬2 batteries the discharge products of primary Li-O2 cells at different depth of discharge (DOD) are systematically analyzed in this work. It is revealed that if discharged to 2.0 V a small amount of Li2O2 coexist with Li2CO3 and RO-(C=O)-OLi) in alkyl carbonate-based electrolyte. Further discharging the air electrodes to below 2.0 V the amount of Li2CO3 and LiRCO3 increases significantly due to the severe electrolyte decomposition. There is no Li2O detected in this alkyl carbonate electrolyte regardless of DOD. It is also found that the alkyl carbonate based electrolyte begins to decompose at 4.0 V during charging under the combined influences from the high surface area carbon, the nickel metal current collector and the oxygen atmosphere. Accordingly the impedance of the Li-O2 cell continues to increase after each discharge and recharge process indicating a repeated plating of insoluble lithium salts on the carbon surface. Therefore the whole carbon electrode becomes completely insulated only after a few cycles and loses the function of providing active tri-phase regions for the Li-oxygen batteries.

  3. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April through June 2003

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN .METALS~ C~RPO~~XON 4182-TAC

  4. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN .METALS~ C~RPO~~XON 4182-TAC700

  5. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report-January through March 2003

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN .METALS~ C~RPO~~XON

  6. Introduction The release of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    during the pull phase are retarded, with retardation manifested in greater dispersion of radon using a physical aquifer model (PAM). Static and push-pull tests were performed before and after contamination of the PAM sediment pack with trichloroethene (TCE), and after alcohol cosolvent flushing and pump

  7. Microsoft Word - N0075800-NAPL April to June 04.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF

  8. Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN .METALS~ C~RPO~~XON 4182-TAC U.S.

  9. Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L

  10. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  11. Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

  12. Non-aqueous, capillary electrophoretic separations of enantiomers with a charged cyclodextrin highly-soluble in organic solvents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Vindas, Silvia Elena

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    host of detection methods is available with detection limits ranging from single molecule to 10 -5 M. Examples include fluorescence, pulsed amperometric, conductivity, electrochemical, MS, refractive-index, laser-induced fluorescence, and UV... of the hydrophilic interactions. Since ion-pair formation is a basic requirement for complexation to occur, the analytes tried were limited to basic compounds analyzed in an acidic buffer. To allow comparisons of the obtained results with reported separations...

  13. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Yang, Xiao -Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zheng, Doug [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA (United States); McKinnon, Meaghan E. [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  14. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Qiang; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Zheng, Doug; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Qu, Deyang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1,more »0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.« less

  15. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Qiang [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Yang, Xiao -Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zheng, Doug [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA (United States); McKinnon, Meaghan E. [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  16. CO2 Capture and Regeneration at Low Temperatures: Novel Non-Aqueous CO2 Solvents and Capture Process with Substantially Reduced Energy Penalties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: RTI is developing a solvent and process that could significantly reduce the temperature associated with regenerating solvent and CO2 captured from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants. Traditional CO2 removal processes using water-based solvents require significant amount of steam from power plants in order to regenerate the solvent so it can be reused after each reaction. RTI’s solvents can be better at absorbing CO2 than many water-based solvents, and are regenerated at lower temperatures using less steam. Thus, industrial heat that is normally too cool to re-use can be deployed for regeneration, rather than using high-value steam. This saves the power plant money, which results in increased cost savings for consumers.

  17. Natural geological responses to anthropogenic alterations of the naples bay estuarine system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fielder, Bryan Robert

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    content. Grain size distribution for the grab samples and vibracores was evaluated using a Malvern? Mastersizer 2000 TM (Malvern, UK). The Mastersizer 2000 is a particle size analyzer using laser diffraction to produce a grain size distribution...

  18. Fast Slope Movements, Naples, 2003, pp.263-267 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HGP (Histori- cal, Geomechanical, Probabilistic), combines the results of geomechanical and historical. The potential failure mechanism is a plane slide. 2 GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS Based on the factors which influence. It is based on both geomechanical and historical approaches: the first one is aimed to classify the rock

  19. A Review of "Becoming Neapolitan. Citizen Culture in Baroque Naples" by John A. Marino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litchfield, R. Burr

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -century news (which excluded plebeians). The ?seggi? had some role in municipal government. A typical procession might begin with troops and trum- pets followed by carriages with the Viceroy and Sindaco, great office holders, the feudal nobility grouped...

  20. Imaging the Angevin Patron Saint: Mary Magdalen in the Pipino Chapel in Naples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, Sarah S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cathedral of Lucera see, Egidi, “Colonia Saracena di Lucera”London: Longman, 1998. Egidi, Pietro “La Colonia Saracena diCharles II, see Pietro Egidi, “La Colonia Saracena di Lucera

  1. Imaging the Angevin Patron Saint: Mary Magdalen in the Pipino Chapel in Naples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, Sarah S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meant to represent contemporary modest fashion. However, theespecially drawn to this modest image of the Magdalen. To my

  2. Imaging the Angevin Patron Saint: Mary Magdalen in the Pipino Chapel in Naples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, Sarah S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Le forme della propaganda politica nel Due e nel Trecento:Le forme della propaganda politica nel Due e nel Trecento:

  3. Imaging the Angevin Patron Saint: Mary Magdalen in the Pipino Chapel in Naples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, Sarah S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comitato di studi storici di Trieste, dall’École françaisedi storia dell’Università degli Studi di Trieste, (Trieste, 2-5 marzo 1993), edited by Paolo Cammarosano, 85-

  4. Pore-scale analysis of thermal remediation of NAPL-contaminated subsurface environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Min

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of oil saturation. At macro-scale, the terminal blob velocity was smaller than water velocity by an order or two. However, the terminal blob velocity reached to water velocity at pore-scale. This investigation would provide the better understanding...

  5. Pore-scale analysis of solubilization and mobilization of trapped NAPL blobs in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Sun Hee

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    was modified to quantify the onset of blob mobilization. Its value for water flooding was nearly 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that of surfactant foam flooding. Next, to investigate the blob flow regime in porous media, a blob velocity was computed...

  6. 2014 FLORIDA TOMATO INSTITUTE PROGRAM The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort, Naples, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    climatic, hydrologic, and agronomic factors to phosphorous transport from plastic mulch beds - Sanjay

  7. Papertown: The Image of Naples and the Foundation of Poetry in Boccaccio’s Early Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfano, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pennsylvania Press, 1988. Battaglia-Ricci, Lucia. Ragionaretake into consideration L. Battaglia Ricci's beautiful book,23 Ibid, book 1, 1. 24 See L. Battaglia-Ricci, Ragionare nel

  8. Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring Solar forProject

  9. Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafelyVirtualStephanieDepartmentSuccesses of the Recovery

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#100069-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Oct-Dec_2004.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF Official Contact ListInterim1 U.S.

  11. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#341474-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_April_-_June_2005.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF Official Contact ListInterim166 2005

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#345139-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Oct-Dec_2005.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF Official Contact ListInterim1661 20055

  13. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#350832-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_April-June_2006.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF Official ContactJanuary

  14. Microsoft Word - N0071600-NAPL-Oct to Dec.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF OfficialJulyMaybell,647005-TAC

  15. Microsoft Word - N0074600-NAPL-Jan to March.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF OfficialJulyMaybell,647005-TACJanuary

  16. Birori Goa Lima Mexico City Lisbon Naples Palermo Seville Soriano Liampo Villanovafranca Beyond Italy and New Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Italy and New Spain Itineraries for an Iberian Art History (1440-1640) Convened by Michael Cole Iberian Europe to the Kingdom of the New Spain. New proposals of itineraries for the origin and interpretation of corn cane sculptures Joana Barreto (Villa Medici, Rome): Spain, Italy, Flanders: Some Dynamics

  17. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#102768-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Report_Jan-March_2005.ƒ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF Official Contact ListInterim16 U.S.

  18. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#344133-v1-Final_NAPL_Quarterly_July-Sept_2005.Dƒ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF Official Contact ListInterim1661 2005

  19. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#99768-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Report_for_July-Sept_20ƒ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF OfficialJuly Through September

  20. The determination of sulfur-containing surfactants with a high pressure liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobill, Jonathan Edward

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the blank millivolt intensities 78 17 Average millivolt intensities for the nickel standard solution 79 Table Page 18 Standard deviations of the nickel standard millivolt intensities 80 19 Slopes of the calibration lines calculated from the blank... widely used sulfur-containing surfactants. The alkylbenzenesulfonates 1 strongly absorb in the UV region and, therefore are easily monitored by UV detectors. Other surfactants, such as alkyl sulfates 2 [13-17], alpha olefin sulfonates 3 [16...

  1. Giambattista Della Porta's Histrionic Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodera, Sergius

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    istituzioni, culture di governo. Naples: Arte Tipografica,istituzioni, culture di governo (Naples: Arte criminals oversociale in Italia ed il governo di Filippo II” in Napoli e

  2. Mapping DNAPL transport contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers with high resolution borehole seismic imaging Project No. SF11SS13 FY01 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, J.T.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Williams, K.H.; Flexser, S.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the work performed in the first year of a three-year project funded by the USDOE's Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA). The objectives of this project are to develop, demonstrate and evaluate, at appropriate field sites, the utility of high frequency seismic imaging methods to detect and characterize non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers. Field tests consist of crosswell seismic tomography acquired before, during and after any remediation action that would potentially affect fluid distributions. Where feasible, other characterization data is obtained, such as crosswell radar, borehole conductivity and cone penetration testing (CPT). Crosswell data are processed to obtain tomographic images, or two-dimensional distributions, of velocity and attenuation. The interpretation of the tomograms utilizes all available site characterization data to relate the geophysical attributes to lithology and fluid phase heterogeneities. Interpretations are validated by evaluation and testing of field cores. Laboratory tests on core retrieved from surveyed locations are performed to determine the relationships between geophysical parameters and solid and fluid phase composition. In the case of sedimentary aquifers, proof of principle has been demonstrated previously in homogeneous sand-packs at the centimeter and half-meter scale (Geller and Myer, 1995; Geller et al., 2000). The field tests will provide proof-of-principle at the field-scale, by working in an unconsolidated sand aquifer with known presence of NAPL. The ability to upscale from the laboratory to the field is evaluated by conducting field measurements over a range of frequencies that overlap the lowest frequencies used in the laboratory tests. In the fractured rock case, previous field work has shown that fracture zones can be detected by crosswell seismic tomography (Daley et al., 2001; Daley et al., 2000). Laboratory studies have demonstrated that the seismic wave signature is sensitive to the fracture stiffness, and that stiffness is affected by fracture-filling fluids (Pyrak-Nolte and Morris, 2000; Pyrak-Nolte, 1996). The field and laboratory experience provide a physical basis for the potential detection of fractures that would be the important flow paths for NAPL contaminants.

  3. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    square law for low voltage and current. At high current the resistance of the diode and the load re function. The curve for Rx 1. 5 K ohm follows the square law curve for outputs from 10 millivolts to 150 millivolts. The Rx = 1. 5 K ohm curve starts near the one-diode curve and ap- proaches the two-diode curve

  4. Groundwater Fate and Transport Modeling for Texarkana Wood Preserving Company Superfund Site, Texarkana, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, Ronald Chester

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fate and transport model results are presented for the Texarkana Wood Preserving Company (TWPC)superfund site. The conceptual model assumes two sources of contamination, specifically, the areas around the old and new process areas. Recent data show the presence of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in the aquifer that are also sources of dissolved contamination in the aquifer. A flow model was constructed and calibrated against measured hydraulic heads at permanent monitoring wells. Good matches were obtained between model simulated heads and most measured heads. An unexplained exception occurs at monitoring well MW-13 down gradient of the site beyond the measured contaminant plume where the model predicts heads that are more than 2 ft. lower than reported field measurements. Adjusting hydraulic parameters in the model could not account for this anomaly and still preserve the head matches at other wells. There is likely a moderate deficiency in the conceptual model or perhaps a data error. Other information such as substantial amounts of infiltrating surface water in the area or a correction in surveyed elevation would improve the flow model. A particle tracking model calculated a travel time from the new process area to the Day’s Creek discharge location on the order of 40 years. Travel times from the old process area to Day’s Creek were calculated to be on the order of 80 years. While these calculations are subject to some uncertainty, travel times of decades are indicated.

  5. Prediction of risk-based screening levels for infiltration of volatile subsurface contaminants into buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hers, I.; Zapf-Gilje, R.; Petrovic, S. [Golder Associates Ltd., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Macfarlane, M.; McLenehan, R. [British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Risk-Based Corrective Action (RBCA) approach is increasingly being used for the management of contaminated sites. Fundamental to this approach is the prediction of risk-based screening levels (RBSL) for operable exposure pathways. Screening level models currently used indicate that RBSLs for the indoor inhalation pathway can be significantly lower than other pathways typically considered. This paper presents the results of a screening level spreadsheet model used to predict human health risks resulting from infiltration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. The model was developed to derive RBSLs for soil and groundwater for possible future incorporation into the regulation of contaminated sites in British Columbia. Key features of the semi-analytical VOC infiltration model are steady-state diffusive mass transfer through soil coupled with advective and diffusive mass transfer through a cracked building floor slab or wall, source mass depletion of soil contaminants present using a mass balance approach, and the capability to incorporate multi-component chemical partitioning for soils containing non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL). The critical factors affecting VOC infiltration and resulting health risks are presented.

  6. Future Perspectives in melanoma research. Meeting report from the "Melanoma Research: a bridge from Naples to the World. Napoli, December 5th-6 th2011".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FUTURE PERSPECTIVES IN MELANOMA RESEARCH.Meeting report from the “Melanoma Research: a bridge fromFUTURE PERSPECTIVES IN MELANOMA RESEARCH. Meeting report

  7. To appear in the Proceedings of The Second International Conference on Energy Efficiency in Household Appliances, Naples (Italy), September 2000. Also published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Standby Power Consumption J.P. Ross University of California, Berkeley, USA Alan Meier Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA ABSTRACT We investigated the variation in standby power consumption in tenTo appear in the Proceedings of The Second International Conference on Energy Efficiency

  8. Systems integration and upgrade of an Engineering Flight Simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcorn, William Pleasant

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Training System Head-down-display Head-up-display Hertz (cycles per second) Level of detail Input / output Light emitting diode Multi Channel Option Millivolt SEI Serial Encoder Interface VME VERSA Module device TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT...

  9. Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunison, Douglas Irvin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

  10. Investigation of the Rechargeability of Li-O2 Batteries in Non...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Rechargeability of Li-O2 Batteries in Non-aqueous Electrolyte. Investigation of the Rechargeability of Li-O2 Batteries in Non-aqueous Electrolyte. Abstract: In order to...

  11. aqueous lithium hydroxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Prediction of the theoretical capacity of non-aqueous lithium-air batteries Peng Tan, Zhaohuan Wei of non-aqueous lithium-air batteries is predicted. Key...

  12. Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Joint Environmental & Geotechnical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    while permitting free flow of ground water and removing dissolved PAHs. Water migration in NAPL-solvated organoclay was minimal, but PAHs were released into water contacting NAPL-solvated organoclay. Column tests barrier (VPRB), which blocks the flow of NAPL, allows the flow of water, and sorbs dissolved organic

  13. ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S-based buffer layer deposition for solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides CBD ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S and spray deposited ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S buffer layers prepared from a solution of zinc salt, thiourea and ammonium hydroxide dissolved in a non-aqueous/aqueous solvent mixture or in 100% non-aqueous solvent. Non-aqueous solvents useful in the invention include methanol, isopropanol and triethyl-amine. One-step deposition procedures are described for CIS, CIGS and other solar cell devices.

  14. The Rise of Unconventional Political Participation in Italy: Measurement equivalence and trend over time, 1976-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaranta, Mario

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the large scale protests at the G8 summit in Naples indisorders during the Genoa G8 summit in 2001, demonstrations

  15. Low-frequency dilatational wave propagation through unsaturated porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, W.-C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water Permeability Porosity Residual water volume fractionwater Permeability Porosity Residual water volume fractionalthough strictly, residual water still exists at full NAPL

  16. STMVOC User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falta, R.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat capacity constant from Reid ct Format (5E12.5) RHOREF, TDENRF, DIFV0, TDIFRF, TEXPO RHOREF TDENRF reference NAPL (liquid)

  17. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, suppl6ment au n0ll, Tome 48, novembre 1987

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, suppl6ment au n0ll, Tome 48, novembre 1987 VERY LARGE PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECTS IN MODULATION-DOPED HETEROSTRUCTURES M.-H. MEYNADIER, N. TABATABAIE, R.E. NAHORY and J.P. HARBISON as high as several hundred millivolts between contacts centimeters away from the exciting spot. The effect

  18. Electric Organs and Their Control Angel Ariel Caputi, Bruce A. Carlson, and Omar Macadar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    410 14 Electric Organs and Their Control Angel Ariel Caputi, Bruce A. Carlson, and Omar Macadar 1 Organs and Their Control 411 microvolts to millivolt range near the mouth, and ventilatory movements to locate females buried under the sand during the breeding season (Tricas et al. 1995). It is likely

  19. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  20. A stochastic analysis of steady state two-phase flow in heterogeneous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    for cleaning jet engines). NAPL spills during transport and leaks from underground storage tanks have soil property field is developed using the Karhunen-Loeve moment equation (KLME) approach) facilities. NAPLs may be leaking from a damaged or decaying storage vessel (e.g., in a gasoline station

  1. Policy Analysis Risk Assessment for Polycyclic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    is manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites that produced a combustible gas from coal, coke, and/or oil. A major phase liquids (NAPLs), such as coal tar. These materials are very complex mixtures with the constituent byproduct of the coal gasification process was coal tar, a dense, viscous nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL

  2. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  3. Removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Torsten; Riemann, Christian; Bartling, Karsten; Rigby, Sean Taylor; Coleman, Luke James Ivor; Lail, Marty Alan

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream, such as flue gas, comprising: providing a non-aqueous absorption liquid containing at least one hydrophobic amine, the liquid being incompletely miscible with water; treating the fluid stream in an absorption zone with the non-aqueous absorption liquid to transfer at least part of the sulphur oxides into the non-aqueous absorption liquid and to form a sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex; causing the non-aqueous absorption liquid to be in liquid-liquid contact with an aqueous liquid whereby at least part of the sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex is hydrolyzed to release the hydrophobic amine and sulphurous hydrolysis products, and at least part of the sulphurous hydrolysis products is transferred into the aqueous liquid; separating the aqueous liquid from the non-aqueous absorption liquid. The process mitigates absorbent degradation problems caused by sulphur dioxide and oxygen in flue gas.

  4. Hydrophobic VOC absorption in two-phase partitioning bioreactors; influence of silicone oil volume fraction on absorber diameter.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Hydrophobic VOC absorption in two-phase partitioning bioreactors; influence of silicone oil of a mixture of an aqueous phase and a NAPL, before being introduced into a two-phase partitioning bioreactor

  5. A Cinematic Nation: Representation, Regionalism, and the National Question in Postwar Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepergerdes, Brent Jeffrey

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    with little industrial development outside of localized metallurgical, mining, and handcraft endeavors centered in Naples and Palermo. Some citrus crops and grains were exported to France, Spain, and North America, but ties to northern Italian markets were...

  6. Muscle news from around the world Report on the 3rd annual scientific meeting of the Asian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    prizes 2004 awarded at Ephesus Frank Lehmann-Horn, Georges Karpati, Corrado Angel- ini, Jane Miller of Ephesus in Turkey. On this occasion, the Gaetano-Conte Academy of Naples, engaged in the support

  7. Outer core density heterogeneity and the discrepancy between PKP and PcP travel time observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschi, Lapo

    . Soldati Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome, Italy L. Boschi Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy A. Piersanti Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia

  8. argon oxides: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jostlein, H; Lockwitz, S; Naples, D; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Schukraft, A; Strauss, T; Weber, M S; Wolbers, S A 2014-01-01 2 Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid...

  9. An efficient gradient method using the Yuan steplength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Computer, Control and Management Engineering “Antonio ... Department of Mathematics and Physics, Second University of Naples, Viale A. .... with the CG method when applied to more general problems than (1.1), e.g., when ...

  10. Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunison, Douglas Irvin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and cumulative production histories. The model is three dimensional and capable of modeling heterogeneity anisotropy. The SEAR simulator models mobilization of residual NAPL through the effects of surfactant on the relative permeability curves. The solubilization...

  11. Resonator Modes in High Gain Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers", Department ofModes in High Gain Free Electron Lasers M. Xie. D.A.O.International Free Electron Laser Conference. Naples. FL.

  12. Fluid Type Density 0.344 3.44E+02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    . Ajo-Franklin * Jil T. Geller (LBNL) Ernest L. Majer (LBNL) John E. Peterson (LBNL) Kenneth H. Williams (LBNL) Jerry M. Harris (Stanford) Integrated Geophysical Characterization Of A NAPL-Contaminated Site

  13. CX-003172: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RTI International - Novel Non-Aqueous Carbon Dioxide-Solvents and Capture ProcessCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/02/2010Location(s): North CarolinaOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  14. MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavior of Metals in Coal Slurries Erosion of Piping in aexposed to non-aqueous coal slurries .1 Both test conditionstemperature coal-solvent slurries are being studied. New

  15. EROSION-CORROSION-WEAR PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Alan V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEHAVIOR OF JVIETALS IN COAL SLURRIES t W. Tsai Figure 1bexposed to non-aqueous coal slurries. Both test conditionstemperature coal-solvent slurries are being studied. New

  16. TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Vijayakumar, M.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We will present a novel design lithium-organic non-aqueous redox flow battery based on a TEMPO catholyte. This RFB produced desired electrochemical performance exceeding most of the currently reported nonaqueous RFB systems.

  17. Towards High-Performance Nonaqueous Redox Flow Electrolyte through Ionic Modification of Active Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Xu, Wu; Hu, Jian Z.; Vijayakumar, M.; Feng, Ju; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We will present a novel design lithium-organic non-aqueous redox flow battery based on a modified ferrocene catholyte. This RFB produced desired electrochemical performance exceeding most of the currently reported nonaqueous RFB systems.

  18. Experimental and theoretical modeling of DNAPL transport in vertical fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Laurent Claude, 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, groundwater contamination by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has become an important environmental concern in many industrialized ...

  19. CX-012256: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/11/2014 Location(s): Norway Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. DNAPL remediation of fractured rock evaluated via numerical simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Ti Wee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured rock formations represent a valuable source of groundwater and can be highly susceptible to contamination by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The goal of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness ...

  1. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Lanthanide Organic Phase Complexes in the TALSPEAK Separations Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimes, Travis S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neodymium(III) and europium(III) at variable temperatures:study of complexation of europium and dicarboxylic acids.preferential salvation of europium(III) in water/non-aqueous

  2. A comparative study of analytical models to estimate the LNAPL mound formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashfaq

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is constant for the duration of the spreading. Secondly, the model does not consider the organic phase which is held up as residual saturation in the unsaturated zone above the water table. Holzer [1976] used the saltwater/freshwater analogy to study... hydrocarbon. Reible et al. , [1991] developed a model to describe the one-dimensional infiltra- tion of a NAPL through an unsaturated zone initially at residual water saturation. tion of a NAPL through an unsaturated zone initially at residual water...

  3. Electrodeposited Ag-Stabilization Layer for High Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, R. N.; Mann, J.; Qiao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a non-aqueous based electrodepostion process of Ag-stabilization layer on YBCO superconductor tapes. The non-aqueous electroplating solution is non-reactive to the HTS layer thus does not detoriate the critical current capability of the superconductor layer when plated directly on the HTS tape. The superconducting current capabilities of these tapes were measured by non-contact magnetic measurements.

  4. Solvated electron lithium electrode for high energy density battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1987-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A rechargeable high energy density lithium-based cell is described comprising: a solvated electron lithium negative electrode comprising a solution of lithium dissolved in liquid ammonia; a lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte contacting the negative electrode; a liquid non-aqueous lithium ion conducting electrolyte comprising a lithium ion conducting supporting electrolyte dissolved in a non-aqueous solvent. The liquid electrolyte contacting the lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte; and a solid lithium intercalation positive electrode contacting the liquid electrolyte.

  5. Scaling fluid content-pressure relations of different fluid systems in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenhard, R.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-fluid-phase relations among fluid saturations (S) and pressures (P) have historically been used to predict S-P relations for three-fluid-phase systems consisting of a gas, nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL), and water, because measurements of three-phase S-P relations are complex. Two-phase S-P relations of air-NAPL systems are generally used to predict the behavior between total-liquid saturations of three-phase systems and air-NAPL capillary pressures. Two-phase S-P relations of NAPL-water systems are generally used to predict the behavior between water saturations of three-phase systems and NAPL-water capillary pressures. Because S-P measurements are very time-consuming, investigators have attempted to scale S-P relations so that fewer measurements would be required. A S-P scaling technique is discussed in this paper, and methods to predict the scaling factors are evaluated.

  6. Enzocide - a chemical dip for the reduction of Salmonella on chicken breast skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchi, Aldo

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Kansas City, MO) to a final product temperature of 79'C. Each sample was combined with three times as much water as the sample weight and blended in a Virtis Homogenizer 23 (Gardiner, NY) for one minute. Replicates of each sample were then placed... was connected to a Corning Science Products 240 pH meter (Corning, NY). Fifty mL of unknown solution and was added 1 mL of the 5 M NaNO, ionic strength adjustor solution to a 100 mL beaker and stirred. Millivolt readings were recorded after the solution had...

  7. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a current transformer for operating currents larger than 2kA (two kiloamps) that is capable of detecting a millivolt level resistive voltage in the presence of a large inductive voltage. Specifically, the present invention includes substantially cylindrical primary turns arranged to carry a primary current and substantially cylindrical secondary turns arranged coaxially with and only partially within the primary turns, the secondary turns including an active winding and a dummy winding, the active and dummy windings being coaxial, longitudinally separated and arranged to mutually cancel voltages excited by commonly experienced magnetic fields, the active winding but not the dummy winding being arranged within the primary turns.

  8. The investigation of atmospheric humidity control by hot gas reheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitlock, Paul Leroy

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Number 1, 2, and 3 24 10 Psychrometric Chart with the Processes of Runs Number 1, 2, and 3 Superimposed Upon One Another 25 Nossle Performance Curvos 31 vi LIST OF SM30LS ~Sbol OF ~tit Cubic feet per minute Constant pressure specific heat... tempera- ture L2/T2 in. Hg in, H2O MV PD psig sp gr tdb Inches of mercury Inches of water Pounds mass Pounds mass dry air Pounds mass water vapor Millivolt s Pressure diff'erential (in. Hg) Gage pressure Heat added or re...

  9. Negative electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John T.; Fransson, Linda M.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative electrode is disclosed for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell. The electrode has an intermetallic compound as its basic structural unit with the formula M.sub.2 M' in which M and M' are selected from two or more metal elements including Si, and the M.sub.2 M' structure is a Cu.sub.2 Sb-type structure. Preferably M is Cu, Mn and/or Li, and M' is Sb. Also disclosed is a non-aqueous electrochemical cell having a negative electrode of the type described, an electrolyte and a positive electrode. A plurality of cells may be arranged to form a battery.

  10. Thin film superconductors and process for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of oxide superconductors from high-viscosity non-aqueous solution is described. Solutions of lanthanide nitrates, alkaline earth nitrates and copper nitrates in a 1:2:3 stoichiometric ratio, when added to ethylene glycol containing citric acid solutions, have been used to prepare highly viscous non-aqueous solutions of metal mixed nitrates-citrates. Thin films of these compositions are produced when a layer of the viscous solution is formed on a substrate and subjected to thermal decomposition.

  11. Lithium-titanium-oxide anodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kahaian, Arthur J. (Chicago, IL); Jansen, Andrew N. (Bolingbrook, IL); Chen, Chun-hua (Westmont, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spinel-type structure with the general formula Li[Ti.sub.1.67 Li.sub.0.33-y M.sub.y ]O.sub.4, for 0non-aqueous electrochemical cell and in a non-aqueous battery comprising an plurality of cells, electrically connected, each cell comprising a negative electrode, an electrolyte and a positive electrode, the negative electrode consisting of the spinel-type structure disclosed.

  12. Real-Time Evolutionary Earthquake Location for Seismic Early Warning by Claudio Satriano, Anthony Lomax, and Aldo Zollo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Lomax, and Aldo Zollo Abstract An effective early-warning system must provide probabilistic estimates. With an early-warning system, alarm mes- sages could be sent to critical sites in Naples 20 or more secondsReal-Time Evolutionary Earthquake Location for Seismic Early Warning by Claudio Satriano, Anthony

  13. Copyright 2009 The Author(s) Journal compilation 2009 National Ground Water Association.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Copyright © 2009 The Author(s) Journal compilation © 2009 National Ground Water Association. NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 29, no. 3/ Summer 2009/pages 93­104 93 Pore Water Characteristics/day. This model aquifer system contained a residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) that extended from

  14. Euro Chordates: Ascidian Community Swims Ahead. The 4th International Tunicate Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    in the early 1990s, that is just before siRNA gene interference was discovered, leading to an explosive growth, Japan 4 Shimoda Marine Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Shimoda, Shizuoka, Japan 5 Stazione Zoologica "Anton Dohrn", Naples, Italy 6 Sars Centre for Marine Molecular Biology, Bergen High Technology

  15. Earthquake early warning: Concepts, methods and physical grounds Claudio Satriano a,c,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    methodologies and procedures have been studied and developed. The leading experience of countries like Japan Federico II, Naples, Italy d Seismological Laboratory California Institute of Technology, USA a r t i c l e July 2010 a b s t r a c t Modern technology allows real-time seismic monitoring facilities to evolve

  16. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 426429, 1999 Printed in the USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    UNIFAC. The NAPL phase activity coefficients for constituent compounds of four different coal tar, with the majority of activity coefficients in the range of 0.9 to 1.1. These results provide a firm theoretical--Nonaqueous phase liquid Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Coal tar UNIFAC Multicomponent INTRODUCTION Many

  17. Pore-scale characteristics of multiphase flow in porous media: A comparison of airwater and oilwater experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    Pore-scale characteristics of multiphase flow in porous media: A comparison of air­water and oil Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Multi-phase flow; NAPLs; Porous media; Microtomography; Interfacial areas; Capillary pressure­saturation curves 1. Introduction Understanding of multiphase flow

  18. Management of Large-Scale International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Shore C. Strawbridge G. Zollo Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA Savannah River National Laboratory, USA River National Laboratory December 3, 2009 Fusion Power Associates Thirty-year Anniversary Meeting Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA University of Naples Federico, Secundo, Italy #12;Project

  19. From Requirements Documents to Feature Models for Aspect Oriented Product Line Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) The NAPLES approach addresses product line (PL) engineering throughout the lifecycle by using differentFrom Requirements Documents to Feature Models for Aspect Oriented Product Line Implementation Neil, Lancaster LA1 4WA, UK (loughran | a.sampaio | awais) @comp.lancs.ac.uk Abstract. Software product line

  20. Paper A-35, in: V.S. Magar and M.E. Kelley (Eds.), In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation--2003. Proceedings of the Seventh International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Orlando, FL; June 2003). ISBN 1-57477-139-6, published by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    Paper A-35, in: V.S. Magar and M.E. Kelley (Eds.), In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation--2003. Proceedings of the Seventh International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Orlando, FL; June 2003 washing, or vapor extraction than through bioremediation. Removal of NAPL through solvent extraction would

  1. Report of GWC participation at Torino, Italy 2 Meeting of MatER (WTERT-Italy), 12-14 September

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such plants in Naples and in Parma). The Gasification Plant (Thermoselect) in Rome does not operate, the other new under development Gasification Plant in Albano is on #12; 2 stand-by. 2. WGER meeting operation. He also provided updated information regarding the new Plasma Gasification by Europlasma

  2. A model for enhanced fluid percolation in porous media by application of low-frequency elastic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beresnev, Igor

    , primarily in connection with the appli- cations to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and remediation of nonaqueousA model for enhanced fluid percolation in porous media by application of low-frequency elastic can significantly enhance transport of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in porous media. Our analyses

  3. MODAL PARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR OPERATIONAL WIND TURBINES Emilio Di Lorenzo1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MODAL PARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR OPERATIONAL WIND TURBINES Emilio Di Lorenzo1, 2 , Simone Manzato1 Claudio 21, 80125 Naples, Italy emilio.dilorenzo@lmsintl.com ABSTRACT Wind turbines are time. This assumption holds in the case of parked wind turbines, but not in the case of operating wind turbines

  4. CURRICULUM VITAE Kathryn Bard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    of Naples "l'Orientale"/Boston University Excavations at Mersa/Wadi Gawasis, Egypt Degrees: Ph. Manzo. Mersa/Wadi Gawasis. A Pharaonic Harbor on the Red Sea. Cairo: Supreme Council of Antiquities-editor, with R. Fattovich, Harbor of the Pharaohs to the Land of Punt. Archaeological Investigations at Mersa/Wadi

  5. A stochastic analysis of transient two-phase flow in heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    the finite element heat and mass (FEHM) transfer code, whose results are considered ``true'' solutions equation (KLME) approach is implemented to model stochastic transient water-NAPL two-phase flow model and Parker and Lenhard models are adopted. The log-transformed intrinsic permeability, soil pore

  6. LEACHING BEHAVIOR OF PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON CONTENT FLY ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    . Approximately 90% of the coal used in United States is burned to produce electricity. As a result, the power and o-xylene, and a tertiary model non-aqueous phase liquid were used as the pollutants in batch for alternative approaches, such as soil stabilization by addition of a binder to adsorb the pollutant(s) while

  7. A novel, single-isomer, sulfated cyclodextrin for use as a chiral resolving agent in capillary electrophoresis: the sodium salt of octakis(2,3-di-O-methyl-6-O-sulfo)-?-cyclodextrin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busby, Michael Brent

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel, single-isomer, sulfated cyclodextrin, the sodium salt of octakis(2,3-di-O-methyl-6-O-sulfo)cyclomaltooctaose (ODMS) was used as a chiral resolving agent in both aqueous and non-aqueous chiral mediated electrophoretic separation of a large...

  8. On Gravity Currents in Heterogeneous Porous Media Daniel M. Andersona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Daniel M.

    methods based upon the injection of a dense brine, which is used to restrict the movement of dense non-aqueous phase liquids and aid remediation [1­3]. For such systems, the behavior of the brine as a function, the behavior of brines under such conditions is of central interest. In previous work [4], hereafter referred

  9. This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 6179

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    successfully been applied as alternative solvents for homogeneous catalysis. Non Aqueous Ionic Liquids [NAILs catalysis in industry as well. In commercial processes, which use pure olefin as feedstock, values of Turn systems have opened a new perspective for transition metal complex driven homogeneous catalysis after

  10. motion of crystalline domains in an otherwise rigid solid-state Received 7 January; accepted 10 June 2002; doi:10.1038/nature00901.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    non- aqueous cells. J. Power Sources 14, 153­166 (1985). 3. Ohzuku, T. & Hirai, T. An electrochromic., Morzilli, S. & Scrosati, B. The electrochromic characteristics of titanium oxide thin film electrodes. Solid State Ionics 20, 197­202 (1986). 5. Cantao, M. P., Cisneros, J. I. & Torresi, R. M. Electrochromic

  11. Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will develop a chemical model, based on existing models and databases, that is capable of simulating chemical reactions between supercritical (SC) CO2 and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir rocks of various compositions in aqueous, non-aqueous and 2-phase environments.

  12. Electrode compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.; Fan, X.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

  13. CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

  15. Capillary exit pressure as a basin sealing mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shosa, J.; Cathles, L. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abnormally pressured compartments in sedimentary basins require an efficient sealing mechanism. Most sealing mechanisms rely on either intrinsically low formation permeabilities or on the entry pressure of a non-aqueous phase into a fine-grained unit. However, the nanodarcy permeabilities required to maintain overpressures over significant geologic time are not plausible over wide areas. Entry pressures, while effective in trapping a non-aqueous phase in a local reservoir, can not prevent leakage where the non-aqueous phase is not ponded against the seal. The capillary exit pressure required to displace water from a fine-grained formation into a coarse-grained formation which contains a non-aqueous phase provides an alternative sealing mechanism. Capillary exit pressure seals require contrasts in grain size and the presence of two phases in the coarse-grained unit, but do not require 100% saturation of the non-aqueous phase. These conditions can exist on all sides of a pressure compartment, and can account for sealing on the top, bottom, and sides of a compartment. We have shown in the laboratory that capillary exit pressure seals under reservoir conditions allow no fluid flow across the seal until a threshold pressure is exceeded (e.g., the seat is not a relative permeability effect) and that exit pressures are additive over a series of fine/coarse interfaces. Capillary exit pressure seals can maintain the abnormal pressures observed in the South Eugene Island Block 330 field. Both a sufficient number of sand/shale layers and a gas phase are present in the pressure transition zone there. We believe capillary exit pressure seals are a general feature of sedimentary basins and are important in controlling large scale fluid flow.

  16. Capillary exit pressure as a basin sealing mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shosa, J.; Cathles, L. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abnormally pressured compartments in sedimentary basins require an efficient sealing mechanism. Most sealing mechanisms rely on either intrinsically low formation permeabilities or on the entry pressure of a non-aqueous phase into a fine-grained unit. However, the nanodarcy permeabilities required to maintain overpressures over significant geologic time are not plausible over wide areas. Entry pressures, while effective in trapping a non-aqueous phase in a local reservoir, can not prevent leakage where the non-aqueous phase is not ponded against the seal. The capillary exit pressure required to displace water from a fine-grained formation into a coarse-grained formation which contains a non-aqueous phase provides an alternative sealing mechanism. Capillary exit pressure seals require contrasts in grain size and the presence of two phases in the coarse-grained unit, but do not require 100% saturation of the non-aqueous phase. These conditions can exist on all sides of a pressure compartment, and can account for sealing on the top, bottom, and sides of a compartment. We have shown in the laboratory that capillary exit pressure seals under reservoir conditions allow no fluid flow across the seal until a threshold pressure is exceeded (e.g., the seat is not a relative permeability effect) and that exit pressures are additive over a series of fine/coarse interfaces. Capillary exit pressure seals can maintain the abnormal pressures observed in the South Eugene Island Block 330 field. Both a sufficient number of sand/shale layers and a gas phase are present in the pressure transition zone there. We believe capillary exit pressure seals are a general feature of sedimentary basins and are important in controlling large scale fluid flow.

  17. Landscape of superconducting membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederik Denef; Sean A. Hartnoll

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The AdS/CFT correspondence may connect the landscape of string vacua and the `atomic landscape' of condensed matter physics. We study the stability of a landscape of IR fixed points of N=2 large N gauge theories in 2+1 dimensions, dual to Sasaki-Einstein compactifications of M theory, towards a superconducting state. By exhibiting instabilities of charged black holes in these compactifications, we show that many of these theories have charged operators that condense when the theory is placed at a finite chemical potential. We compute a statistical distribution of critical superconducting temperatures for a subset of these theories. With a chemical potential of one milliVolt, we find critical temperatures ranging between 0.24 and 165 degrees Kelvin.

  18. CONTRIBUTING TO THE DISCUSSIONS ON THE FUNDAMENTAL ASPECTS AND COMPLEXITIES OF TALSPEAK CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter R. Zalupski; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When liquid-liquid distribution of lanthanides was monitored at Talspeak-related conditions a characteristic drop in the extraction efficiency was observed at high lactate concentrations. The lactate dependency trend also appears to be directly affected by the increasing complexity of the non-aqueous environment. Some considerations of the non-ideal solution behavior in aqueous and organic environment are presented here in an attempt to explain the observed metal partitioning trends. While the mechanism of metal ion phase transfer appears to adhere to the conventional thermodynamic struggle between HDEHP and DTPA, the diminished metal distribution and suppressed slopes for the extractant dependencies suggest further build-up in the complexity of the non-aqueous environment in Talspeak systems.

  19. Method of remediation of contaminants in porous media through minimization of bouyancy effects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shook, G. Michael (Rigby, ID); Pope, Gary A. (Austin, TX)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for controlling vertical migration of contaminants in an aquifer includes introduction of a solubilizing solution having a surfactant and an alcohol or other light co-solvent. The surfactant is selected to solubilize the contaminant. The alcohol or other solvent is selected to provide the microemulsion with a substantially neutral buoyancy with respect to groundwater. The neutral buoyancy of the microemulsion prevents the normal downward movement which is typical of the solubilized dense non-aqueous phase liquid in surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation. Thus, the risk that any significant amount of the solubilized dense non-aqueous contaminants will migrate vertically can be controlled. The relative tendency for vertical migration may also be reduced by increasing the injection rate or injected fluid viscosity (by adding polymer), or by reducing the well spacing.

  20. Available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/watres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    -grade ethanol transport and impacts to groundwater in a pilot-scale aquifer tank Natalie L. Ca´piroa,�, Brent P September 2006 Available online 28 November 2006 Keywords: Fuel-grade ethanol Capillary-zone Hydrocarbons Groundwater NAPL Vadose-zone Capillary-fringe Ethanol A B S T R A C T Fuel-grade ethanol (76 L of E95, 95% v

  1. An investigation of pneumatic control on immiscible contaminant migration in confined aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, John David

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? dimensional (vertical and lateral) finite ? element contaminant groundwater simulator to investigate the migration of NAPL's in the unsaturated zone. The physical conception of this model is based upon the salt/fresh water interface problem occurring..., or the use of water-flooding in secondary recovery operations. " Faust[1985] and Faust et uk[1989] attested to the validity of known and accepted petroleum engineering mathematical models used to describe multiphase flow through porous media. Osborne...

  2. Reduction of Perchlorate and Nitrate by Aluminum Activated by pH Change and Electrochemically Induced Pitting Corrosion.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raut Desai, Aditya B.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    for separation are ion exchange, adsorption on granular activated carbon, cationic-substance coated material, membrane filtration, capacitive deionization/carbon aerogel (Sellers 2007). Of the above mentioned processes only ion exchange resins, granular... evenly distributed among four oxygen atoms (Gu and Coates 2006). The low charge density and large ionic size of perchlorate ion is responsible for its decreased affinity for cations, making it highly soluble in aqueous and non-aqueous media (Gu...

  3. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  4. Simplified one-pot synthesis of [.sup.18F]SFB for radiolabeling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olma, Sebastian; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-aqueous single pot synthesis of [.sup.18F]SFB is set forth. The [.sup.18F]SFB produced with this method is then used, for example, to label a peptide or an engineered antibody fragment (diabody) targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as representative examples of labeled compounds for use as an injectable composition to locate abnormal tissue, specifically tumors within an animal or human using a PET scan.

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colioque C3, supplkment au n06, Tome 44,juin 1983 page C3-579

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . This synthesis was also performed in a non aqueous medium pyrrole, N ( ~ t ) ~ BF4 in CH3CN, by DIAZ et a1J/mole. The electrochemical synthesis of polypyrrole films has been performed by DALL'OLIO et a1 in 1968 (1). The medium used was a solution of pyrrole and sulphuric acid in water. The polypyrrole film obtained was in the oxidation state

  6. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  7. Membrane reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.; Bloom, I.D.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A reference electrode utilizes a small thin, flat membrane of a highly conductive glass placed on a small diameter insulator tube having a reference material inside in contact with an internal voltage lead. When the sensor is placed in a non-aqueous ionic electrolytic solution, the concentration difference across the glass membrane generates a low voltage signal in precise relationship to the concentration of the species to be measured, with high spatial resolution. 2 figs.

  8. A/M Area DNAPL characterization report for cores collected in 2Q99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas , K.M.

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling activities were conducted in the second quarter of 1999 in the A/M Area to further delineate the soil contamination and potential areas of dense non-aqueous phase liquids below the water table emanating from the M-Basin. The purpose of the work was to further understand the subsurface contaminant distribution and to identify locations below the water table where aggressive DNAPL remediation technologies should be pursued.

  9. Influence of Wetting and Mass Transfer Properties of Organic Chemical Mixtures in Vadose Zone Materials on Groundwater Contamination by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles J Werth; Albert J Valocchi, Hongkyu Yoon

    2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have found that organic acids, organic bases, and detergent-like chemicals change surface wettability. The wastewater and NAPL mixtures discharged at the Hanford site contain such chemicals, and their proportions likely change over time due to reaction-facilitated aging. The specific objectives of this work were to (1) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on surface wettability, (2) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on CCl4 volatilization rates from NAPL, and (3) accurately determine the migration, entrapment, and volatilization of organic chemical mixtures. Five tasks were proposed to achieve the project objectives. These are to (1) prepare representative batches of fresh and aged NAPL-wastewater mixtures, (2) to measure interfacial tension, contact angle, and capillary pressure-saturation profiles for the same mixtures, (3) to measure interphase mass transfer rates for the same mixtures using micromodels, (4) to measure multiphase flow and interphase mass transfer in large flow cell experiments, all using the same mixtures, and (5) to modify the multiphase flow simulator STOMP in order to account for updated P-S and interphase mass transfer relationships, and to simulate the impact of CCl4 in the vadose zone on groundwater contamination. Results and findings from these tasks and summarized in the attached final report.

  10. Proceedings of the international workshop on measurement and computation of turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, R.S. [ed.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the proceedings of the International Workshop on Measurement and Computation of Turbulent Nonpremixed Flames, held in Naples, Italy on July 26--27, 1996. Contents include materials that were distributed to participants at the beginning of the workshop, as well as a Summary of Workshop Accomplishments that was generated at the close to this Naples meeting. The Naples workshop involved sixty-one people from eleven countries. The primary objectives were: (1) to select a set of well-documented and relatively simple flames that would be appropriate for collaborative comparisons of model predictions; and (2) to specify common submodels to be used in these predictions, such that models for the coupling of turbulence and chemistry might be isolated and better understood. Studies involve hydrogen and natural gas fuels. These proceedings are also published on the Web and those interested in the ongoing process of data selection and model comparison should consult the workshop page for the most recent and complete information on these collaborative research efforts. The URL is: http://www/ca.sandia/gov/tdf/Workshop.html.

  11. Subjects: Trematoda And Trematode Diseases, Part 1: Supergenera and Genera A and B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Roach, Katharine F.; Breen, Virginia L.

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hauteur de la pointe du Raz). --Han- son, M. L., 1950a, 8 5, 86, 87(Bermuda). --Linton, E., 1940a, 146 - 147 (Mola mola;Woods Hole, Massachusetts). megnini (J. Poirier, 1885) Dollfus, R. P. F.,1946k,74. nigroflavum (Rudolphi, 1819) Robinson, V. C...., 1934a, 349(Orthagoriscus mola). --Dollfus, R. P. , 1935g, 212, 213-214, 216,figs. 5-6(Mola mola;cote atlanti- que d'Europe, de Naples, de l'ile d'Elbe, Mola nasus; Warberg, Sweden); 1946k, 74 (=A. megnini (J. Poirier, 1885)) (Mofa moia). - Guiart...

  12. Chemical overcharge protection of lithium and lithium-ion secondary batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Rohan, James F. (Cork City, IE); Foo, Conrad C. (Dedham, MA); Pasquariello, David M. (Pawtucket, RI)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention features the use of redox reagents, dissolved in non-aqueous electrolytes, to provide overcharge protection for cells having lithium metal or lithium-ion negative electrodes (anodes). In particular, the invention features the use of a class of compounds consisting of thianthrene and its derivatives as redox shuttle reagents to provide overcharge protection. Specific examples of this invention are thianthrene and 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene. One example of a rechargeable battery in which 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene is used has carbon negative electrode (anode) and spinet LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4 positive electrode (cathode).

  13. Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

  14. Chemical overcharge protection of lithium and lithium-ion secondary batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, K.M.; Rohan, J.F.; Foo, C.C.; Pasquariello, D.M.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention features the use of redox reagents, dissolved in non-aqueous electrolytes, to provide overcharge protection for cells having lithium metal or lithium-ion negative electrodes (anodes). In particular, the invention features the use of a class of compounds consisting of thianthrene and its derivatives as redox shuttle reagents to provide overcharge protection. Specific examples of this invention are thianthrene and 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene. One example of a rechargeable battery in which 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene is used has carbon negative electrode (anode) and spinet LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} positive electrode (cathode). 8 figs.

  15. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen [Mesa, AZ; Xu, Wu [Tempe, AZ

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  16. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Tempe, AZ)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  17. Anodes for rechargeable lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kepler, Keith D. (Mountain View, CA); Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative electrode (12) for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell (10) with an intermetallic host structure containing two or more elements selected from the metal elements and silicon, capable of accommodating lithium within its crystallographic host structure such that when the host structure is lithiated it transforms to a lithiated zinc-blende-type structure. Both active elements (alloying with lithium) and inactive elements (non-alloying with lithium) are disclosed. Electrochemical cells and batteries as well as methods of making the negative electrode are disclosed.

  18. Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Liu, Jun (Naperville, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Lu, Wenquan (Darien, IL)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In some embodiments the additives include a substituted or unsubstituted cyclic or spirocyclic hydrocarbon containing at least one oxygen atom and at least one alkenyl or alkynyl group. When used in electrochemical devices with, e.g., lithium manganese oxide spinel electrodes or olivine or carbon-coated olivine electrodes, the new electrolytes provide batteries with improved calendar and cycle life.

  19. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Kim, Jaekook (Naperville, IL)

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  20. Chemically modified graphite for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to chemically modified graphite particles: (a) that are useful in alkali metal-containing electrode of a electrochemical cell comprising: (1) the electrode, (2) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent which solvent tends to decompose when the electrochemical cell is in use, and an electrically conductive salt of an alkali metal, and (3) a counter electrode; and (b) that are chemically modified with fluorine, chlorine, iodine or phosphorus to reduce such decomposition. This invention also relates to electrodes comprising such chemically modified graphite and a binder and to electrochemical cells containing such electrodes. 3 figs.

  1. Influence of Controlled Viscous Dissipation on the Propagation of Strongly Nonlinear Waves in Stainless Steel Based Phononic Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. B. Herbold; V. F. Nesterenko; C. Daraio

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Strongly nonlinear phononic crystals were assembled from stainless steel spheres. Single solitary waves and splitting of an initial pulse into a train of solitary waves were investigated in different viscous media using motor oil and non-aqueous glycerol to introduce a controlled viscous dissipation. Experimental results indicate that the presence of a viscous fluid dramatically altered the splitting of the initial pulse into a train of solitary waves. Numerical simulations qualitatively describe the observed phenomena only when a dissipative term based on the relative velocity between particles is introduced.

  2. Semiconductor electrochemistry coal pyrite. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrite dissolution in acidic solution was found to involve both electrochemical oxidation and chemical decomposition. The mechanism of chemical decomposition of pyrite in acidic solution may involve surface complexation of hydrogen ions. The anodic current of pyrite was relatively small in non-aqueous solution (acetonitrile) compared with that in aqueous solution. The implication is that the direct reaction of holes with S{sub 2}{sup 2{minus}} in the pyrite lattice was not significant and that the dissolution of pyrite required the presence of water. The anodic dissolution product was elemental sulfur which was detected by X-ray diffraction.

  3. Guidelines for 90% accuracy in zone isolation decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, D.D.; McGhee, B.F.; McGuire, J.A.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technological advances in the logging industry are causing marked improvements in cement bond log recordings. New presentations of the travel time, amplitude and wave train measurements are increasing the reliability and effective use of cement bond log instrumentation. Examples show how these new presentations can be used more effectively. These presentations are especially adaptable to increasing effective use in hard formation applications. A completely new, uniquely fast and simple quantitative interpretation method has been developed. This new method is essentially a graphical solution which allows direct receiver outputs to be easily converted to percent bonded cement by acknowledging the logarithmic response of sound attenuation. This method is not affected by pipe size, weight, thickness, or cement compressive strength as long as they care constant. It is also adaptable to practically all logs run by the various service companies as long as presentations are maintained within guidelines discussed herein. It makes little difference whether the amplitude curve is recorded in millivolts, percentage, chart divisions, etc., again, with only minor restrictions. This interpretation method has been field tested for several years and results indicate that when cement bond logs are run within the guidelines presented, the decisions made have been over 90% successful.

  4. Fundamental measure theory for the electric double layer: implications for blue-energy harvesting and water desalination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Härtel; Mathijs Janssen; Sela Samin; René van Roij

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacitive mixing (CAPMIX) and capacitive deionization (CDI) are promising candidates for harvesting clean, renewable energy and for the energy efficient production of potable water, respectively. Both CAPMIX and CDI involve water-immersed porous carbon (supercapacitors) electrodes at voltages of the order of hundreds of millivolts, such that counter-ionic packing is important for the electric double layer (EDL) which forms near the surface of these porous materials. Thus, we propose a density functional theory (DFT) to model the EDL, where the White-Bear mark II fundamental measure theory functional is combined with a mean-field Coulombic and a mean spherical approximation-type correction to describe the interplay between dense packing and electrostatics, in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss the concentration-dependent potential rise due to changes in the chemical potential in capacitors in the context of an over-ideal theoretical description and its impact on energy harvesting and water desalination. Compared to less elaborate mean-field models our DFT calculations reveal a higher work output for blue-energy cycles and a higher energy demand for desalination cycles.

  5. Chemical oxidation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, D.D.; Siegrist, R.L.; Cline, S.R.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface contamination with fuel hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is prevalent throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and in many sites managed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program. The most commonly reported chlorinated hydrocarbons (occurring > 50% of DOE contaminated sites) were trichloroethylene (TCE), 1, 1, 1,-trichloroethane (TCA), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with concentrations in the range of 0.2 {mu}g/kg to 12,000 mg/kg. The fuel hydrocarbons most frequently reported as being present at DOE sites include aromatic compounds and polyaromatic compounds such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and naphthalene. The primary sources of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are coal waste from coal fired electric power plants used at many of these facilities in the past and gasoline spills and leaks. Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) can migrate within the subsurface for long periods of time along a variety of pathways including fractures, macropores, and micropores. Diffusion of contaminants in the non-aqueous, aqueous, and vapor phase can occur from the fractures and macropores into the matrix of fine-textured media. As a result of these contamination processes, removal of contaminants from the subsurface and the delivery of treatment agents into and throughout contaminated regions are often hindered, making rapid and extensive remediation difficult.

  6. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Development of Computational Models for Pyrochemical Electrorefiners of Nuclear Waste Transmutation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.F. Simpson; K.-R. Kim

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of closing the nuclear fuel cycle using non-aqueous separations technology, this project aims to develop computational models of electrorefiners based on fundamental chemical and physical processes. Spent driver fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is currently being electrorefined in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). And Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing electrorefining technology for future application to spent fuel treatment and management in the Republic of Korea (ROK). Electrorefining is a critical component of pyroprocessing, a non-aqueous chemical process which separates spent fuel into four streams: (1) uranium metal, (2) U/TRU metal, (3) metallic high-level waste containing cladding hulls and noble metal fission products, and (4) ceramic high-level waste containing sodium and active metal fission products. Having rigorous yet flexible electrorefiner models will facilitate process optimization and assist in trouble-shooting as necessary. To attain such models, INL/UI has focused on approaches to develop a computationally-light and portable two-dimensional (2D) model, while KAERI/SNU has investigated approaches to develop a computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) model for detailed and fine-tuned simulation.

  7. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  8. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  9. Leaching of BTEX from Aged Crude Oil Contaminated Model Soils: Experimental and Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally assumed that soil properties such as organic matter content, porosity, and mineral surface area have a significant effect on the bioavailability and leachability of aged petroleum hydrocarbons. In order to test this hypothesis, nine model soils or sorbents (i.e., fine and coarse quartz sand, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay, peat, 60? and 150? silica gel, a loam soil, and non-porous glass beads) were spiked with a crude oil, aged for 27 months in the laboratory, and transferred to glass columns for the performance of continuous flow leaching experiments. The column effluents were periodically sampled for 43 days and analyzed for BTEX. A one-dimensional flow model for predicting the dissolution and dispersion of individual hydrocarbons from a multi-component NAPL such as crude oil was used to fit the leaching data (i.e., the BTEX concentration versus time curves) by adjusting the equilibrium oil-leachate partitioning coefficient (Kol) for each respective hydrocarbon. The Peclet number, which is a measure of dispersion and a required modeling parameter, was measured in separate chloride tracer experiments for each soil column. Results demonstrate that soil properties did not significantly affect the leaching kinetics of BTEX from the columns. Instead, BTEX leaching curves could be successfully fitted with the one-dimensional NAPL dissolution flow model for all sorbents with the exception of montmorillonite clay. The fitting parameter Kol for each hydrocarbon was found to be similar to the Kol values that were independently measured for the same crude oil by Rixey et al. (Journal of Hazardous Materials B, 65: 137-156, 1999). In addition, the fitted Kol values were very similar for BTEX leaching from aged compared to freshly spiked loam soil. These findings indicate that leaching of BTEX in the aged soils that are contaminated with crude oil at the high concentrations commonly found in the environment (i.e., >20,000 mg/kg) was not affected by soil properties or aging but rather was governed by the equilibrium dissolution of these hydrocarbons from the crude oil NAPL that is coating the soil particles.

  10. Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacFadden, Kenneth Orville (Highland, MD)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer bonded sheet product suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance.

  11. Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pereira, Candido (Naperville, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700.degree. C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite.

  12. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  13. Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pereira, C.

    1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700 C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite. 3 figs.

  14. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  15. Investigation of the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction and evolution reactions in lithium–oxygen batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Dong; Zhang, Xuran; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Lee, Hung-Sui; Qu, Deyang

    2015-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions were studied on graphite electrodes with different crystal orientations. The kinetics for the redox couple O2/O2•- are very fast, therefore no catalyst seems necessary to assist the charge transfer process. Apparently, the main source of the overpotential for the O2 reduction reaction is from mass diffusion. Li2O2 becomes soluble in non-aqueous electrolytes in the presence of the tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate additive. The soluble B-O22- ions can be oxidized electro-catalytically. The edge orientation of graphite demonstrates superior catalytic activity for the oxidation over basal orientation. The findings reveal an opportunity for recharging Li-air batteries efficiently andmore »a new strategy of developing the catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction.« less

  16. New capabilities and applications for electrophoretically deposited coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, D.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our primary purpose in this test is to provide a brief general description of a few applications of various electrophoretic systems which have been investigated and have found use in various coating applications at Sandia National Laboratories. Both organic and inorganic suspensions in aqueous and non-aqueous media have been considered in these studies. Applications include high voltage insulating dielectrics, thermally conductive/electrically insulating films, adherent lubricating films, uniform photoresist films, glass coatings, and fissile uranium oxide/carbon composite films for studies of nuclear powered lasers. More recently, we have become interested in the beneficial environmental aspects of being able to provide protective polymer coatings which reduce or minimize the use of organic solvents required by traditional spray coat processes. Important practical factors which relate to film uniformity, adhesion, and composition are related to unique coating or plating capabilities and applications. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Analyzing remediation technologies for Department of Energy sites contaminated with DNAPL pollutants. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatyi, A.F.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is in the process of conducting a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for a site contaminated with Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) pollutants at their Paducah Kentucky facility. This thesis effort focuses on acquiring insight into a number of remediation technology trains that are candidates for the Paducah site. This insight is used to recommend and justify the screening of candidate technology trains. The research makes use of two decision analysis models (one is deterministic, the other is probabilistic) built to provide a quantitative assessment of the candidate technology trains. Dominance considerations and multi-attribute utility theory are utilized to make the quantitative assessments and to gain insight into each candidate technology train. The results of the analysis provide the DOE with a rational justification for screening 55 of the 58 candidate technology trains from further consideration.

  18. Solvent for urethane adhesives and coatings and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A solvent for urethane adhesives and coatings, the solvent having a carbaldehyde and a cyclic amide as constituents. In some embodiments the solvent consists only of miscible constituents. In some embodiments the carbaldehyde is benzaldehyde and in some embodiments the cyclic amide is N-methylpyrrolidone (M-pyrole). An extender may be added to the solvent. In some embodiments the extender is miscible with the other ingredients, and in some embodiments the extender is non-aqueous. For example, the extender may include isopropanol, ethanol, tetrahydro furfuryl alcohol, benzyl alcohol, Gamma-butyrolactone or a caprolactone. In some embodiments a carbaldehyde and a cyclic amide are heated and used to separate a urethane bonded to a component.

  19. Al{sup 3+} doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanostructure: Synthesis and structural, morphological and optical characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatesan, A. [Department of Physics, Panimalar Engineering College, Chennai - 600 123, India and Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai - 600 005 (India); Chandar, N. Krishna; Jayavel, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University, Chennai - 600 025 (India); Kumar, M. Krishna; Kumar, R. Mohan [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai - 600 005 (India); Arjunan, S. [Department of Physics, R.M.K. Engineering College, Chennai - 601 206 (India)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Al{sub x}V{sub 2-x}O{sub 5}(x = 0,2mol%) nanorods were synthesized at room temperature by facile surfactant free non-aqueous route. The phase pure orthorhombic structure and nanorods-like morphology have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and High resolution scanning electron microscopy. EDXS spectrum confirms the purity and presence of Al into V{sub 2}O{sub 5} lattice. Optical absorption from DRS UV-Vis spectra showed the band gap broadening due to quantum confinement effect. The results ensure that the dopant cation (Al{sup 3+}) successfully intercalated with the host cation (V{sup 5+}) and the products are promising for electrochromic and catalytic applications.

  20. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  1. Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacFadden, K.O.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer bonded sheet product is described suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance. 1 fig.

  2. Investigation of the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction and evolution reactions in lithium–oxygen batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Dong [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Collece of Engineering and Applied Science; Zhang, Xuran [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China). School of Science; Qu, Deyu [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China). School of Science; Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Lee, Hung-Sui [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Collece of Engineering and Applied Science

    2015-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions were studied on graphite electrodes with different crystal orientations. The kinetics for the redox couple O2/O2•- are very fast, therefore no catalyst seems necessary to assist the charge transfer process. Apparently, the main source of the overpotential for the O2 reduction reaction is from mass diffusion. Li2O2 becomes soluble in non-aqueous electrolytes in the presence of the tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate additive. The soluble B-O22- ions can be oxidized electro-catalytically. The edge orientation of graphite demonstrates superior catalytic activity for the oxidation over basal orientation. The findings reveal an opportunity for recharging Li-air batteries efficiently and a new strategy of developing the catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction.

  3. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO2.(1-x)Li2M'O3 in which 0

  4. Lithium Metal Oxide Electrodes For Lithium Cells And Batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Kim, Jaekook (Naperville, IL)

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  5. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Oakbrook, IL)

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

  6. Electrode for a lithium cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a positive electrode for an electrochemical cell or battery, and to an electrochemical cell or battery; the invention relates more specifically to a positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell or battery when the electrode is used therein. The positive electrode includes a composite metal oxide containing AgV.sub.3O.sub.8 as one component and one or more other components consisting of LiV.sub.3O.sub.8, Ag.sub.2V.sub.4O.sub.11, MnO.sub.2, CF.sub.x, AgF or Ag.sub.2O to increase the energy density of the cell, optionally in the presence of silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrode and to improve the power capability of the cell or battery.

  7. Redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Chen, Zonghai (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Qingzheng (San Jose, CA)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is generally related to electrolytes containing novel redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium-ion batteries. The redox shuttles are capable of thousands hours of overcharge tolerance and have a redox potential at about 3-5.5 V vs. Li and particularly about 4.4-4.8 V vs. Li. Accordingly, in one aspect the invention provides electrolytes comprising an alkali metal salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive that is an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring with four or more electronegative substituents, two or more oxygen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring, and no hydrogen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring; and wherein the electrolyte solution is substantially non-aqueous. Further there are provided electrochemical devices employing the electrolyte and methods of making the electrolyte.

  8. Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Kang, Sun-Ho (Naperville, IL); Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL)

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor thereof a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0.5

  9. Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Li, Naichao (Croton on Hudson, NY)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor of a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0

  10. Protective coating on positive lithium-metal-oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Christopher S.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Kahaian, Arthur J.

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell comprising a LiMn2-xMxO4 spinel structure in which M is one or more metal cations with an atomic number less than 52, such that the average oxidation state of the manganese ions is equal to or greater than 3.5, and in which 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.15, having one or more lithium spine oxide LiM'2O4 or lithiated spinel oxide Li1+yM'2O4 compounds on the surface thereof in which M' are cobalt cations and in which 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1.

  11. Metal intercalation characteristics of n-HfS/sub 2/ photoelectrodes in nonaqueous electrolytes. Technical report No. 1, October 1986-May 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semkow, K.W.; Pujare, N.U.; Sammells, A.F.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance of single-crystal n-hafnium disulfide was correlated with capacitance and impedance measurements obtained with the photoanode van der Waals layers oriented either parallel or perpendicular to acetonitrile-based nonaqueous electrolytes, with and without copper chloride introduced as an intercalating redox species. For van der Waals layers, perpendicular to the electrolyte (i.e., available for copper intercalation) space-charge capacitance values of respectively .01 and 1 microfarad/sq. cm were obtained for the non-intercalated and copper-intercalated photoelectrodes. The implications of these experimental observations were discussed in relation to the application of these intercalating photoelectrodes in both liquid non-aqueous and solid-polymer-electrolyte PEC storage devices.

  12. Simultaneous {sup 233}U and{sup 235}U characterization through the assay of delayed neutron temporal behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellers, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Kelly, D. G. [Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Stn. Forces, P.O. Box 17000, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous solutions containing dissolved uranium-233 and uranium-235 were irradiated for 60's in the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada. The temporal behavior of the delayed neutrons produced was recorded by the Facility's Delayed Neutron Counting (DNC) system. The percentage of uranium-233 as a function of total fissile mass present in each sample ranged from 0 to 100% and was predicted by the DNC system with average absolute errors of {+-} 4%. Future work will upgrade the system electronics and software to reduce both uncertainties in timings and electrical noise. Mixture analysis will also be expanded to include plutonium-239 and fissile materials contained in non-aqueous matrices. (authors)

  13. Lithium-ion batteries with intrinsic pulse overcharge protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates in general to the field of lithium rechargeable batteries, and more particularly relates to the positive electrode design of lithium-ion batteries with improved high-rate pulse overcharge protection. Thus the present invention provides electrochemical devices containing a cathode comprising at least one primary positive material and at least one secondary positive material; an anode; and a non-aqueous electrolyte comprising a redox shuttle additive; wherein the redox potential of the redox shuttle additive is greater than the redox potential of the primary positive material; the redox potential of the redox shuttle additive is lower than the redox potential of the secondary positive material; and the redox shuttle additive is stable at least up to the redox potential of the secondary positive material.

  14. Universal iso-density polarizable continuum model for molecular solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunceler, Deniz

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implicit electron-density solvation models based on joint density-functional theory offer a computationally efficient solution to the problem of calculating thermodynamic quantities of solvated systems from first-principles quantum mechanics. However, despite much recent interest in such models, to date the applicability of such models to non-aqueous solvents has been limited because the determination of the model parameters requires fitting to a large database of experimental solvation energies for each new solvent considered. This work presents an alternate approach which allows development of new solvation models for a large class of protic and aprotic solvents from only simple, single-molecule ab initio calculations and readily available bulk thermodynamic data. We find that this model is accurate to nearly 1.7 kcal/mol even for solvents outside our development set.

  15. Low-temperature lithium diffusion in simulated high-level boroaluminosilicate nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gin, Stephane; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange is recognized as an integral, if underrepresented, mechanism influencing glass corrosion. However, due to the formation of various alteration layers in the presence of water, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the mechanisms of ion exchange from other processes occurring simultaneously during corrosion. In this work, an operationally inert non-aqueous solution was used as an alkali source material to isolate ion exchange and study the solid-state diffusion of lithium. Specifically, the experiments involved contacting glass coupons relevant to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste, SON68 and CJ-6, which contained Li in natural isotope abundance, with a non-aqueous solution of 6LiCl dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at 90 °C for various time periods. The depth profiles of major elements in the glass coupons were measured using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Lithium interdiffusion coefficients, DLi, were then calculated based on the measured depth profiles. The results indicate that the penetration of 6Li is rapid in both glasses with the simplified CJ-6 glass (D6Li ? 4.0-8.0 × 10-21 m2/s) exhibiting faster exchange than the more complex SON68 glass (DLi ? 2.0-4.0 × 10-21 m2/s). Additionally, sodium ions present in the glass were observed to participate in ion exchange reactions; however, different diffusion coefficients were necessary to fit the diffusion profiles of the two alkali ions. Implications of the diffusion coefficients obtained in the absence of alteration layers to the long-term performance of nuclear waste glasses in a geological repository system are also discussed.

  16. Pore-scale flow characterization of low-interfacial tension flow through mixed-wet porous media with different pore geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadali Jamaloei, Benyamin [Petroleum Systems Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, The University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Petroleum Research Center, The Petroleum University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asghari, Koorosh [Petroleum Systems Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, The University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Kharrat, Riyaz [Petroleum Research Center, The Petroleum University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-interfacial tension flow through porous media occurs in surfactant-based enhanced oil recovery (EOR), soil clean-up, underground removal of the non-aqueous phase liquid and dense non-aqueous phase liquid, etc. In surfactant-based EOR processes, numerous works have been carried out to characterize - either qualitatively or quantitatively - the micro- and macro-scale flow behavior. What has been lacking is to link the statistics of oil blobs population (e.g., distribution of blob length and diameter) to the pore-scale phenomena and macro-scale quantities. In particular, no work has been reported to elucidate the effect of the ratio of pore body to throat diameter (i.e., aspect ratio) on the pore-scale characterization based on the blobs population statistics. The significance of the aspect ratio lies in that it describes the geometry of a porous medium and is one of the foremost morphological features. The aspect ratio is also one of the fundamental factors governing the pore-level events. This study presents the effect of aspect ratio on the statistical distribution of the blob length and equivalent diameter and links the blobs population statistics to the observed pore-level events. The pore-scale variation of the ratio of viscous-to-capillary forces acted on the oil blobs at the threshold of displacement is utilized to characterize the effect of blob length distribution at different aspect ratios. It also provides some insight into correlating the change in oil recovery efficiency and capillary number, by change in aspect ratio, with the change in blobs population statistics. (author)

  17. Technetium Sorption by Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Estes, Shanna L. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Powell, Brian A. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to measure technetium ({sup 99}Tc) sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. {sup 99}Tc(VII) batch sorption experiments were conducted for 319 days in an inert glovebag with a variety of cementitious materials (aged cement, Vault 2, TR545, and TR547) containing varying amounts of blast furnace slag. Between 154 and 319 days, the {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations tended to remain constant and samples amended with different initial {sup 99}Tc concentrations, tended to merge at about 10{sup -9} M for Vault 2 (17% slag) and TR545 (90% slag) and 10{sup -8} M for TR547 (45% slag). This data provided strong evidence that solubility, and not adsorption (K{sub d} values), was controlling aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations. Laboratory data superimposed over thermodynamic speciation diagrams further supported the conclusion that solubility, and not adsorption controlled {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations. The oxidation state of the aqueous {sup 99}Tc at the end of the sorption experiment was determined by solvent extraction to be almost entirely {sup 99}Tc(VII). The pH of the present system was ~11.8. Previously proposed solubility controlling phases including Tc-sulfides may be present, but do not appear to control solubility. After the 319 day sorption period, the suspensions were removed from the glovebag and a desorption step under oxic conditions was conducted for 20 days by adding oxic, pH-buffered solutions to the suspensions. {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations increased by more than an order of magnitude and Eh increased by several hundred millivolts within 24 hours after the introduction of the oxic solutions. These desorption results are consistent with re-oxidation and dissolution/desorption of {sup 99}Tc(IV) phases possibly present in the cementitious materials after the anoxic sorption step of the experiment. Aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations continued to increase slowly until the termination of the desorption experiment after 20 days. Although the cementitious materials investigated demonstrated the ability to strongly sequester aqueous {sup 99}Tc under anoxic conditions, the introduction of oxygen resulted in the rapid remobilization of {sup 99}Tc. These studies provide experimental support for the use of a solubility based model under reducing saltstone conditions where Tc(IV) is expected to be the dominant species. The existing Kd model would be appropriate for oxidized saltstone conditions (aged saltstone, not directly evaluated in this study) where Tc(VII) is expected to be the dominant species.

  18. Particle Physics at the University of Pittsburgh Summary Report for Proposal Period FY'09-11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreau, Joe; Dytman, Steven; Mueller, James; Naples, Donna; Paolone, Vittorio; Savinov, Vladimir

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented is the final summary report for grant DOE-FG02-91ER40646. The HEP group at the University consists of three tasks: B,D and L. Task B supports Pitt's CDF group at the energy frontier which includes Joe Boudreau and Paul Shepard. Work of the group includes Hao Song's thesis on the measurement of the B_c lifetime using exclusive J/psi+pion decays, and an update of the previous B_c semi-leptonic analyses under the supervision of Paul Shepard. Task D supports Pitt's neutrino group at the intensity frontier which includes PIs Dytman, Naples and Paolone. The group also includes postdoctoral research associate Danko, and thesis students Isvan (MINOS), Eberly (Minerva ), Ren (Minerva )and Hansen (T2K). This report summarizes their progress on ongoing experiments which are designed to make significant contributions to a detailed understanding of the neutrino mixing matrix. Task L supports Pitt's ATLAS group at the energy frontier and includes investigators Vladimir Savinov, James Mueller and Joe Boudreau. This group contributed both to hardware (calorimeter electronics, Savinov) and to software (Simulation, Detector Description, and Visualization: Boudreau and Mueller; MC generators: Savinov) and a summary of their progress is presented.

  19. TMVOC, simulator for multiple volatile organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten; Battistelli, Alfredo

    2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    TMVOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase non-isothermal flow of water, soil gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. It is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. TMVOC is designed for applications to contamination problems that involve hydrocarbon fuel or organic solvent spills in saturated and unsaturated zones. It can model contaminant behavior under ''natural'' environmental conditions, as well as for engineered systems, such as soil vapor extraction, groundwater pumping, or steam-assisted source remediation. TMVOC is upwards compatible with T2VOC (Falta et al., 1995) and can be initialized from T2VOC-style initial conditions. The main enhancements in TMVOC relative to T2VOC are as follows: a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals can be modeled; any and all combinations of the three phases water-oil-gas are treated; several non-condensible gases may be present; diffusion is treated in all phases in a manner that is fully coupled with phase partitioning. This paper gives a brief summary of the methodology used in TMVOC as well as highlighting some implementation issues. Simulation of a NAPL spill and subsequent remediation is discussed for a 2-D vertical section of a saturated-unsaturated flow problem.

  20. Hybrid joule heating/electro-osmosis process for extracting contaminants from soil layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Joule (ohmic) heating and electro-osmosis are combined in a hybrid process for removal of both water-soluble contaminants and non-aqueous phase liquids from contaminated, low-permeability soil formations that are saturated. Central to this hybrid process is the partial desaturation of the formation or layer using electro-osmosis to remove a portion of the pore fluids by induction of a ground water flow to extraction wells. Joule heating is then performed on a partially desaturated formation. The joule heating and electro-osmosis operations can be carried out simultaneously or sequentially if the desaturation by electro-osmosis occurs initially. Joule heating of the desaturated formation results in a very effective transfer or partitioning of liquid state contaminants to the vapor phase. The heating also substantially increases the vapor phase pressure in the porous formation. As a result, the contaminant laden vapor phase is forced out into soil layers of a higher permeability where other conventional removal processes, such as steam stripping or ground water extraction can be used to capture the contaminants. This hybrid process is more energy efficient than joule heating or steam stripping for cleaning low permeability formations and can share electrodes to minimize facility costs.

  1. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

  2. Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Broadview Heights, OH); Belieres, Jean-Philippe (Chandler, AZ); Yoshizawa, Masahiro (Tokyo, JP)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  3. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Hashim M.; Iedema, Martin J.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cowin, James P.

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium particles was studied by utilizing a crossflow-mini reactor. The reaction kinetics was followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely SEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry’s law solubility of H2O2 to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to eventually a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted rates using previously established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the Henry’s law constant of H2O2 dependence on ionic strength.

  4. Electric current-producing device having sulfone-based electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Sun, Xiao-Guang (Tempe, AZ)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytic solvents and applications of such solvents including electric current-producing devices. For example, a solvent can include a sulfone compound of R1--SO2--R2, with R1 being an alkyl group and R2 a partially oxygenated alkyl group, to exhibit high chemical and thermal stability and high oxidation resistance. For another example, a battery can include, between an anode and a cathode, an electrolyte which includes ionic electrolyte salts and a non-aqueous electrolyte solvent which includes a non-symmetrical, non-cyclic sulfone. The sulfone has a formula of R1--SO2--R2, wherein R1 is a linear or branched alkyl or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms, and R2 is a linear or branched or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched oxygen containing alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms. The electrolyte can include an electrolyte co-solvent and an electrolyte additive for protective layer formation.

  5. Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aulich, Ted R. (Grand Forks, ND); Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Jiang, Junhua (Grand Forks, ND)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia, at low temperature and pressure, preferably at ambient temperature and pressure, utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen or hydrogen equivalent. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source or a hydrogen equivalent such as carbon monoxide or a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be aqueous, non-aqueous, or solid.

  6. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0

  7. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

  8. Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

  9. Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O'Brien, J.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

  10. Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

  11. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  12. Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

  13. Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. Progress report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

  14. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

  15. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  16. PCLC flake-based apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, Gerald P; Fromen, Cathy A; Marshall, Kenneth L; Jacobs, Stephen D

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A PCLC flake/fluid host suspension that enables dual-frequency, reverse drive reorientation and relaxation of the PCLC flakes is composed of a fluid host that is a mixture of: 94 to 99.5 wt % of a non-aqueous fluid medium having a dielectric constant value .di-elect cons., where 1<.di-elect cons.<7, a conductivity value .sigma., where 10.sup.-9>.sigma.>10.sup.-7 Siemens per meter (S/m), and a resistivity r, where 10.sup.7>r>10.sup.10 ohm-meters (.OMEGA.-m), and which is optically transparent in a selected wavelength range .DELTA..lamda.; 0.0025 to 0.25 wt % of an inorganic chloride salt; 0.0475 to 4.75 wt % water; and 0.25 to 2 wt % of an anionic surfactant; and 1 to 5 wt % of PCLC flakes suspended in the fluid host mixture. Various encapsulation forms and methods are disclosed including a Basic test cell, a Microwell, a Microcube, Direct encapsulation (I), Direct encapsulation (II), and Coacervation encapsulation. Applications to display devices are disclosed.

  17. Influences of Flow Transients and Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Colloid-Associated Contaminant Transport in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Saiers; Joseph Ryan

    2006-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclides, metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids have contaminated about six billion cubic meters of soil at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The subsurface transport of many of these contaminants is facilitated by colloids (i.e., microscopic, waterborne particles). The first step in the transport of contaminants from their sources to off-site surface water and groundwater is migration through the vadose zone. Developing our understanding of the migration of colloids and colloid-associated contaminants through the vadose zone is critical to assessing and controlling the release of contaminants from DOE sites. In this study, we examined the mobilization, transport, and filtration (retention) of mineral colloids and colloidassociated radionuclides within unsaturated porous media. This investigation involved laboratory column experiments designed to identify properties that affect colloid mobilization and retention and pore-scale visualization experiments designed to elucidate mechanisms that govern these colloid-mass transfer processes. The experiments on colloid mobilization and retention were supplemented with experiments on radionuclide transport through porous media and on radionuclide adsorption to mineral colloids. Observations from all of these experiments – the column and visualization experiments with colloids and the experiments with radionuclides – were used to guide the development of mathematical models appropriate for describing colloids and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through the vadose zone.

  18. Influences of Flow Transients and Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Colloid-Associated Contaminant Transport in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Saiers

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclides, metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids have contaminated about six billion cubic meters of soil at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The subsurface transport of many of these contaminants is facilitated by colloids (i.e., microscopic, waterborne particles). The first step in the transport of contaminants from their sources to off-site surface water and groundwater is migration through the vadose zone. Developing our understanding of the migration of colloids and colloid-associated contaminants through the vadose zone is critical to assessing and controlling the release of contaminants from DOE sites. In this study, we examined the mobilization, transport, and filtration (retention) of mineral colloids and colloid-associated radionuclides within unsaturated porous media. This investigation involved laboratory column experiments designed to identify properties that affect colloid mobilization and retention and pore-scale visualization experiments designed to elucidate mechanisms that govern these colloid-mass transfer processes. The experiments on colloid mobilization and retention were supplemented with experiments on radionuclide transport through porous media and on radionuclide adsorption to mineral colloids. Observations from all of these experiments – the column and visualization experiments with colloids and the experiments with radionuclides – were used to guide the development of mathematical models appropriate for describing colloids and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through the vadose zone.

  19. In-situ Spectroscopic and Structural Studies of Electrode Materials for Advanced Battery Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel A Scherson

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques have been developed and implemented to gain insight into fundamental factors that affect the performance of electrodes in Li and Li-ion batteries and other energy storage devices. These include experimental strategies for monitoring the Raman scattering spectra of single microparticles of carbon and transition metal oxides as a function of their state of charge. Measurements were performed in electrolytes of direct relevance to Li and Li-Ion batteries both in the static and dynamic modes. In addition, novel strategies were devised for performing conventional experiments in ultrahigh vacuum environments under conditions which eliminate effects associated with presence of impurities, using ultrapure electrolytes, both of the polymeric and ionic liquid type that display no measurable vapor pressure. Also examined was the reactivity of conventional non aqueous solvent toward ultrapure Li films as monitored in ultrahigh vacuum with external reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also pursued were efforts toward developing applying Raman-scattering for monitoring the flow of charge of a real Li ion battery. Such time-resolved, spatially-resolved measurements are key to validating the results of theoretical simulations involving real electrode structures.

  20. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  1. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Application of liquid chromatographic separation methods to THF-soluble portions of integrated two-stage coal liquefaction resids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.B.; Pearson, C.D.; Young, L.L.; Green, J.A. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using non-aqueous ion exchange liquid chromatography (NIELC) for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resids and THF-soluble whole oils derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique can be used to separate the material into a number of acid, base, and neutral fractions. Each of the fractions obtained by NIELC was analyzed and then further fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The separation and analysis schemes are given in the accompanying report. With this approach, differences can be distinguished among samples obtained from different process streams in the liquefaction plant and among samples obtained at the same sampling location, but produced from different feed coals. HPLC was directly applied to one THF-soluble whole process oil without the NIELC preparation, with limited success. The direct HPLC technique used was directed toward the elution of the acid species into defined classes. The non-retained neutral and basic components of the oil were not analyzable by the direct HPLC method because of solubility limitations. Sample solubility is a major concern in the application of these techniques.

  2. Solution Synthesis and Processing of PZT Materials for Neutron Generator Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, M.A.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Montoya, T.V.; Moore, R.H.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new solution synthesis route has been developed for the preparation of lead-based ferroelectric materials (patent filed). The process produces controlled stoichiometry precursor powders by non-aqueous precipitation. For a given ferroelectric material to be prepared, a metal acetate/alkoxide solution containing constituent metal species in the appropriate ratio is mixed with an oxalic acid/n-propanol precipitant solution. An oxalate coprecipitate is instantly fonned upon mixing that quantitatively removes the metals from solution. Most of the process development was focused on the synthesis and processing of niobium-substituted lead zirconate titanate with a Zr-to-Ti ratio of 95:5 (PNZT 95/5) that has an application in neutron generator power supplies. The process was scaled to produce 1.6 kg of the PNZT 95/5 powder using either a sen-ii-batch or a continuous precipitation scheme. Several of the PNZT 95/5 powder lots were processed into ceramic slug form. The slugs in turn were processed into components and characterized. The physical properties and electrical performance (including explosive functional testing of the components met the requirements set for the neutron generator application. Also, it has been demonstrated that the process is highly reproducible with respect to the properties of the powders it produces and the properties of the ceramics prepared from its powders. The work described in this report was funded by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  3. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  4. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  5. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

  6. Colloquium: Majorana Fermions in nuclear, particle and solid-state physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Elliott; M. Franz

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ettore Majorana (1906-1938) disappeared while traveling by ship from Palermo to Naples in 1938. His fate has never been fully resolved and several articles have been written that explore the mystery itself. His demise intrigues us still today because of his seminal work, published the previous year, that established symmetric solutions to the Dirac equation that describe a fermionic particle that is its own anti-particle. This work has long had a significant impact in neutrino physics, where this fundamental question regarding the particle remains unanswered. But the formalism he developed has found many uses as there are now a number of candidate spin-1/2 neutral particles that may be truly neutral with no quantum number to distinguish them from their anti-particles. If such particles exist, they will influence many areas of nuclear and particle physics. Most notably the process of neutrinoless double beta decay can only exist if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. Hence, many efforts to search for this process are underway. Majorana's influence doesn't stop with particle physics, however, even though that was his original consideration. The equations he derived also arise in solid state physics where they describe electronic states in materials with superconducting order. Of special interest here is the class of solutions of the Majorana equation in one and two spatial dimensions at exactly zero energy. These Majorana zero modes are endowed with some remarkable physical properties that may lead to advances in quantum computing and, in fact, there is evidence that they have been experimentally observed. This review first summarizes the basics of Majorana's theory and its implications. It then provides an overview of the rich experimental programs trying to find a fermion that is its own anti-particle in nuclear, particle, and solid state physics.

  7. New Crystal-Growth Methods for Producing Lattice-Matched Substrates for High-Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatner, L.A.

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This effort addressed the technical problem of identifying and growing, on a commercial scale, suitable single-crystal substrates for the subsequent deposition of epitaxial thin films of high temperature semiconductors such as GaN/AlN. The lack of suitable lattice-matched substrate materials was one of the major problem areas in the development of semiconducting devices for use at elevated temperatures as well as practical opto-electronic devices based on Al- and GaN technology. Such lattice-matched substrates are necessary in order to reduce or eliminate high concentrations of defects and dislocations in GaN/AlN and related epitaxial thin films. This effort concentrated, in particular, on the growth of single crystals of ZnO for substrate applications and it built on previous ORNL experience in the chemical vapor transport growth of large single crystals of zinc oxide. This combined expertise in the substrate growth area was further complemented by the ability of G. Eres and his collaborators to deposit thin films of GaN on the subject substrates and the overall ORNL capability for characterizing the quality of such films. The research effort consisted of research on the growth of two candidate substrate materials in conjunction with concurrent research on the growth and characterization of GaN films, i.e. the effort combined bulk crystal growth capabilities in the area of substrate production at both ORNL and the industrial partner, Commercial Crystal Growth Laboratories (CCL), Naples, Florida, with the novel thin-film deposition techniques previously developed in the ORNL SSD.

  8. Remediation of a fractured clay soil contaminated with gasoline containing MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.L.; Grady, D.E. [Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR (United States); Walden, T. [BP Oil Europe, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline and other light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) released into fractured clay soils initially move by advection of the LNAPL through the fractures. Once advective movement of the LNAPL ceases, dissolution of the gasoline components into the pore water and diffusion into the intact blocks of clay becomes an important transport process. The aqueous-phase flux of each compound in the mixture depends in large part upon its aqueous solubility. For example, a low-solubility compound like isooctane remains primarily in the fracture in the LNAPL. A high-solubility compound, like methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), dissolves readily and may move almost entirely into the clay matrix. The distribution of compounds between the matrix and the fractures will have an important impact on the rate at which the gasoline contaminated soil can be remediated. In this context, the presence of soluble additives like MTBE can significantly impact the risk and remediation time for the, soil. Beginning in 1993 a field study to examine the applicability of air flushing for remediation of low-permeability soils was sponsored by API. The study focused on a variety of soil vapor extraction (SVE) and in situ air sparging (IAS) approaches for mass removal and risk reduction. The source of gasoline contamination in this study was a release of 50 liters of a mixture containing 14 gasoline hydrocarbons ranging from pentane to naphthalene, and including MTBE. The mixture was released into the shallow subsurface and allowed to redistribute for 10 months prior to air flushing startup. Numerical modeling indicated that essentially all of the MTBE should have dissolved into the matrix. In contrast, essentially all of the isooctane should have remained in the LNAPL in the fractures.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING SUPPRESSOR CONCENTRATION IN THE MCU NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT (NGS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Diprete, D.; Milliken, C.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with identifying and developing at least one, but preferably two methods for quantifying the suppressor in the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) system. The suppressor is a guanidine derivative, N,N',N"-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). A list of 10 possible methods was generated, and screening experiments were performed for 8 of the 10 methods. After completion of the screening experiments, the non-aqueous acid-base titration was determined to be the most promising, and was selected for further development as the primary method. {sup 1}H NMR also showed promising results from the screening experiments, and this method was selected for further development as the secondary method. Other methods, including {sup 36}Cl radiocounting and ion chromatography, also showed promise; however, due to the similarity to the primary method (titration) and the inability to differentiate between TiDG and TOA (tri-n-ocytlamine) in the blended solvent, {sup 1}H NMR was selected over these methods. Analysis of radioactive samples obtained from real waste ESS (extraction, scrub, strip) testing using the titration method showed good results. Based on these results, the titration method was selected as the method of choice for TiDG measurement. {sup 1}H NMR has been selected as the secondary (back-up) method, and additional work is planned to further develop this method and to verify the method using radioactive samples. Procedures for analyzing radioactive samples of both pure NGS and blended solvent were developed and issued for the both methods.

  10. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

  11. Novel Nonflammable Electrolytes for Secondary Magnesium Batteries and High Voltage Electrolytes for Electrochemcial Supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Brian Dixon

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnesium has been used successfully in primary batteries, but its use in rechargeable cells has been stymied by the lack of suitable non-aqueous electrolyte that can conduct Mg+2 species, combined with poor stripping and plating properties. The development of a suitable cathode material for rechargeable magnesium batteries has also been a roadblock, but a nonflammable electrolyte is key. Likewise, the development of safe high voltage electrochemical supercapaitors has been stymied by the use of flammable solvents in the liquid electrolyte; to wit, acetonitrile. The purpose of the research conducted in this effort was to identify useful compositions of magnesium salts and polyphosphate solvents that would enable magnesium ions to be cycled within a secondary battery design. The polyphosphate solvents would provide the solvent for the magnesium salts while preventing the electrolyte from being flammable. This would enable these novel electrolytes to be considered as an alternative to THF-based electrolytes. In addition, we explored several of these solvents together with lithium slats for use as high voltage electrolytes for carbon-based electrochemical supercapacitors. The research was successful in that: 1) Magnesium imide dissolved in a phosphate ester solvent that contains a halogented phosphate ester appears to be the preferred electrolyte for a rechargeable Mg cell. 2) A combination of B-doped CNTs and vanadium phosphate appear to be the cathode of choice for a rechargeable Mg cell by virtue of higher voltage and better reversibility. 3) Magnesium alloys appear to perform better than pure magnesium when used in combination with the novel polyphosphate electrolytes. Also, this effort has established that Phoenix Innovationâ??s family of phosphonate/phosphate electrolytes together with specific lithium slats can be used in supercapacitor systems at voltages of greater than 10V.

  12. Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

  13. High Density Nano-Electrode Array for Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mano Misra

    2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk single crystals of Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04 to x=0.2) compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection. The production of large volume of Cd1-xZnxTe with low defect density is expensive. As a result there is a growing research interest in the production of nanostructured compound semiconductors such as Cd1-xZnxTe in an electrochemical route. In this investigation, Cd1-xZnxTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO2 nanotubular template from propylene carbonate as the non-aqueous electrolyte, using a pulse-reverse electrodeposition process at 130 ºC. The template acted as a support in growing ordered nanowire of CZT which acts as a one dimensional conductor. Cyclic Voltammogram (CV) studies were conducted in determining the potentials for the growth of nanowires of uniform stoichiometry. The morphologies and composition of CZT were characterized by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The STEM mapping carried out on the nanowires showed the uniform distribution of Cd, Zn and Te elements. TEM image showed that the nanowires were polycrystalline in nature. The Mott-Schottky analysis carried on the nanowires showed that the nanowires were a p-type semiconductor. The carrier density, band gap and resistivity of the Cd0.9Zn0.1Te nanowires were 4.29x1013 cm-3, 1.56 eV and 2.76x1011?-cm respectively. The high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies or Te antisites which were created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were tested with different bias potentials. The background current was in the order of tens of picoamperes. When exposed to radiation source Amerecium-241 (60 KeV, 4 ?Ci), the stacked CZT nanowires arrays showed sensing behavior. The sensitivity of the nanowire arrays increased as the number of stacks increased. The preliminary results indicate that the CZT nanowire arrays can be used as a potential X-ray and low energy gamma ray detector material at room temperature with a much low bias potential (0.7 – 4V) as against 300 – 500 V applied in the commercial bulk detector materials.

  14. Synthesis and application of new polymer bound catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterly, Brandon Michael

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitric acid has been shown to be a weak acid in acetonitrile. It is conceivable that a nitrate salt of a weakly Lewis acidic cation could furnish a ''naked'' nitrate anion as a basic catalyst in a variety of reactions in non-aqueous solvents. Such a nitrate salt could also be bound to a polymeric support via the cation, thereby allowing for reclamation and recycling of the nitrate ion. This subject is dealt with in Chapter 2, wherein my contributions consisted of performing all the reactions with the polymer supported catalyst and carrying out the experiments necessary to shed light on the reaction mechanisms. Chapter 3 contains a description of the structure and catalytic properties of an azidoproazaphosphatrane. This compound is an air-stable versatile catalyst that has proven useful not only homogeneously, but also when bound to a solid support. The synthesis of a polymer bound proazaphosphatrane containing a trivalent phosphorus is presented in Chapter 4. Such a compound has been sought after by our group for a number of years. Not only does the synthesis I have accomplished for it allow for easier separation of proazaphosphatrane catalysts from reaction mixtures, but recycling of the base is made much simpler. Proazaphosphatranes are useful homogeneous catalysts that activate atoms in other reagents, thus enhancing their reactivity. The next chapters deal with two such reactions with aldehydes and ketones, namely silylcyanations with trialkylsilylcyanides (Chapters 5 and 6) and reductions with poly(methylhydrosiloxane), in Chapter 7. In Chapter 5, Zhigang Wang performed the initial optimization and scoping of the reaction, while repetitions of the scoping experiments for reproducibility, determination of diastereomeric ratios, and experiments aimed at elucidating aspects of the mechanism were performed by me. The proazaphosphatrane coordinates to the silicon atom in both cases, thereby allowing the aforementioned reactions to proceed under much milder conditions. Proazaphosphatranes are also effective Broensted-Lowry bases. This is illustrated in Chapter 8 wherein a wide variety of conjugate addition reactions are catalyzed by proazaphosphatranes. In that chapter, repetitions of the nitroalkane addition reactions for reproducibility, improved spectral data for the products and comparisons of literature yields of all reactions were performed by the author.

  15. Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, Nicolas R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garn, Troy [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, Mitchell [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jubin, Robert T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Strachan, Denis M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thallapally, Praveen K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing. These can evolve in volatile species in the reprocessing facility off-gas streams, depending on the separations and reprocessing technologies that are used. Radionuclides that have been identified as “volatile radionuclides” are noble gases (most notably isotopes of Kr and Xe); 3H; 14C; and 129I. Radionuclides that tend to form volatile species that evolve into reprocessing facility off-gas systems are more challenging to efficiently control compared to radionuclides that tend to stay in solid or liquid phases. Future used fuel reprocessing facilities in the United States can require efficient capture of some volatile radionuclides in their off-gas streams to meet regulatory emission requirements. In aqueous reprocessing, these radionuclides are most commonly expected to evolve into off-gas streams in tritiated water [3H2O (T2O) and 3HHO (THO)], radioactive CO2, noble gases, and gaseous HI, I2, or volatile organic iodides. The fate and speciation of these radionuclides from a non-aqueous fuel reprocessing facility is less well known at this time, but active investigations are in progress. An Off-Gas Sigma Team was formed in late FY 2009 to integrate and coordinate the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) activities directed towards the capture and sequestration of the these volatile radionuclides (Jubin 2012a). The Sigma Team concept was envisioned to bring together multidisciplinary teams from across the DOE complex that would work collaboratively to solve the technical challenges and to develop the scientific basis for the capture and immobilization technologies such that the sum of the efforts was greater than the individual parts. The Laboratories currently participating in this effort are Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). This article focuses on control of volatile radionuclides that evolve during aqueous reprocessing of UNF. In particular, most of the work by the Off-gas Sigma Team has focused on the capture and sequestration of 129I and 85Kr, mainly because, as discussed below, control of 129I can require high efficiencies to meet regulatory requirements, and control of 85Kr using cryogenic processing, which has been the technology demonstrated and used commercially to date, can add considerable cost to a reprocessing facility.

  16. DOE-EMSP Final Report: Characterization of Changes in Colloid and DNAPL Affecting Surface Chemistry and Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan E. Powers; Stefan J. Grimberg; Miles Denham

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The waste disposal to the M-area basin and A-14 outfall at the Savannah River Department of Energy facility in Aiken SC (USA) included a wide variety of inorganic aqueous flows and organic solvents in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The DNAPL has migrated through the subsurface resulting in widespread groundwater contamination. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify processes that could have affected the migration and remediation of the DNAPL in the subsurface. It was hypothesized that the variety of waste disposed at this site could have altered the mineral, microbial and DNAPL properties at this site relative to other DNAPL sites. The DNAPL was determined to have a very low interfacial tension and is suspected to be distributed in fine grained media, thereby reducing the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation efforts. Although the DNAPL is primarily comprised of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethane, it also contains organic acids and several heavy metals. Experimental results suggest that iron from the aqueous and DNAPL phases undergoes precipitation and dechlorination reactions at the DNAPL-water interface, contributing to the low interfacial tension and acidity of the DNAPL. Biological activity in the contaminated region can also contribute to the low interfacial tension. PCE degrading bacteria produce biosurfactants and adhere to the DNAPL-water interface when stressed by high tetrachloroethene or low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The presence of iron can reduce the interfacial tension by nearly an order of magnitude, while the PCE degraders reduced the interfacial tension by nearly 50%. Abiotic changes in the mineral characteristics were not found to be substantially different between contaminated and background samples. The research completed here begins to shed some insight into the complexities of DNAPL fate and migration at sites where co-disposal of many different waste products occurred. Quantifying the low interfacial tension of the SRS DNAPL helps to formulate a new conceptual picture of the subsurface DNAPL migration and provides an explanation of the limited effectiveness of remediation efforts. Alternative designs for remediation that are more effective for sites with DNAPL in fine grained media are required.

  17. Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to systematically characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF, aiming to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating. The understanding gained will help us to optimize the composition and morphology of the catalyst layer and microstructure of the LSCF backbone for better performance. More specifically, the technical objectives include: (1) to characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF; (2) to characterize the microscopic details and stability of the LSCF-catalyst (e.g., LSM) interfaces; (3) to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating; and (4) to demonstrate that the performance and stability of porous LSCF cathodes can be enhanced by the application of a thin-film coating of LSM through a solution infiltration process in small homemade button cells and in commercially available cells of larger dimension. We have successfully developed dense, conformal LSM films with desired structure, composition, morphology, and thickness on the LSCF surfaces by two different infiltration processes: a non-aqueous and a water-based sol-gel process. It is demonstrated that the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes can be improved by the introduction of a thin-film LSM coating through an infiltration process. Surface and interface of the LSM-coated LSCF cathode were systematically characterized using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. TEM observation suggests that a layer of La and Sr oxide was formed on LSCF surfaces after annealing. With LSM infiltration, in contrast, we no longer observe such La/Sr oxide layer on the LSM-coated LSCF samples after annealing under similar conditions. This was also confirmed by x-ray analyses. For example, soft x-ray XANES data reveal that Co cations displace the Mn cations as being more favored to be reduced. Variations in the Sr-O in the annealed LSCF Fourier-transformed (FT) EXAFS suggest that some Sr segregation is occurring, but is not present in the annealed LSM-infiltrated LSCF cathode materials. Further, a surface enhanced Raman technique was also developed into to probe and map LSM and LSCF phase on underlying YSZ substrate, enabling us to capture important chemical information of cathode surfaces under practical operating conditions. Electrochemical models for the design of test cells and understanding of mechanism have been developed for the exploration of fundamental properties of electrode materials. Novel catalyst coatings through particle depositions (SDC, SSC, and LCC) or continuous thin films (PSM and PSCM) were successfully developed to improve the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes. Finally, we have demonstrated enhanced activity and stability of LSCF cathodes over longer periods of time in homemade and commercially available cells by an optimized LSM infiltration process. Microstructure examination of the tested cells did not show obvious differences between blank and infiltrated cells, suggesting that the infiltrated LSM may form a coherent film on the LSCF cathodes. There was no significant change in the morphology or microstructure of the LSCF cathode due to the structural similarity of LSCF and LSM. Raman analysis of the tested cells indicated small peaks emerging on the blank cells that correspond to trace amounts of secondary phase formation during operation (e.g., CoO{sub x}). The formation of this secondary phase might be attributed to performance degradation. In contrast, there was no such secondary phase observed in the LSM infiltrated cells, indicating that the LSM modification staved off secondary phase formation and thus improved the stability.

  18. Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

    2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid number (TAN), which includes both mineral acids and organic acids, is therefore a useful indicator which can be used to monitor the condition of the system in order to perform remedial maintenance, when required, to prevent system failure. The critical TAN value is the acid level at which remedial action should be taken to prevent the onset of rapid acid formation which can result in system failure. The level of 0.05 mg KOH/g of oil was established for CFC/mineral oil systems based on analysis of 700 used lubricants from operating systems and failed units. There is no consensus within the refrigeration industry as to the critical TAN value for HFC/POE systems, however, the value will be higher than the CFC/mineral oil systems critical TAN value because of the much weaker organic acids produced from POE. A similar study of used POE lubricants should be performed to establish a critical TAN limit for POE systems. Titrimetric analysis per ASTM procedures is the most commonly used method to determine TAN values in lubricants in the refrigeration industry and other industries dealing with lubricating oils. For field measurements, acid test kits are often used since they provide rapid, semi-quantitative TAN results.

  19. Zone Freezing Study for Pyrochemical Process Waste Minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammon Williams

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyroprocessing technology is a non-aqueous separation process for treatment of used nuclear fuel. At the heart of pyroprocessing lies the electrorefiner, which electrochemically dissolves uranium from the used fuel at the anode and deposits it onto a cathode. During this operation, sodium, transuranics, and fission product chlorides accumulate in the electrolyte salt (LiCl-KCl). These contaminates change the characteristics of the salt overtime and as a result, large volumes of contaminated salt are being removed, reprocessed and stored as radioactive waste. To reduce the storage volumes and improve recycling process for cost minimization, a salt purification method called zone freezing has been proposed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Zone freezing is melt crystallization process similar to the vertical Bridgeman method. In this process, the eutectic salt is slowly cooled axially from top to bottom. As solidification occurs, the fission products are rejected from the solid interface and forced into the liquid phase. The resulting product is a grown crystal with the bulk of the fission products near the bottom of the salt ingot, where they can be easily be sectioned and removed. Despite successful feasibility report from KAERI on this process, there were many unexplored parameters to help understanding and improving its operational routines. Thus, this becomes the main motivation of this proposed study. The majority of this work has been focused on the CsCl-LiCl-KCl ternary salt. CeCl3-LiCl-KCl was also investigated to check whether or not this process is feasible for the trivalent species—surrogate for rare-earths and transuranics. For the main part of the work, several parameters were varied, they are: (1) the retort advancement rate—1.8, 3.2, and 5.0 mm/hr, (2) the crucible lid configurations—lid versus no-lid, (3) the amount or size of mixture—50 and 400 g, (4) the composition of CsCl in the salt—1, 3, and 5 wt%, and (5) the temperature differences between the high and low furnace zones—200 and 300 ?C. During each experiment, the temperatures at selected locations around the crucible were measured and recorded to provide temperature profiles. Following each experiment, samples were collected and elemental analysis was done to determine the composition of iii the salt. Several models—non-mixed, well-mixed, Favier, and hybrid—were explored to describe the zone freezing process. For CsCl-LiCl-KCl system, experimental results indicate that through this process up to 90% of the used salt can be recycled, effectively reducing waste volume by a factor of ten. The optimal configuration was found to be a 5.0 mm/hr rate with a lid configuration and a ?T of 200°C. The larger 400 g mixtures had recycle percentages similar to the 50 g mixtures; however, the throughput per time was greater for the 400 g case. As a result, the 400 g case is recommended. For the CeCl3-LiCl-KCl system, the result implies that it is possible to use this process to separate the rare-earth and transuranics chlorides. Different models were applied to only CsCl ternary system. The best fit model was the hybrid model as a result of a solute transport transition from non- mixed to well-mixed throughout the growing process.

  20. Alternative (Potentially Green) Separations Media: Aqueous Biphasic and Related Systems � Extending the Frontier Final Report For Period September 1, 2002 � January 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin D. Rogers

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the current DoE-BES funding, we have extended our fundamental understanding of the critical phase separation of aqueous polymer solutions at the molecular level, and have developed a similar understanding of their application as novel solvent systems. Our principal aims included mode of delivery of the aqueous biphasic system (ABS) solvent system and the application of this system to problems of reactive extraction. In the former case we have developed novel solid phase analogues, in the form of cross-linked polyethylene glycol hydrogels, and in the latter case we have examined the role that ABS might play in reaction engineering, with a view to greener, simpler, and safer processes. We have also developed a new salt/salt ABS and have extended our understanding of this system as well. The major outcomes are as follows: (1) Through the use of variable temperature phase diagrams, coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the phases, a better understanding of the thermodynamics of phase formation was obtained. Evidence to the existence and role of an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) or lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (or both) in these systems was gained. With variable temperature solute partitioning, thermodynamic parameters were calculated, and inter-system comparisons were made. Through the use of Abraham's linear solvation energy regression (LSER) the solvent-solute properties of liquid/liquid ABS were examined. We have shown that ABS are indeed very tunable and LSERs have been used as a tool to compare these systems to traditional organic/water and other liquid/liquid systems. (2) We have successfully shown the development of novel reaction media for chemical synthesis and reaction; Aqueous Biphasic Reactive Extraction (ABRE). As a proof of concept, we have shown the synthesis of adipic acid from cyclohexene in an ABS, which represents an important development in the exploitation of this technology. Previous oxidations of this type have relied on the use of phase transfer catalysts, which are expensive to produce and difficult to recover. In this reaction the polyethylene glycol (PEG) phase seems to function simultaneously as the phase transfer catalyst, the reaction solvent, and to provide the reaction driving force. (3) PEG hydrogels may be used as probes for their macroscopic analogues by which the molecular events underlying the phase behavior of polymer-salt systems can be investigated. The properties of covalently cross-linked PEG hydrogels have been studied. It was demonstrated that these hydrogels could be thought of as analogous to polymer/salt ABS without phase separation. The salts examined cause collapse of the hydrogel, and there is a physical limit to the degree of collapse that can be achieved. In addition, salts bringing about significant collapse are only prevented from reaching this limit by the limits of their own solubility. This lead to our discovery that PEG will phase separate with KSCN at high enough concentration of polymer and salt. We have also successfully shown the development of an IL-PEG hydrogel as well as a Si-modified PEG hydrogel. We have also demonstrated for the first time that this cross-linked PEG matrix has been used to gel non-aqueous solvents. (4) The use of hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs) in separation schemes has been accomplished via a 'salting out' technique using inorganic, kosmotropic salts that is applicable to many classes of these materials. We have begun to obtain a deeper knowledge about the role that each component plays in the process, including that of the ionic liquid cation and anion, the kosmotropic salt cation and anions, as well as the distribution of water in the system. This is allowing us to design separation systems with desired properties. In addition, temperature studies on these aqueous biphasic systems are revealing thermodynamic data for the first time, so that we can quantitate the importance of entropic and enthalpic contributions to the biphase-forming process.