Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Residual Saturation of Coal Tar, a Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL), in Soils at MGP Sites: March 2002 Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal tar, a non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), is present in the subsurface at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. EPRI initiated this research project to compile and synthesize available data on residual saturation of various NAPLs, as well as to summarize available data on groundwater quality and soil concentrations of coal tar constituents found at a number of MGP sites. The continuing EPRI research will carry out laboratory experiments to generate residual saturation values for a number of soil-...

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

NAPL Calculator  

An environmental engineer at the Savannah River Site has developed a software application that will determine if non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants are present in soil, groundwater, or soil vapor samples.  The software will determine both ...

3

New 'Tool Box' Approaches for Innovative Characterization of NAPL at MGP Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers presented at a workshop held by EPRI's Contaminant Characterization and Source Attribution project on June 23, 2004. The project seeks to improve risk management and decision making by delivering better methods and new scientific information for characterizing soils, non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), and groundwater at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. This research will deliver improved conventional methods as well as new methods for characterizing NAPLs, including field a...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

Electrical resistivity for detecting subsurface non-aqueous phase liquids: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

Soils and groundwater have been contaminated by hazardous substances at many places in the United States and many other countries. The contaminants are commonly either petroleum products or industrial solvents with very low solubility in water. These contaminants are usually called non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The cost of cleaning up the affected sites in the United States is estimated to be of the order of 100 billion dollars. In spite of the expenditure of several billion dollars during the last 15 years, to date, very few, if any major contaminated site has been restored. The presence of NAPL pools in the subsurface is believed to be the main cause for the failure of previous cleanup activities. Due to their relatively low water solubility, and depending on their volume, it takes tens or even hundreds of years to deplete the NAPL sources if they are not removed from the subsurface. The intrinsic electrical resistivity of most NAPLs is typically in the range of 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 12}{Omega}-m, which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of groundwater containing dissolved solids (usually in the range of a few {Omega}-m to a few thousand {Omega}-m). Although a dry soil is very resistive, the electrical resistivity of a wet soil is on the order of 100 {Omega}-m and is dependent on the extent of water saturation. For a given soil, the electrical resistivity increases with decrease of water saturation. Therefore, if part of the pore water is replaced by a NAPL, the electrical resistivity will increase. At many NAPL sites, both the vadose and phreatic zones can be partially occupied by NAPL pools. It is the great contrast in electrical resistivity between the NAPLs and groundwater that may render the method to be effective in detecting subsurface NAPLs at contaminated sites. The following experiments were conducted to investigate the change of the electrical resistivity of porous media when diesel fuel (NAPL) replaces part of the water.

Lee, K.H.; Shan, C.; Javandel, I.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

700 700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002 January 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057700 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site NAPL Interim Measures Progress Report January 2003 Page ii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

6

First field test of NAPL detection with high resolution borehole seismic imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this field test is to evaluate the detectability of NAPLs by high resolution tomographic borehole seismic imaging. The site is a former Department of Energy (DOE) manufacturing facility in Pinellas County, Florida. Cross-hole seismic and radar measurements were made in a shallow aquifer contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Cone penetration test (CPT) and induction logging were performed for lithology and conductivity, respectively. The main challenge is to distinguish fluid phase heterogeneities from anomalies arising from geologic structure. Our approach is to compare measurements between locations of known contamination with a nearby uncontaminated location of similar lithology where differences in signal transmission may be attributed to fluid phase changes. The CPT data show similar lithologic structure at the locations both within and outside the NAPL-contaminated area. Zones of low seismic amplitude at about 7 m depth appear more extensive in the NAPL-contaminated area. These zones may be the result of fluid phase heterogeneities (NAPL or gas), or they may be due to the lithology, i.e. attenuating nature of the layer itself, or the transition between two distinct layers. The presence of lithologic contrasts, specifically from higher permeability sands to lower permeability silts and clays, also indicate potential locations of NAPL, as they could be flow barriers to downward NAPL migration.

Geller, Jil T.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model of non-aqueous phase liquid flow and dissolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model was developed to simulate the flow of mixtures of aqueous and non-aqueous phase liquids in porous media and the dissolution of the non-aqueous phase in the aqueous phase. The model was used to study the effects of pore-scale heterogeneity and anisotropy on the steady state dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) saturation when gravity driven DNAPL displaces water from initially water saturated porous media. Pore-scale anisotropy was created by using co-oriented non overlapping elliptically shaped grains to represent the porous media. After a steady state DNAPL saturation was reached, water was injected until a new steady state DNAPL saturation was reached. The amount of trapped DNAPL was found to be greater when DNAPL is displaced in the direction of the major axes of the soil grains than when it is displaced in the direction of the minor axes of the soil grains. The amount of trapped DNAPL was also found to increase with decreasing initial saturation of the continuous DNAPL phase. For the conditions used in our simulations, the saturation of the trapped NAPL with a smaller initial DNAPL saturation was more than 3 times larger than the amount of trapped DNAPL with a larger initial saturation. These simulations were carried out assuming that the DNAPL did not dissolve in water. Simulations including the effect of dissolution of DNAPL in the aqueous phase were also performed, and effective (macroscopic) mass transfer coefficients were determined.

Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Meakin, Paul; Ward, Anderson L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Inorganic rechargeable non-aqueous cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A totally inorganic non-aqueous rechargeable cell having an alkali or alkaline earth metal anode such as of lithium, a sulfur dioxide containing electrolyte and a discharging metal halide cathode, such as of CuCl.sub.2, CuBr.sub.2 and the like with said metal halide being substantially totally insoluble in SO.sub.2 and admixed with a conductive carbon material.

Bowden, William L. (Nashua, NH); Dey, Arabinda N. (Needham, MA)

1985-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

naples_cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage A. Mammoli a , M. Stadler b , N. DeForest b , H. Barsun a , R. Burnett a and C. Marnay b a University of New Mexico (UNM) MSC01-1150 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA b Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Environmental Energy Technologies Division to be presented at the 3 rd International Conference on Microgeneration and Related Technologies Naples, 15-17 April 2013 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html This work was supported by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's Energy Storage and Smart Grid Programs in the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and through

10

NON-AQUEOUS DISSOLUTION OF MASSIVE PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for obtaining non-aqueous solutions or plutonium from massive forms of the metal. In the present invention massive plutonium is added to a salt melt consisting of 10 to 40 weight per cent of sodium chloride and the balance zinc chloride. The plutonium reacts at about 800 deg C with the zinc chloride to form a salt bath of plutonium trichloride, sodium chloride, and metallic zinc. The zinc is separated from the salt melt by forcing the molten mixture through a Pyrex filter.

Reavis, J.G.; Leary, J.A.; Walsh, K.A.

1959-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pore-scale analysis of solubilization and mobilization of trapped NAPL blobs in porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAPL (non-aqueous phase liquid) blob mobilization and solubilization models were developed to predict residual NAPL fate and describe flow dynamics of various displacing phases (water and surfactant foam). The models were achieved by pore-scale mass and force balances and were focused on the understanding of the physico-chemical interactions between NAPL blobs and the displacing phases. The pore-level mass balance indicated changes in NAPL saturation instead of mass reduction occurring with blob solubilization. The force balance was used to explain the complex flow configurations among NAPL blobs and the displacing phases. Some factors such as the wettability and the spreading/entering coefficients were useful in determining flow configurations. From the models developed in this study, dimensional analysis was performed to identify NAPL blob motion during water or surfactant foam flooding. In non-dimensionalized forms, a Trapping number employed as an indicator of blob displacement performance was modified to quantify the onset of blob mobilization. Its value for water flooding was nearly 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that of surfactant foam flooding. Next, to investigate the blob flow regime in porous media, a blob velocity was computed. Regardless of the displacing phases, a blob’s velocity increased with increasing blob sizes after commencement of blob motion, and the velocity of DNAPL (dense non-aqueous phase liquid) blobs was greater than that of LNAPL (light non-aqueous phase liquid) blobs. From this investigation, it is expected that the pore-scale solubilization and mobilization models would provide better understanding leading to a predictive capability for the flow behavior of NAPL blobs removed by various displacing phases in a porous medium. Additionally, the models based on newly approached concepts and modified governing equations would be useful in conceptualization, as well as the model prediction of other immiscible or miscible fluids flowing through a porous medium. Further, the models developed in our study would be a useful contribution to the study of small-scale contaminants or substances such as particle and bacterial transport in porous media.

Yoon, Sun Hee

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Microsoft Word - N0075800-NAPL April to June 04.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April Through June 2004 April Through June 2004 July 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE LM/ 6 2004 - - GJ 93 N0075800 DOE-LM/GJ693-2004 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April through June 2004 July 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado Document Number N0075800 Contents U.S. Department of Energy Northeast Site NAPL Interim Measures Progress Report

13

Phase Stability of Multicomponent NAPLs Containing PAHs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural or engineered process that acts to selectively extract compounds will alter NAPL composition examines the relationship between NAPL composition and liquid phase stability for mixtures of polycyclic as a subsurface environmental contaminant at sites of former manufactured gas plants (1). Multicomponent NAPLs

Peters, Catherine A.

14

Naples, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Naples, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

15

Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Paper presented at the Third...

16

Anion receptor compounds for non-aqueous electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

A new family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

Phenyl boron-based compounds as anion receptors for non-aqueous battery electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

Novel fluorinated boronate-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boronate-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boronate-based anion receptors include different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY); Sun, Xuehui (Middle Island, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Microsoft Word - N0074600-NAPL-Jan to March.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January Through March 2004 January Through March 2004 April 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE LM/ 646 2004 - - GJ N0074600 DOE-LM/GJ646-2004 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report January through March 2004 April 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado Document Number N0074600 Contents U.S. Department of Energy Northeast Site NAPL Interim Measures Progress Report

19

Recovery of Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids from Contaminated Soil by CO2-Supersaturated Water Injection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supersaturated water injection (SWI) is a novel remediation technology which is able to remove entrapped residual NAPLs from saturated porous media by both volatilization (partitioning… (more)

Li, Meichun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

CHEMICAL PROBLEMS OF NON-AQUEOUS FLUID-FUEL REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The three main chemical problems of non-aqueous fluidfuel reactors are selection of a fuel system which meets nuclear and thermal requirements, control of corrosion of structural materials, and development of an efficient and economical separation process. The problems of the fastneutron reactor with a core of fused NaCl, PbCl/sub 2/, UCl/sub 4/ mixture and a blanket of fused UCl/ sub 4/ are discussed, except for the separation process. Brief treatment is given the Bi- U - Pu fuel system for thermal reactors, including tentative flowsheets for the separation process. A detailed discussion of the experiments of Bareis at Brookhaven and related experiments on the distribution of various metals between liquid Bi and fused-salt solutions is given, the experimental results correlated, and application made to reactor problems. A general discussion is given of nonaqueous high-temperature separation processes (L.M.T.)

Scatchard, G.; Clark, H.M.; Golden, S.; Boltax, A.; Schuhmann, R. Jr.

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electric cell with a non-aqueous electrolyte  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A secondary electric cell is described which includes: a non-aqueous electrolyte, a negative electrode whose active material includes at least one alkali metal in contact with the electrolyte, and a positive electrode whose active material is suitable for intercalating the active material of the negative electrode, wherein said positive electrode includes an active compound or solid solution whose general formula is Mxx, RyX3 where: M is an element chosen from lead and tin; R is an element chosen from bismuth and antimony; and X is an element chosen from sulphur and selenium, with X having a value lying between 0 and 1 (Inclusive), and Y having a value lying between 0 and 2 (Inclusive). Such cells may be used in watches or pacemakers.

Brec, R.; Dugast, A.; Le Mehaute, A.

1982-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Electric cell with a non-aqueous electrolyte  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric cell with a non-aqueous electrolyte. The cell includes a positive electrode whose active material is suitable for inserting the negative active material dynamically, a negative electrode whose active material includes at least one alkali metal, and an electrolyte, wherein said positive electrode includes at least one compound whose general formula is mx4rntp, where M represents an element chosen from among silicon, germanium, tin and lead, X represents sulphur, selenium or tellurium, R and T represent an element chosen from among copper, silver, manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel, N being greater than or equal to 0 and less than or equal to 4, P being greater than or equal to 0 and less than or equal to 2. The invention is used in connection with button type electric cells.

Le Blanc-Soreau, A.; Le Mehaute, A.; Rouxel, J.

1982-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

23

Naples, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naples, Maine: Energy Resources Naples, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.971739°, -70.6092258° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.971739,"lon":-70.6092258,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center...

25

Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

82-TAC 82-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 N0065200 GJO- 2003- 482- TAC GJO- PIN 13.12.10 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report Young - Rainey STAR Center September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13- 02GJ79491 Document Number N0065200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 Page iii

26

Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report-January through March 2003  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4-TAC 4-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project January through March 2003 Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April 2003 Grand Junction Office U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. N0060900 GJO-2003-434-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report January through March 2003 April 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107

27

Method and device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system includes a generally cylindrical push-rod defining an internal recess therein. The push-rod includes first and second end portions and an external liquid collection surface. A liquid collection member is detachably connected to the push-rod at one of the first and second end portions thereof. The method of the present invention for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a contaminated groundwater system includes providing a lance including an external hydrophobic liquid collection surface, an internal recess, and a collection chamber at the bottom end thereof. The lance is extended into the groundwater system such that the top end thereof remains above the ground surface. The liquid is then allowed to collect on the liquid collection surface, and flow downwardly by gravity into the collection chamber to be pumped upwardly through the internal recess in the lance.

Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Technical and Economic Evaluation of Coal Tar Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) Pumping Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry has become aware of potential environmental issues at some sites resulting from process residues or byproducts at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. One of the greatest challenges utility managers face in the management of these sites is the subsurface presence of coal tar, dense-non aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). This report, which explores the technical feasibility and life cycle costs for several coal tar DNAPL pumping alternatives, is intended to assist utilities in evalua...

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Northeast Site Area B Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1457 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1457-2007 Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

30

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent CO2 Capture Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0013865 Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is continuing the development process for a non-aqueous solvent (NAS)-based CO2 capture process that was originated at laboratory scale under an ARPA-E project. This project will conduct bench-scale testing to show the potential of the technology to reduce the parasitic energy penalty. Key technical and economic challenges and uncertainties to be addressed include solvent makeup cost, scalable regenerator design, development of a complete NAS process arrangement, and improved confidence in the capital cost estimate that will enable the scale up of the process. One major focus is identification of best-candidate NAS formulations. This will entail reducing solvent makeup costs by reducing the formulation cost. In addition, efforts will be made to reduce evaporative and degradation losses while maintaining the desired CO2 absorption chemistry. A second focus area involves advancing the design of the process. This will be done by developing and evaluating the effectiveness of two process units specific to NASs - the NAS Recovery/Wash Section and NAS Regenerator. As the project proceeds, the testing campaign will evaluate thermal regeneration energy requirements [kJt / kg CO2] and develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the process. Preliminary analyses indicate that the NAS process can reduce energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent compared to current state of the art CO2 capture processes.

31

High Rate Oxygen Reduction in Non-aqueous Electrolytes with the Addition of Perfluorinated Additives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discharge rate capability of Li-air batteries is substantially increased by using perfluorinated compounds as oxygen carriers. The solubility of oxygen in a non-aqueous electrolyte can be significantly increased by the introduction of such compounds, which leads to the increase in the diffusion-limited current of oxygen reduction on the gas diffusion electrode in a Li-air battery. The perfluorinated compound is found to be stable within the electrochemical window of the electrolyte. A powder microelectrode and a rotating disk electrode were used to study the gas diffusion-limited current together with a rotating disk electrode. A 5 mA cm{sup -2} discharge rate is demonstrated in a lab Li-O{sub 2} cell.

Wang, Y.; Yang, X.; Zheng, D.; Qu, D.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

32

Optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for Primary lithium/air batteries operated in Ambient Enviroment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection and optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for ambient operations of lithium/air batteries has been studied. Organic solvents with low volatility and low moisture absorption are necessary to minimize the change of electrolyte compositions and the reaction between lithium anode and water during discharge process. It is critical to make the electrolytes with high polarity so that it can reduce wetting and flooding of carbon based air electrode and lead to improved battery performance. For ambient operations, the viscosity, ionic conductivity, and oxygen solubility of the electrolyte are less important than the polarity of organic solvents once the electrolyte has reasonable viscosity, conductivity, and oxygen solubility. It has been found that PC/EC mixture is the best solvent system and LiTFSI is the most feasible salt for ambient operations of Li/air batteries. Battery performance is not very sensitive to PC/EC ratio or salt concentration.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jiguang

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV. Also conducted was screening of 13 chemicals to determine their relative effectiveness and the selection of three chemicals for further testing.

L.A. Johnson, Jr.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Highly Quantitative Electrochemical Characterization of Non-Aqueous Electrolytes & Solid Electrolyte Interphases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The methods to measure solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) electrochemical properties and SEI formation capability of non-aqueous electrolyte solutions are not adequately addressed in the literature. And yet, there is a strong demand in new electrolyte generations that promote stabilized SEIs and have an influence to resolve safety, calendar life and other limitations of Li-ion batteries. To fill this gap, in situ electrochemical approach with new descriptive criteria for highly quantitative characterization of SEI and electrolytes is proposed. These criteria are: SEI formation capacity, SEI corrosion rate, SEI maintenance rate, and SEI kinetic stability. These criteria are associated with battery parameters like irreversible capacity, self-discharge, shelf-life, power, etc. Therefore, they are especially useful for electrolyte development and standard fast screening, allowing a skillful approach to narrow down the search for the best electrolyte. The characterization protocol also allows retrieving information on interfacial resistance for SEI layers and the electrochemical window of electrolytes, the other important metrics of characterization. The method validation was done on electrolyte blends containing phosphazenes, developed at Idaho National Laboratory, as 1.2M LiPF6 [80 % EC-MEC (2:8) (v/v) + 20% Phosphazene variety] (v/v), which were targeted for safer electrolyte variations.

Sergiy V. Sazhin; Kevin L. Gering; Mason K. Harrup; Harry W. Rollins

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Imaging the Angevin Patron Saint: Mary Magdalen in the Pipino Chapel in Naples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naples 1266-1713,” 1-15, esp. 1-2; Aislinn Loconte’ssee: ibid. , 295-394, esp. 298-331; André Vauchez, “BeataRuprecht, 2000), esp. 61-84: “Das Selbstverständnis der

Wilkins, Sarah S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Coal Tar Treatability Test Program: Chemical Oxidation Effects on Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Using Potassium Permanganate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has initiated a progressive program to investigate the effectiveness of using potassium permanganate to mitigate the impact of coal tar on groundwater at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using potassium permanganate to reduce the rate of dissolution of chemical constituents present in coal-tar-derived dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) into the surrounding groundwater. The focus of the research was 1) to develop a proof of concept for using pot...

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Technical Protocols for Assessing Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Mobility in the Subsurface at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research that has been conducted on dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) mobility at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and presents technical protocols for conducting DNAPL mobility assessments at MGP sites using currently available methodologies and/or technologies. The technical protocols address each of the primary zones of the subsurface environment: vadose zone, saturated zone, and bedrock (both competent and fractured). The report a...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Cross borehole induced polarization to detect subsurface NAPL at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral induced polarization measurements were acquired in six cross-borehole panels within four boreholes at the Savannah River Site. The investigation was performed to delineate the presence of dense non-aqueous phase ...

Lambert, Michael B. (Michael Brian), 1980-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Artists, Patrons, and Trust in Seventeenth-Century Naples: The Case of the Certosa di San Martino  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the sculptor/architect and the monks. It appears innumber of painters, sculptors, architects, embroiderers, andthe premier sculptor-architect in Naples, Cosimo Fanzago, a

Napoli, J. Nicholas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Impact of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone architecture on mass removal mechanisms in strongly layered heterogeneous porous media during soil vapor extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An existing multiphase flow simulator was modified in order to determine the effects of four mechanisms on NAPL mass removal in a strongly layered heterogeneous vadose zone during soil vapor extraction (SVE): a) NAPL flow, b) diffusion and dispersion from low permeability zones, c) slow desorption from sediment grains, and d) rate-limited dissolution of trapped NAPL. The impact of water and NAPL saturation distribution, NAPL type (i.e., free, residual, or trapped) distribution, and spatial heterogeneity of the permeability field on these mechanisms were evaluated. Two different initial source zone architectures (one with and one without trapped NAPL) were considered and these architectures were used to evaluate seven different SVE scenarios. For all runs, slow diffusion from low permeability zones that gas flow bypassed was a dominant factor for diminished SVE effectiveness at later times. This effect was more significant at high water saturation due to the decrease of gas-phase relative permeability. Transverse dispersion contributed to fast NAPL mass removal from the low permeability layer in both source zone architectures, but longitudinal dispersion did not affect overall mass removal time. Both slow desorption from sediment grains and rate-limited mass transfer from trapped NAPL only marginally affected removal times. However, mass transfer from trapped NAPL did affect mass removal at late time, as well as the NAPL distribution. NAPL flow from low to high permeability zones contributed to faster mass removal from the low permeability layer, and this effect increased when water infiltration was eliminated. These simulations indicate that if trapped NAPL exists in heterogeneous porous media, mass transfer can be improved by delivering gas directly to zones with trapped NAPL and by lowering the water content, which increases the gas relative permeability and changes trapped NAPL to free NAPL.

Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charlie; Valocchi, Albert J.; Oostrom, Martinus

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cr(VI) adsorption on functionalized amorphous and mesoporous silica from aqueous and non-aqueous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoporous silica (SBA-15) and amorphous silica (SG) have been chemically modified with 2-mercaptopyridine using the homogeneous route. This synthetic route involved the reaction of 2-mercaptopyridine with 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane prior to immobilization on the support. The resulting material has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen gas sorption, FT-IR and MAS NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. The solid was employed as a Cr(VI) adsorbent from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, metal concentration and solvent polarity) has been studied using the batch technique. The results indicate that under the optimum conditions, the maximum adsorption value for Cr(VI) was 1.83 {+-} 0.03 mmol/g for MP-SBA-15, whereas the adsorption capacity of the MP-SG was 0.86 {+-} 0.02 mmol/g. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically SBA-15 and SG with 2-mercaptopyridine and to use the resulting modified silicas as effective adsorbents for Cr(VI)

Perez-Quintanilla, Damian [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Analitica, E.S.C.E.T, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: damian.perez@urjc.es; Hierro, Isabel del [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Analitica, E.S.C.E.T, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Fajardo, Mariano [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Analitica, E.S.C.E.T, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Sierra, Isabel [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Analitica, E.S.C.E.T, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: isabel.sierra@urjc.es

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Microsoft Word - N0071600-NAPL-Oct to Dec.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6-TAC 6-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measure Progress Report October Through December 2003 January 2004 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management N0071600 GJO-2004-556-TAC PIN 700.15.10 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2003 January 2004 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491

43

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#350832-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_April-June_2006.DOC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Northeast Site Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April through June 2006 July 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1253-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1253-2006 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April through June 2006 July 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

44

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#345139-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Oct-Dec_2005.DOC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 2006 - -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measure Progress Report October Through December 2005 January 2006 DOE-LM/GJ1105-2006 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2005 January 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

45

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#100069-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Oct-Dec_2004.DOC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measure Progress Report October through December 2004 January 2005 DOE-LM/GJ801-2005 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2004 January 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

46

Investigation of the Gas-Diffusion-Electrode Used as Lithium/Air Cathode in Non-aqueous Electrolyte and the Importance of Carbon Material Porosity  

SciTech Connect

The gas-diffusion-electrode used in a Li-air cell has been studied in a unique homemade electrochemical cell. Three major obstacles for the development of a feasible Li-air system were discussed with a focus on the development of a functional gas-diffusion-electrode in non-aqueous electrolytes and the way of avoiding the passivation of gas-diffusion-electrodes caused by the deposition of the reduction products. It is the first time that the importance of establishing the 3-phase electrochemical interface in non-aqueous electrolyte is demonstrated by creating air-diffusion paths and an air saturated portion for an air cathode. A model mechanism of electrode passivation by the reaction products was also proposed. Lithium oxides formed during O{sub 2} reduction tend to block small pores, preventing them from further utilization in the electrochemical reaction. On the other hand, lithium oxides would accumulate inside the large pores during the reduction until the density of oxides becomes high enough to choke-off the mass transfer. Carbon materials with a high surface area associated with larger pores should be selected to make the gas-diffusion-electrode for Li-air battery. For the first time, a near linear relationship between the capacity of GDE in a non-aqueous electrolyte and the average pore diameter was demonstrated, which could be used to estimate the capacity of the GDE quantitatively.

Qu, D.; Yang, X.; Tran, C.

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#102768-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Report_Jan-March_2005.ƒ  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6 6 U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measure Progress Report January through March 2005 April 2005 DOE-LM/GJ876-2005 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report January through March 2005 April 2005 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

48

Improved Predictions of Carbon Tetrachloride Contaminant Flow and Transport: Implementation of Kinetic Volatilization and Multicomponent NAPL Behavior  

SciTech Connect

Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was discharged to waste sites that are included in the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit in Hanford 200 West Area. Fluor Hanford, Inc. is conducting a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit. The RI/FS process and remedial investigations for the 200-PW-1, 200 PW-3, and 200-PW-6 Operable Units are described in the Plutonium/Organic-Rich Process Condensate/Process Waste Groups Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. As part of this overall effort, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to improve the STOMP simulator (White and Oostrom, 2006) by incorporating kinetic volatilization of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL) and multicomponent flow and transport. This work supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to characterize the nature and distribution of CT in the 200 West Area and subsequently select an appropriate final remedy. Previous numerical simulation results with the STOMP simulator have overestimated the effect of soil vapor extraction (SVE) on subsurface CT, showing rapid removal of considerably more CT than has actually been recovered so far. These previous multiphase simulations modeled CT mass transfer between phases based on equilibrium partitioning. Equilibrium volatilization can overestimate volatilization because mass transfer limitations present in the field are not considered. Previous simulations were also conducted by modeling the NAPL as a single component, CT. In reality, however, the NAPL mixture disposed of at the Hanford site contained several non-volatile and nearly insoluble organic components, resulting in time-variant fluid properties as the CT component volatilized or dissolved over time. Simulation of CT removal from a DNAPL mixture using single-component DNAPL properties typically leads to an overestimation of CT removal. Other possible reasons for the discrepancy between observed and simulated CT mass removal during SVE are differences between the actual and simulated (1) SVE flow rates, (2) fluid-media properties, and (3) disposal history (volumes, rates, and timing). In this report, numerical implementation of kinetic volatilization and multicomponent DNAPL flow and transport into the STOMP simulator (White and Oostrom, 2006) is described. The results of several test cases are presented and explained. The addition of these two major code enhancements increases the ability of the STOMP simulator to model complex subsurface flow and transport processes involving CT at the Hanford site.

Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

Laboratory Assessment of Leaching Potential of Coal Tar at MGP Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are highly immiscible in water, and their presence in the environment continues to spark interest in the regulatory community. When considering NAPL mobility in the subsurface, it is often classified as free product or residual product. Free product or free-phase NAPL exists in the subsurface with a positive pressure such that it can flow into a well. Dense NAPL (DNAPL) will typically flow in this manner until all NAPL is trapped within soil pores by capillary forces. NA...

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

Kim, Yu Seung; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Rockward, Tommy Q. T.

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fluorinated Arylboron Oxalate for Non-Aqueous Battery Electrolytes  

A range of new fluorinated arylboron oxalate compounds for use as additives and anion receptors in lithium-based battery electrolytes have been ...

52

Non-aqueous solution preparation of doped and undoped lixmnyoz  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generation of phase-pure doped and undoped Li.sub.x Mn.sub.y O.sub.z precursors. The method of this invention uses organic solutions instead of aqueous solutions or nonsolution ball milling of dry powders to produce phase-pure precursors. These precursors can be used as cathodes for lithium-polymer electrolyte batteries. Dopants may be homogeneously incorporated to alter the characteristics of the powder.

Boyle, Timothy J. (5801 Eubank, N.E., Apt. #97, Albuquerque, NM 87111); Voigt, James A. (187 Aaramar La., Corrales, NM 87048)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A pentafluorophenylboron oxalate additive in non-aqueous ...  

increase the solubility of lithium ?uorite and lithium oxides. ... per foil were used as current collectors for cathode and anode ... Energy, Of?ce of ...

54

Groundwater modeling: Application of a multiphase fluid flow model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating installation restoration program sites. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research examined a two-dimensional numerical model, VALOR, which can simulate multiphase fluid flow in soils and groundwater, and evaluated the applicability of the model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating IRP sites. Model sensitivity analyses were conducted to study the influence of grid sizes, soil types, and organic release rates on the simulated migration of both light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The VALOR model was applied to a case study of a JP-4 release at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The finer grid sizes provide the most accurate definition of NAPL distribution. The soil type and release rate sensitivity analyses demonstrate that NAPL migrates quicker through coarse sands than fine sand and clay. The light NAPL ponds at the water table and spreads laterally. The dense NAPL migrates through the subsurface and ponds at the aquifer bottom. The fast organic release simulations predict wider vertical pathways of migration. The slow organic release simulations predict higher light NAPL saturation at the water table. The case study indicates that within limits, VALOR may be useful for assessing NAPL distribution, estimating contaminated soil volumes, and evaluating remediation alternatives.... Groundwater modeling, Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: NAPL, Multiphase fluid flow model, Installation Restoration Program, IRP.

Scott, D.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effect of immiscible liquid contaminants on P-wave transmission through natural aquifer samples  

SciTech Connect

We performed core-scale laboratory experiments to examine the effect of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants on P-wave velocity and attenuation in heterogeneous media. This work is part of a larger project to develop crosswell seismic methods for minimally invasive NAPL detection. The test site is the former DOE Pinellas Plant in Florida, which has known NAPL contamination in the surficial aquifer. Field measurements revealed a zone of anomalously high seismic attenuation, which may be due to lithology and/or contaminants (NAPL or gas phase). Intact core was obtained from the field site, and P-wave transmission was measured by the pulse-transmission technique with a 500 kHz transducer. Two types of samples were tested: a clean fine sand from the upper portion of the surficial aquifer, and clayey-silty sand with shell fragments and phosphate nodules from the lower portion. Either NAPL trichloroethene or toluene was injected into the initially water-saturated sample. Maximum NAPL saturations ranged from 30 to 50% of the pore space. P-wave velocity varied by approximately 4% among the water-saturated samples, while velocities decreased by 5 to 9% in samples at maximum NAPL saturation compared to water-saturated conditions. The clay and silt fraction as well as the larger scatterers in the clayey-silty sands apparently caused greater P-wave attenuation compared to the clean sand. The presence of NAPLs caused a 34 to 54% decrease in amplitudes of the first arrival. The central frequency of the transmitted energy ranged from 85 to 200 kHz, and was sensitive to both grain texture and presence of NAPL. The results are consistent with previous trends observed in homogeneous sand packs. More data will be acquired to interpret P-wave tomograms from crosswell field measurements, determine the cause of high attenuation observed in the field data and evaluate the sensitivity of seismic methods for NAPL detection.

Geller, Jil T.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Pentafluorophenylboron Oxalate Additive in Non-aqueous Electrolytes 3 for Lithium Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel compound named pentafluorophenylboron oxalate (PFPBO) has been synthesized. PFPBO has a unique molecular structure containing a boron atom center with electron deficiency and an oxalate group. It is found that when PFPBO is used as additive, the solubility of lithium fluoride (LiF) or lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in propylene carbonate (PC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) solvents can be increased dramatically. The new electrolytes show high ionic conductivity, high lithium ion transference number and good compatibility with LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode and MCMB anode. PFPBO was synthesized with the designed structure to act as a bi-functional additive: boron-based anion receptor (BBAR) additive and stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation additive in PC-based electrolytes. The results show it does possess these two desired functionalities.

Yang, X.Q.; Li, L.F.; Lee, H.S.; Li, H.; Huang, X.J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Application of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Containment Barriers at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status and use of containment technologies at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and provides a framework for a rigorous evaluation of containment technologies and applicability. It identifies the performance parameters that, through additional bench- or field-scale research, would promote increased understanding of the use and limitations of containment technologies at MGP sites.

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

Kinetics and mechanism of the reduction of sulphur dioxide in non-aqueous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electroreduction of sulfur dioxide has been studied using three solvents and six supporting electrolytes. Electrochemical and spectroscopic measurements indicate that several follow-on reactions occur after the initial electron transfer step. The results are interpreted in terms of equilibria between SO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 4//sup -/ and S/sub 2/O/sub 4//sup 2-/. It has been found that both the solvent and supporting electrolyte have a strong influence on the distribution of products. These results indicate that ion-pairing plays an important role in determining the course of the reduction process. 11 refs.

Gardner, C.L.; Fouchard, D.T.; Laman, F.C.; Fawcett, W.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Non-aqueous liquid compositions comprising ion exchange polymers reference to related application  

SciTech Connect

Compositions, and methods of making thereof, comprising from about 1% to about 5% of a perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer or a hydrocarbon-based ionomer; and from about 95% to about 99% of a solvent, said solvent consisting essentially of a polyol; wherein said composition is substantially free of water and wherein said ionomer is uniformly dispersed in said solvent.

Kim; Yu Seung (Los Alamos, NM), Lee; Kwan-Soo (Los Alamos, NM), Rockward; Tommy Q. T. (Rio Rancho, NM)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Microscopic Insights into the Electrochemical Behavior of Non-aqueous Electrolytes in Supercapacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric double-layer capacitors (EDLC) are electrical devices that store energy by adsorption of ionic species at the inner surface of porous electrodes. Compared with aqueous electrolytes, ionic liquid and organic electrolytes have the advantage of larger potential windows, making them attractive for the next generation of EDLC with superior energy and power densities. The performance of both ionic liquid and organic electrolyte EDLC hinges on the judicious selection of the electrode pore size and the electrolyte composition that requires a comprehension of the charging behavior from a microscopic view. In this perspective, we discuss predictions from the classical density functional theory (CDFT) on the dependence of the capacitance on the pore size for ionic-liquid and organic-electrolyte EDLC. CDFT is applicable to electrodes with the pore size ranging from that below the ionic dimensionality to mesoscopic scales, thus unique for investigating the electrochemical behavior of the confined electrolytes for EDLC applications.

Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Wu, Jianzhong [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Experimental assessment and modeling of organic compound interphase mass-transfer rates in multiphase subsurface systems. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

During the initial eight month period of this grant, work has been conducted on all facets of the project. Significant progress has been made in the design, construction and testing of the experimental apparatus. Investigation of methods for characterizing the physical forms of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) residuals (globules or blobs) has led to a narrowing of possible approaches. Development of a numerical simulator that accomodates multiphase transport with mass transfer rate interactions is well underway.

Weber, W.J. Jr.; Abriola, L.M.

1990-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

A Pilot Scale Evaluation of Surfactant-Enhanced In Situ Chemical Oxidation (S-ISCO) Technology: A Field Application at a Former Manu factured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites commonly contain areas where coal tar has been released, potentially existing in several phases including non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in portions of the subsurface site soils. This report describes a field-based pilot scale study of an in situ oxidation technology called Surfactant-Enhanced In Situ Chemical Oxidation (S-ISCO), which was developed by VeruTEK Technologies, Inc.BackgroundCoal tar can remain as ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

63

Compatibility of Lithium Salts with Solvent of the Non-Aqueous Electrolyte in Li–O2 Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The stability of lithium salts, especially in the presence of reduced oxygen species, O2 and H2O (even in a small amount), plays an important role in the cyclability and capacity of Li–O2 cells. This combined experimental and computational study provides evidence that the stability of the electrolyte used in Li–O2 cells strongly depends on the compatibility of lithium salts with solvent. In the case of the LiPF6–1NM3 electrolyte, the decomposition of LiPF6 occurs in the cell as evidenced by in situ XRD, FT-IR and XPS analysis, which triggers the decomposition of 1NM3 solvent due to formation of HF from the decomposition of LiPF6. These reactions lead to degradation of the electrolyte and cause poor cyclability of the cell. The same reactions are not observed when LiTFSI and LiCF3SO3 are used as the lithium salts in 1NM3 solvent, or LiPF6 is used in TEGDME solvent.

Du, Peng; Lu, Jun; Lau, Kah Chun; Luo, Xiangyi; Bareno, Javier; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Curtiss, Larry A.; Sun, Yang-Kook; Amine, Khalil

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Synthesis and studies of boron based anion receptors and their use in non-aqueous electrolytes for lithium batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new family of anion receptors based on boron compounds has been synthesized. These compounds can be used as anion receptors in lithium battery electrolytes and can greatly increase solubility and ionic conductivities of various lithium salts, such as LiF, LiCl, CF{sub 3}COOLi and C{sub 2}F{sub 5}COOLi, in DME solutions. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy studies show that Cl{sup {minus}} anions of LiCl are complexed with these compounds in DME solutions. The electrochemical stability of lithium salts and one of the boron compounds in deferent solvents was studied. For the first time, LiF has been successfully used as conducting salt in a novel electrolyte with this boron compound as an additive in DME. A rechargeable Li/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cell using this electrolyte was successfully cycled 51 times. However, the capacity fades with cycling due to decomposition of the solvent. The cycling performance of the battery was greatly improved by replacing DME with PC-EC-DMC as the solvent.

Sun, X.; Yang, X.Q.; Lee, H.S.; McBreen, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Choi, L.S. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

2B-01.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds 1, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds -2004. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds (Monterey, CA; May 2004). ISBN 1-57477-145-0, published by Battelle Press, Columbus, OH, www.battelle.org/bookstore. SUCCESSFUL FIELD-SCALE IN SITU THERMAL NAPL REMEDIATION AT THE YOUNG-RAINEY STAR CENTER ABSTRACT: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field- scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at a site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The STAR Center is a former DOE facility. The remediation project covered an

66

HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Microsoft Word - San Diego 2004 ORT Conference paper_1.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

presented at the Third International Conference on Oxidation and Reduction Technologies for Soil and presented at the Third International Conference on Oxidation and Reduction Technologies for Soil and Groundwater in San Diego, CA, on October 24-28, 2004 PROJECT OVERVIEW: SUCCESSFUL FIELD-SCALE IN SITU THERMAL NAPL REMEDIATION ABSTRACT: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field-scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The Young-Rainey STAR Center is a former DOE facility that was previously known as the Pinellas Plant and the Pinellas STAR Center. The remediation project encompassed an area of 10,000 ft 2 and depths extending to 35 ft below ground surface. Prior to the remediation, DOE evaluated technologies that had the potential to remove

68

Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluation of Site Investigation/Closure Requirements and Their Applicability to Residuals from Former Manufactured Gas Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free product is defined as the concentration of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) that is present in concentrations greater than the residual saturation point of the site media at a contaminated location. Identifying free product is important for the management of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites because the free product is mobile and has the potential to migrate off site. The report provides a review of the regulatory programs for six states in the mid-west and northeast with regard to closure re...

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

N0057000.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

000 000 GJO- 2002-380- TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report July through September 2002 October 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057000 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site NAPL Interim Measures Progress Report October 2002 Page ii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ..........................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

71

Evaluation of Innovative Technologies for Remediation of an MGP Located at a Municipal Park: Bench Scale Treatability Testing and Fe asibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the evaluation of various remediation options in addressing the cleanup of an MGP site in southeastern Pennsylvania presently used as a municipal park. The site has many of the features typical of MGP sites. It is located in a suburban area on approximately 0.4 hectare (one acre) adjacent to a stream. It has areas of soil and groundwater impacted primarily by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals, and there is an area of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at ...

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

72

L'ANE ET LES FEUX D'ARTIFICE Essai sur l'imaginaire de Naples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moindre rang dans le légendaire local : tel est le cas, par exemple, de Jeppson, un Suédois rigoureux

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#344133-v1-Final_NAPL_Quarterly_July...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

hydraulic control. One week later vapor extraction was started to establish pneumatic control. Approximately two weeks after the start of system operation, Phase I...

74

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#99768-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Report_for...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of...

75

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#341474-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_April_-...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(Photo 1). Other equipment, such as the extraction well pumps, steam generator, emergency generator, and various tanks were delivered to the site and installed. Additionally,...

76

CO2 Capture and Regeneration at Low Temperatures: Novel Non-Aqueous CO2 Solvents and Capture Process with Substantially Reduced Energy Penalties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: RTI is developing a solvent and process that could significantly reduce the temperature associated with regenerating solvent and CO2 captured from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants. Traditional CO2 removal processes using water-based solvents require significant amount of steam from power plants in order to regenerate the solvent so it can be reused after each reaction. RTI’s solvents can be better at absorbing CO2 than many water-based solvents, and are regenerated at lower temperatures using less steam. Thus, industrial heat that is normally too cool to re-use can be deployed for regeneration, rather than using high-value steam. This saves the power plant money, which results in increased cost savings for consumers.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A new family of anion receptors and their effects on ion pair dissociation and conductivity of lithium salts in non-aqueous solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new family of anion receptors based on aza-ether compounds have been synthesized. Since the anion complexation of these compounds is not based on either positively charged sites or hydrogen bonding, they have a potential to be used in lithium batteries as electrolyte additives. When these compounds are added into nonaqueous electrolytes using lithium salts, such as LiCl/BF or LiBr/THF, the ionic conductivity can be dramatically increased. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NF-XAFS) spectroscopy studies show that Cl{sup {minus}} anions are completed with the nitrogen groups in these compounds. The increase in ionic conductivity and the degree of complexation, are both related to the number of R=CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2} groups that are used to substitute the amine hydrogen atoms in these aza-ether compounds.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Okamoto, Y. [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Non-aqueous solution preparation of doped and undoped Li{sub x}Mn{sub y}O{sub z}  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for generation of phase-pure doped and undoped Li{sub x}Mn{sub y}O{sub z} precursors. The method of this invention uses organic solutions instead of aqueous solutions or nonsolution ball milling of dry powders to produce phase-pure precursors. These precursors can be used as cathodes for lithium-polymer electrolyte batteries. Dopants may be homogeneously incorporated to alter the characteristics of the powder. 1 fig.

Boyle, T.J.; Voigt, J.A.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Synthesis of Cyclic Aza-Ether Compounds and Studies of Their Use as Anion Receptors in Non-Aqueous Lithium Halide Salt Solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of new anion receptors, based on cyclic aza-ether compounds, have been synthesized. In all of these cyclic aza-ether compounds, the electron-withdrawing group CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2} was attached to each of the nitrogen atoms. When used as additives, all of them can significantly increase the ionic conductivity of lithium halide salts in THF solutions. This is due to the complexation between these compounds and halide anions. Ionic conductivity studies show that the complexation behavior is related to both the ring structure of the cyclic compounds and the characteristics of the halide anions. X-ray diffraction data show that the diffraction patterns of the complex crystals are different from the pure cyclic aza-ether compounds. New Bragg peaks representing a large d-spacing ({approx}15 {angstrom}) are observed for the complex crystals which provides a clear evidence for complexation.

Lee, H. S.; Sun, X.; Yang, X. Q.; McBreen, J.; Callahan, J. H.; Choi, L. S.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Exhibitor: JBM, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... anode riser bar technology to dramatically decrease millivolt drop and make your anode riser bar almost maintenance free from normal repair and pin wash.

82

NIST Scientists Use Electron Beam to Unravel the Secrets of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a threshold voltage of about 15-20 millivolts, the probability for switching per electron is constant, meaning that the electrons contain sufficient ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

83

Groundwater Fate and Transport Modeling for Texarkana Wood Preserving Company Superfund Site, Texarkana, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Fate and transport model results are presented for the Texarkana Wood Preserving Company (TWPC)superfund site. The conceptual model assumes two sources of contamination, specifically, the areas around the old and new process areas. Recent data show the presence of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in the aquifer that are also sources of dissolved contamination in the aquifer. A flow model was constructed and calibrated against measured hydraulic heads at permanent monitoring wells. Good matches were obtained between model simulated heads and most measured heads. An unexplained exception occurs at monitoring well MW-13 down gradient of the site beyond the measured contaminant plume where the model predicts heads that are more than 2 ft. lower than reported field measurements. Adjusting hydraulic parameters in the model could not account for this anomaly and still preserve the head matches at other wells. There is likely a moderate deficiency in the conceptual model or perhaps a data error. Other information such as substantial amounts of infiltrating surface water in the area or a correction in surveyed elevation would improve the flow model. A particle tracking model calculated a travel time from the new process area to the Day’s Creek discharge location on the order of 40 years. Travel times from the old process area to Day’s Creek were calculated to be on the order of 80 years. While these calculations are subject to some uncertainty, travel times of decades are indicated.

Arnett, Ronald Chester

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section VI. Safety and Codes & Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in high temperature · Compare performance against industry requirements to assess outcome and opportunity for improved precision (ca. 1 millivolt) · Adapt high temperature ceramic "spark plug" packaging for field

85

Offshore Application of Self-potential Prospecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrodes and polarizing them. Volt- meters have evo l veda solution is measured in volts (or millivolts) referred toEh of a solution is measured in volts, and depends upon the

Corwin, Robert Frederic

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Microsoft Word - S07963_MND 5yr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MNA monitored natural attenuation mV millivolts nCiL nanocurie per liter NCP National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan Mound, Ohio, Third Five-Year Review...

87

Steele, A., Reynolds, D. A., Kueper, B. H. & Lerner, D. N. (2006). Geotechnique 56, No. 1, 2738 Field determination of mechanical aperture, entry pressure and relative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a waterflood in the formation to remove mobile NAPL, and Fig. 1. Conceptual model of RADIO experiment

Sheffield, University of

88

Intermetallic electrodes for lithium batteries - Energy ...  

This invention relates to intermetallic negative electrode compounds for non-aqueous, electrochemical lithium cells and batteries. More specifically, ...

89

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UT CC Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program NEPA approval for CNG station to be constructed in Naples, UT. Grant funded by Solicitation...

90

Modeling and Simulation of Pore Scale Multiphase Fluid Flow and Reactive Transport in Fractured and Porous Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the subsurface fluids play a critical role by transporting dissolved minerals, colloids and contaminants (sometimes over long distances), by mediating dissolution and precipitation processes and enabling chemical transformations in solution and at mineral surfaces. Although the complex geometries of fracture apertures, fracture networks and pore spaces may make it difficult to accurately predict fluid flow in saturated (single-phase) subsurface systems, well developed methods are available. The simulation of multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface is much more challenging because of the large density and/or viscosity ratios found in important applications (water/air in the vadose zone, water/oil, water/gas, gas/oil and water/oil/gas in oil reservoirs, water/air/non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in contaminated vadose zone systems and gas/molten rock in volcanic systems, for example). In addition, the complex behavior of fluid-fluid-solid contact lines, and its impact on dynamic contact angles, must also be taken into account, and coupled with the fluid flow. Pore network models and simple statistical physics based models such as the invasion percolation and diffusion-limited aggregation models have been used quite extensively. However, these models for multiphase fluid flow are based on simplified models for pore space geometries and simplified physics. Other methods such a lattice Boltzmann and lattice gas models, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods, and particle methods such as dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics are based more firmly on first principles, and they do not require simplified pore and/or fracture geometries. However, they are less (in some cases very much less) computationally efficient that pore network and statistical physics models. Recently a combination of continuum computation fluid dynamics, fluid-fluid interface tracking or capturing and simple models for the dependence of contact angles on fluid velocity at the contact line has been used to simulate multiphase fluid flow in fracture apertures, fracture networks and pore spaces. Fundamental conservation principles - conservation of momentum, and conservation of mass (or conservation of volume for incompressible fluids) and conservation of energy, as well as symmetries (Galilean invariance and isotropy) are central to the physics of fluids and the models used to simulate them. In molecular and mesoscale models observance of these conservation principles and symmetries at the microscopic level leads to macroscopic fluid dynamics that can be represented by the Navier Stokes equation. The remarkable fact that the flow of all simpe fluids, irrespective of their chemical nature, can be described by the Navier-Stokes equation is a result of these conservation principles and symmetries acting on the molecular level.

Paul Meakin; Alexandre Tartakovsky

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Boron compounds as anion binding agents for nonaqueous battery electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel fluorinated boron-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boron-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boron-based anion receptors include borane and borate compounds bearing different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xia-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY); Xiang, Caili (Upton, NY)

2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S-based buffer layer deposition for solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides CBD ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S and spray deposited ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S buffer layers prepared from a solution of zinc salt, thiourea and ammonium hydroxide dissolved in a non-aqueous/aqueous solvent mixture or in 100% non-aqueous solvent. Non-aqueous solvents useful in the invention include methanol, isopropanol and triethyl-amine. One-step deposition procedures are described for CIS, CIGS and other solar cell devices.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

93

CX-003172: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

172: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003172: Categorical Exclusion Determination RTI International - Novel Non-Aqueous Carbon Dioxide-Solvents and Capture Process CX(s)...

94

Simulator for Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP ...  

Experimentally verified and supported modeling of dense and light non-aqueous phase liquids ... CO2 exchange technologies for production of natural ga ...

95

Cermic Chemistry.qrk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science and Technology Center develops both aque- ous and non-aqueous chemical synthesis routes to generate highly controlled...

96

Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

R&D 100: Battery Technology Goes Viral | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Battery Technology Goes Viral Battery Technology Goes Viral R&D 100: Battery Technology Goes Viral July 24, 2013 - 3:55pm Addthis By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs

98

R&D 100: Battery Technology Goes Viral | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Battery Technology Goes Viral Battery Technology Goes Viral R&D 100: Battery Technology Goes Viral July 24, 2013 - 3:55pm Addthis By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs

99

Presentations of bdj50 conference lectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hall—100 m south of the Mond. Free School Lane100 m North of the Mond SQUIDs Then… First Week at the Mond • Thesis advisor: Brian Pippard • Thesis research required measuring voltages of 10?12 to10?13 volts • Tangent magnetometer •Magnet and mirror...  to  the   problems  of  measuring  2e/h:     (i)?  ge?g  from  millivolts  to  volts     (ii)?  ge?g  the  voltage  units  from  one  country  to   another,  and     (iii)?  comparing  the...

Speakers

2012-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Microsoft PowerPoint - TemplatesrnlTechBriefp1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NAPL Calculator NAPL Calculator at a glance  easy and quick  based on microsoft excel  guides clean-up decision making  works with soil, soil vapor, or groundwater samples The NAPL Calculator is an analytical model that is a self- executing Microsoft Excel workbook that requires qualitative/quantitative soil, groundwater, or soil vapor sample results and a few simple geotechnical parameters. A classic chemistry approach is used that is based on the work of Shiu, Feenstra, McKay and Cherry and is advocated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The method is known to many academics and researchers but not to many practitioners in environmental clean-up. Even for those who know the method, the calculation can be laborious. The NAPL Calculator is designed to make this

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Reanalysis of the Surface Winds for Hurricane Donna of 1960  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Donna, the only major hurricane to strike the United States during the 1960 Atlantic hurricane season, passed over the middle Florida Keys near Sombrero Key before making landfall southeast of Naples, near Goodland, Florida, on 10 ...

Jason P. Dunion; Christopher W. Landsea; Samuel H. Houston; Mark D. Powell

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Admiral John M. Richardson | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. 6th Fleet; Chief of Staff, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa, in Naples, Italy; and Commander, Naval Submarine Forces in Norfolk, Virginia. His...

103

Numerical and experimental investigation of DNAPL removal mechanisms in a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to identify the mechanisms that govern the removal of carbon tetrachloride (CT) during soil vapor extraction (SVE) by comparing multiphase flow simulations with a detailed data set from a well-defined two-dimensional flow cell experiment. The flow cell was packed with two sandy soils including an embedded fine-grained sand layer. Gas concentrations at the outlet of the flow cell and 15 sampling ports inside the flow cell were measured during SVE. A dual-energy gamma radiation system was used to measure an initial NAPL saturation profile in a fine-grained sand layer. Imaging result from a dual-energy gamma radiation system with dyed CT mark along CT migration was used to construct the distribution of initial NAPL saturation in the flow cell for input to numerical simulations. Gas concentration results and photographs during SVE were compared to simulation results using a continuum-based multiphase flow simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases). The measured effluent gas concentration decreased quickly at first, and then started to decrease gradually, resulting in long-term tailing. CT mass was removed quickly in coarse sand, followed by a slow removal from the fine-grained sand layer. An analytical solution for a one-dimensional advection and first-order volatilization model matched the tailing well with two fitting parameters. However, given detailed knowledge of the permeability field and initial NAPL distribution, we can predict the tailing and gas concentration profiles at sampling ports using equilibrium NAPL volatilization. NAPL flow occurs in the presence of free NAPL, and must be accounted for to accurately predict NAPL removal during the SVE experiment. The model prediction was accurate within the uncertainty of the measured or literature derived parameters (i.e., dispersivity and soil parameters). This study provides insights into the physical mechanisms of NAPL removal from a low permeability zone, and use of the local equilibrium assumption for NAPL volatilization during SVE. In addition, this study demonstrates that lack of detailed information regarding NAPL distribution and heterogeneity pattern lead overall NAPL removal to a kinetically controlled system at a 2-D flow cell scale.

Yoon, Hongkyu; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

104

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

762) RTI Int'l. - Novel Non-Aqueous C02-Solvents and Capture Process Location: North Carolina Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: (g)...

105

Kaneen Elizabeth Christensen kaneen@gmail.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Environmental Restoration Planned Graduated Date: May 2011 Dissertation: Dense Non-aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL through to completion at petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites involving lake ice, sea ice, ice, snow

106

Jun Lu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop novel non-aqueous electrolytes, explore new approach to fabricate novel catalysts on carbon cathode and apply state-of-the-art characterization for Li-air batteries application Background and Introduction Approach Develop New Non-aqueous Electrolytes for Rechargeable Li-Air Battery Application Jun Lu and Khalil Amine * Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South, Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL, 60439

107

Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a current transformer for operating currents larger than 2kA (two kiloamps) that is capable of detecting a millivolt level resistive voltage in the presence of a large inductive voltage. Specifically, the present invention includes substantially cylindrical primary turns arranged to carry a primary current and substantially cylindrical secondary turns arranged coaxially with and only partially within the primary turns, the secondary turns including an active winding and a dummy winding, the active and dummy windings being coaxial, longitudinally separated and arranged to mutually cancel voltages excited by commonly experienced magnetic fields, the active winding but not the dummy winding being arranged within the primary turns.

Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Lithium-titanium-oxide anodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spinel-type structure with the general formula Li[Ti.sub.1.67 Li.sub.0.33-y M.sub.y ]O.sub.4, for 0non-aqueous electrochemical cell and in a non-aqueous battery comprising an plurality of cells, electrically connected, each cell comprising a negative electrode, an electrolyte and a positive electrode, the negative electrode consisting of the spinel-type structure disclosed.

Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kahaian, Arthur J. (Chicago, IL); Jansen, Andrew N. (Bolingbrook, IL); Chen, Chun-hua (Westmont, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thin film superconductors and process for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of oxide superconductors from high-viscosity non-aqueous solution is described. Solutions of lanthanide nitrates, alkaline earth nitrates and copper nitrates in a 1:2:3 stoichiometric ratio, when added to ethylene glycol containing citric acid solutions, have been used to prepare highly viscous non-aqueous solutions of metal mixed nitrates-citrates. Thin films of these compositions are produced when a layer of the viscous solution is formed on a substrate and subjected to thermal decomposition.

Nigrey, P.J.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

Resonant Interaction between an Atmospheric Gravity Wave and Shallow Water Wave along Florida's West Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 25 March 1995, a large solitary wave, seemingly from nowhere, washed ashore along the normally tranquil Gulf Coast of Florida from Tampa Bay to south of Naples. On this Saturday morning, many beachgoers and coastal residents saw either a large ...

Charles H. Paxton; Daniel A. Sobien

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODEL. The power produced by the PV array Pi is equal to the solar power incident on the array surface. The load is constant during the year. The solar radiation is computed for Naples with the PV panels facing the SAPV components are discussed with some detail. The results of several runs using the solar radiation

112

Available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/watres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were present in the NAPL source zone, and increased in numbers (i.e., grew) throughout the source. (2007) Custom 5-cm flow cell containing sand mixtures (course- to fine-grained) with residual and pooled (30­140 mesh; US Silica Company, Berkeley Spring, West Virginia) was selected for the column experi

Löffler, Frank E.

113

Three-and-six-month-before forecast of water resources in a karst aquifer in the Terminio massif (Southern Italy)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of artificial neural networks (ANN) to model the rainfall-discharge relationships of karstic aquifers has been studied in the Terminio massif (Southern Italy), which supplies the Naples area with a yearly mean discharge of approximately 1-3.5m^3/s. ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Feature extraction, Forecast, Karstic aquifer, Serino, Spring discharge

Salvatore Rampone

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Data Sources: California Department of Fish and Game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dume SMR Point Vicente SMR Naples SMCA Crystal Cove SMCA Dana Point SMCA Point Dume SMCA San Diego Closure 2 Bolsa Chica SMR Batiquitos Lagoon SMR San Elijo Lagoon SMR Swami's SMCA Tijuana River Mouth SMCA River Sisquoc River Santa Cr uzCr eek Santa Ynez Ri ver Mono Cree k San Antonio Creek Santa Ynez R iver

Hampton, Randy

115

A novel method for simulating smoldering propagation and its application to STAR (Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the development and proof of concept of a phenomenologically-based numerical model capable of simulating the expansion of a smoldering front in a heterogeneous reactive porous medium. This practical tool has potential for investigating ... Keywords: Multiphase flow, NAPLs, Site remediation, Smoldering propagation, Subsurface heterogeneity

Stephanie L. MacPhee; Jason I. Gerhard; Guillermo Rein

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

CIRA ANNUAL REPORT FY 01/02 COOPERATIVE INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH IN THE ATMOSPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrode (anode) for non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cells and batteries. Conventional lithium-ion to that of metallic lithium and are extremely reactive. This composition can cause lithium-ion batteries to overheat lithium-ion batteries have become the battery of choice for everything from cell phones to electric cars

117

CHEMISTRY COLLOQUIUM Wednesday, February 29, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrode (anode) for non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cells and batteries. Conventional lithium-ion to that of metallic lithium and are extremely reactive. This composition can cause lithium-ion batteries to overheat lithium-ion batteries have become the battery of choice for everything from cell phones to electric cars

Heller, Barbara

118

Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 9/09)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrode (anode) for non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cells and batteries. Conventional lithium-ion to that of metallic lithium and are extremely reactive. This composition can cause lithium-ion batteries to overheat lithium-ion batteries have become the battery of choice for everything from cell phones to electric cars

Farritor, Shane

119

Electrode compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

Block, J.; Fan, X.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Electrode compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode composition for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5-4.5 volts.

Block, Jacob (Rockville, MD); Fan, Xiyun (Orange, TX)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MagneticsLab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetics Laboratory Magnetics Laboratory Manufacturing Technologies The Magnetics Lab provides customers with design, prototyping, packaging solutions and production of unique magnetic and resistive components from millivolts to extremely high voltage (250KV) components. Capabilities * Design review of specification and requirements * Design and develop from sketches, verbal ideas, or circuit design parameters * Coil windings of any size or configuration * Coil diameter from 0.1 to 24 inches * Low temperature and high temperature coils * Precision resistors from 0.1 ohms to 2 megaohms (non-inductive) * Special high voltage transformers (2KV to 250KV) and high voltage loads (38K ohms to 100K ohms and 2KV to 250KV) Resources * Computer Aided Mechanical Design (Solid Works 3D CAD System) for mechanical

122

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 25, 2013 July 25, 2013 Data compiled by Yan (Joann) Zhou at Argonne National Laboratory. (*) Sales from the second quarter of 2013 for Tesla Model S are based off of estimates provided by the Hybrid Market Dashboard. Data updated 9/25/2013. Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales Our new interactive chart lets you explore the continued growth of electric vehicle sales. July 24, 2013 By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

123

Electrogenerative oxidation of lower alcohols to useful products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the disclosed electrogenerative process for converting alcohols such as ethanol to aldehydes such as acetaldehyde, the alcohol starting material is an aqueous solution containing more than the azeotropic amount of water. Good first-pass conversions (<40% and more typically <50%) are obtained at operating cell voltages in the range of about 80 to about 350 millivolts at ordinary temperatures and pressures by using very high flow rates of alcohol to the exposed anode surface (i.e. the "gas" side of an anode whose other surface is in contact with the electrolyte). High molar flow rates of vaporized aqueous alcohol also help to keep formation of undesired byproducts at a low level.

Meshbesher, Thomas M. (4507 Weldin Rd., Wilmington, DE 19803)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

EPICS: Allen-Bradley hardware reference manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual covers the following hardware: Allen-Bradley 6008 -- SV VMEbus I/O scanner; Allen-Bradley universal I/O chassis 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, and -A4B; Allen-Bradley power supply module 1771-P4S; Allen-Bradley 1771-ASB remote I/O adapter module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IFE analog input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OFE analog output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IG(D) TTL input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OG(d) TTL output; Allen-Bradley 1771-IQ DC selectable input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OW contact output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IBD DC (10--30V) input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OBD DC (10--60V) output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IXE thermocouple/millivolt input module; and the Allen-Bradley 2705 RediPANEL push button module.

Nawrocki, G.

1993-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

125

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center

126

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center

127

1B-03.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1B-03, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds 1B-03, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds -2004. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds (Monterey, CA; May 2004). ISBN 1-57477-145-0, published by Battelle Press, Columbus, OH, www.battelle.org/bookstore. NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUID CHARACTERIZATION AND POST-REMEDIATION VERIFICATION SAMPLING ABSTRACT: Light and dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) were identified in the surficial aquifer at the Northeast Site of the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center located in Largo, Florida. The composition and the horizontal and verti- cal extent of NAPLs were determined using historical site information, analysis of

128

Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Gorm Heron, Steven Carroll, Hank Sowers, Bruce McGee, Randall Juhlin, Joe Daniel, David S. Ingle Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center More Documents & Publications Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification

129

2B-05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds 5, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds -2004. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds (Monterey, CA; May 2004). ISBN 1-57477-145-0, published by Battelle Press, Columbus, OH, www.battelle.org/bookstore. STEAM AND ET-DSP COMBINED FOR DNAPL REMEDIATION: FULL-SCALE SITE RESTORATION AT YOUNG-RAINEY STAR CENTER ABSTRACT: In March of 2003, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) com- pleted a full-scale nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) remediation of Area A of the North- east Site at the Young-Rainey STAR Center, Largo, Florida. The site was contaminated with approximately 2,300 kg (5,000 lbs) of NAPL constituents such as TCE, cis-1,2-

130

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 11200 of 28,560 results. 91 - 11200 of 28,560 results. Download Microsoft Word- Final Sample Participant Profile November 2008.doc http://energy.gov/management/downloads/microsoft-word-final-sample-participant-profile-november-2008doc Download Audit Report: IG-0434 Waste Inventory Data at Oak Ridge and Savannah River http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-ig-0434 Download Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Paper presented at the Third International Conference on Oxidation and Reduction Technologies for Soil and Groundwater.October 2004, San Diego, California.Michael Butherus, David S. Ingle, Randall... http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/project-overview-successful-field-scale-situ-thermal-napl-remediation Download 2013 Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Briefings

131

Cracking a Cold Case and Enduring Mystery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cracking a Cold Case and Enduring Mystery Cracking a Cold Case and Enduring Mystery Cracking a Cold Case and Enduring Mystery July 1, 2013 - 3:04pm Addthis Chris Brandon of the ROMACONS project collects a sample of ancient Roman concrete drilled from a breakwater in Pozzuoli Bay, near Naples, Italy. The breakwater dates back to roughly 37 B.C. | Photo courtesy of J.P. Oleson. Chris Brandon of the ROMACONS project collects a sample of ancient Roman concrete drilled from a breakwater in Pozzuoli Bay, near Naples, Italy. The breakwater dates back to roughly 37 B.C. | Photo courtesy of J.P. Oleson. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Modern concrete buildings -- most made with Portland cement -- are built to last for a hundred or so years. But Roman concrete has withstood

132

Measure of Solar oscillations and supergranulation with Magnetic-Optical Filter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helioseismology is the branch of the Solar Physics which studies the solar global oscillations, a phenomenon very important in order to understand the inside of the Sun. We explain here a method for measuring the solar velocity fields along the line of sight by the VAMOS instrument developed at the Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte in Naples, in particular we present the measures of the so called five-minutes oscillations and of the Supergranulation.

I. Formicola; A. Longobardo; C. Pinto; P. Cerulo

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Surface and Interfacial Properties of Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Mixtures Released to the Subsurface at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface and interfacial tensions that arise at the interface between different phases are key parameters affecting Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) movement and redistribution in the vadose zone after spill events. In this study, the impact of major additive components on surface and interfacial tensions for organic mixtures and wastewater was investigated. Organic mixture and wastewater compositions are based upon carbon tetrachloride (CT) mixtures released at the Hanford site, where CT was discharged simultaneously with dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP), tributyl phosphate (TBP), dibutyl phosphate (DBP), and a machining lard oil (LO). A considerable amount of wastewater consisting primarily of nitrates and metal salts was also discharged. The tension values measured in this study revealed that the addition of these additive components caused a significant lowering of the interfacial tension with water or wastewater and the surface tension of the wastewater phase in equilibrium with the organic mixtures, compared to pure CT, but had minimal effect on the surface tension of the NAPL itself. These results lead to large differences in spreading coefficients for several mixtures, where the additives caused both a higher (more spreading) initial spreading coefficient and a lower (less spreading) equilibrium spreading coefficient. This indicates that if these mixtures migrate into uncontaminated areas, they will tend to spread quickly, but form a higher residual NAPL saturation after equilibrium, as compared to pure CT. Over time, CT likely volatilizes more rapidly than other components in the originally disposed mixtures and the lard oil and phosphates would become more concentrated in the remaining NAPL, resulting in a lower interfacial tension for the mixture. Spreading coefficients are expected to increase and perhaps change the equilibrated organic mixtures from nonspreading to spreading in water-wetting porous media. These results show that the behavior of organic chemical mixtures should be accounted for in numerical flow and transport models.

Nellis, Scott; Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charlie; Oostrom, Martinus; Valocchi, Albert J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Meat consumption and mortality - results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European countries [France, Italy (Florence, Varese, Ragusa, Turin, Naples), Spain (Asturias, Granada, Murcia, Navarra, San Sebastian), The Netherlands (Bilthoven, Utrecht), United Kingdom (UK; Cambridge, Oxford), Greece, Germany (Heidelberg, Potsdam... to capture local dietary habits and to provide high compliance [18]. Seven countries adopted an extensive self-administered dietary questionnaire, which can provide data on up to 300 to 350 food items per country. In Greece, Spain and Ragusa, the dietary...

Rohrmann, Sabine; Overvad, Kim; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Egeberg, Rikke; Tjønneland, Anne; Nailler, Laura; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Bergmann, Manuela M; Boeing, Heiner; Li, Kuanrong; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Crowe, Francesca L; Key, Timothy J; Naska, Androniki; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitirios; Leenders, Max; Peeters, Petra H M; Engeset, Dagrun; Parr, Christine L; Skeie, Guri; Jakszyn, Paula; Sánchez, María-José; Huerta, José M; Redondo, M L; Barricarte, Aurelio; Amiano, Pilar; Drake, Isabel; Sonestedt, Emily; Hallmans, Göran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Fedirko, Veronika; Romieux, Isabelle; Ferrari, Pietro; Norat, Teresa; Vergnaud, Anne C; Riboli, Elio; Linseisen, and J

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

Influence of Wetting and Mass Transfer Properties of Organic Chemical Mixtures in Vadose Zone Materials on Groundwater Contamination by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have found that organic acids, organic bases, and detergent-like chemicals change surface wettability. The wastewater and NAPL mixtures discharged at the Hanford site contain such chemicals, and their proportions likely change over time due to reaction-facilitated aging. The specific objectives of this work were to (1) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on surface wettability, (2) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on CCl4 volatilization rates from NAPL, and (3) accurately determine the migration, entrapment, and volatilization of organic chemical mixtures. Five tasks were proposed to achieve the project objectives. These are to (1) prepare representative batches of fresh and aged NAPL-wastewater mixtures, (2) to measure interfacial tension, contact angle, and capillary pressure-saturation profiles for the same mixtures, (3) to measure interphase mass transfer rates for the same mixtures using micromodels, (4) to measure multiphase flow and interphase mass transfer in large flow cell experiments, all using the same mixtures, and (5) to modify the multiphase flow simulator STOMP in order to account for updated P-S and interphase mass transfer relationships, and to simulate the impact of CCl4 in the vadose zone on groundwater contamination. Results and findings from these tasks and summarized in the attached final report.

Charles J Werth; Albert J Valocchi, Hongkyu Yoon

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Proceedings of the international workshop on measurement and computation of turbulent nonpremixed flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the proceedings of the International Workshop on Measurement and Computation of Turbulent Nonpremixed Flames, held in Naples, Italy on July 26--27, 1996. Contents include materials that were distributed to participants at the beginning of the workshop, as well as a Summary of Workshop Accomplishments that was generated at the close to this Naples meeting. The Naples workshop involved sixty-one people from eleven countries. The primary objectives were: (1) to select a set of well-documented and relatively simple flames that would be appropriate for collaborative comparisons of model predictions; and (2) to specify common submodels to be used in these predictions, such that models for the coupling of turbulence and chemistry might be isolated and better understood. Studies involve hydrogen and natural gas fuels. These proceedings are also published on the Web and those interested in the ongoing process of data selection and model comparison should consult the workshop page for the most recent and complete information on these collaborative research efforts. The URL is: http://www/ca.sandia/gov/tdf/Workshop.html.

Barlow, R.S. [ed.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) Characterization at the M-Area Settling Basin Western Sector Treatment System (WSTS) Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) Characterization at the M-Area Settling Basin Western Sector Treatment System (WSTS) Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Soil bores will be advanced with a Rotosonic drilling rig to confirm the effectiveness of the Western Sector Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) project at the M-Area Settling Basin. Replacement monitoring wells will also be installed as part of this effort. These groundwater monitoring wells will replace wells that were abandoned due to the installation and / or operation of the DUS system. Now that the heating phase has ended the DUS is transitioning to the Western Sector Treatment System (WSTS). B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Andrew R. Grainger

138

CONTRIBUTING TO THE DISCUSSIONS ON THE FUNDAMENTAL ASPECTS AND COMPLEXITIES OF TALSPEAK CHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect

When liquid-liquid distribution of lanthanides was monitored at Talspeak-related conditions a characteristic drop in the extraction efficiency was observed at high lactate concentrations. The lactate dependency trend also appears to be directly affected by the increasing complexity of the non-aqueous environment. Some considerations of the non-ideal solution behavior in aqueous and organic environment are presented here in an attempt to explain the observed metal partitioning trends. While the mechanism of metal ion phase transfer appears to adhere to the conventional thermodynamic struggle between HDEHP and DTPA, the diminished metal distribution and suppressed slopes for the extractant dependencies suggest further build-up in the complexity of the non-aqueous environment in Talspeak systems.

Peter R. Zalupski; Leigh R. Martin

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Simplified one-pot synthesis of [.sup.18F]SFB for radiolabeling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-aqueous single pot synthesis of [.sup.18F]SFB is set forth. The [.sup.18F]SFB produced with this method is then used, for example, to label a peptide or an engineered antibody fragment (diabody) targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as representative examples of labeled compounds for use as an injectable composition to locate abnormal tissue, specifically tumors within an animal or human using a PET scan.

Olma, Sebastian; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of conceptual flowsheets for incorporating Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel materials in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary study by a group of experts at ORNL has generated and evaluated a number of aqueous and non-aqueous flowsheets for recovering transuranium actinides from LWR fuel for use as fuel in an LMR and, at the same time, for transmutation of the wastes to less hazardous materials. The need for proliferation resistance was a consideration in the flowsheets. The current state of development of the flowsheets was evaluated and recommendations for additional study were made. 3 refs., 6 figs.

Bell, J.T.; Burch, W.D.; Collins, E.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Prince, B.E.; Bond, W.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Delene, J.G.; Mailen, J.C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pentavalent Uranium Chemistry - Synthetic Pursuit Of A Rare Oxidation State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feature article presents a comprehensive overview of pentavalent uranium systems in non-aqueous solution with a focus on the various synthetic avenues employed to access this unusual and very important oxidation state. Selected characterization data and theoretical aspects are also included. The purpose is to provide a perspective on this rapidly evolving field and identify new possibilities for future developments in pentavalent uranium chemistry.

Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

PROTACTINIUM EXTRACTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing and separating protactinium from taorium containing solids is described. The protactinium is formed by irradiating thorium containing solids, such as thorium dioxide and thorium tetrafluoride with neutrons. The protactinium is separated from the thorium solids by contacting the solids with a non-squeous solution of hydrogen fluoride and a complexing agent, NO/sub 2/. The protactinium complex formed is soluble in the non-aqueous solution, whereas the thorium solids remain insoluble in the solution. (AEC)

Horn, F.L.

1962-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Aza compounds as anion receptors  

SciTech Connect

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors  

SciTech Connect

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

STMVOC User's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains instructions for using the STMVOC numerical simulator. This code, which was developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is an extension of the TOUGH geothermal code for use in problems involving subsurface contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The code is used for modeling the nonisothermal transport of air, water, and an organic chemical in three fluid phases. A discussion of the physical processes included in the simulator is given along with a brief outline of the mathematical formulation. A detailed guide to preparing the STMVOC input file with several illustrative examples is provided. 22 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs.

Falta, R.W.; Pruess, K.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 24, 2013 July 24, 2013 By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. R&D 100: Battery Technology Goes Viral Learn how Energy Department researchers are harnessing power from an unlikely source -- viruses. July 24, 2013 If you've ever heard the thunderous sound of a sonic boom, you've experienced the shock waves in the air created by an object traveling faster than the speed of sound. But what happens when an object travels faster than the speed of light? At Jefferson Laboratory, construction is underway to upgrade the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the CEABF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) at Hall B. During the experiments, the accelerator will shoot electrons at speeds faster than the speed at which light travels in the same medium, creating shock waves that emit a blue light, known as Cherenkov light -- this light is equivalent to the sonic boom. By recording data from Cherenkov light, scientists will be able to map a nucleon's three-dimensional spin.

148

Recent News from the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2013 24, 2013 By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. R&D 100: Battery Technology Goes Viral Learn how Energy Department researchers are harnessing power from an unlikely source -- viruses. July 24, 2013 If you've ever heard the thunderous sound of a sonic boom, you've experienced the shock waves in the air created by an object traveling faster than the speed of sound. But what happens when an object travels faster than the speed of light? At Jefferson Laboratory, construction is underway to upgrade the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the CEABF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) at Hall B. During the experiments, the accelerator will shoot electrons at speeds faster than the speed at which light travels in the same medium, creating shock waves that emit a blue light, known as Cherenkov light -- this light is equivalent to the sonic boom. By recording data from Cherenkov light, scientists will be able to map a nucleon's three-dimensional spin.

149

Engineering Task Plan for the 241-AN-105 Multi-Function Corrosion Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of the corrosion probe assembly into riser WST-RISER-016 (formerly 15B) of tank 241-AN-105. The corrosion monitoring system utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring system is designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the system also facilitates the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates.

EDGEMON, G.L.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel carbonaceous electrode support material is disclosed characterized by a corrosion rate of 0.03 wt. %/hour or less when measured a5 550 millivolts vs. a Hg/HgO electrode in a 30 wt. % KOH electrolyte a5 30.degree. C. The electrode support material comprises a preselected carbon black material which has been heat-treated by heating the material to a temperature of from about 2500.degree. to about 3000.degree. C. over a period of from about 1 to about 5 hours in an inert atmosphere and then maintaining the preselected carbon black material at this temperature for a period of at least about 1 hour, and preferably about 2 hours, in the inert atmosphere. A carbonaceous electrode suitable for use as an air electrode in a metal-air cell may be made from the electrode support material by shaping and forming it into a catalyst support and then impregnating it with a catalytically active material capable of catalyzing the reaction with oxygen at the air electrode of metal-air cell.

Ross, Jr., Philip N. (Kensington, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dry Blending to Achieve Isotopic Dilution of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide Materials  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war produced large amounts of excess fissile materials in the United States and Russia. The Department of Energy has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies for disposition of these excess materials. To date, many of these planning strategies have included isotopic dilution of highly enriched uranium as a means of reducing the proliferation and safety risks. Isotopic dilution by dry blending highly enriched uranium with natural and/or depleted uranium has been identified as one non-aqueous method to achieve these risk (proliferation and criticality safety) reductions. This paper reviews the technology of dry blending as applied to free flowing oxide materials.

Henry, Roger Neil; Chipman, Nathan Alan; Rajamani, R. K.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Dynamic Underground Stripping: In situ steam sweeping and electrical heating to remediate a deep hydrocarbon spill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic Underground Stripping is a combination of in situ steam injection, electrical resistance heating, and fluid extraction for rapid removal and recovery of subsurface contaminants such as solvents or fuels. Underground imaging and other measurement techniques monitor the system in situ for process control. Field tests at a deep gasoline spill at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recovered over 7000 gallons of gasoline during several months of field operations. Preliminary analysis of system cost and performance indicate that Dynamic Underground Stripping compares favorably with conventional pump-and-treat and vacuum extraction schemes for removing non-aqueous phase liquids such as gasoline from deep subsurface plumes.

Yow, J.L. Jr.; Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.; Udell, K.S.; Ziagos, J.P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Influence of Controlled Viscous Dissipation on the Propagation of Strongly Nonlinear Waves in Stainless Steel Based Phononic Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strongly nonlinear phononic crystals were assembled from stainless steel spheres. Single solitary waves and splitting of an initial pulse into a train of solitary waves were investigated in different viscous media using motor oil and non-aqueous glycerol to introduce a controlled viscous dissipation. Experimental results indicate that the presence of a viscous fluid dramatically altered the splitting of the initial pulse into a train of solitary waves. Numerical simulations qualitatively describe the observed phenomena only when a dissipative term based on the relative velocity between particles is introduced.

E. B. Herbold; V. F. Nesterenko; C. Daraio

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Kim, Jaekook (Naperville, IL)

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Tempe, AZ)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Chemical overcharge protection of lithium and lithium-ion secondary batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention features the use of redox reagents, dissolved in non-aqueous electrolytes, to provide overcharge protection for cells having lithium metal or lithium-ion negative electrodes (anodes). In particular, the invention features the use of a class of compounds consisting of thianthrene and its derivatives as redox shuttle reagents to provide overcharge protection. Specific examples of this invention are thianthrene and 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene. One example of a rechargeable battery in which 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene is used has carbon negative electrode (anode) and spinet LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} positive electrode (cathode). 8 figs.

Abraham, K.M.; Rohan, J.F.; Foo, C.C.; Pasquariello, D.M.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Chemical overcharge protection of lithium and lithium-ion secondary batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention features the use of redox reagents, dissolved in non-aqueous electrolytes, to provide overcharge protection for cells having lithium metal or lithium-ion negative electrodes (anodes). In particular, the invention features the use of a class of compounds consisting of thianthrene and its derivatives as redox shuttle reagents to provide overcharge protection. Specific examples of this invention are thianthrene and 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene. One example of a rechargeable battery in which 2,7-diacetyl thianthrene is used has carbon negative electrode (anode) and spinet LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4 positive electrode (cathode).

Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Rohan, James F. (Cork City, IE); Foo, Conrad C. (Dedham, MA); Pasquariello, David M. (Pawtucket, RI)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In some embodiments the additives include a substituted or unsubstituted cyclic or spirocyclic hydrocarbon containing at least one oxygen atom and at least one alkenyl or alkynyl group. When used in electrochemical devices with, e.g., lithium manganese oxide spinel electrodes or olivine or carbon-coated olivine electrodes, the new electrolytes provide batteries with improved calendar and cycle life.

Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Liu, Jun (Naperville, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Lu, Wenquan (Darien, IL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Heteroatom incorporated coke for electrochemical cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an electrode for a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) calcined coke particles: (i) that contain at least 0.5 weight percent of nitrogen heteroatoms and at least 1.0 weight percent sulfur heteroatoms, and (ii) that have an average particle size from 2 microns to 40 microns with essentially no particles being greater than 50 microns. (b) a binder This invention also relates to a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrically conductive salt, and (c) a counterelectrode.

Lewis, Irwin Charles (Strongsville, OH); Greinke, Ronald Alfred (Medina, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Heteroatom incorporated coke for electrochemical cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an electrode for a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) calcined coke particles: (1) that contain at least 0.5 weight percent of nitrogen heteroatoms and at least 1.0 weight percent sulfur heteroatoms, and (2) that have an average particle size from 2 microns to 40 microns with essentially no particles being greater than 50 microns and (b) a binder. This invention also relates to a coke/alkali metal electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrically conductive salt, and (c) a counterelectrode. 5 figs.

Lewis, I.C.; Greinke, R.A.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Post-Combustion CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-concentrating Amine Absorbent Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-concentrating Amine Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0004274 3H Company will evaluate the feasibility of its "Self-Concentrating Absorbent CO2 Capture Process." The process is based on amines in a non-aqueous solvent which, upon reaction with CO2, separate into two distinct phases: a CO2-rich liquid phase and a dilute lean phase. The proposed process offers several potential advantages. Preliminary experimental data show that the process has the potential of reducing the total regeneration energy by as much as 70 percent. The solvent has high working capacity, thus required solvent volume would be lower than that required in a currently available amine system. This results in lower pumping requirements, lower auxiliary power demands, and reduced equipment size. In addition, since the solvent is non-aqueous, corrosion issues would be reduced. During the three-year project, an engineering design supported by laboratory data and economic justification will be developed to construct and operate a slipstream demonstration facility at an E-ON power plant in the United States as a next stage of commercialization development.

162

Corrosion resistance of metallic solar absorber materials in a range of heat transfer fluids. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report is intended to provide manufacturers, designers, and installers with reliable corrosion compatibility data, meaningful maintenance schedule, and confidence in durability and performance of solar collector units. The corrosion behavior of Cu alloy 122, Al alloy 1100, mild steel 1010, and a ferritic stainless steel (alloy 444) was determined in a variety of potential solar heat transfer fluids. The fluids included potable waters, water glycol solutions, and four non-aqueous fluids. The test apparatus cycled the temperatures of the fluids through those typical of an operating solar energy collector unit. The 444 stainless steel was the most corrosion resistant material and in uninhibited solutions demonstrated only extremely shallow pits during the 180 day test. The use of inhibited solutions generally prevented pits from forming. Cu alloy 122 showed quite low corrosion rates in uninhibited solutions although the presence of excess solder flux promoted some crevice corrosion. In such solutions, uniform, corrosive attack produced general surface roughening along with a protective surface oxide. The overall corrosion rate of the alloy was generally lower in inhibited glycol solutions although pitting within the crevice region occurred in limited cases. Exposure in the non-aqueous fluids resulted in extremely low corrosion rates with little evidence of localized attack.

Brock, A.J.; Smith, E.F. III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SYNTHESIS OF A NEW FAMILY OF FLUORINATED BORONATE COMPOUNDS AS ANION RECEPTORS AND STUDIES OF THEIR USE AS ADDITIVES IN LITHIUM BATTERY ELECTROLYTES.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been done on developing new electrolytes for lithium batteries with high ionic conductivity, and good chemical and electrochemical stability. In addition to the research on new salts and solvents, the use of cation receptors to reduce ion pairing in non-aqueous electrolytes has been considered as an approach to improve the properties of electrolytes. Although both cation and anion receptors enhance the dissociation of ion pairs and increase the conductivity of electrolytes, the use of anion receptors is more attractive for a lithium battery electrolyte because anion receptors increase the lithium transference number in the electrolyte. However, most available neutral anion receptors complex with anions through hydrogen binding and cannot be used in lithium batteries. Recently, we have reported on synthesis of a series of new neutral boron compounds as anion receptors based on the idea that electron-deficient boron would complex the anion of the ion pair. The anion complexation effect of these boron compounds was further enhanced by attaching electron-withdrawing groups. Here we report synthesis of another new family of boronate compounds. The effect of these new compounds on conductivity of lithium salts in non-aqueous solution was studied. The molecular weights of these new boronate compounds are lower than our previously reported boron compounds. Therefore, their effects on conductivity enhancement are superior. They also display high electrochemical stability up to 5 V.

MCBREEN,J.; LEE,H.S.; YANG,X.Q.

2001-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

164

Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Crown Ethers in Nonaqueous Electrolytes for Lithium/Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The effects of three crown ethers, 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5, and 18-crown-6, as additives and co-solvents in non-aqueous electrolytes on the cell performance of primary Li/air batteries operated in a dry air environment were investigated. Crown ethers have large effects on the discharge performance of non-aqueous electrolytes in Li/air batteries. A small amount (normally less than 10% by weight or volume in electrolytes) of 12-Crown-4 and 15-crown-5 reduces the battery performance and a minimum discharge capacity appears at the crown ether content of ca. 5% in the electrolytes. However, when the content increases to about 15%, both crown ethers improve the capacity of Li/air cells by about 28% and 16%, respectively. 15-Crown-5 based electrolytes even show a maximum discharge capacity in the crown ether content range from 10% to 15%. On the other hand, the increase of 18-crown-6 amount in the electrolytes continuously lowers of the cell performance. The different battery performances of these three crown ethers in electrolytes are explained by the combined effects from the electrolytes’ contact angle, oxygen solubility, viscosity, ionic conductivity, and the stability of complexes formed between crown ether molecules and lithium ions.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

Leaching of BTEX from Aged Crude Oil Contaminated Model Soils: Experimental and Modeling Results  

SciTech Connect

It is generally assumed that soil properties such as organic matter content, porosity, and mineral surface area have a significant effect on the bioavailability and leachability of aged petroleum hydrocarbons. In order to test this hypothesis, nine model soils or sorbents (i.e., fine and coarse quartz sand, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay, peat, 60? and 150? silica gel, a loam soil, and non-porous glass beads) were spiked with a crude oil, aged for 27 months in the laboratory, and transferred to glass columns for the performance of continuous flow leaching experiments. The column effluents were periodically sampled for 43 days and analyzed for BTEX. A one-dimensional flow model for predicting the dissolution and dispersion of individual hydrocarbons from a multi-component NAPL such as crude oil was used to fit the leaching data (i.e., the BTEX concentration versus time curves) by adjusting the equilibrium oil-leachate partitioning coefficient (Kol) for each respective hydrocarbon. The Peclet number, which is a measure of dispersion and a required modeling parameter, was measured in separate chloride tracer experiments for each soil column. Results demonstrate that soil properties did not significantly affect the leaching kinetics of BTEX from the columns. Instead, BTEX leaching curves could be successfully fitted with the one-dimensional NAPL dissolution flow model for all sorbents with the exception of montmorillonite clay. The fitting parameter Kol for each hydrocarbon was found to be similar to the Kol values that were independently measured for the same crude oil by Rixey et al. (Journal of Hazardous Materials B, 65: 137-156, 1999). In addition, the fitted Kol values were very similar for BTEX leaching from aged compared to freshly spiked loam soil. These findings indicate that leaching of BTEX in the aged soils that are contaminated with crude oil at the high concentrations commonly found in the environment (i.e., >20,000 mg/kg) was not affected by soil properties or aging but rather was governed by the equilibrium dissolution of these hydrocarbons from the crude oil NAPL that is coating the soil particles.

Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Microsoft PowerPoint - VZCOMML_4SRNLTechBriefp1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VZCOMML©, Version 4.0 VZCOMML©, Version 4.0 New Features  New infiltration estimator  Enhanced pore-water velocity module which includes assignment of layer hydraulic functions  Pre-loaded soil hydraulic parameters  Analyte database includes US EPA TAL/TCL listings  Enhanced radiological SSLs and groundwater calculations  Mass transfer adjustment for soil and groundwater concentrations  Screens soil data for single component NAPLs The VZCOMML© model uses fundamental fate and transport processes and is easy to use and understand. The increased analytical complexity of this newest version is invisible to the user. The model design minimizes the need for extensive input data. It is preloaded with chemical parameters for all 221 compounds on the USEPA target compound/target analyte list

168

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 6440 of 28,905 results. 31 - 6440 of 28,905 results. Download CX-003472: Categorical Exclusion Determination Water Heater Zigbee Open Standard Wireless Controller CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): St. Louis, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003472-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002796: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/23/2010 Location(s): Naples, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002796-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002798: Categorical Exclusion Determination

169

Transportation Protocols Working Group First Conference Call March 1, 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protocols Working Group First Conference Call March 1, 1999 Protocols Working Group First Conference Call March 1, 1999 Conference Call Summary The first conference call of the Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC/WG) DOE Transportation Protocols Working Group was held at 3:00 p.m. Eastern time on Monday March 1, 1999. The session was led by Mona Williams, DOE/NTP-Albuquerque. Other participants included Bill Lemeshewsky, DOE/RW; Ellen Ott, DOE/GC; Elizabeth Helvey, JK Research Associates; Chris Wells, SSEB; Lisa Sattler, CSG-MW, Elissa Turner, DOE/RW; Chris Wentz, New Mexico; Carl Guidice, DOE/EM; Jim Cruickshank, DOE/EM, Elmer Naples, DOE/NR; Fred Butterfield, DOE/EM; and Alex Thrower, UETC. Ms. Williams first indicated that notes from the Jacksonville meeting had been prepared and circulated for comment. She asked if there were

170

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-002796: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/23/2010 Location(s): Naples, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 23, 2010 CX-002792: Categorical Exclusion Determination Massachusetts-City-Taunton CX(s) Applied: B1.32, B2.5, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06/23/2010 Location(s): Taunton, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 22, 2010 CX-003027: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Replacement of PacifiCorp?s Kennewick ? Dayton Hilltop Microwave Communication Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.6 Date: 06/22/2010 Location(s): Benton County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

171

Event:World Urban Forum 6 (WUF6) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban Forum 6 (WUF6) Urban Forum 6 (WUF6) Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png World Urban Forum 6 (WUF6): on 2012/09/01 "Organised jointly by UN-Habitat, the Government of Italy, the Campania Region and the City of Naples, the theme for this year's meeting is The Urban Future. Nearly 2,000 participants from 114 countries have already registered for the premier conference on cities and urban issues since registration opened just four weeks ago. The four focus areas for discussion are: Urban Planning: Institutions and Regulations, including the improvement of Quality of Life; Equity and Prosperity: Distribution of Wealth and Opportunities; Productive Cities: Competitive and Innovative Cities and Urban Mobility, Energy & Environment." Event Details Name World Urban Forum 6 (WUF6)

172

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2011 2, 2011 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Aug. 22 PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS SEMINARS WILL RESUME IN THE FALL 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special topics: Main Injector Running and Plan; Beam Tests of a High-Pressure H2-Filled RF Cavity Tuesday, Aug. 23 10:30 a.m. Research Techniques Seminar - Curia II Speaker: Corrado Gatto, INFN Naples Title: Dual Readout Calorimetry with Heavy Glasses in the T1015 Collaboration 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences

173

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of full carbon budget of Assessment of full carbon budget of Italy: the CarbIUS project Dario Papale, DISAFRI, University of Tuscia Simona Castaldi, Department of Environmental Science, Second University of Naples Paolo Ciccioli, IMC, Italian National Research Council CNR Piermaria Corona, DISAFRI, University of Tuscia Alessandra Di Tizio, DABAC, University of Tuscia Alberto Masci, DISAFRI, University of Tuscia Franco Miglietta, IBIMET, Italian National Research Council CNR Markus Reichstein, DISAFRI, University of Tuscia Andrea Vannini, DPROP, University of Tuscia Riccardo Valentini, DISAFRI, University of Tuscia CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION DOE/NETL May 2-5, 2005 Abstract The Carbon Regional Balance Italy-USA (CarbIUS) is a joint Italian-US program to quantify and compare

174

Francesco Borrelli  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Francesco Borrelli Francesco Borrelli Mechanical Engineering Dept. University of California, Berkeley This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. Francesco Borrelli received the Laurea degree in computer science engineering in 1998 from the University of Naples Federico II, Italy. In 2002 he received the PhD from the Automatic Control Laboratory at ETH-Zurich, Switzerland. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of California at Berkeley, USA.He is the author of more than sixty publications in the field of predictive control. He is author of the book Constrained Optimal Control

175

Stochastic Finite Element Analysis for Multiphase Flow in Heterogeneous Porous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This study is concerned with developing a two-dimensional multiphase model that simulates the movement of NAPL in heterogeneous aquifers. Heterogeneity is dealt with in a probabilistic sense by modeling the intrinsic permeability of the porous medium as a stochastic process. The deterministic finite element method is used to spatially discretize the multiphase flow equations. The intrinsic permeability is represented in the model via its Karhunen-Loeve expansion (Ghanem and Spanos, 1991). This is a computationally expedient representation of stochastic processes by means of a discrete set of random variables. Further, the nodal unknowns, water phase saturations and water phase pressures, are represented by their stochastic spectral expansions. This representation involves an orthogonal basis in the space of random variables. The basis consists of orthogonal polynomial chaoses of consecutive orders. The relative permeabilities of water and oil phases, and the capillary pressure are ex...

R. Ghanem; S. Dham

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MN-City-Blaine MN-City-Blaine Location: City Blaine MN American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Senior Blaine County Apartment energy efficiency upgrades (boiler upgrades, windows, water heaters, air supply, and appliances); 2) retrofits to City Hall and Police Department including variable frequency drives, occupancy sensors, lighting upgrades, building automation system, programming air handling units, programming hot water heaters, boiler burner upgrades, window tints, energy management system, modify supply and return air supply configuration, replace gas and electric water heaters, and re-lamping; and 3) construct multi-purpose (bike/pedestrian) trail adjacent to Naples Street. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A1, B1.13, B2.5, B5.1

177

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRNL will conduct fundamental studies into the solution chemistry of novel actinide complexes and nano-clusters. These studies will focus on the SRNL will conduct fundamental studies into the solution chemistry of novel actinide complexes and nano-clusters. These studies will focus on the stability, reactivity, and electrochemistry of novel actinide compounds in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Spectroscopic, electrochemical and other techniques will be used to determine solution phase species. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy will be used to identify solid phases that may form as a result of solution phase chemical reactions. These studies will be in collaboration with other participants in the Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC). The collective body of work will determine if the chemical and electrochemical properties of the novel actinide materials can be exploited to affect chemical separations from other species. Possible outcomes of this research would be the identification of novel actinide complexes

178

CX-000813: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

813: Categorical Exclusion Determination 813: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000813: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Frontiers Research Center - Nanoscale Actinide Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/16/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River National Laboratory will conduct fundamental studies into the solution chemistry of novel actinide complexes and nano-clusters. These studies will focus on the stability, reactivity, and electrochemistry of novel actinide compounds in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Spectroscopic, electrochemical and other techniques will be used to determine solution phase species. The collective body of work will determine if the chemical and electrochemical properties of the novel

179

CX-005496: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005496: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC) - Nanoscale Actinide Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/28/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River National Laboratory will conduct fundamental studies into the solution chemistry of novel actinide complexes and nano-clusters. These studies will focus on the stability, reactivity, and electrochemistry of novel actinide compounds in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Spectroscopic, electrochemical and other techniques will be used to determine solution phase species. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy will be used to identify solid phases that may form as a result of solution

180

Simultaneous {sup 233}U and{sup 235}U characterization through the assay of delayed neutron temporal behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aqueous solutions containing dissolved uranium-233 and uranium-235 were irradiated for 60's in the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada. The temporal behavior of the delayed neutrons produced was recorded by the Facility's Delayed Neutron Counting (DNC) system. The percentage of uranium-233 as a function of total fissile mass present in each sample ranged from 0 to 100% and was predicted by the DNC system with average absolute errors of {+-} 4%. Future work will upgrade the system electronics and software to reduce both uncertainties in timings and electrical noise. Mixture analysis will also be expanded to include plutonium-239 and fissile materials contained in non-aqueous matrices. (authors)

Sellers, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Kelly, D. G. [Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Stn. Forces, P.O. Box 17000, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 Existing Regulations A11: Technical advice and assistance to organizations Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 24, 2013 CX-010914: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing of a Highly Efficient Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion (CX)) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6

182

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRNL will conduct fundamental studies into the solution chemistry of novel actinide complexes and nano-clusters. These studies will focus on the SRNL will conduct fundamental studies into the solution chemistry of novel actinide complexes and nano-clusters. These studies will focus on the stability, reactivity, and electrochemistry of novel actinide compounds in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Spectroscopic, electrochemical and other techniques will be used to determine solution phase species. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy will be used to identify solid phases that may form as a result of solution phase chemical reactions. These studies will be in collaboration with other participants in the Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC). The collective body of work will determine if the chemical and electrochemical properties of the novel actinide materials can be exploited to affect chemical separations from other species. Possible outcomes of this research would be the identification of novel actinide

183

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carolina Carolina Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in North Carolina. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010908: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 17, 2013 CX-010939: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2, 2013 CX-010812: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scoping Studies of Advanced Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen

184

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Jersey | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jersey Jersey Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Jersey Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in New Jersey. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 26, 2013 CX-011114: Categorical Exclusion Determination Municipal Complex Solar Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/26/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 1, 2013 CX-010816: Categorical Exclusion Determination Effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Turbulent Combustion and

185

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC) - Nanoscale Actinide Materials Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC) - Nanoscale Actinide Materials Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina SRNL will conduct fundamental studies into the solution chemistry of novel actinide complexes and nano-clusters. These studies will focus on the stability, reactivity, and electrochemistry of novel actinide compounds in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Spectroscopic, electrochemical and other techniques will be used to determine solution phase species. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy will be used to identify solid phases that may form as a result of solution phase chemical reactions. These studies will be in collaboration with other participants in the Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC). The collective body of work will determine if the chemical and electrochemical properties of the novel actinide

186

Lithium-ion batteries with intrinsic pulse overcharge protection  

SciTech Connect

The present invention relates in general to the field of lithium rechargeable batteries, and more particularly relates to the positive electrode design of lithium-ion batteries with improved high-rate pulse overcharge protection. Thus the present invention provides electrochemical devices containing a cathode comprising at least one primary positive material and at least one secondary positive material; an anode; and a non-aqueous electrolyte comprising a redox shuttle additive; wherein the redox potential of the redox shuttle additive is greater than the redox potential of the primary positive material; the redox potential of the redox shuttle additive is lower than the redox potential of the secondary positive material; and the redox shuttle additive is stable at least up to the redox potential of the secondary positive material.

Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Khalil

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer bonded sheet product is described suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance. 1 fig.

MacFadden, K.O.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

A method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700 C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite.

Pereira, Candido

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

189

Lithium Metal Oxide Electrodes For Lithium Cells And Batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Kim, Jaekook (Naperville, IL)

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700 C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite. 3 figs.

Pereira, C.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Ultrasonic properties of granular media saturated with dnapl/watermixtures  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of four experiments investigating the ultrasonic properties of granular materials partially saturated with trichloroethylene (TCE), a dense non-aqueous contaminant. P-wave velocity measurements were made under in situ effective stress conditions using a pulse transmission cell at ?250 kHz. Two synthetic samples and two natural aquifer cores were fully saturated with water and then subjected to an axial injection of TCE. The resulting measurements show reductions in P-wave velocity of up to 15% due to contaminant saturation. A theoretical model combining Gassmann fluid substitution and Hill's equation was used to estimate the effects of DNAPL saturation; this model underpredicted observed reductions in velocity at high TCE saturations. A linear relationship, expressed in terms of volumetric contaminant fraction, provided an excellent empirical fit to the laboratory measurements.

Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Geller, J.T.; Harris, J.M.

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Process to produce lithium-polymer batteries  

SciTech Connect

A polymer bonded sheet product suitable for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. A porous electrode sheet is impregnated with a solid polymer electrolyte, so as to diffuse into the pores of the electrode. The composite is allowed to cool, and the electrolyte is entrapped in the porous electrode. The sheet products composed have the solid polymer electrolyte composition diffused into the active electrode material by melt-application of the solid polymer electrolyte composition into the porous electrode material sheet. The solid polymer electrolyte is maintained at a temperature that allows for rapid diffusion into the pores of the electrode. The composite electrolyte-electrode sheets are formed on current collectors and can be coated with solid polymer electrolyte prior to battery assembly. The interface between the solid polymer electrolyte composite electrodes and the solid polymer electrolyte coating has low resistance.

MacFadden, Kenneth Orville (Highland, MD)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Electrode for a lithium cell  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to a positive electrode for an electrochemical cell or battery, and to an electrochemical cell or battery; the invention relates more specifically to a positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell or battery when the electrode is used therein. The positive electrode includes a composite metal oxide containing AgV.sub.3O.sub.8 as one component and one or more other components consisting of LiV.sub.3O.sub.8, Ag.sub.2V.sub.4O.sub.11, MnO.sub.2, CF.sub.x, AgF or Ag.sub.2O to increase the energy density of the cell, optionally in the presence of silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrode and to improve the power capability of the cell or battery.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

Novel concepts in electrochemical solar cells. First quarterly progress report, May 15-July 15, 1979. [Molten salt electrolytes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emphasis has been directed toward the development and evaluation of an efficient, operational photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) system involving (i) molten salt (and/or highly concentrated, inorganic, non-aqueous) electrolytes, and (ii) the promising semiconductor electrode materials such as CuTnS/sub 2/, CuInSe/sub 2/, MoS/sub 2/, MoSe/sup 2/ etc. As a direct consequence, the stages of the work program that are most critical at this time are the electrode fabrication and characterization and the electrolyte preparation and characterization phases. It has been demonstrated for the first time that a semiconductor electrode exhibits quite large photoeffects in a cell containing a molten salt electrolyte. Detailed studies are underway to explore the constraints and advantages of this type of electrolyte, from the standpoint of efficiency, corrosion of the electrode, and the chemical and physical properties related to overall cell performance. Progress is reported. (WHK)

DuBow, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor thereof a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0.5

Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Kang, Sun-Ho (Naperville, IL); Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

196

Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor of a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Li, Naichao (Croton on Hudson, NY)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Oakbrook, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development of electrochemical photovoltaic cells. Third technical progress report, November 1, 1979-January 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of stable, efficient, electrochemical photovoltaic cells based on silicon and gallium arsenide in non-aqueous electrolyte systems is being investigated. The effect of surface condition of silicon electrodes on electrochemical and physical characteristics has been studied. An electrode-supporting electrolyte interaction in acetonitrile has been identified which leads to etching of the surface. Improved performance can result, which has practical significance. Gallium arsenide electrodes have been electrochemically characterized in cells containing propylene carbonate with a ferrocene/ferricenium redox additive. Degradation of the ferricenium salt under illumination has been investigated. Other redox couples studied to date have not given promising results. Long-term stability experiments have been deferred while a better understanding of electrode behavior is being obtained.

Byker, H.J.; Schwerzel, R.E.; Wood, V.E.; Austin, A.E.; Brooman, E.W.

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Solvent for urethane adhesives and coatings and method of use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solvent for urethane adhesives and coatings, the solvent having a carbaldehyde and a cyclic amide as constituents. In some embodiments the solvent consists only of miscible constituents. In some embodiments the carbaldehyde is benzaldehyde and in some embodiments the cyclic amide is N-methylpyrrolidone (M-pyrole). An extender may be added to the solvent. In some embodiments the extender is miscible with the other ingredients, and in some embodiments the extender is non-aqueous. For example, the extender may include isopropanol, ethanol, tetrahydro furfuryl alcohol, benzyl alcohol, Gamma-butyrolactone or a caprolactone. In some embodiments a carbaldehyde and a cyclic amide are heated and used to separate a urethane bonded to a component.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microsoft Word - Research Campaign_Oostrom et al.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solute Transport Data Sets for Benchmarking Pore-Scale Numerical Solute Transport Data Sets for Benchmarking Pore-Scale Numerical Simulators Mart Oostrom, 1 Changyong Zhang, 1 Thomas Wietsma, 2 1 Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, PNNL, 2 Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, PNNL. Introduction. Developing predictive models of multiphase flow and reactive transport at the pore scale is a challenge common to diverse science areas. Increasingly, it has become more important in subsurface research due to its relevance to contaminant and colloidal transport, non- aqueous phase liquid dissolution, and deep sequestration of CO2. Currently, several independent research groups are developing numerical simulations of multiphase flow and reactive transport at the pore scale without experimental data sets to test, verify, and validate the models. To our

202

Phosphate-stabilized Lithium intercalation compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four manganese and iron phosphates with alluaudite or fillowite structures have been prepared by solid state reactions: Na2FeMn2(PO4)3, LiNaFeMn2(PO4)3, NaFe3(PO4)3, and Na2Mn3(PO4)3. LixNa2-xFeMn2(PO4)3 with x close to 2 was prepared from Na2FeMn2(PO4)3 by molten salt ion exchange. These materials are similar in stoichiometry to the phospho-olivines LiFe(Mn)PO4, but have a more complex structure that can accommodate mixed transition metal oxidation states. They are of interest as candidates for lithium battery cathodes because of their somewhat higher electronic conductivity, high intercalant ion mobility, and ease of preparation. Their performance as intercalation electrodes in non-aqueous lithium cells was, however, poor.

Richardson, Thomas J.

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

Monte Carlo Electromagnetic Cross Section Production Method for Low Energy Charged Particle Transport Through Single Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present state of modeling radio-induced effects at the cellular level neglects to account for the microscopic inhomogeneity of the nucleus from the non-aqueous contents by approximating the entire cellular nucleus as a homogenous medium of water. Charged particle track-structure calculations utilizing this principle of superposition are thereby neglecting to account for approximately 30% of the molecular variation within the nucleus. To truly understand what happens when biological matter is irradiated, charged particle track-structure calculations need detailed knowledge of the secondary electron cascade, resulting from interactions with not only the primary biological component – water – but also the non-aqueous contents, down to very low energies. This paper presents developments for a novel approach, which to our knowledge has never been done before, to reducing the homogenous water approximation. The purpose of our work is to develop of a completely self-consistent computational method for predicting molecule-specific ionization, excitation, and scattering cross sections in the very low energy regime that can be applied in a condensed history Monte Carlo track-structure code. The present methodology begins with the calculation of a solution to the many-body Schrödinger equation and proceeds to use Monte Carlo methods to calculate the perturbations in the internal electron field to determine the aforementioned processes. Results are computed for molecular water in the form of linear energy loss, secondary electron energies, and ionization-to-excitation ratios and compared against the low energy predictions of the GEANT4-DNA physics package of the Geant4 simulation toolkit.

Madsen, Jonathan R

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Pore-scale flow characterization of low-interfacial tension flow through mixed-wet porous media with different pore geometries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-interfacial tension flow through porous media occurs in surfactant-based enhanced oil recovery (EOR), soil clean-up, underground removal of the non-aqueous phase liquid and dense non-aqueous phase liquid, etc. In surfactant-based EOR processes, numerous works have been carried out to characterize - either qualitatively or quantitatively - the micro- and macro-scale flow behavior. What has been lacking is to link the statistics of oil blobs population (e.g., distribution of blob length and diameter) to the pore-scale phenomena and macro-scale quantities. In particular, no work has been reported to elucidate the effect of the ratio of pore body to throat diameter (i.e., aspect ratio) on the pore-scale characterization based on the blobs population statistics. The significance of the aspect ratio lies in that it describes the geometry of a porous medium and is one of the foremost morphological features. The aspect ratio is also one of the fundamental factors governing the pore-level events. This study presents the effect of aspect ratio on the statistical distribution of the blob length and equivalent diameter and links the blobs population statistics to the observed pore-level events. The pore-scale variation of the ratio of viscous-to-capillary forces acted on the oil blobs at the threshold of displacement is utilized to characterize the effect of blob length distribution at different aspect ratios. It also provides some insight into correlating the change in oil recovery efficiency and capillary number, by change in aspect ratio, with the change in blobs population statistics. (author)

Yadali Jamaloei, Benyamin [Petroleum Systems Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, The University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Petroleum Research Center, The Petroleum University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asghari, Koorosh [Petroleum Systems Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, The University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Kharrat, Riyaz [Petroleum Research Center, The Petroleum University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Electromagnetic Induction for Improved Target Location and Segregation Using Spatial Point Pattern Analysis with Applications to Historic Battlegrounds and UXO Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remediation of unexploded ordnance (UXO) and prioritization of excavation procedures for archaeological artifacts using electromagnetic (EM) induction are studied in this dissertation. Lowering of the false alarm rates that require excavation and artifact excavation prioritization can reduce the costs associated with unnecessary procedures. Data were taken over 5 areas at the San Jacinto Battleground near Houston, Texas, using an EM-63 metal detection instrument. The areas were selected using the archaeological concepts of cultural and natural formation processes applied to what is thought to be areas that were involved in the 1836 Battle of San Jacinto. Innovative use of a Statistical Point Pattern Analysis (PPA) is employed to identify clustering of EM anomalies. The K-function uses point {x,y} data to look for possible clusters in relation to other points in the data set. The clusters once identified using K-function will be further examined for classification and prioritization using the Weighted K-function. The Weighted K-function uses a third variable such as millivolt values or time decay to aid in segregation and prioritization of anomalies present. Once the anomalies of interest are identified, their locations are determined using the Gi-Statistics Technique. The Gi*-Statistic uses the individual Cartesian{x, y} points as origin locations to establish a range of distances to other cluster points in the data set. The segregation and location of anomalies supplied by this analysis will have several benefits. Prioritization of excavations will narrow down what areas should be excavated first. Anomalies of interest can be located to guide excavation procedures within the areas surveyed. Knowing what anomalies are of greater importance than others will help to lower false alarm rates for UXO remediation or for archaeological artifact selection. Knowing significant anomaly location will reduce the number of excavations which will subsequently save time and money. The procedures and analyses presented here are an interdisciplinary compilation of geophysics, archaeology and statistical analysis brought together for the first time to examine problems associated with UXO remediation as well as archaeological artifact selection at historic battlegrounds using electromagnetic data.

Pierce, Carl J.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Technetium Sorption by Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to measure technetium ({sup 99}Tc) sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. {sup 99}Tc(VII) batch sorption experiments were conducted for 319 days in an inert glovebag with a variety of cementitious materials (aged cement, Vault 2, TR545, and TR547) containing varying amounts of blast furnace slag. Between 154 and 319 days, the {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations tended to remain constant and samples amended with different initial {sup 99}Tc concentrations, tended to merge at about 10{sup -9} M for Vault 2 (17% slag) and TR545 (90% slag) and 10{sup -8} M for TR547 (45% slag). This data provided strong evidence that solubility, and not adsorption (K{sub d} values), was controlling aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations. Laboratory data superimposed over thermodynamic speciation diagrams further supported the conclusion that solubility, and not adsorption controlled {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations. The oxidation state of the aqueous {sup 99}Tc at the end of the sorption experiment was determined by solvent extraction to be almost entirely {sup 99}Tc(VII). The pH of the present system was ~11.8. Previously proposed solubility controlling phases including Tc-sulfides may be present, but do not appear to control solubility. After the 319 day sorption period, the suspensions were removed from the glovebag and a desorption step under oxic conditions was conducted for 20 days by adding oxic, pH-buffered solutions to the suspensions. {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations increased by more than an order of magnitude and Eh increased by several hundred millivolts within 24 hours after the introduction of the oxic solutions. These desorption results are consistent with re-oxidation and dissolution/desorption of {sup 99}Tc(IV) phases possibly present in the cementitious materials after the anoxic sorption step of the experiment. Aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations continued to increase slowly until the termination of the desorption experiment after 20 days. Although the cementitious materials investigated demonstrated the ability to strongly sequester aqueous {sup 99}Tc under anoxic conditions, the introduction of oxygen resulted in the rapid remobilization of {sup 99}Tc. These studies provide experimental support for the use of a solubility based model under reducing saltstone conditions where Tc(IV) is expected to be the dominant species. The existing Kd model would be appropriate for oxidized saltstone conditions (aged saltstone, not directly evaluated in this study) where Tc(VII) is expected to be the dominant species.

Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Estes, Shanna L. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Powell, Brian A. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

A multi-component partitioning model to predict organic leaching from stabilized/solidified oily wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) is an established remediation process in hazardous waste management. Recently this process has been applied to hazardous organic wastes with mixed results. These results have prompted further studies to examine the effectiveness of this process in containing organic contaminants. The primary goal of S/S is to contain the contaminants in a solidified form, removing them from the environment. This is accomplished by decreasing the contaminant surface area and chemically converting the waste by reducing the contaminant solubility. The most common S/S processes utilize the chemical reactions achieved in cement-based and pozzolanic mixes. The effectiveness of this process is determined by the degree to which contaminants will leach from the waste end-product. Leach models, therefore, are an effective way to predict the leaching of contaminants and to describe the immobilization and binding mechanisms that take place. The multi-component nature of oily wastes requires that a multi-component approach be taken to describe the partitioning between the aqueous and non-aqueous phases. The heterogeneous nature of these wastes precludes analysis of partitioning of all chemical species. Thus a pseudo-component model has been developed that describes the partitioning of TOC as caused by the partitioning of a small number of pseudo-components. A pseudo-component is used to represent a group of chemical species that have similar tendencies to partition between the aqueous and non-aqueous phases. A linear partitioning relationship is used to develop the partitioning model, with the values of the partitioning coefficients chosen to represent strongly sorbed, moderately sorbed, and weakly sorbed components. The partitioning characteristics of the waste were determined in a series of sequential experiments in which different amounts of water were added. After each addition, the system was allowed to equilibrate, the added water removed by centrifugation and its TOC measured. The model predicts that the measured concentrations of TOC are due to the sum of all pseudo-components in the aqueous or mobile phase.

O'Cleirigh, Declan Ronan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Morphology evolution of ZrB{sub 2} nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel method  

SciTech Connect

Zirconium diboride (ZrB{sub 2}) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using zirconium n-propoxide (Zr(OPr){sub 4}), boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), sucrose (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11}), and acetic acid (AcOH). Clearly, it was a non-aqueous solution system at the very beginning of the reactions. Here, AcOH was used as both chemical modifier and solvent to control Zr(OPr){sub 4} hydrolysis. Actually, AcOH could dominate the hydrolysis by self-produced water of the chemical propulsion, rather than the help of outer water. C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11} was selected, since it can be completely decomposed to carbon. Thus, carbon might be accounted precisely for the carbothermal reduction reaction. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of the gelation temperature on the morphology of ZrB{sub 2} particles. Increasing the gelation temperature, the particle shapes changed from sphere-like particles at 65 deg. C to a particle chain at 75 deg. C, and then form rod-like particles at 85 deg. C. An in-depth HRTEM observation revealed that the nanoparticles of ZrB{sub 2} were gradually fused together to evolve into a particle chain, finally into a rod-like shape. These crystalline nature of ZrB{sub 2} related to the gelation temperature obeyed the 'oriented attachment mechanism' of crystallography. - Graphical Abstract: Increasing the gelation temperature, the particle shapes changed from sphere-like particles at 65 deg. C to a particle chain at 75 deg. C, and then form rod-like particles at 85 deg. C. Highlights: > ZrB{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method in an non-aqueous solution system. > AcOH was used as both chemical modifier and solvent to control Zr(OPr){sub 4} hydrolysis. > C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11} was selected since it can be completely decomposed to carbon. > Increasing the gelation temperature, the particles changed from sphere-like to rod-like ones. > Crystalline nature of ZrB{sub 2} obeyed the 'oriented attachment mechanism' of crystallography.

Zhang Yun [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li Ruixing, E-mail: ruixingli@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Jiang Yanshan; Zhao Bin; Duan Huiping [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li Junping; Feng Zhihai [Aerospace Research Institute of Materials and Processing Technology, Beijing 100076 (China)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Response Tracking Number: 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The significance of vadose-zone biodegradation on the vapor intrusion of petroleum compounds is well recognized, but considered to a limited extent in the guidance document. Although exceptions can occur, the likelihood that dissolved hydrocarbons in groundwater will cause impacts to indoor air is remote. It is more reasonable to focus screening efforts on hydrocarbon release sites with i) shallow NAPL present below the building, ii) direct contact of dissolved hydrocarbons on the building, or iii) migration of petroleum vapors through preferential pathways in contact with contamination. Studies have demonstrated that vadose-zone aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons is common and significant (Roggemans et al., 2001). The USEPA vapor intrusion database and industry experience both indicate that dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater do not cause vapor intrusion impacts. Provided no preferential pathways are present, the potential for biodegradation is increased at sites with low hydrocarbon concentration, large depth to source, relatively permeable soils, and no capping effect (e.g., low permeability surface soil or cover that would limit transport of O2 into the subsurface) (Health Canada, 2004). Hence, Health Canada is currently considering a provision to allow for a 10x adjustment in the attenuation factor to account for biodegradation at sites with no surface cap and large depths to source. Modeling and site investigation studies demonstrate that biodegradation can result in many orders of magnitude reduction in vapor intrusion risk estimates (Abreu and Johnson, 2005b; Ettinger

Commenter Organization

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Overview of research and development in subsurface fate and transport modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is responsible for the remediation of over 450 different subsurface-contaminated sites. Contaminant plumes at these sites range in volume from several to millions of cubic yards. The concentration of contaminants also ranges over several orders of magnitude. Contaminants include hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and organic chemicals, radioactive waste including tritium, uranium, and thorium, and mixed waste, which is a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes. The physical form of the contaminants includes solutes, nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), and vapor phase contaminants such as volatilized organic chemicals and radon. The subject of contaminant fate and transport modeling is multi-disciplinary, involving hydrology, geology, microbiology, chemistry, applied mathematics, computer science, and other areas of expertise. It is an issue of great significance in the United States and around the world. As such, many organizations have substantial programs in this area. In gathering data to prepare this report, a survey was performed of research and development work that is funded by US government agencies to improve the understanding and mechanistic modeling of processes that control contaminant movement through subsurface systems. Government agencies which fund programs that contain fate and transport modeling components include the Environmental Protection Agency, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, United States Geological Survey, and National Institutes of Health.

Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chehata, M. [Science Applications Internationa Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Solution Synthesis and Processing of PZT Materials for Neutron Generator Applications  

SciTech Connect

A new solution synthesis route has been developed for the preparation of lead-based ferroelectric materials (patent filed). The process produces controlled stoichiometry precursor powders by non-aqueous precipitation. For a given ferroelectric material to be prepared, a metal acetate/alkoxide solution containing constituent metal species in the appropriate ratio is mixed with an oxalic acid/n-propanol precipitant solution. An oxalate coprecipitate is instantly fonned upon mixing that quantitatively removes the metals from solution. Most of the process development was focused on the synthesis and processing of niobium-substituted lead zirconate titanate with a Zr-to-Ti ratio of 95:5 (PNZT 95/5) that has an application in neutron generator power supplies. The process was scaled to produce 1.6 kg of the PNZT 95/5 powder using either a sen-ii-batch or a continuous precipitation scheme. Several of the PNZT 95/5 powder lots were processed into ceramic slug form. The slugs in turn were processed into components and characterized. The physical properties and electrical performance (including explosive functional testing of the components met the requirements set for the neutron generator application. Also, it has been demonstrated that the process is highly reproducible with respect to the properties of the powders it produces and the properties of the ceramics prepared from its powders. The work described in this report was funded by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

Anderson, M.A.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Montoya, T.V.; Moore, R.H.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Sand consolidation method  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of treating a subterranean, unconsolidated sand and petroleum-containing formation whose temperature is less than 200{degrees}F penetrated by at least one well, which is in fluid communication with at least a portion of the unconsolidated sand-containing subterranean formation, in order to form a permeable barrier in the treatment zone around the well which restrains the movement of sand particles into the well while permitting the passage of formation fluids including petroleum therethrough. It comprises introducing a non aqueous gas into the treatment zone of the formation to reduce the water content of the portion of the formation where the permeable barrier is to be formed to less than 5 percent by volume based on the volume of pore space to be treated; introducing an effective volume of treating fluid into the treatment zone, comprising a compound which is capable of being acid catalyzed to undergo condensation polymerization at formation temperatures, an anhydride of a strong acid, and a diluent for the polymerizable compound and the anhydride; and allowing the treating fluid to remain in the treatment zone for a period of time sufficient to ensure substantially complete polymerization.

Friedman, R.H.; Surles, B.W.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

213

Présentation PowerPoint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Electrolyzer Workshop - 20-21 April 2009 - 1 DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME Characterization and optimization of materials for hybrid sulfur cycle electrolyser CEA Saclay R. Robin, N. Gruet Laboratory of Non Aqueous Corrosion DEN/DPC/SCCME Hybrid Sulfur Electrolyzer Workshop - 20-21 April 2009 - 2 DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME Hybrid Sulfur Cycle Electrolyser - Schematic Diagram Electrochemical Step Electrochemical Step Oxidation of SO 2 and Reduction of proton SO 2 + 2 H H 2 2 O O → H H 2 2 + H 2 SO 4 Recycling Intermediate H 2 SO 4 SO 2 H 2 O O 2 SO 3 HTR H 2 H 2 O 900°C 100°C 600°C Thermochemical Thermochemical Step Step Thermal decomposition of H 2 SO 4 H 2 2 SO 4 4 → SO 3 3 + H 2 2 O SO 2 2 + ½ O O 2 2 Hybrid Sulfur Electrolyzer Workshop - 20-21 April 2009 - 3 DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME Hybrid Sulfur Cycle Electrolyzer - Objective Main objective of the study

214

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

215

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linde, LLC Linde, LLC SCC/Capture Division FY14-15/ 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2015 Steve Mascaro Murray Hill, NJ Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Continue the advancement of the Recipient's NAS CO2 Capture Process, both in solvent formulation and in process equipment. This work will involve modeling, techno-economic analysis, and risk assessment. Steven A. Mascaro Digitally signed by Steven A. Mascaro DN: cn=Steven A. Mascaro, email=Steven.Mascaro@netl.doe.gov, o=U.S. Dept. Of Energy, NETL, l=Morgantown, WV Reason: I attest to the accuracy and integrity of this document Date: 2013.09.23 16:10:00 -04'00' 09 23 2013 John Ganz Digitally signed by John Ganz DN: cn=John Ganz, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

216

Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

Sommer, W.F.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Cost-benefit analysis of cosolvent flushing to treat groundwater contamination source areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the zone beneath the water table can be a virtually permanent source of groundwater contamination that cannot be remediated by currently available technologies. Cosolvent flushing is a new technology that has the potential to remediate these sites and could pose a solution to the problem of DNAPL source areas. A computer model was developed to determine the cost and time to remediate an aquifer using cosolvent flushing. Included in the model is a module to calculate the costs of recycling the alcohol that is used as the cosolvent. The model was validated using site conditions to a prior study. It was determined that recycling the cosolvent allows cosolvent flushing to be a cost effective alternative to surfactant flushing, another new technology being considered for DNAPL source remediation. Sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted by varying the saturation percentage of contaminant, percentage and type of alcohol used in the cosolvent mixture, site hydraulic conductivity, and the contaminant. Five alcohols were modeled: methanol, ethanol, 1-isopropanol, 2-isopropanol, and tert-butyl-alcohol (TBA). 1-Isopropanol, 2-isopropanol, and TBA were always more expensive than methanol and ethanol.

Anason, S.L.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Use of the electrically-driven emulsion phase contactor in chemical and biochemical processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrically driven liquid-liquid contactor has been developed to enhance the efficiency of chemical and biochemical processes. A uniform electric field is utilized to induce a drop dispersion- coalescence cycle, producing high surface area for interfacial mass transfer under continuous-countercurrent-flow conditions. The mass- transport capability of this system has been analyzed by observing the extraction of acetic acid from water (dispersed phase) into methyl isobutyl ketone. Results showed that, due to increased efficiency of mass transfer, the electrically-driven device could be an order of magnitude smaller than a conventional contactor accomplishing the same level of separation. In the case of biochemical processes within non-aqueous environments, a biocatalyst (enzymes or bacteria) is introduced in the aqueous (dispersed) phase. The biocatalyst uses nutrients and other reactants to selectively transform species transferred from the continuous (organic) phase to the interior of the drops. An example of such system that has been investigated is the oxidation of p-cresol dissolved in toluene by aqueous-phase horseradish peroxidase.

Tsouris, C; DePaoli, D.W.; Scott, T.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

Peter Zalupski

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

Angell, C. Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Broadview Heights, OH); Belieres, Jean-Philippe (Chandler, AZ); Yoshizawa, Masahiro (Tokyo, JP)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electric current-producing device having sulfone-based electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytic solvents and applications of such solvents including electric current-producing devices. For example, a solvent can include a sulfone compound of R1--SO2--R2, with R1 being an alkyl group and R2 a partially oxygenated alkyl group, to exhibit high chemical and thermal stability and high oxidation resistance. For another example, a battery can include, between an anode and a cathode, an electrolyte which includes ionic electrolyte salts and a non-aqueous electrolyte solvent which includes a non-symmetrical, non-cyclic sulfone. The sulfone has a formula of R1--SO2--R2, wherein R1 is a linear or branched alkyl or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms, and R2 is a linear or branched or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched oxygen containing alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms. The electrolyte can include an electrolyte co-solvent and an electrolyte additive for protective layer formation.

Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Sun, Xiao-Guang (Tempe, AZ)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hydrophobic ionic liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrophobic ionic liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, and R.sub.6 are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F--, Cl--, CF.sub.3 --, SF.sub.5 --, CF.sub.3 S--, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CHS-- or (CF.sub.3).sub.3 CS--; and X.sup.- is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 .ANG..sup.3.

Koch, Victor R. (Lincoln, MA); Nanjundiah, Chenniah (Lynn, MA); Carlin, Richard T. (Nashua, NH)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

NONE

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

228

In-situ Spectroscopic and Structural Studies of Electrode Materials for Advanced Battery Applications  

SciTech Connect

Techniques have been developed and implemented to gain insight into fundamental factors that affect the performance of electrodes in Li and Li-ion batteries and other energy storage devices. These include experimental strategies for monitoring the Raman scattering spectra of single microparticles of carbon and transition metal oxides as a function of their state of charge. Measurements were performed in electrolytes of direct relevance to Li and Li-Ion batteries both in the static and dynamic modes. In addition, novel strategies were devised for performing conventional experiments in ultrahigh vacuum environments under conditions which eliminate effects associated with presence of impurities, using ultrapure electrolytes, both of the polymeric and ionic liquid type that display no measurable vapor pressure. Also examined was the reactivity of conventional non aqueous solvent toward ultrapure Li films as monitored in ultrahigh vacuum with external reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also pursued were efforts toward developing applying Raman-scattering for monitoring the flow of charge of a real Li ion battery. Such time-resolved, spatially-resolved measurements are key to validating the results of theoretical simulations involving real electrode structures.

Daniel A Scherson

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

229

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependence of ether synthesis, particularly unsymmetric methylisobutylether (MIBE), was carried out over the Nafion-H microsaddles (MS) catalyst. The principal product formed under the rather severe reaction conditions of 1100 psig pressure and temperatures in the range of 123--157{degree}C was the expected MIBE formed directly by coupling the methanol/isobutanol reactants. In addition, significantly larger quantities of the dimethylether (DME) and hydrocarbon products were observed than were obtained under milder reaction conditions. Deactivation of the Nafion-H MS catalyst was determined by periodically testing the catalyst under a given set of reaction conditions for the synthesis of MIBE and MTBE from methanol/isobutanol = 2/1, i.e. 123{degree}C, 1100 psig, and total GHSV = 248 mol/kg cat/hr. After carrying out various tests over a period of 2420 hr, with intermittant periods of standing under nitrogen at ambient conditions, the yields of MIBE and MTBE had decreased by 25% and 41%, respectively. In order to gain insight into the role of the surface acidity in promoting the selective coupling of the alcohols to form the unsymmetric ether, the strengths of the acid sites on the catalysts are still being probed by calorimetric titrations in non-aqueous solutions. 11 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; DeTavernier, S.; Johannson, M.; Kieke, M.; Bastian, R.D.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Influence of nitric acid treatment in different media on X-ray structural parameters of coal  

SciTech Connect

The treatment of coal with nitric acid in aqueous and non-aqueous media introduces changes in the chemical and spatial structure of the organic mass. Four coals of different rank have been treated with nitric acid in aqueous and glacial acetic acid media for assessing the changes in the structural parameters by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Slow-scan XRD has been performed for the raw and treated coals, and X-ray structural parameters (d002, Lc, and Nc) and aromaticity (fa) have been determined by profile-fitting software. Considerable variation of the structural parameters has been observed with respect to the raw coals. The d002 values have decreased in aqueous medium but increased in acetic acid medium; however, Lc, Nc, and fa values have increased in aqueous medium but decreased in acetic acid medium. It is also observed that considerable oxidation takes place during nitric acid treatment in aqueous medium, but nitration is the predominant phenomenon in acetic acid medium. Disordering of the coal structure increases in acetic acid medium, but a reverse trend is observed in the aqueous medium. As a result, structurally modified coals (SMCs) are derived as new coal-derived substances. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Sudip Maity; Ashim Choudhury [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, FRI, Dhanbad (India)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Synthesis, structural and electrochemical properties of electron beam evaporated V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vanadium pentoxide is one of the most promising cathode materials because it offers high energy density, low cost, low toxicity over the other cathode materials. Its layered and open structure makes this material in thin film form well suited for electro-chemical insertion reactions with the Li ions. In the present investigation, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films have been prepared by electron beam evaporation technique on gold coated silicon substrates maintained at a substrate temperature of 250 Degree-Sign C in an oxygen partial pressure of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} mbar. The XRD patterns exhibited three predominant diffraction peaks corresponding to (200) (001) and (400) planes of orthorhombic phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with P{sub mnm} space group. The electrochemical characteristics of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films with thickness of 600 nm were examined in non-aqueous region. The film exhibited step wise discharge with two plateaus. The as-deposited film delivered a discharge capacity of 70 {mu}Ah/(cm{sup 2}-{mu}m) at a current density of 30 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. Annealing of these films at 450 Degree-Sign C exhibited a better discharge capacity of 90 {mu}Ah/(cm{sup 2}-{mu}m).

Hussain, O. M.; Rosaiah, P. [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati-517 502 (India)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

233

Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O'Brien, J.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

None

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counterelectrode.

Greinke, Ronald Alfred (Medina, OH); Lewis, Irwin Charles (Strongsville, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Henry de Tonty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Henry de Tonty Henry de Tonty Nature Bulletin No. 294-A February 17, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation HENRY DE TONTY Among the greatest of the dauntless men who made possible the exploration J and settlement of the Mississippi Basin, there is one forgotten man. He was a simple sturdy soldier, blunt and laconic in his speech or his reports, over-shadowed by his brilliant chief -- La Salle -- whose trusted lieutenant, loyal friend and devoted companion he was. The Forest Preserve District proposes to create a lake and name it for Henry de Tonty, Sieur and Chevalier, Governor of Fort St. Louis in the Province of the Illinois -- The Man with the Iron Hand. Lorenzo Tonty, his father, was a banker in Naples, Italy. After a bloody revolt in 1647, he escaped to Paris where Cardinal Mazarin, also an Italian, had succeeded Cardinal Richelieu as prime minister for Louis XIV. It was Lorenzo Tonty who suggested to Mazarin a system of life insurance which would replenish the royal treasury, and the name "tontine" for such a policy is in your dictionary. Henry, or Henri Tonti, was born in 1650. In 1668 he became a cadet in the French army and served through seven campaigns, rising to the rank of captain, commanding marines on warships. During a battle at Libisso, Sicily, his right hand was blown off by a grenade. In place of it he wore that iron hook so feared by the Indians as "big medicine". In 1678 he was engaged as LaSalle's lieutenant and they sailed for Quebec .

238

Growth of large single crystals of MgO  

SciTech Connect

The progressive identification of new high-technology applications and requirements for MgO single crystals in the commercial realm, as well as in DOE and other government-agency project areas, has resulted in an increased demand and international market for this material. Specifically, the demand for MgO crystals in large sizes and quantities is presently increasing due to existing and developing applications that include: (a) MgO substrates for the formation of electro-optic thin films and devices, (b) epitaxial substrates for high-temperature thin-film superconducting devices MgO optical components - including high-temperature windows, lenses, and prisms, and (d) specialty MgO crucibles and evaporation sources for thin-film production. In the course of CRADA ORNL92-0091, carried out with Commercial Crystal Laboratories of Naples, Florida as the commercial participant, we have made major progress in increasing the size of single crystals of MgO produced by means of the submerged-arc-fusion technique-thereby increasing the commercial utility of this material. Prior to the accomplishments realized in the course of this CRADA, the only commercially available single crystals of MgO were produced in Japan, Israel, and Russia. The results achieved in the course of CRADA ORNL92-0091 have now led to the establishment of a domestic commercial source of MgO single-crystal substrates and components, and the U.S. is no longer totally dependent on foreign sources of this increasingly important material.

Boatner, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Urbanik, M. [Commercial Crystal Laboratories, Inc., Naples, FL (United States)

1997-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

239

Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery through Fluid Viscosity Modifications: Experiments and numerical simulations  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Heterogeneity is often encountered in subsurface contamination characterization and remediation. Low-permeability zones are typically bypassed when remedial fluids are injected into subsurface heterogeneous aquifer systems. Therefore, contaminants in the bypassed areas may not be contacted by the amendments in the remedial fluid, which may significantly prolong the remediation operations. Laboratory experiments and numerical studies have been conducted to develop the Mobility-Controlled Flood (MCF) technology for subsurface remediation and to demonstrate the capability of this technology in enhancing the remedial amendments delivery to the lower permeability zones in heterogeneous systems. Xanthan gum, a bio-polymer, was used to modify the viscosity of the amendment-containing remedial solutions. Sodium mono-phosphate and surfactant were the remedial amendment used in this work. The enhanced delivery of the amendments was demonstrated in two-dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments, packed with heterogeneous systems. The impact of polymer concentration, fluid injection rate, and permeability contract in the heterogeneous systems has been studied. The Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator was modified to include polymer-induced shear thinning effects. Shear rates of polymer solutions were computed from pore-water velocities using a relationship proposed in the literature. Viscosity data were subsequently obtained from empirical viscosity-shear rate relationships derived from laboratory data. The experimental and simulation results clearly show that the MCF technology is capable of enhancing the delivery of remedial amendments to subsurface lower permeability zones. The enhanced delivery significantly improved the NAPL removal from these zones and the sweeping efficiency on a heterogeneous system was remarkably increased when a polymer fluid was applied. MCF technology is also able to stabilize the fluid displacing front when there is a density difference between the fluids. The modified STOMP simulator was able to predict the experimental observed fluid displacing behavior. The simulator may be used to predict the subsurface remediation performance when a shear thinning fluid is used to remediate a heterogeneous system.

Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

240

Structural, magnetic, and electrochemical studies on lithium insertion materials LiNi{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O{sub 2} with 0{<=}x{<=}0.25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of the LiNi{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O{sub 2} samples with x= 0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.25 have been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction analyses, magnetic susceptibility ({chi}) measurements, and electrochemical charge and discharge test in non-aqueous lithium cell. According to the structural analyses using a Rietveld method, the occupancy of the Ni ions in the Li layer was estimated to be below 0.01 for all the samples and was eventually independent of x. The temperature (T) dependence of {chi}{sup -1} obtained with the magnetic field H=10 kOe indicated that all the samples are a Curie-Weiss paramagnet down to {approx}100K. At low T, all the samples entered into a spin-glass-like phase below T{sub f}. The magnitude of T{sub f} was found to decrease almost linearly with x, as in the case for the x dependences of the lattice parameters of a{sub h}- and c{sub h}-axes, Weiss temperature, and effective magnetic moment. It is, therefore, found that the change of the magnetic properties with x is simply explained by a dilution effect due to the increase of the quantity of Co{sup 3+} ions. On the other hand, the electrochemical measurements demonstrated that the irreversible capacity at the initial cycle is drastically decreased by the small amount of Co ions. Furthermore, the discharge capacity (Q{sub dis}) for the x=0.05 and 0.1 samples are larger than that for the x=0 sample; namely, Q{sub dis}=180 mAh g{sup -1} for x=0, Q{sub dis}=217 mAh g{sup -1} for x=0.05, and Q{sub dis}=206 mAh g{sup -1} for x=0.1. Comparing with the past results, the amount of Ni ions in the Li layer is found to play a significant role for determining the magnetic and electrochemical properties of LiNi{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O{sub 2}. - Graphical Abstract: The inter-relationship between structural, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of the lithium insertion materials LiNi{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O{sub 2} with 0{<=}x{<=}0.25 were investigated by X-ray diffraction measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and electrochemical charge and discharge test in non-aqueous lithium cell. The magnitude of spin-glass-like transition temperature T{sub f} was found to decrease almost linearly with x, as well as the x dependences of effective magnetic moment, Weiss temperature, and lattice parameters.

Mukai, Kazuhiko, E-mail: e1089@mosk.tytlabs.co.j [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Sugiyama, Jun; Aoki, Yoshifumi [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "millivolt napl non-aqueous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Combinatorial–Computational–Chemoinformatics (C³) Approach to Finding and Analyzing Low-Energy Tautomers  

SciTech Connect

Finding the most stable tautomer or a set of low-energy tautomers of molecules is critical in many aspects of molecular modelling or virtual screening experiments. Enumeration of low-energy tautomers of neutral molecules in the gas-phase or typical solvents can be performed by applying available organic chemistry knowledge. This kind of enumeration is implemented in a number of software packages and it is relatively reliable. However, in esoteric cases such as charged molecules in uncommon, non-aqueous solvents there is simply not enough available knowledge to make reliable predictions of low energy tautomers. Over the last few years we have been developing an approach to address the latter problem and we successfully applied it to discover the most stable anionic tautomers of nucleic acid bases that might be involved in the process of DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. The approach involves three steps: (1) combinatorial generation of a library of tautomers, (2) energy-based screening of the library using electronic structure methods, and (3) analysis of the information generated in step (2). In steps 1–3 we employ combinatorial, computational and chemoinformatics techniques, respectively. Therefore, this hybrid approach is named “Combinatorial*Computational*Chemoinformatics”, or just abbreviated as C³ (or C-cube) approach. This article summarizes our developments and most interesting methodological aspects of the C³ approach. It can serve as an example how to identify the most stable tautomers of molecular systems for which common chemical knowledge had not been sufficient to make definite predictions.

Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Novel Nonflammable Electrolytes for Secondary Magnesium Batteries and High Voltage Electrolytes for Electrochemcial Supercapacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnesium has been used successfully in primary batteries, but its use in rechargeable cells has been stymied by the lack of suitable non-aqueous electrolyte that can conduct Mg+2 species, combined with poor stripping and plating properties. The development of a suitable cathode material for rechargeable magnesium batteries has also been a roadblock, but a nonflammable electrolyte is key. Likewise, the development of safe high voltage electrochemical supercapaitors has been stymied by the use of flammable solvents in the liquid electrolyte; to wit, acetonitrile. The purpose of the research conducted in this effort was to identify useful compositions of magnesium salts and polyphosphate solvents that would enable magnesium ions to be cycled within a secondary battery design. The polyphosphate solvents would provide the solvent for the magnesium salts while preventing the electrolyte from being flammable. This would enable these novel electrolytes to be considered as an alternative to THF-based electrolytes. In addition, we explored several of these solvents together with lithium slats for use as high voltage electrolytes for carbon-based electrochemical supercapacitors. The research was successful in that: 1) Magnesium imide dissolved in a phosphate ester solvent that contains a halogented phosphate ester appears to be the preferred electrolyte for a rechargeable Mg cell. 2) A combination of B-doped CNTs and vanadium phosphate appear to be the cathode of choice for a rechargeable Mg cell by virtue of higher voltage and better reversibility. 3) Magnesium alloys appear to perform better than pure magnesium when used in combination with the novel polyphosphate electrolytes. Also, this effort has established that Phoenix Innovationâ??s family of phosphonate/phosphate electrolytes together with specific lithium slats can be used in supercapacitor systems at voltages of greater than 10V.

Dr. Brian Dixon

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing  

SciTech Connect

Soft landing (SL) of mass-selected ions is used to introduce catalytically-active metal complexes complete with organic ligands into the gas phase and then to transfer them as ions onto an inert surface. This is part of an effort to prepare materials with defined active sites and thus achieve molecular design of surfaces in a highly controlled way. Solution-phase electrochemical studies have shown that VIVO(salen) reacts in the presence of acid to form VVO(salen)+ and the deoxygenated VIII(salen)+ complex -- a key intermediate in the four electron reduction of O2 by vanadium-salen. In this work, the VVO(salen)+ and [NiII(salen)+H]+ complexes were generated by electrospray ionization and mass-selected before being deposited into an inert fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (FSAM) surface on gold. A time dependence study after ion deposition showed loss of O from VVO(salen)+ forming VIII(salen)+ over a four-day period, indicating a slow interfacial reduction process. Similar results were obtained when other protonated molecules were co-deposited with VVO(salen)+ on the FSAM surface. In all these experiments oxidation of the VIII(salen)+ product occurred upon exposure to oxygen or to air. The cyclic regeneration of VVO(salen)+ upon exposure to molecular oxygen and its subsequent reduction to VIII(salen)+ in vacuum completes the catalytic cycle of O2 reduction by the immobilized vanadium-salen species. Moreover, our results represent the first evidence of formation of reactive organometallic complexes on substrates in the absence of solvent. Remarkably, deoxygenation of the oxo-vanadium complex, previously observed only in highly acidic non-aqueous solvents, occurs on the surface in the UHV environment using an acid which is deposited into the inert monolayer. This acid can be a protonated metal complex, e.g. [NiII(salen)+H]+ or an organic acid such as protonated diaminododecane.

Peng, Wen-Ping; Johnson, Grant E.; Fortmeyer, Ivy C.; Wang, Peng; Hadjar, Omar; Cooks, Robert G.; Laskin, Julia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Characterization of Waste Tar Associated with Abandoned Wood Chemical Plant Sites in Northwest Pennsylvania, USA  

SciTech Connect

Over 70 wood chemical plants operated in northern Pennsylvania between ca. 1890 and 1950, all located within 72 km of the New York state border. Their original purpose was to salvage the small unwanted hardwood trees left behind by the lumber mills, and to make charcoal, calcium acetate and methanol for a number of industrial uses via destructive distillation. At many old wood chemical plant sites, unknown quantities of wood tar remain as a residual contaminant and pose a pollution threat to aquatic life in nearby streams. Research on the composition and properties of residual wood tars from five abandoned industrial sites in Pennsylvania are described. Weathered wood tars were more viscous and contained fewer volatile and semivolatile organic compounds than did soil-buried tars. Phenol, 2-methylphenol (o-cresol), 4-methylphenol (p-cresol), and 2, 4-dimethylphenol were found in all sampled tars. These water-soluble phenolic compounds were released quasi-instantaneously in aqueous solution, followed by a slower rate of release, consistent with the behavior of similar compounds in other dense non-aqueous liquids. Air-exposed wood tar deposits developed a hard crust, which contained fewer volatiles and semivolatiles and had a higher softening point than other samples. These tars eroded to form a powdered soil colonized by lichens and mosses. Residual wood tar material found at one site was shown to be thermally altered, likely during the historical destruction of the chemical plant by fire. Recovered wood tar wastes have a relatively high heating value and may have use as a potential, but limited, alternate energy source.

Edendorn, H.M.; Severson, D. (Allegheny Institute of Natural History, Bradford, PA)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

In situ spectroscopic applications to the study of rechargeable lithium batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR) has been employed to examine the reactivity of lithium toward polyethylene oxide (PEO) at ca. 60{degree}C. Uncertainties regarding the cleanliness of the Li surfaces were, minimized by electrodepositing a film of metallic Li directly onto a thin layer of gold (ca. 60 {Angstrom}) vapor deposited on a Ge ATR optical element during the spectroscopic measurements. The ATR/FTIR features observed upon stripping the Li layer were consistent with the formation of alkoxide-type moieties resulting from the Li-induced cleavage of the ether-type functionalities. Electronic and structural aspects of the electrochemical insertion of lithium from non-aqueous electroyltes into FeS{sub 2} have been investigated using in situ Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results obtained indicate that the incorporation of Li{sup +} in the pyrite lattice brings about a marked decrease in the amplitude of the extended XAFS (EXAFS) oscillations, particularly for shells associated with distant atoms and a rounding of the, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) region. An analysis of the EXAFS spectra yielded a value for the FeS distance of 2.29 {plus_minus} 0.02 {Angstrom}. On this basis and additional in situ room temperature {sup 57}Fe Mossbauer effect spectroscopy data for the same system it has been proposed that the electrically formed material involves a highly disordered (possibly amorphous) form of Fe{sub l-x}S (with Li+ counterbalancing the charge).

Barbour, R.; Kim, Sunghyun; Tryk, D.; Scherson, D.A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept of Chemistry

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A field-scale test of in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ chemical oxidation is a developing class of remediation technologies in which organic contaminants are degraded in place by powerful oxidants. Successful implementation of this technology requires an effective means for dispersing the oxidant to contaminated regions in the subsurface. An oxidant delivery technique has been developed wherein the treatment solution is made by adding an oxidant to extracted groundwater. The oxidant-laden groundwater is then injected and recirculated into a contaminated aquifer through multiple horizontal and/or vertical wells. This technique, referred to as in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation (ISCOR), can be applied to saturated and hydraulically conductive formations and used with relatively stable oxidants such as potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}). A field-scale test of ISCOR was conducted at a site (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) where groundwater in a 5-ft thick silty gravel aquifer is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) at levels that indicate the presence of residual dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The field test was implemented using a pair of parallel horizontal wells with 200-ft screened sections. For approximately one month, groundwater was extracted from one horizontal well, dosed with crystalline KMnO{sub 4}, and re-injected into the other horizontal well 90 ft away. Post-treatment characterization showed that ISCOR was effective at removing TCE in the saturated region. Lateral and vertical heterogeneities within the treatment zone impacted the uniform delivery of the oxidant solution. However, TCE was not detected in groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells and soil samples from borings in locations where the oxidant had permeated.

West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Holden, W.L.; Gardner, F.G.; Schlosser, B.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Siegrist, R.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Bechtel-Jacobs, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts continued to explore existing catalytic methods involving nano catalysts for capture of CO2 from the fermentation process.

Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage Title Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6127E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mammoli, Andrea, Michael Stadler, Nicholas DeForest, Hans Barsun, Richard Burnett, and Chris Marnay Conference Name 3rd International Conference on Microgeneration and Related Technologies Date Published 04/2013 Conference Location Naples, Italy Keywords absorption cooling, mixed integer programming, optimisation, software-as-a-service, thermal storage Abstract The UNM Mechanical Engineering HVAC system incorporates cooling assisted by a 232 m2 solar thermal array providing heat to a 70 kWthermal absorption chiller. A 30 m3 heat storage tank solar decouples heat production and absorption cooling. Additionally, 350 m3 of chilled water storage shifts the cooling electrical load of this high desert location off-peak. While this system already provides substantial energy and cost savings compared to similar conventional buildings, there are still opportunities for improvement. Absorption cooling (augmented by an electrically powered central cooling loop) suffers from parasitic electric loads from a cooling tower pump, a cooling tower fan, and hot and chilled water circulation pumps. Moreover, depending on seasonal, weather, occupancy, and cost conditions, the cold storage tanks may only need partial charging to meet the next day's net building load, and losses need to be considered. Optimally operating this complex thermal-electrical system poses a challenging mathematical problem. A model of the system was built on LBNL's Distributed Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) platform. A direct interface between the building energy control system, and DER-CAM hosted on LBNL's server was developed. This interface delivers daily scheduling based on weather forecasts, tariffs, etc., to the building controller. It is found that energy cost savings can be proportionally substantial (almost 30%) - although in this case the payback period for system implementation is long, due to the very low energy consumption of the building. Also, it is found that accurate weather forecasting is a key ingredient of the optimization, although local biases can be corrected for in the optimization.

250

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

Genotoxicity of complex chemical mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex chemical mixtures are ubiquitous in the environment. Humans are frequently exposed to these mixtures; therefore, it is important to understand potential interactions of chemical mixtures. Mixture interactions may influence the absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of the components of a complex mixture. The research conducted for this dissertation has coupled chemical fractionation with in vitro and in vivo bioassays to assess the potential carcinogenic risk of complex mixtures. A non-aqueous phase liquid from a wood treatment plant was separated into acid (AF), base (BF) and neutral fractions (NF). The NF was further enriched using column chromatography to produce a polychlorinated dinbenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fraction. The genotoxicity of these mixtures were assessed via analytical quantification, in vitro (Salmonella microsome and E. coli prophage induction) and in vivo (32P-postlabeling) bioassays. The NF was further tested to measure bulky DNA adducts and induction of tumor formation. The AF contained the highest level of pentachlorophenol and the highest concentration of total PAHs. Although the carcinogenic PAHs were highest in the PCDD fraction, the highest concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene (BAP), indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and dibenz(a,h)anthracene were detected in the PAH fraction. A positive genotoxic response in Salmonella was induced by the crude extract, the PAH and BF, whereas the AF and BF induced a positive response in the E. coli assay. In vivo, the PAH fraction induced the highest DNA adduct frequencies in the lung. The NF, reconstituted mixture (RM) (which includes equivalent concentrations of seven carcinogenic PAHs in the NF), BAP and the NF amended with BAP (NF+BAP) were all tested in an infant mouse model. At the highest dose, after a 24 hr exposure, NF+BAP had the highest total DNA adducts measured in liver which was three to seven times higher than with other treatments. Adduct levels were comparable to the control after 280 days. The highest incidence of tumors was observed in the liver. At the high dose, NF+BAP elicited the highest incidence of tumors. The results of this research confirm previous studies and indicate that the carcinogenic potential of PAH mixtures may be greater than predicted by chemical analysis.

Phillips, Tracie Denise

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

DOE-EMSP Final Report: Characterization of Changes in Colloid and DNAPL Affecting Surface Chemistry and Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The waste disposal to the M-area basin and A-14 outfall at the Savannah River Department of Energy facility in Aiken SC (USA) included a wide variety of inorganic aqueous flows and organic solvents in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The DNAPL has migrated through the subsurface resulting in widespread groundwater contamination. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify processes that could have affected the migration and remediation of the DNAPL in the subsurface. It was hypothesized that the variety of waste disposed at this site could have altered the mineral, microbial and DNAPL properties at this site relative to other DNAPL sites. The DNAPL was determined to have a very low interfacial tension and is suspected to be distributed in fine grained media, thereby reducing the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation efforts. Although the DNAPL is primarily comprised of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethane, it also contains organic acids and several heavy metals. Experimental results suggest that iron from the aqueous and DNAPL phases undergoes precipitation and dechlorination reactions at the DNAPL-water interface, contributing to the low interfacial tension and acidity of the DNAPL. Biological activity in the contaminated region can also contribute to the low interfacial tension. PCE degrading bacteria produce biosurfactants and adhere to the DNAPL-water interface when stressed by high tetrachloroethene or low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The presence of iron can reduce the interfacial tension by nearly an order of magnitude, while the PCE degraders reduced the interfacial tension by nearly 50%. Abiotic changes in the mineral characteristics were not found to be substantially different between contaminated and background samples. The research completed here begins to shed some insight into the complexities of DNAPL fate and migration at sites where co-disposal of many different waste products occurred. Quantifying the low interfacial tension of the SRS DNAPL helps to formulate a new conceptual picture of the subsurface DNAPL migration and provides an explanation of the limited effectiveness of remediation efforts. Alternative designs for remediation that are more effective for sites with DNAPL in fine grained media are required.

Susan E. Powers; Stefan J. Grimberg; Miles Denham

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

High Density Nano-Electrode Array for Radiation Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk single crystals of Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04 to x=0.2) compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection. The production of large volume of Cd1-xZnxTe with low defect density is expensive. As a result there is a growing research interest in the production of nanostructured compound semiconductors such as Cd1-xZnxTe in an electrochemical route. In this investigation, Cd1-xZnxTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO2 nanotubular template from propylene carbonate as the non-aqueous electrolyte, using a pulse-reverse electrodeposition process at 130 ºC. The template acted as a support in growing ordered nanowire of CZT which acts as a one dimensional conductor. Cyclic Voltammogram (CV) studies were conducted in determining the potentials for the growth of nanowires of uniform stoichiometry. The morphologies and composition of CZT were characterized by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The STEM mapping carried out on the nanowires showed the uniform distribution of Cd, Zn and Te elements. TEM image showed that the nanowires were polycrystalline in nature. The Mott-Schottky analysis carried on the nanowires showed that the nanowires were a p-type semiconductor. The carrier density, band gap and resistivity of the Cd0.9Zn0.1Te nanowires were 4.29x1013 cm-3, 1.56 eV and 2.76x1011?-cm respectively. The high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies or Te antisites which were created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were tested with different bias potentials. The background current was in the order of tens of picoamperes. When exposed to radiation source Amerecium-241 (60 KeV, 4 ?Ci), the stacked CZT nanowires arrays showed sensing behavior. The sensitivity of the nanowire arrays increased as the number of stacks increased. The preliminary results indicate that the CZT nanowire arrays can be used as a potential X-ray and low energy gamma ray detector material at room temperature with a much low bias potential (0.7 – 4V) as against 300 – 500 V applied in the commercial bulk detector materials.

Mano Misra

2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Low-cost flexible packaging for high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Batteries with various types of chemistries are typically sold in rigid hermetically sealed containers that, at the simplest level, must contain the electrolyte while keeping out the exterior atmosphere. However, such rigid containers can have limitations in packaging situations where the form of the battery is important, such as in hand-held electronics like personal digital assistants (PDAs), laptops, and cell phones. Other limitations exist as well. At least one of the electrode leads must be insulated from the metal can, which necessitates the inclusion of an insulated metal feed-through in the containment hardware. Another limitation may be in hardware and assembly cost, such as exists for the lithium-ion batteries that are being developed for use in electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The large size (typically 10-100 Ah) of these batteries usually results in electric beam or laser welding of the metal cap to the metal can. The non-aqueous electrolyte used in these batteries are usually based on flammable solvents and therefore require the incorporation of a safety rupture vent to relieve pressure in the event of overcharging or overheating. Both of these features add cost to the battery. Flexible packaging provides an alternative to the rigid container. A common example of this is the multi-layered laminates used in the food packaging industry, such as for vacuum-sealed coffee bags. However, flexible packaging for batteries does not come without concerns. One of the main concerns is the slow egress of the electrolyte solvent through the face of the inner laminate layer and at the sealant edge. Also, moisture and air could enter from the outside via the same method. These exchanges may be acceptable for brief periods of time, but for the long lifetimes required for batteries in electric/hybrid electric vehicles, batteries in remote locations, and those in satellites, these exchanges are unacceptable. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with several industrial partners, is working on low-cost flexible packaging as an alternative to the packaging currently being used for lithium-ion batteries [1,2]. This program is funded by the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. (It was originally funded under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, or PNGV, Program, which had as one of its mandates to develop a power-assist hybrid electric vehicle with triple the fuel economy of a typical sedan.) The goal in this packaging effort is to reduce the cost associated with the packaging of each cell several-fold to less than $1 per cell ({approx} 50 cells are required per battery, 1 battery per vehicle), while maintaining the integrity of the cell contents for a 15-year lifetime. Even though the battery chemistry of main interest is the lithium-ion system, the methodology used to develop the most appropriate laminate structure will be very similar for other battery chemistries.

Jansen, A. N.; Amine, K.; Henriksen, G. L.

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Zone Freezing Study for Pyrochemical Process Waste Minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyroprocessing technology is a non-aqueous separation process for treatment of used nuclear fuel. At the heart of pyroprocessing lies the electrorefiner, which electrochemically dissolves uranium from the used fuel at the anode and deposits it onto a cathode. During this operation, sodium, transuranics, and fission product chlorides accumulate in the electrolyte salt (LiCl-KCl). These contaminates change the characteristics of the salt overtime and as a result, large volumes of contaminated salt are being removed, reprocessed and stored as radioactive waste. To reduce the storage volumes and improve recycling process for cost minimization, a salt purification method called zone freezing has been proposed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Zone freezing is melt crystallization process similar to the vertical Bridgeman method. In this process, the eutectic salt is slowly cooled axially from top to bottom. As solidification occurs, the fission products are rejected from the solid interface and forced into the liquid phase. The resulting product is a grown crystal with the bulk of the fission products near the bottom of the salt ingot, where they can be easily be sectioned and removed. Despite successful feasibility report from KAERI on this process, there were many unexplored parameters to help understanding and improving its operational routines. Thus, this becomes the main motivation of this proposed study. The majority of this work has been focused on the CsCl-LiCl-KCl ternary salt. CeCl3-LiCl-KCl was also investigated to check whether or not this process is feasible for the trivalent species—surrogate for rare-earths and transuranics. For the main part of the work, several parameters were varied, they are: (1) the retort advancement rate—1.8, 3.2, and 5.0 mm/hr, (2) the crucible lid configurations—lid versus no-lid, (3) the amount or size of mixture—50 and 400 g, (4) the composition of CsCl in the salt—1, 3, and 5 wt%, and (5) the temperature differences between the high and low furnace zones—200 and 300 ?C. During each experiment, the temperatures at selected locations around the crucible were measured and recorded to provide temperature profiles. Following each experiment, samples were collected and elemental analysis was done to determine the composition of iii the salt. Several models—non-mixed, well-mixed, Favier, and hybrid—were explored to describe the zone freezing process. For CsCl-LiCl-KCl system, experimental results indicate that through this process up to 90% of the used salt can be recycled, effectively reducing waste volume by a factor of ten. The optimal configuration was found to be a 5.0 mm/hr rate with a lid configuration and a ?T of 200°C. The larger 400 g mixtures had recycle percentages similar to the 50 g mixtures; however, the throughput per time was greater for the 400 g case. As a result, the 400 g case is recommended. For the CeCl3-LiCl-KCl system, the result implies that it is possible to use this process to separate the rare-earth and transuranics chlorides. Different models were applied to only CsCl ternary system. The best fit model was the hybrid model as a result of a solute transport transition from non- mixed to well-mixed throughout the growing process.

Ammon Williams

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project is to systematically characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF, aiming to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating. The understanding gained will help us to optimize the composition and morphology of the catalyst layer and microstructure of the LSCF backbone for better performance. More specifically, the technical objectives include: (1) to characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF; (2) to characterize the microscopic details and stability of the LSCF-catalyst (e.g., LSM) interfaces; (3) to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating; and (4) to demonstrate that the performance and stability of porous LSCF cathodes can be enhanced by the application of a thin-film coating of LSM through a solution infiltration process in small homemade button cells and in commercially available cells of larger dimension. We have successfully developed dense, conformal LSM films with desired structure, composition, morphology, and thickness on the LSCF surfaces by two different infiltration processes: a non-aqueous and a water-based sol-gel process. It is demonstrated that the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes can be improved by the introduction of a thin-film LSM coating through an infiltration process. Surface and interface of the LSM-coated LSCF cathode were systematically characterized using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. TEM observation suggests that a layer of La and Sr oxide was formed on LSCF surfaces after annealing. With LSM infiltration, in contrast, we no longer observe such La/Sr oxide layer on the LSM-coated LSCF samples after annealing under similar conditions. This was also confirmed by x-ray analyses. For example, soft x-ray XANES data reveal that Co cations displace the Mn cations as being more favored to be reduced. Variations in the Sr-O in the annealed LSCF Fourier-transformed (FT) EXAFS suggest that some Sr segregation is occurring, but is not present in the annealed LSM-infiltrated LSCF cathode materials. Further, a surface enhanced Raman technique was also developed into to probe and map LSM and LSCF phase on underlying YSZ substrate, enabling us to capture important chemical information of cathode surfaces under practical operating conditions. Electrochemical models for the design of test cells and understanding of mechanism have been developed for the exploration of fundamental properties of electrode materials. Novel catalyst coatings through particle depositions (SDC, SSC, and LCC) or continuous thin films (PSM and PSCM) were successfully developed to improve the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes. Finally, we have demonstrated enhanced activity and stability of LSCF cathodes over longer periods of time in homemade and commercially available cells by an optimized LSM infiltration process. Microstructure examination of the tested cells did not show obvious differences between blank and infiltrated cells, suggesting that the infiltrated LSM may form a coherent film on the LSCF cathodes. There was no significant change in the morphology or microstructure of the LSCF cathode due to the structural similarity of LSCF and LSM. Raman analysis of the tested cells indicated small peaks emerging on the blank cells that correspond to trace amounts of secondary phase formation during operation (e.g., CoO{sub x}). The formation of this secondary phase might be attributed to performance degradation. In contrast, there was no such secondary phase observed in the LSM infiltrated cells, indicating that the LSM modification staved off secondary phase formation and thus improved the stability.

Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid number (TAN), which includes both mineral acids and organic acids, is therefore a useful indicator which can be used to monitor the condition of the system in order to perform remedial maintenance, when required, to prevent system failure. The critical TAN value is the acid level at which remedial action should be taken to prevent the onset of rapid acid formation which can result in system failure. The level of 0.05 mg KOH/g of oil was established for CFC/mineral oil systems based on analysis of 700 used lubricants from operating systems and failed units. There is no consensus within the refrigeration industry as to the critical TAN value for HFC/POE systems, however, the value will be higher than the CFC/mineral oil systems critical TAN value because of the much weaker organic acids produced from POE. A similar study of used POE lubricants should be performed to establish a critical TAN limit for POE systems. Titrimetric analysis per ASTM procedures is the most commonly used method to determine TAN values in lubricants in the refrigeration industry and other industries dealing with lubricating oils. For field measurements, acid test kits are often used since they provide rapid, semi-quantitative TAN results.

Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Alternative (Potentially Green) Separations Media: Aqueous Biphasic and Related Systems âÂ?Â? Extending the Frontier Final Report For Period September 1, 2002 âÂ?Â? January 31, 2007  

SciTech Connect

Through the current DoE-BES funding, we have extended our fundamental understanding of the critical phase separation of aqueous polymer solutions at the molecular level, and have developed a similar understanding of their application as novel solvent systems. Our principal aims included mode of delivery of the aqueous biphasic system (ABS) solvent system and the application of this system to problems of reactive extraction. In the former case we have developed novel solid phase analogues, in the form of cross-linked polyethylene glycol hydrogels, and in the latter case we have examined the role that ABS might play in reaction engineering, with a view to greener, simpler, and safer processes. We have also developed a new salt/salt ABS and have extended our understanding of this system as well. The major outcomes are as follows: (1) Through the use of variable temperature phase diagrams, coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the phases, a better understanding of the thermodynamics of phase formation was obtained. Evidence to the existence and role of an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) or lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (or both) in these systems was gained. With variable temperature solute partitioning, thermodynamic parameters were calculated, and inter-system comparisons were made. Through the use of Abraham's linear solvation energy regression (LSER) the solvent-solute properties of liquid/liquid ABS were examined. We have shown that ABS are indeed very tunable and LSERs have been used as a tool to compare these systems to traditional organic/water and other liquid/liquid systems. (2) We have successfully shown the development of novel reaction media for chemical synthesis and reaction; Aqueous Biphasic Reactive Extraction (ABRE). As a proof of concept, we have shown the synthesis of adipic acid from cyclohexene in an ABS, which represents an important development in the exploitation of this technology. Previous oxidations of this type have relied on the use of phase transfer catalysts, which are expensive to produce and difficult to recover. In this reaction the polyethylene glycol (PEG) phase seems to function simultaneously as the phase transfer catalyst, the reaction solvent, and to provide the reaction driving force. (3) PEG hydrogels may be used as probes for their macroscopic analogues by which the molecular events underlying the phase behavior of polymer-salt systems can be investigated. The properties of covalently cross-linked PEG hydrogels have been studied. It was demonstrated that these hydrogels could be thought of as analogous to polymer/salt ABS without phase separation. The salts examined cause collapse of the hydrogel, and there is a physical limit to the degree of collapse that can be achieved. In addition, salts bringing about significant collapse are only prevented from reaching this limit by the limits of their own solubility. This lead to our discovery that PEG will phase separate with KSCN at high enough concentration of polymer and salt. We have also successfully shown the development of an IL-PEG hydrogel as well as a Si-modified PEG hydrogel. We have also demonstrated for the first time that this cross-linked PEG matrix has been used to gel non-aqueous solvents. (4) The use of hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs) in separation schemes has been accomplished via a 'salting out' technique using inorganic, kosmotropic salts that is applicable to many classes of these materials. We have begun to obtain a deeper knowledge about the role that each component plays in the process, including that of the ionic liquid cation and anion, the kosmotropic salt cation and anions, as well as the distribution of water in the system. This is allowing us to design separation systems with desired properties. In addition, temperature studies on these aqueous biphasic systems are revealing thermodynamic data for the first time, so that we can quantitate the importance of entropic and enthalpic contributions to the biphase-forming process.

Robin D. Rogers

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z