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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Glossary Term - Proton Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Previous Term (Proton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Quark) Quark Proton Emission After proton emission, an atom contains one less proton. Proton emission is one process...

2

Glossary Term - Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prometheus Previous Term (Prometheus) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Proton Emission) Proton Emission Proton A Proton Protons are positively charged particles found within atomic...

3

Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

Scott Han

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Characterization of ceramics and glass using proton-induced X-ray emission  

SciTech Connect

Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is one of various chemical analysis tools that uses X-rays to identify individual elements. It is closely related to X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microprobe analysis (EMA). Although XRF and EMA are routinely used by materials engineers, PIXE is relatively uncommon. On the other hand, PIXE has proved to be the preferred technique in several specialized applications in environmental and biological studies. Many of the authors of this paper have recently demonstrated the utility of the technique in analyzing various commercial glass plates with and without transition-metal oxide coatings. The recent development of focused proton beams increases the potential of PIXE for the analysis of engineering materials.

Shackelford, J.F.; Risbud, S.H. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science); Kusko, B.H.; Cahill, T.A. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Crocker Nuclear Lab); Bihuniak, P.P.; Hanson, M.E. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Advanced Research Div.)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Green Bank Telescope Studies of Giant Pulses from Millisecond Pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have conducted a search for giant pulses from four millisecond pulsars using the 100m Green Bank Telescope. Coherently dedispersed time-series from PSR J0218+4232 were found to contain giant pulses of very short intrinsic duration whose energies follow power-law statistics. The giant pulses are in phase with the two minima of the radio integrated pulse profile but are phase aligned with the peaks of the X-ray profile. Historically, individual pulses more than 10-20 times the mean pulse energy have been deemed to be ``giant pulses''. As only 4 of the 155 pulses had energies greater than 10 times the mean pulse-energy, we argue the emission mechanism responsible for giant pulses should instead be defined through: (a) intrinsic timescales of microsecond or nanosecond duration; (b) power-law energy statistics; and (c) emission occurring in narrow phase-windows coincident with the phase windows of non-thermal X-ray emission. Four short-duration pulses with giant-pulse characteristics were also observed from PSR B1957+20. As the inferred magnetic fields at the light cylinders of the millisecond pulsars that emit giant pulses are all very high, this parameter has previously been considered to be an indicator of giant pulse emissivity. However, the frequency of giant pulse emission from PSR~B1957+20 is significantly lower than for other millisecond pulsars that have similar magnetic fields at their light cylinders. This suggests that the inferred magnetic field at the light cylinder is a poor indicator of the rate of emission of giant pulses.

H. S. Knight; M. Bailes; R. N. Manchester; S. M. Ord; B. A. Jacoby

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Millisecond Proto-Magnetars & Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the seconds after core collapse and explosion, a thermal neutrino-driven wind emerges from the cooling, deleptonizing newly-born neutron star. If the neutron star has a large-scale magnetar-strength surface magnetic field and millisecond rotation period, then the wind is driven primarily by magneto-centrifugal slinging, and only secondarily by neutrino interactions. The strong magnetic field forces the wind to corotate with the stellar surface and the neutron star's rotational energy is efficiently extracted. As the neutron star cools, and the wind becomes increasingly magnetically-dominated, the outflow becomes relativistic. Here I review the millisecond magnetar model for long-duration gamma ray bursts and explore some of the basic physics of neutrino-magnetocentrifugal winds. I further speculate on some issues of collimation and geometry in the millisecond magnetar model.

Todd A. Thompson

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

Measurements of nuclear $?$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $?$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code TALYS with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei $^{14}$N, $^{20,22}$Ne and $^{28}$Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

H. Benhabiles-Mezhoud; J. Kiener; J. -P. Thibaud; V. Tatischeff; I. Deloncle; A. Coc; J. Duprat; C. Hamadache; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; J. -C. Dalouzy; F. De Grancey; F. De Oliveira; F. Dayras; N. De Srville; M. -G. Pellegriti; L. Lamia; S. Ouichaoui

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Proton emission from cone-in-shell fast-ignition experiments at Omega  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of energetic protons from cone-in-shell fast-igniton implosions at Omega have been conducted. In these experiments, charged-particle spectrometers were used to measure a significant population (>10{sup 13}) of energetic protons (7.5 MeV max.), indicating the presence of strong electric fields. These energetic protons, observed in directions both transverse and forward relative to the direction of the short-pulse laser beam, have been used to study aspects of coupling efficiency of the petawatt fast-ignitior beam. Approximately 5% of the laser energy coupled to hot electrons was lost to fast ions. Forward going protons were less energetic and showed no dependence on laser intensity or whether the cone tip was intact when the short-pulse laser was fired. Maximum energies of protons emitted transverse to the cone-in-shell target scale with incident on-target laser intensity (2-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18}W-cm{sup -2}), as described by the ponderomotive scaling ({proportional_to}I{sup 1/2}). It is shown that these protons are accelerated from the entire cone, rather than from the cone tip alone. These protons were used to estimate the lower limit on the hot-electron temperature, which was found to be hotter than the ponderomotive scaling by factors of 2-3.

Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

MICROWAVE QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATION WITH MILLISECOND BURSTS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 AUGUST 9  

SciTech Connect

A peculiar microwave quasi-periodic pulsation (QPP) accompanying a hard X-ray (HXR) QPP of about 20 s duration occurred just before the maximum of an X6.9 solar flare on 2011 August 9. The most interesting aspect is that the microwave QPP consists of millisecond timescale superfine structures. Each microwave QPP pulse is made up of clusters of millisecond spike bursts or narrowband type III bursts. There are three different frequency drift rates: the global frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse group, the frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse, and the frequency drift rate of individual millisecond spikes or type III bursts. The physical analysis indicates that the energetic electrons accelerating from a large-scale highly dynamic magnetic reconnecting current sheet above the flaring loop propagate downward, impact the flaring plasma loop, and produce HXR bursts. The tearing-mode (TM) oscillations in the current sheet modulate HXR emission and generate HXR QPP; the energetic electrons propagating downward produce Langmuir turbulence and plasma waves, resulting in plasma emission. The modulation of TM oscillation on the plasma emission in the current-carrying plasma loop may generate microwave QPP. The TM instability produces magnetic islands in the loop. Each X-point will be a small reconnection site and will accelerate the ambient electrons. These accelerated electrons impact the ambient plasma and trigger the millisecond spike clusters or the group of type III bursts. Possibly, each millisecond spike burst or type III burst is one of the elementary bursts (EBs). A large number of such EB clusters form an intense flaring microwave burst.

Tan Baolin; Tan Chengming, E-mail: bltan@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Quark cluster contribution to cumulative proton emission in fragmentation of carbon ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the FRAGM experiment at heavy ion accelerator complex TWAC-ITEP, the proton yields at an angle 3.5$^\\circ$ have been measured at fragmentation of carbon ions at $T_0 = $ 0.6, 0.95 and 2.0 GeV/nucleon on beryllium target. The data are presented as invariant proton yields on cumulative variable $x$ in the range 0.9 carbon nuclei are estimated to be 8--12% for six-quark clusters and 0.2--0.6% for nine-quark clusters.

B. M. Abramov; P. N. Alekseev; Yu. A. Borodin; S. A. Bulychjov; I. A. Dukhovskoy; A. I. Khanov; A. P. Krutenkova; V. V. Kulikov; M. A. Martemyanov; M. A. Matsyuk; E. N. Turdakina

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

12

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Europium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 131 17.8 milliseconds Proton Emission 89.00% Electron Capture 11.00% 132 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available Electron...

13

Neutron to proton ratios of quasiprojectile and midrapidity emission in the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni reaction at 52 MeV/nucleon  

SciTech Connect

By combining data from a charged particle {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni experiment at 52 MeV/nucleon with an {sup 36}Ar+{sup 58}Ni experiment at 50 MeV/nucleon for which free neutrons have been detected, an increase in the neutron to proton ratio of the whole nuclear material at midrapidity has been experimentally observed in the reaction {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon. The neutron-to-proton ratio of the quasi-projectile emission is analyzed for the same reactions and is seen to decrease below the ratio of the initial system. Those observations suggest that an asymmetric exchange of neutrons and protons between the quasiprojectile and the midrapidity region exists.

Theriault, D.; Vallee, A.; Gingras, L.; Larochelle, Y.; Roy, R.; April, A.; Beaulieu, L.; Grenier, F.; Lemieux, F.; Moisan, J.; St-Pierre, C.; Turbide, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire, Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Samri, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et Applications, Universite Ibn Tofail, Kenitra (Morocco); Borderie, B.; Rivet, M. F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Bougault, R.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Lecolley, J.F. [LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ISMRA and Universite, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France)] [and others

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Thulium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission > 0.00% 145 3.17 microseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 146 80 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 146m 200 milliseconds...

15

AN ASTEROID BELT INTERPRETATION FOR THE TIMING VARIATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR B1937+21  

SciTech Connect

Pulsar timing observations have revealed companions to neutron stars that include other neutron stars, white dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and planets. We demonstrate that the correlated and apparently stochastic residual times of arrival from the millisecond pulsar B1937+21 are consistent with the signature of an asteroid belt having a total mass {approx}< 0.05 M{sub Circled-Plus }. Unlike the solar system's asteroid belt, the best fit pulsar asteroid belt extends over a wide range of radii, consistent with the absence of any shepherding companions. We suggest that any pulsar that has undergone accretion-driven spin-up and subsequently evaporated its companion may harbor orbiting asteroid mass objects. The resulting timing variations may fundamentally limit the timing precision of some of the other millisecond pulsars. Observational tests of the asteroid belt model include identifying periodicities from individual asteroids, which are difficult; testing for statistical stationarity, which becomes possible when observations are conducted over a longer observing span; and searching for reflected radio emission.

Shannon, R. M.; Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Metcalfe, T. S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)] [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Lazio, T. J. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G. [LPC2E/CNRS-Universite d'Orleans, Orleans, F-45071, Cedex 2 (France)] [LPC2E/CNRS-Universite d'Orleans, Orleans, F-45071, Cedex 2 (France); Janssen, G. H.; Purver, M. B.; Stappers, B. W. [University of Manchester and Jodrell Bank Observatory, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [University of Manchester and Jodrell Bank Observatory, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jessner, A.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K., E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au, E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastonomie, Bonn, D-53121 (Germany)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Assessing Millisecond Proto-Magnetars as GRB Central Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetars are a sizable subclass of the neutron star census. Their very high magnetic field strengths are thought to be a consequence of rapid (millisecond) rotation at birth in a successful core-collapse supernova. In their first tens of seconds of existence, magnetars transition from hot, extended ``proto-''magnetars to the cooled and magnetically-dominated objects we identify $\\sim10^4$ years later as Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) and Anamolous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs). Millisecond proto-magnetar winds during this cooling phase likewise transition from non-relativistic and thermally-driven to magneto-centrifugally-driven, and finally to relativistic and Poynting-flux dominated. Here we review the basic considerations associated with that transition. In particular, we discuss the spindown of millisecond proto-magnetars throughout the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling epoch. Because of their large reservoir of rotational energy, their association with supernovae, and the fact that their winds are expected to become highly relativistic in the seconds after their birth, proto-magnetars have been suggested as the central engine of long-duration gamma ray bursts. We discuss some of the issues and outstanding questions in assessing them as such.

Todd A. Thompson

2006-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Spectrum of the Millisecond Pulsar J0218+4232 - Theoretical Interpretations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We interpret the unique high-energy spectrum of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0218+4232 within polar cap scenarios. We show that the spectral data from BeppoSAX (Mineo et al.2000) and EGRET (Kuiper et al 2000) impose very restrictive limitations on possible radiation mechanisms, energy spectrum of radiating charges as well as viewing geometry. Theoretical spectra are able to reproduce the data, however, this can be achieved provided very special -- unusual within the conventional polar cap picture -- conditions are satisfied. Those include off-beam viewing geometry along with one of the following alternatives: 1) strong acceleration of secondary pairs; 2) broad energy distribution of primary electrons extending down to $10^5$ MeV; 3) high-altitude synchrotron emission.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Lanthanum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decay Mode Branching Percentage 117 23.5 milliseconds Proton Emission 93.90% Electron Capture 6.10% 117m 10 milliseconds Proton Emission 97.40% Electron Capture 2.60% 118...

19

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Lutetium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 150 45 milliseconds Proton Emission 70.90% Electron Capture 29.10% 151 80.6 milliseconds Proton Emission 63.40% Electron Capture 36.60%...

20

Finding binary millisecond pulsars with the Hough transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hough transformation has been used successfully for more than four decades. Originally used for tracking particle traces in bubble chamber images, this work shows a novel approach turning the initial idea into a powerful tool to incoherently detect millisecond pulsars in binary orbits. This poster presents the method used, a discussion on how to treat the time domain data from radio receivers and create the input "image" for the Hough transformation, details about the advantages and disadvantages of this approach, and finally some results from pulsars in 47 Tucanae.

C. Aulbert

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A bright millisecond radio burst of extragalactic origin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsar surveys offer one of the few opportunities to monitor even a small fraction (~0.00001) of the radio sky for impulsive burst-like events with millisecond durations. In analysis of archival survey data, we have discovered a 30-Jy dispersed burst of duration <5 ms located three degrees from the Small Magellanic Cloud. The burst properties argue against a physical association with our Galaxy or the Small Magellanic Cloud. Current models for the free electron content in the Universe imply a distance to the burst of <1 Gpc No further bursts are seen in 90-hr of additional observations, implying that it was a singular event such as a supernova or coalescence of relativistic objects. Hundreds of similar events could occur every day and act as insightful cosmological probes.

D. R. Lorimer; M. Bailes; M. A. McLaughlin; D. J. Narkevic; F. Crawford

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

22

A CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATION OF THE BINARY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1023+0038  

SciTech Connect

We present a Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5{sigma}) large-amplitude (factor of two to three) orbital variability over the five consecutive orbits covered by the observation, with a pronounced decline in the flux at all energies at superior conjunction. This can be naturally explained by a partial geometric occultation by the secondary star of an X-ray-emitting intrabinary shock, produced by the interaction of outflows from the two stars. The depth and duration of the eclipse imply that the intrabinary shock is localized near or at the surface of the companion star and close to the inner Lagrangian point. The energetics of the shock favor a magnetically dominated pulsar wind that is focused into the orbital plane, requiring close alignment of the pulsar spin and orbital angular momentum axes. The X-ray spectrum consists of a dominant non-thermal component and at least one thermal component, likely originating from the heated pulsar polar caps, although a portion of this emission may be from an optically thin 'corona'. We find no evidence for extended emission due to a pulsar wind nebula or bow shock down to a limiting luminosity of L{sub X} {approx}< 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg s{sup -1} (0.3-8 keV), {approx}< 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} of the pulsar spin-down luminosity, for a distance of 1.3 kpc and an assumed power-law spectrum with photon index {Gamma} = 1.5.

Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Hessels, Jason W. T. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Lorimer, Duncan; McLaughlin, Maura A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 210E Hodges Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Ransom, Scott M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Stairs, Ingrid H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Millisecond Pulsar J0030+0451 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the nearby isolated millisecond pulsar PSR J0030+0451 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). This discovery makes PSR J0030+0451 the second millisecond pulsar to be detected in gamma-rays after PSR J0218+4232, observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The spin-down power {dot E} = 3.5 x 10{sup 33} ergs s{sup -1} is an order of magnitude lower than the empirical lower bound of previously known gamma-ray pulsars. The emission profile is characterized by two narrow peaks, respectively 0.07 {+-} 0.01 and 0.08 {+-} 0.02 wide, separated by 0.44 {+-} 0.02 in phase. The first gamma-ray peak falls 0.15 {+-} 0.01 after the main radio peak. The pulse shape is similar to that of the 'normal' gamma-ray pulsars. An exponentially cut-off power-law fit of the emission spectrum leads to an integral photon flux above 100 MeV of (6.76 {+-} 1.05 {+-} 1.35) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with cut-off energy (1.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.5) GeV. Based on its parallax distance of (300 {+-} 90) pc, we obtain a gamma-ray efficiency L{sub {gamma}}/{dot E} {approx_equal} 15% for the conversion of spin-down energy rate into gamma-ray radiation, assuming isotropic emission.

Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U.; /more authors..

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Holmium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Emission 100.00% 141 4.1 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 142 0.4 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission > 0.00% 143 No Data...

25

Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange Using Microfluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanocrystal with DDA, R CdSe was calculated to be 3.4 nm. Rto measure the kinetics of the CdSe-to-Ag 2 Se nanocrystalthe millisecond mixing of CdSe nanocrystal and Ag + reactant

Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar, Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Protons - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protons Protons The BASE Facility is capable of providing fluxes of up to 1E10 protons/cm2-sec (the limit of our standard, continuously reading ion chamber dosimetry), but works best in the 1E7 to 1E8 protons/cm2-sec range. Higher levels of flux are monitored using intermittent faraday cup readings. Standard proton energies include 13.5, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 55 MeV/nucleon. Energies below 13.5 MeV/nucleon can be run in vacuum in Cave 4B. All proton testing is performed in air. Shielding materials, laser alignment tools, and mounting fixtures are available. Holes are provided through the cave shielding blocks for connecting additional test equipment, with a distance of approximately 10 feet from the test bench to the top of the shielding block (10 BNC cables are permanently installed and available for use; additional cables can be added).

27

Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei  

SciTech Connect

To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of {sup 31}Cl, {sup 27}P and {sup 28}P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas {Delta}E-gas {Delta}E-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in {sup 31}Cl and {sub 27}P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of {sup 31}Cl were shown to be from the decay of {sup 25}Si. In {sup 27}P, two proton groups at 459 {+-} 14 keV and 610 {+-} 11 keV, with intensities of 7 {+-} 3% and 92 {+-} 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the {beta}-decay of {sup 28}P, at 1,444 {+-} 12 keV with a 1.7 {+-} 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 {+-} 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of {sup 17}Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar were resolved.

Ognibene, T.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Measurements of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $\\alpha$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very in...

Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H; Thibaud, J -P; Tatischeff, V; Deloncle, I; Coc, A; Duprat, J; Hamadache, C; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A; Dalouzy, J -C; De Grancey, F; De Oliveira, F; Dayras, F; De Srville, N; Pellegriti, M -G; Lamia, L; Ouichaoui, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Proton interrogation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Neutron-to-proton ratios of quasiprojectile and midrapidity emission in the {sup 64}Zn + {sup 64}Zn reaction at 45 MeV/nucleon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurement of both neutrons and charged particles emitted in the reaction {sup 64}Zn + {sup 64}Zn at 45 MeV/nucleon allows comparison of the neutron to proton ratio at midrapidity with that at projectile rapidity. The evolution of N/Z in both rapidity regimes with increasing centrality is examined. For the completely reconstructed midrapidity material one finds that the neutron to proton ratio is above that of the overall {sup 64}Zn + {sup 64}Zn system. In contrast, the reconstructed ratio for the quasiprojectile is below that of the overall system. This difference provides the most complete evidence to date of neutron enrichment of midrapidity nuclear matter at the expense of the quasiprojectile.

Theriault, D.; Gauthier, J.; Grenier, F.; Moisan, F.; St-Pierre, C.; Roy, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire, Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Davin, B.; Hudan, S.; Paduszynski, T.; Souza, R. T. de [Department of Chemistry and Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Bell, E.; Garey, J.; Iglio, J.; Keksis, A. L.; Parketon, S.; Richers, C.; Shetty, D. V.; Soisson, S. N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Stein, B. C. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] (and others)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Yttrium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mode Branching Percentage 76 > 200 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available Electron Capture No Data Available 77 57 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron...

32

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Terbium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percentage 135 0.94 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 136 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available 137 No Data Available Electron Capture...

33

Temporal variations in space-time and progenitors of gamma ray burst and millisecond pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A time varying space-time metric is shown to be a source of electromagnetic radiation. The post-Newtonian approximation is used as a realistic model of the connection between the space-time metric and a time varying gravitational potential. Large temporal variations in the metric from the coalescence of colliding black holes and neutron stars are shown to be possible progenitors of gamma ray burst and millisecond pulsars.

Preston Jones

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

34

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Technetium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

85 0.5 seconds Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 86 54 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 87...

35

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Iodine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available No Data Available No Data Available 108 36 milliseconds Alpha Decay 91.00% Electron Capture 9.00% Proton Emission < 1.00% 109 93.5 microseconds Proton Emission 99.99%...

36

A PARALLAX DISTANCE AND MASS ESTIMATE FOR THE TRANSITIONAL MILLISECOND PULSAR SYSTEM J1023+0038  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently discovered transitional millisecond pulsar system J1023+0038 exposes a crucial evolutionary phase of recycled neutron stars for multiwavelength study. The system, comprising the neutron star itself, its stellar companion, and the surrounding medium, is visible across the electromagnetic spectrum from the radio to X-ray/gamma-ray regimes and offers insight into the recycling phase of millisecond pulsar evolution. Here, we report on multiple-epoch astrometric observations with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) which give a system parallax of 0.731 {+-} 0.022 milliarcseconds (mas) and a proper motion of 17.98 {+-} 0.05 mas yr{sup -1}. By combining our results with previous optical observations, we are able to use the parallax distance of 1368{sup +42}{sub -{sub 39}} pc to estimate the mass of the pulsar to be 1.71 {+-} 0.16 M{sub Sun }, and we are also able to measure the three-dimensional space velocity of the system to be 126 {+-} 5 km s{sup -1}. Despite the precise nature of the VLBA measurements, the remaining {approx}3% distance uncertainty dominates the 0.16 M{sub Sun} error on our mass estimate.

Deller, A. T. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Archibald, A. M.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Brisken, W. F. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Chatterjee, S. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Janssen, G. H.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Lorimer, D.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Ransom, S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

The X-ray afterglow flat segment in short GRB 051221A: Energy injection from a millisecond magnetar?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flat segment lasting $\\sim 10^4$ seconds in the X-ray afterglow of GRB051221A represents the first clear case of strong energy injection in the external shock of a short GRB afterglow. In this work, we show that a millisecond pulsar with dipole magnetic field $\\sim 10^{14}$ Gauss could well account for that energy injection. The good quality X-ray flat segment thus suggests that the central engine of this short burst may be a millisecond magnetar.

Yizhong Fan; Dong Xu

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

38

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

39

New Binary and Millisecond Pulsars from Arecibo Drift-Scan Searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss four recycled pulsars found in Arecibo drift-scan searches. PSR J1944+0907 has a spin period of 5.2 ms and is isolated. The 5.8-ms pulsar J1453+19 may have a low-mass companion. We discuss these pulsars in the context of isolated millisecond pulsar formation and the minimum spin period of neutron stars. The isolated 56-ms pulsar J0609+2130 is possibly the remnant of a disrupted double neutron star binary. The 41-ms pulsar J1829+2456 is in a relativistic orbit. Its companion is most likely another neutron star, making this the eighth known double neutron star binary system.

M. A. McLaughlin; D. R. Lorimer; D. J. Champion; Z. Arzoumanian; D. C. Backer; J. M. Cordes; A. S. Fruchter; A. N. Lommen; K. M. Xilouris

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

40

Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike [PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstrasse 28, 80803 Muenchen (Germany); Strueder, Lothar [Max-Planck-Institut Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Muenchen (Germany); Volz, Kerstin [Materials Science Center and Faculty of Physics, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Zweck, Josef [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Production of Millisecond Dips in Sco X-1 Count Rates by Dead Time Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chang et al. (2006) reported millisecond duration dips in the X-ray intensity of Sco X-1 and attributed them to occultations of the source by small trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). We have found multiple lines of evidence that these dips are not astronomical in origin, but rather the result of high-energy charged particle events in the RXTE PCA detectors. Our analysis of the RXTE data indicates that at most 10% of the observed dips in Sco X-1 could be due to occultations by TNOs, and, furthermore, we find no positive or supporting evidence for any of them being due to TNOs. We therefore believe that it is a mistake to conclude that any TNOs have been detected via occultation of Sco X-1.

T. A. Jones; A. M. Levine; E. H. Morgan; S. Rappaport

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

42

Proton structure and tensor gluons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a possibility that inside the proton and, more generally, inside the hadrons there are additional partons - tensor-gluons, which can carry a part of the proton momentum. The tensor-gluons have zero electric charge, like gluons, but have a larger spin. Inside the proton a nonzero density of the tensor-gluons can be generated by the emission of tensor-gluons by gluons. The last mechanism is typical for non-Abelian tensor gauge theories, in which there exists a gluon-tensor-tensor vertex of order g. Therefore the number of gluons changes not only because a quark may radiate a gluon or because a gluon may split into a quark-antiquark pair or into two gluons, but also because a gluon can split into two tensor-gluons. The process of gluon splitting suggests that part of the proton momentum which was carried by neutral partons is shared between vector and tensor gluons. We derive evolution equations for the parton distribution functions which take into account these new processes. The momentum sum rule allows to find the tensor-gluons contribution to the Callan-Simanzik beta function and to calculate the corresponding anomalous dimensions. This contribution changes the behavior of the structure functions, and the logarithmic correction to the Bjorken scaling becomes more mild. This also influences the unification scale at which the coupling constants of the Standard Model merge, shifting its value to lower energies of order of 40 TeV.

George Savvidy

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

Yip, K.

2011-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

44

LANL | Physics | Proton Radiography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pioneering proton radiography Pioneering proton radiography Invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory, proton radiography employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials driven by high explosives. The penetrating power of high-energy protons, like that of x-rays, makes them an excellent probe of a wide range of materials under extreme pressures, strains, and strain rates. The charge of the particles both affects scattering in interesting ways but allows them to be imaged with magnetic optics that gives them unique advantages for penetrating radiography. The incredible efficacy and versatility of proton radiography also stems from the ability to produce multiple proton pulses in an accelerator coupled with multiple optical viewing systems that can result

45

TWO MILLISECOND PULSARS DISCOVERED BY THE PALFA SURVEY AND A SHAPIRO DELAY MEASUREMENT  

SciTech Connect

We present two millisecond pulsar discoveries from the PALFA survey of the Galactic plane with the Arecibo telescope. PSR J1955+2527 is an isolated pulsar with a period of 4.87 ms, and PSR J1949+3106 has a period of 13.14 ms and is in a 1.9 day binary system with a massive companion. Their timing solutions, based on 4 years of timing measurements with the Arecibo, Green Bank, Nancay, and Jodrell Bank telescopes, allow precise determination of spin and astrometric parameters, including precise determinations of their proper motions. For PSR J1949+3106, we can clearly detect the Shapiro delay. From this we measure the pulsar mass to be 1.47{sup +0.43}{sub -0.31} M{sub Sun }, the companion mass to be 0.85{sup +0.14}{sub -0.11} M{sub Sun }, and the orbital inclination to be i = 79.9{sup -1.9}{sub +1.6} deg, where uncertainties correspond to {+-}1{sigma} confidence levels. With continued timing, we expect to also be able to detect the advance of periastron for the J1949+3106 system. This effect, combined with the Shapiro delay, will eventually provide very precise mass measurements for this system and a test of general relativity.

Deneva, J. S.; Camilo, F. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Freire, P. C. C.; Champion, D. J.; Desvignes, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement et de l'Espace, LPC2E, CNRS et Universite d'Orleans, and Station de radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris (France); Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Bhat, N. D. R. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Jenet, F. A. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue Universite, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); and others

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

46

Millisecond dips in the RXTE/PCA light curve of Sco X-1 and TNO occultation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Millisecond dips in the RXTE/PCA light curve of Sco X-1 were reported recently (Chang et al. 2006), which were interpreted as the occultation of X-rays from Sco X-1 caused by Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNO) of hundred-meter size. Inconclusive signatures of possible instrumental effects in many of these dip events related to high-energy cosmic rays were later found (Jones et al. 2006) and the TNO interpretation became shaky. Here we report more detailed analysis aiming at distinguishing true occultation events from those related to cosmic rays. Based on some indicative criteria derived from housekeeping data and two-channel spectral information, we suggest that about 10% of the dips are probable events of occultation. The total number of TNOs of size from 60 m to 100 m is estiamted to be about 10^{15} accordingly. Limited by the coarser time resolution of standard data modes of RXTE/PCA, however, definite results cannot be obtained. Adequately configured observations with RXTE or other new instruments in the future are very much desired.

Hsiang-Kuang Chang; Jau-Shian Liang; Chih-Yuan Liu; Sun-Kun King

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Luminosity and Energy Dependence of Pulse Phase Lags in the Accretion-Powered Millisecond Pulsar Sax J1808.4-3658  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft phase lags, in which X-ray pulses in lower energy bands arrive later than pulses in higher energy bands, have been observed in nearly all accretion-powered millisecond pulsars, but their origin remains an open question. ...

Hartman, Jacob M.

48

Physics Out Loud - Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photomultiplier Tube Previous Video (Photomultiplier Tube) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)) Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) Proton Learn about the...

49

A METAL-RICH LOW-GRAVITY COMPANION TO A MASSIVE MILLISECOND PULSAR  

SciTech Connect

Most millisecond pulsars with low-mass companions are in systems with either helium-core white dwarfs or non-degenerate (''black widow'' or ''redback'') stars. A candidate counterpart to PSR J1816+4510 was identified by Kaplan et al. whose properties were suggestive of both types of companions although identical to neither. We have assembled optical spectroscopy of the candidate companion and confirm that it is part of the binary system with a radial velocity amplitude of 343 {+-} 7 km s{sup -1}, implying a high pulsar mass, M{sub psr}sin {sup 3} i = 1.84 {+-} 0.11 M{sub Sun }, and a companion mass M{sub c} sin {sup 3} i = 0.193 {+-} 0.012 M{sub Sun }, where i is the inclination of the orbit. The companion appears similar to proto-white dwarfs/sdB stars, with a gravity log{sub 10}(g) = 4.9 {+-} 0.3, and effective temperature 16, 000 {+-} 500 K. The strongest lines in the spectrum are from hydrogen, but numerous lines from helium, calcium, silicon, and magnesium are present as well, with implied abundances of roughly 10 times solar (relative to hydrogen). As such, while from the spectrum the companion to PSR J1816+4510 is superficially most similar to a low-mass white dwarf, it has much lower gravity, is substantially larger, and shows substantial metals. Furthermore, it is able to produce ionized gas eclipses, which had previously been seen only for low-mass, non-degenerate companions in redback or black widow systems. We discuss the companion in relation to other sources, but find that we understand neither its nature nor its origins. Thus, the system is interesting for understanding unusual stellar products of binary evolution, as well as, independent of its nature, for determining neutron-star masses.

Kaplan, D. L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI 53211 (United States); Bhalerao, V. B. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Van Kerkwijk, M. H. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Koester, D. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, University of Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Kulkarni, S. R. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stovall, K., E-mail: kaplan@uwm.edu, E-mail: mhvk@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

THE QUIESCENT X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND X-RAY PULSAR AND ECLIPSING BINARY SWIFT J1749.4-2807  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swift J1749.4-2807 is a transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary that contains an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar spinning at 518 Hz. It is the first of its kind that displays X-ray eclipses, which holds significant promise to precisely constrain the mass of the neutron star. We report on a {approx_equal} 105 ks long XMM-Newton observation performed when Swift J1749.4-2807 was in quiescence. We detect the source at a 0.5-10 keV luminosity of {approx_equal}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33}(D/6.7 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1}. The X-ray light curve displays three eclipses that are consistent in orbital phase and duration with the ephemeris derived during outburst. Unlike most quiescent neutron stars, the X-ray spectrum can be adequately described with a simple power law, while a pure-hydrogen atmosphere model does not fit the data. We place an upper limit on the 0.01-100 keV thermal luminosity of the cooling neutron star of {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} and constrain its temperature to be {approx}< 0.1 keV (for an observer at infinity). Timing analysis does not reveal evidence for X-ray pulsations near the known spin frequency of the neutron star or its first overtone with a fractional rms of {approx}< 34% and {approx}< 28%, respectively. We discuss the implications of our findings for dynamical mass measurements, the thermal state of the neutron star, and the origin of the quiescent X-ray emission.

Degenaar, N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Patruno, A.; Wijnands, R., E-mail: degenaar@umich.edu [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Apparatus for proton radiography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Proton computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible.

Hanson, K.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

SPIN EVOLUTION OF MILLISECOND MAGNETARS WITH HYPERACCRETING FALLBACK DISKS: IMPLICATIONS FOR EARLY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shallow decay phase or plateau phase of early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), discovered by Swift, is currently understood as being due to energy injection to a relativistic blast wave. One natural scenario for energy injection invokes a millisecond magnetar as the central engine of GRBs because the conventional model of a pulsar predicts a nearly constant magnetic-dipole-radiation luminosity within the spin-down timescale. However, we note that significant brightening occurs in some early afterglows, which apparently conflicts with the above scenario. Here we propose a new model to explain this significant brightening phenomena by considering a hyperaccreting fallback disk around a newborn millisecond magnetar. We show that for typical values of the model parameters, sufficient angular momentum of the accreted matter is transferred to the magnetar and spins it up. It is this spin-up that leads to a dramatic increase of the magnetic-dipole-radiation luminosity with time and thus significant brightening of an early afterglow. Based on this model, we carry out numerical calculations and fit well early afterglows of 12 GRBs assuming sufficiently strong fallback accretion. If the accretion is very weak, our model turns out to be the conventional energy-injection scenario of a pulsar. Therefore, our model can provide a unified explanation for the shallow decay phase, plateaus, and significant brightening of early afterglows.

Dai, Z. G.; Liu Ruoyu, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: ryliu@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The search for proton decay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a very brief description of the theoretical developments which motivated the search for proton decay

R. Bionta; G. Blewitt; C. B. Bratton; D. Casper; B. G. Cortez; G. W. Foster; W. Gajewski; K. S. Ganezer; M. Goldhaber; T. J. Haines; T. W. Jones; D. Kielczewka; W. R. Kropp; J. G. Learned; E. Lehmann; J. M. LoSecco; H. S. Park; J. Shultz; S. Seidel; H. W. Sobel; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; J. C. van der Velde

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Proton Polarimetry at RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The techniques used to measure precisely the polarization of the proton beams at RHIC are presented and discussed. Fast polarization measurements are performed using polarimeters based on pC elastic scattering. The absolute normalization is provided by a polarized hydrogen gas jet target. During the 2004 polarized proton run a relative precision on the beam polarization ?P beam /P beam of 6.6% has been achieved.

Alessandro Bravar; RHIC Polarimetry group

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Praseodymium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mode Branching Percentage 121 10 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 122 0.5 seconds Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available 123 0.8 seconds Electron Capture (suspected) No...

57

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Thallium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alpha Decay 73.00% Proton Emission 27.00% 178 254 milliseconds Alpha Decay 53.00% Electron Capture 47.00% 179 0.23 seconds Alpha Decay < 100.00% Electron Capture No Data...

58

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

59

A Model of Proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I suggest to consider a proton as a body in a state of free precession. Such approach allows to define a proton as periodic system with two rotary degrees of freedom with corresponding frequency ratio and resonances. In result on a power scale the points corresponding to a birth of leptons are designated. The interrelation between masses of leptons is established through a fine structure constant. The given approach is distributed to a nucleus. Other representation is given on the nature of X-rays which connect with a charge of a nucleus and its mass.

Vladislav Shchegolev

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

DISCOVERY OF THE OPTICAL/ULTRAVIOLET/GAMMA-RAY COUNTERPART TO THE ECLIPSING MILLISECOND PULSAR J1816+4510  

SciTech Connect

The energetic, eclipsing millisecond pulsar J1816+4510 was recently discovered in a low-frequency radio survey with the Green Bank Telescope. With an orbital period of 8.7 hr and a minimum companion mass of 0.16 M{sub Sun }, it appears to belong to an increasingly important class of pulsars that are ablating their low-mass companions. We report the discovery of the {gamma}-ray counterpart to this pulsar and present a likely optical/ultraviolet counterpart as well. Using the radio ephemeris, we detect pulsations in the unclassified {gamma}-ray source 2FGL J1816.5+4511, implying an efficiency of {approx}25% in converting the pulsar's spin-down luminosity into {gamma}-rays and adding PSR J1816+4510 to the large number of millisecond pulsars detected by Fermi. The likely optical/UV counterpart was identified through position coincidence (<0.''1) and unusual colors. Assuming that it is the companion, with R = 18.27 {+-} 0.03 mag and effective temperature {approx}> 15,000 K, it would be among the brightest and hottest of low-mass pulsar companions and appears qualitatively different from other eclipsing pulsar systems. In particular, current data suggest that it is a factor of two larger than most white dwarfs of its mass but a factor of four smaller than its Roche lobe. We discuss possible reasons for its high temperature and odd size, and suggest that it recently underwent a violent episode of mass loss. Regardless of origin, its brightness and the relative unimportance of irradiation make it an ideal target for a mass, and hence a neutron star mass, determination.

Kaplan, D. L.; Kotulla, R.; Biwer, C. M.; Day, D. F. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI 53211 (United States); Stovall, K.; Dartez, L.; Ford, A. J.; Garcia, A.; Jenet, F. A. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Roberts, M. S. E. [Eureka Scientific, Inc., 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Archibald, A. M.; Karako, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lynch, R. S. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Boyles, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, 115 Willey Street, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T.; Kondratiev, V. I., E-mail: kaplan@uwm.edu [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); and others

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of a Low-Energy Proton Accelerator System for the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a Low-Energy Proton Accelerator System for the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP)

Han, J M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Contruction of User Facilities for the Proton Beam Utilization of PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contruction of User Facilities for the Proton Beam Utilization of PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project)

Kim, K R; Lee, H R; Nam, K Y; Park, B S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

1951-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane, also known as polymer electrolyte membrane, fuel cells (PEMFCs) offer the promise of efficient conversion of chemical energy of fuel, such as hydrogen or methanol, into electricity with minimal pollution. Their widespread use to power zero-emission automobiles as part of a hydrogen economy can contribute to enhanced energy security and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, the commercial viability of PEMFC technology is hindered by high cost associated with the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and poor membrane durability under prolonged operation at elevated temperature. Membranes for automotive fuel cell applications need to perform well over a period comparable to the life of an automotive engine and under heavy load cycling including start-stop cycling under sub-freezing conditions. The combination of elevated temperature, changes in humidity levels, physical stresses and harsh chemical environment contribute to membrane degradation. Perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)-based membranes, such as Nafion, have been the mainstay of PEMFC technology. Their limitations, in terms of cost and poor conductivity at low hydration, have led to continuing research into membranes that have good proton conductivity at elevated temperatures above 120 C and under low humidity conditions. Such membranes have the potential to avoid catalyst poisoning, simplify fuel cell design and reduce the cost of fuel cells. Hydrocarbon-based membranes are being developed as alternatives to PFSA membranes, but concerns about chemical and mechanical stability and durability remain. Novel anhydrous membranes based on polymer gels infused with protic ionic liquids have also been recently proposed, but considerable fundamental research is needed to understand proton transport in novel membranes and evaluate durability under fuel cell operating conditions. In order to advance this promising technology, it is essential to rationally design the next generation of PEMs based on an understanding of chemistry, membrane morphology and proton transport obtained from experiment, theory and computer simulation.

Devanathan, Ramaswami

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Radiative proton-antiproton annihilation to a lepton pair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annihilation of proton and antiproton to an electron-positron pair, including radiative corrections due to the emission of virtual and real photons is considered. The results are generalized to leading and next-to leading approximations. The relevant distributions are derived and numerical applications are given in the kinematical range accessible to the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility.

Ahmadov, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Bytev, V. V.; Kuraev, E. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. [CEA, IRFU, SPhN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France, and CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, UMR 8608, 91405 Orsay (France)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

History of Proton Linear Accelerators  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Some personal recollections are presented that relate to the author`s experience developing linear accelerators, particularly for protons. (LEW)

Alvarez, L. W.

1987-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

67

High-energy emission from pulsars in polar-cap models with CR-induced cascades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a subclass of polar-cap models based on electromagnetic cascades induced by curvature radiation (CR) we calculate broad-band high-energy spectra of pulsed emission expected for classical and millisecond pulsars. The spectra are a combination of curvature and synchrotron components. The spectrum of curvature component breaks at 150MeV, and neither its slope nor level below this energy are compatible with phase-averaged spectra of pulsed X-ray emission inferred from observations. Spectral properties in the combined energy range of ROSAT and ASCA (0.1 - 10 keV) depend upon the location of cyclotron turnover energy epsilon_ct=\\hbar{e B \\over m_e c} /sin(psi) in the synchrotron component. Unlike in outer-gap models, the available range of pitch angles psi is rather narrow and confined to low values. For classical pulsars, a gradual turnover begins already at 1MeV, and the level of the synchrotron spectrum decreases. At 10keV the curvature component eventually takes over, but with photon index alpha = 2/3, in disagreement with observations. For millisecond pulsars, the X-ray spectra are dominated by synchrotron component with alpha \\simeq 1.5, and a sharp turnover into alpha \\simeq -1 at epsilon_ct \\sim 100eV. Relations of pulsed luminosity L_X to spin-down luminosity \\edot are presented for classical and millisecond pulsars. We conclude that spectral properties and fluxes of pulsed non-thermal X-ray emission of some objects, like the Crab or the millisecond pulsar B1821-24, pose a challenge to the subclass of polar-cap models based on curvature and synchrotron radiation alone.

B. Rudak; J. Dyks

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Solar proton fluxes since 1956  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of /sup 56/Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of /sup 22/Na and /sup 55/Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity.

Reedy, R.C.

1977-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

69

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science of Chocolate The Science of Chocolate Previous Video (The Science of Chocolate) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (Adventures in Infectious Diseases) Adventures in Infectious Diseases Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives Dr. Cynthia Keppel - Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute October 25, 2011 In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy

70

Constraining the Bulk Properties of Dense Matter by Measuring Millisecond Pulsar Masses - A White Paper for the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, CFP Panel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than four decades after the discovery of pulsars, the composition of matter at their cores is still a mystery. This white paper summarizes how recent high-precision measurements of millisecond pulsar masses have introduced new experimental constraints on the properties of super-dense matter, and how continued timing of intriguing new objects, coupled with radio telescope surveys to discover more pulsars, might introduce significantly more stringent constraints.

Freire, Paulo C; Lattimer, James; Stairs, Ingrid; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Cordes, James; Deneva, Julia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Gravitational-wave spin-down and stalling lower limits on the electrical resistivity of the accreted mountain in a millisecond pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electrical resistivity of the accreted mountain in a millisecond pulsar is limited by the observed spin-down rate of binary radio millisecond pulsars (BRMSPs) and the spins and X-ray fluxes of accreting millisecond pulsars (AMSPs). We find $\\eta \\ge 10^{-28}\\,\\mathrm{s}\\, (\\tau_\\mathrm{SD}/1\\,\\mathrm{Gyr})^{-0.8}$ (where $\\tau_\\mathrm{SD}$ is the spin-down age) for BRMSPs and $\\eta \\ge 10^{-25}\\,\\mathrm{s}\\,(\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{a}/\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{E})^{0.6}$ (where $\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{a}$ and $\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{E}$ are the actual and Eddington accretion rates) for AMSPs. These limits are inferred assuming that the mountain attains a steady state, where matter diffuses resistively across magnetic flux surfaces but is replenished at an equal rate by infalling material. The mountain then relaxes further resistively after accretion ceases. The BRMSP spin-down limit approaches the theoretical electron-impurity resistivity at temperatures $\\ga 10^5$ K for an impurity concentration of $\\sim 0.1$, while the AMSP stalling limit falls two orders of magnitude below the theoretical electron-phonon resistivity for temperatures above $10^8$ K. Hence BRMSP observations are already challenging theoretical resistivity calculations in a useful way. Next-generation gravitational-wave interferometers will constrain $\\eta$ at a level that will be competitive with electromagnetic observations.

Matthias Vigelius; Andrew Melatos

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Gravitational-wave spin-down and stalling lower limits on the electrical resistivity of the accreted mountain in a millisecond pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electrical resistivity of the accreted mountain in a millisecond pulsar is limited by the observed spin-down rate of binary radio millisecond pulsars (BRMSPs) and the spins and X-ray fluxes of accreting millisecond pulsars (AMSPs). We find $\\eta \\ge 10^{-28}\\,\\mathrm{s}\\, (\\tau_\\mathrm{SD}/1\\,\\mathrm{Gyr})^{-0.8}$ (where $\\tau_\\mathrm{SD}$ is the spin-down age) for BRMSPs and $\\eta \\ge 10^{-25}\\,\\mathrm{s}\\,(\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{a}/\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{E})^{0.6}$ (where $\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{a}$ and $\\dot{M}_\\mathrm{E}$ are the actual and Eddington accretion rates) for AMSPs. These limits are inferred assuming that the mountain attains a steady state, where matter diffuses resistively across magnetic flux surfaces but is replenished at an equal rate by infalling material. The mountain then relaxes further resistively after accretion ceases. The BRMSP spin-down limit approaches the theoretical electron-impurity resistivity at temperatures $\\ga 10^5$ K for an impurity concentration of $\\sim 0.1$, while the AMSP stalling l...

Vigelius, Matthias

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Proton Size Anomaly  

SciTech Connect

A measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen yields a charge radius of the proton that is smaller than the CODATA value by about 5 standard deviations. We explore the possibility that new scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and tensor flavor-conserving nonuniversal interactions may be responsible for the discrepancy. We consider exotic particles that, among leptons, couple preferentially to muons and mediate an attractive nucleon-muon interaction. We find that the many constraints from low energy data disfavor new spin-0, spin-1, and spin-2 particles as an explanation.

Barger, Vernon [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Chiang, Cheng-Wei [Department of Physics and Center for Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan 32001 (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11925 (China); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Keung, Wai-Yee [Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Marfatia, Danny [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Investigating the proton's strange sea  

SciTech Connect

Several research groups are conducting experiments to determine the exact contributions of strange quarks in the quark-gluon ''sea'' to the proton's charge distribution and magnetization.

David Armstrong; Kandice Carter

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

1953-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

76

Energy Dependence of High Moments for Net-proton Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High moments of multiplicity distributions of conserved quantities are predicted to be sensitive to critical fluctuations. To understand the effect of the non-critical physics backgrounds on the proposed observable, we have studied various moments of net-proton distributions with AMPT, Hijing, Therminator and UrQMD models, in which no QCD critical point physics is implemented. It is found that the centrality evolution of various moments of net-proton distributions can be uniformly described by a superposition of emission sources. In addition, in the absence of critical phenomena, some moment products of net-proton distributions, related to the baryon number susceptibilities in Lattice QCD calculations, are predicted to be constant as a function of the collision centrality. We argue that a non-monotonic dependence of the moment products as a function of the beam energy may be used to locate the QCD critical point.

Luo, Xiaofeng; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu, Nu

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium Isotopes of the Element Rhenium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 185 37.40% STABLE 187 62.60% 4.33×10+10 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 159 No Data Available No Data Available No Data Available 160 0.82 milliseconds Proton Emission 91.00% Alpha Decay 9.00% 161 0.44 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay <= 1.40% 161m 14.7 milliseconds Alpha Decay 93.00% Proton Emission 7.00% 162 107 milliseconds Alpha Decay 94.00% Electron Capture 6.00%

78

Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos researchers and German collaborators have investigated the application of giga-electron volt (GeV, or billion electron volts) energy proton beams for medical imaging in combination with proton radiation treatment for cancer. The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal

79

Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos researchers and German collaborators have investigated the application of giga-electron volt (GeV, or billion electron volts) energy proton beams for medical imaging in combination with proton radiation treatment for cancer. The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal

80

Low Temperature Proton Conductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and MEAs at Freezing Temperatures Thomas A. Zawodzinski, Jr. Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio 2 Freezing Fuel Cells: Impact on MEAS Below 0 o C *Transport processes/motions slow down: questions re: lower conductivity,water mobility etc *Residual water will have various physical effects in different portions of the MEA questions re: durability of components 3 3 'States' of Water in Proton Conductors ? Freezing (bulk), bound freezable, bound non freezable water states claimed based on DSC * Freezing water more mobile, allegedly important for high conductivity Analysis common for porous systems Does the presence of these states matter? Why? 4 'State of Water' in PEMs At T < 0 o C *'Liquid-like' water freezes *'Non-freezing' fraction: water of solvation at pore

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Self-proton/ion radiography of laser-produced proton/ion beam from thin foil targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protons and multicharged ions generated from high-intensity laser interactions with thin foil targets have been studied with a 100 TW laser system. Protons/ions with energies up to 10 MeV are accelerated either from the front or the rear surface of the target material. We have observed for the first time that the protons/ions accelerated from the front surface of the target, in a direction opposite to the laser propagation direction, are turned around and pulled back to the rear surface, in the laser propagation direction. This proton/ion beam is able to create a self-radiograph of the target and glass stalk holding the target itself recorded through the radiochromic film stack. This unique result indicates strong long-living (ns time scale) magnetic fields present in the laser-produced plasma, which are extremely important in energy transport during the intense laser irradiation. The magnetic field from laser main pulse expands rapidly in the preformed plasma to rotate the laser produced protons. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations and ray tracing found that the magnetic field created by the amplified spontaneous emission prepulse is not sufficient to explain the particle trajectories, but the additional field created by the main pulse interaction estimated from particle-in-cell simulation is able to change the particle trajectories.

Paudel, Y.; Renard-Le Galloudec, N.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Sentoku, Y. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Nicolai, Ph.; D'Humieres, E. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, 33405 Talence (France); Faenov, A.Ya. [Joint Institute for High Temperature, Russian Academy of Science, Izhirskaya Street, Moscow (Russian Federation) and Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

RHIC Polarized proton operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above injection, the polarized hydrogen jet target runs for every fill with both beams. Based on the known analyzing power, there is very little polarization loss between injection and 100 GeV. An alternative way is to measure the asymmetry at 100 GeV followed by ramping up to 250 GeV and back down to 100 GeV and then to measure the asymmetry again at 100 GeV. If the asymmetry after the down ramp is similar to the measurement before the up ramp, polarization was also preserved during the ramp to 250 GeV. The analyzing power at storage energy can then be extracted from the asymmetries measured at 100 GeV and 250 GeV. The tune and orbit feedbacks are essential for the down ramp to be possible. The polarized proton operation is still going on. We will push bunch intensity higher until reaching the beam-beam limit. The even higher intensity will have to wait for the electron lenses to compensate the beam-beam effect. To understand the details of spin dynamics in RHIC with two snakes, spin simulation with the real magnet fields have been developed recently. The study will provide guidance for possible polarization loss schemes. Further polarization gain will requires a polarized source upgrade; more careful setup jump quads in the AGS to get full benefit; and control emittance in the whole accelerator chain.

Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

83

Muon - proton inelastic scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This experiment will examine muon-proton inelastic scattering for virtual-photon energies of 10 to 110 GeV and for |q{sup 2}| values of 0.2 to 20.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The virtual-photon total cross sections {sigma}{sub t} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub s}, or the equivalent expression in W{sub 1} and W{sub 2}, will be measured over this range of virtual-photon energies and q{sup 2} values. Some separation of {sigma}{sub T} and {sigma}{sub S}, or equivalently W{sub 1} and W{sub 2}, will be made. The multiplicity, momentum spectra and angular spectra of the charged hadrons produced in this reaction will be measured. Some channels such as {mu} + P {yields} {mu} + P + P{sup 0} will be isolated and completely analyzed. The experiment uses a hydrogen target, wire spark chambers and an analyzing magnet of conventional design.

Dieterle, B.; Lakin, W.; Martin, F.; Perl, M.; Petraske, E.; Tenebaum, J.; Toner, W.; Zipf, T.; /SLAC

1970-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Proton acceleration experiments with Z-Petawatt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outline of this presentation: (1) Proton acceleration with high-power lasers - Target Normal Sheath Acceleration concept; (2) Proton acceleration with mass-reduced targets - Breaking the 60 MeV threshold; (3) Proton beam divergence control - Novel focusing target geometry; and (4) New experimental capability development - Proton radiography on Z.

Arefiev, A. (University of Texas at Austin); Schaumann, G. (Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany); Deppert, O. (Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany); Rambo, Patrick K.; Roth, M. (Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany); Geissel, Matthias; Schwarz, Jens; Sefkow, Adam B.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Kimmel, Mark W.; Schollmeier, Marius; Breizman, B. (University of Texas at Austin)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

High intensity protons in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

Montag, C.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Blaskiewicz& #44; M.; Brennan& #44; J.M.; Drees& #44; K.A.; Fischer& #44; W.; Huang& #44; H.; Minty& #44; M.; Robert-Demolaize& #44; G.; Thieberger& #44; P.; Yip& #44; K.

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

86

The efficiency of gamma-ray emission from pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a modified scenario of gamma-ray emission from pulsars within the framework of polar cap models. Our model incorporates possible acceleration of electron-positron pairs created in magnetospheres, and their subsequent contribution to gamma-ray luminosity L_\\gamma. It also reproduces the empirical trend in L_\\gamma for seven pulsars detected with Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) experiments. At the same time it avoids basic difficulties (Nel et al. 1996, Arons 1996) faced by theoretical models when confronted with observational constraints. We show that the classical and millisecond pulsars form two distinct branches in the L_gamma - L_sd diagram (where L_sd is the spin-down luminosity). In particular, we explain why the millisecond pulsar J0437-4715 has not been detected with any of the CGRO instruments despite its very high position in the ranking list of spin-down fluxes (i.e. L_sd/D^2, where D is a distance). The gamma-ray luminosity predicted for this particular object is about one order of magnitude below the upper limit set by EGRET.

B. Rudak; J. Dyks

1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

87

Strangeness production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In these lectures we discuss the investigation of the strange meson production in proton-proton ($pp$) and in proton-nucleus ($pA$) reactions within an effective Lagrangian model. The kaon production proceeds mainly via the excitations of $N^*$(1650), $N^*$(1710), and $N^*$(1720) resonant intermediate nucleonic states, in the collision of two initial state nucleons. Therefore, the strangeness production is expected to provide information about the resonances lying at higher excitation energies. For beam energies very close to the kaon production threshold the hyperon-proton final state interaction effects are quite important. Thus, these studies provide a check on the models of hyperon-nucleon interactions. The in-medium production of kaons show strong sensitivity to the self energies of the intermediate mesons.

Radhey Shyam

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Oorja Protonics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oorja Protonics Oorja Protonics Jump to: navigation, search Name Oorja Protonics Address 40923 Encyclopedia Circle Place Fremont, California Zip 94538 Sector Fuel Cell Product Maker of methanol fuel cell Website http://www.oorjaprotonics.com/ Coordinates 37.5155329°, -121.9858875° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5155329,"lon":-121.9858875,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Proton SOFC SECA.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Based Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells S. Elangovan, F. Zhao, J. Hartvigsen, D. Ramirez, and D. Larsen 11 th Annual SECA Workshop July 27, 2010 Pittsburgh, PA Supported by DOE SBIR Grant: DE- G02- 6ER84595 Outline  Thermodynamic Analysis Shows Higher Efficiency for Proton Cells compared to Oxygen Cells  Stability addressed by the use of composite electrolyte  Anode supported composite electrolyte cell shows good performance  Stability in high CO 2 containing fuel demonstrated 2 Driving Force Comparison  High driving force even at high fuel utilization 3 Max. Efficiency Comparison  Proton Cell 4  Oxygen Cell Single Stage Two Stage BaCeO 3 Proton Conductivity and Transference Number  Highest conductivity range from 0.01 to 0.016 in 700° to 800°C range  ~ half the oxygen ion conductivity of 8YSZ

90

Active interrogation using energetic protons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Milner, Edward C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waters, Laurie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

92

Proton radiography application to medical imaging  

SciTech Connect

In order to demonstrate the potential advantages of proton radiography for medical imaging, a 205 MeV proton radiography beam was developed using the Argonne National Laboratory Booster I synchrotron. Data were taken using a narrow scanning beam and an electronic detector system. The proton radiographs presented here demonstrate a significant dose reduction and improved mass resolution over conventional x-ray techniques. The radiographs also show significant differences in the proton stopping power of biological tissues and, therefore, considerable potential in soft tissue imaging. Also presented is the motivation for the interest in developing a proton tomographic scan system.

Kramer, S.L.; Moffett, D.R.; Martin, R.L.; Colton, E.P.; Steward, V.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

94

Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

RECIPIENT: Oo~a Protonics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oo~a Protonics Oo~a Protonics .STATE: CA PROJECT Deployment Testing of Alternative-Fuel Fuel Cell Technologies for Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling TITLE: Equipment; NREL Tracking No. 11-005 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number NREL-11-005 G010337 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 86.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

96

Solid-state proton conductors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies, to include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells including the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms. 164 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

Jewulski, J.R.; Osif, T.L.; Remick, R.J.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

High-Intensity Proton Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

99

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

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Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...

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101

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

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102

CO2 Emissions - Macau  

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103

CO2 Emissions - Guadeloupe  

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104

CO2 Emissions - Ghana  

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105

CO2 Emissions - Ireland  

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106

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

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Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

107

CO2 Emissions - Kyrgyzstan  

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Centrally Planned Europe Kyrgyzstan CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kyrgyzstan...

108

CO2 Emissions - Mali  

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109

CO2 Emissions - Portugal  

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110

CO2 Emissions - Paraguay  

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111

CO2 Emissions - Macedonia  

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112

CO2 Emissions - Malawi  

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113

CO2 Emissions - Gabon  

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114

CO2 Emissions - Grenada  

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115

CO2 Emissions - Kiribati  

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116

CO2 Emissions - Israel  

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117

CO2 Emissions - Phillippines  

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118

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

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119

CO2 Emissions - Mauritius  

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120

CO2 Emissions - Malaysia  

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121

CO2 Emissions - Reunion  

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122

CO2 Emissions - Guatemala  

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123

CO2 Emissions - Iceland  

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124

CO2 Emissions - Mongolia  

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125

CO2 Emissions - Romania  

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126

CO2 Emissions - Panama  

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127

CO2 Emissions - Madagascar  

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128

CO2 Emissions - Netherlands  

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129

CO2 Emissions - Greenland  

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130

CO2 Emissions - Norway  

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131

CO2 Emissions - Guyana  

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132

CO2 Emissions - Mauritania  

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133

CO2 Emissions - Lithuania  

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134

CO2 Emissions - Kenya  

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135

CO2 Emissions - Latvia  

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136

CO2 Emissions - Georgia  

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137

CO2 Emissions - Gambia  

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138

CO2 Emissions - Montenegro  

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Centrally Planned Europe Montenegro CO2 Emissions from Montenegro Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montenegro image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Montenegro...

139

CO2 Emissions - Oman  

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140

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

CO2 Emissions - Lebanon  

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142

CO2 Emissions - Nigeria  

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Africa Nigeria Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nigeria Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nigeria image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nigeria...

143

CO2 Emissions - Maldives  

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144

CO2 Emissions - Morocco  

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145

CO2 Emissions - Pakistan  

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146

CO2 Emissions - Palau  

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147

CO2 Emissions - Qatar  

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Middle East Qatar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Qatar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Qatar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Qatar...

148

CO2 Emissions - Guam  

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149

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda  

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Africa Rwanda Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda...

150

CO2 Emissions - Guinea  

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Africa Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea...

151

CO2 Emissions - Luxembourg  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Luxembourg CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Luxembourg...

152

CO2 Emissions - Liberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Liberia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Liberia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Liberia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Liberia...

153

CO2 Emissions - Haiti  

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Haiti Graphics CO2 Emissions from Haiti Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Haiti image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Haiti...

154

CO2 Emissions - Iraq  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iraq Graphics CO2 Emissions from Iraq Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iraq image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iraq...

155

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

156

CO2 Emissions - Nepal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Nepal CO2 Emissions from Nepal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nepal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nepal...

157

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

158

CO2 Emissions - Myanmar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Myanmar CO2 Emissions from Myanmar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Myanmar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Myanmar...

159

Glossary Term - Neutron Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Previous Term (Neutron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Niobe) Niobe Neutron Emission After neutron emission, an atom contains one less neutron. Neutron emission is one...

160

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CO2 Emissions - Greece  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Greece CO2 Emissions from Greece Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greece image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greece...

162

Observation of green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Green emission at around 500 nm is observed in Gd2O3:Ce3+ nanoparticles and the intensity is highly dependent on the concentration of Ce3+ in the nanoparticles. The luminescence of this emission displays both picosecond and millisecond lifetimes. The msec lifetime is over four orders of magnitude longer than typical luminescence lifetimes (10-40 ns) of Ce3+ in traditional Ce3+ doped phosphors and therefore likely originates from defect states. The picosecond lifetime is shorter than the typical Ce3+ value and is also likely due to defect or surface states. When the samples are annealed at 700 oC, this emission disappears possibly due to changes in the defect moieties or concentration. In addition, a blue emission at around 430 nm is observed in freshly-prepared Gd2O3 undoped nanoparticles which is attributed to the stabilizer, polyethylene glycol biscarboxymethyl ether. Upon aging, the undoped particles show similar emission to the doped particles with similar luminescence lifetimes. When Eu3+ ions are co-doped in Gd2O3:Ce nanoparticles, both the green emission and the emission at 612 nm from Eu3+ are observed.

Woo, Boon K.; Joly, Alan G.; Chen, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Shielding measurements for a 230 MeV proton beam  

SciTech Connect

Energetic secondary neutrons produced as protons interact with accelerator components and patients dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton radiotherapy facilities. Due to the scarcity of data describing neutron production, attenuation, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent values, these parameters were measured for 230 MeV proton bombardment of stopping length Al, Fe, and Pb targets at emission angles of 0{degree}, 22{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree} in a thick concrete shield. Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters with volumes ranging from 1 cm{sup 3} to 1000 cm{sup 3} were used to obtain microdosimetric spectra from which absorbed dose and radiation quality are deduced. Does equivalent values and attenuation lengths determined at depth in the shield were found to vary sharply with angle, but were found to be independent of target material. Neutron dose and radiation length values are compared with Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations performed using the Los Alamos High Energy Transport Code (LAHET). Calculations used 230 MeV protons incident upon an Fe target in a shielding geometry similar to that used in the experiment. LAHET calculations overestimated measured attenuation values at 0{degree}, 22{degree}, and 45{degree}, yet correctly predicted the attenuation length at 90{degree}. Comparison of the mean radiation quality estimated with the Monte Carlo calculations with measurements suggest that neutron quality factors should be increased by a factor of 1.4. These results are useful for the shielding design of new facilities as well as for testing neutron production and transport calculations.

Siebers, J.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

Wang Sigen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui [Curriculum of Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Schreiber, Eric C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum of Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

166

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials A method of producing a proton conducting material. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials A method of producing a proton conducting material, comprising adding a pyrophosphate salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved pyrophosphate salt; adding an inorganic acid salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved inorganic acid salt; adding the dissolved inorganic acid salt to the dissolved pyrophosphate salt to produce a mixture; substantially evaporating the solvent from the mixture to produce a precipitate; and calcining the precipitate at a temperature of from about 400.degree. C. to about

167

Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

Pomes, R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Photoproduction of proton antiproton resonances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} pp{bar p}. The data were obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study is to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to {bar p}p. Both final state protons were detected in CLAS whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the accepted data are presented.

P. Eugenio

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

Proton beam therapy control system  

SciTech Connect

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

Proton beam therapy control system  

SciTech Connect

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

SuperProtonic | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name SuperProtonic Place Pasadena, California Zip 91101 Product Established to market and commercialize the solid acid fuel cell (SAFC) technology developed and patented by...

174

Recent Development in Proton Spin Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development in Proton Spin Physics Feng YUAN [8] H. Jackson,investigations. These important physics, together with otherthat the transverse spin physics is playing a very important

Yuan, Feng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

176

Simultaneous multiparticle emissions in hot nuclei evaporation process  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a new mechanism for the evaporation with simultaneous particles emission mechanism in the evaporation chain as new channels opened to high excitation energy regime of the compound nucleus. The probability of multiple simultaneous emissions is determined based on phase space approach. A Monte Carlo simulation is employed to compute the final average yield of emitted particles after the decay chain. The neutron, proton, alpha and fission yields are obtained and compared to the conventional calculation with sequential simple particles emission and the relevance of the different channels in competition is also analyzed.

Santos, B. M. [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade Federal Fluminense Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, 24210-346 Niteroi. RJ (Brazil); De Assis, L. P.; Duarte, S. B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - CBPF Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro. RJ (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections. If these images are used for treatment planning, the average proton range uncertainty is estimated to be less than 1.5% for an imaging dose in the milligray range. Conclusions: The proposed method can be used to convert x-ray projections into virtual proton projections. The converted proton projections can be blended with existing proton projections or can be used solely for pCT reconstruction, addressing the range limit problem of pCT using current therapeutic proton machines.

Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Morgridge Institute of Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Oncophysics Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

PRODUCTION OF HIGH BRIGHTNESS PROTON BUNCHES.  

SciTech Connect

Strongly pulsed proton beams for secondary beam production are required for projects such as pulsed spallation neutron sources or neutrino factories where accurate time-of-flight information is required. To meet these demands techniques to produce multi-GeV proton bunches with very high longitudinal brightness are being developed. A review of the present status is presented.

ROSER,T.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

Transverse instability in high intensity proton rings  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, many applications are being considered for low energy high intensity proton synchrotrons. Most high intensity proton rings are at low energy below transition. Several aspects of the beam dynamics of this kind of rings are different from the electron or high energy rings. The transverse microwave instabilities will be discussed in this article.

Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.  

SciTech Connect

One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Chlorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon Isotopes of the Element Chlorine [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 35 75.76% STABLE 37 24.24% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 28 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 29 < 20 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 30 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 31 150 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.70% 32 298 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

182

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

183

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Copper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc Isotopes of the Element Copper [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 63 69.15% STABLE 65 30.85% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 52 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 53 < 300 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 54 < 75 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 55 27 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 15.0% 56 93 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

184

Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

185

Diffuse TeV Emission at the Galactic Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) has detected intense diffuse TeV emission correlated with the distribution of molecular gas along the galactic ridge at the centre of our Galaxy. Earlier HESS observations of this region had already revealed the presence of several point sources at these energies, one of them (HESS J1745-290) coincident with the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A*. It is still not entirely clear what the origin of the TeV emission is, nor even whether it is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions. It is reasonable to suppose, however, that at least for the diffuse emission, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the molecular gas indicates a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In this paper, we explore the possible source(s) of energetic hadrons at the galactic centre, and their propagation through a turbulent medium. We conclude that though Sagittarius A* itself may be the source of cosmic rays producing the emission in HESS J1745-290, it cannot be responsible for the diffuse emission farther out. A distribution of point sources, such as pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the galactic plane, similarly do not produce a TeV emission profile consistent with the HESS map. We conclude that only a relativistic proton distribution accelerated throughout the inter-cloud medium can account for the TeV emission profile measured with HESS.

Elizabeth Wommer; Fulvio Melia; Marco Fatuzzo

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

187

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

188

CO2 Emissions - Peru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Peru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Peru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

189

CO2 Emissions - Bolivia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Bolivia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Bolivia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Bolivia image Per capita CO2 Emission...

190

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

191

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

192

Generalized parton distributions in proton-proton collisions at LHC  

SciTech Connect

Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describe the distributions of quarks and gluons in the proton with respect to both longitudinal momentum and transverse position. The transverse spatial distributions of partons can be extracted from measurements of the t-dependence of hard exclusive processes in e-p scattering, such as J/psi photoproduction at HERA (gluons). This information is an important ingredient in the theory of high-energy p-p collisions with hard QCD processes (dijets, Higgs boson production). We summarize recent results obtained from applying these ideas to (a) inclusive p-p scattering (hard processes as a trigger on central collisions, approach to the unitarity limit), (b) diffractive p-p scattering (rapidity gap survival, Higgs boson search at LHC). We also comment on the possibilities of using high-energy p-p scattering with hard processes as a means to ''measure'' the GPDs, complementing the information obtained from e-p scattering.

Christian Weiss

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Polarized proton acceleration program at the AGS  

SciTech Connect

The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A multi-university/laboratory collaborative effort involving Argonne, Brookhaven, Michigan, Rice and Yale is underway to improve and modify to accelerate polarized protons. From the experience at the ZGS and careful studies made us confident of the feasibility of achieving a polarization of over 60 percent up to 26 GeV/c with an intensity of 10/sup 11/ approx. 10/sup 12/ per pulse. The first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS is expected in 1983.

Lee, Y.Y.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

Mariam, Fesseha G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

195

Attosecond neutron Compton scattering from protons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of "anomalous" scattering of neutrons and electrons from protons in the electron-volt energy-transfer range is considered, and related experimental results are mentioned. A recent independent confirmation of this effect with a new data analysis procedure is presented. Due to the very short characteristic scattering time, there is no well defined separation of time scales of electronic and protonic motions. An outline of a proposed theoretical interpretation is presented, which is based on the fact that scattering protons represent \\textit{open} quantum systems, thus being subject to decoherence.

C. Aris Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

CO2 Emissions - Montserrat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Montserrat Graphics CO2 Emissions from Montserrat Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montserrat image Per capita CO2...

197

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

198

CO2 Emissions - Honduras  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Honduras Graphics CO2 Emissions from Honduras Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Honduras image Per capita CO2...

199

CO2 Emissions - Nicaragua  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Nicaragua Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua image Per capita CO2...

200

Trends Online Methane Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Introduction Annual Estimates of Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions: 1860-1994 - D.I. Stern and R.K. Kaufmann Contents-Trends | CDIAC Home 102001...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Proton trajectories and electric fields in a laser-accelerated focused proton beam  

SciTech Connect

The focusing properties of a laser generated proton beam have been investigated using hemispherical targets in both freestanding and enclosed cone-shaped geometries. The proton trajectories and focusing were strongly affected by the electric fields in the beam, bending the trajectories near the axis. In the cone targets, a sheath field effectively channels the proton beam through the open cone tip, substantially improving the beam focusing from Almost-Equal-To 90 {mu}m to Almost-Equal-To 55 {mu}m diameter for protons with energies >3 MeV. The proton generation and focusing were modeled using 2D hybrid particle-in-cell simulations, which compared well with the experimental results. Simulations predict further improvement in focusing with more uniform target illumination. These results are of significant interest to proton fast ignition and other high energy density physics applications.

Foord, M. E.; Bellei, C.; Key, M.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H. S.; Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bartal, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Flippo, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stephens, R. B.; Wei, M. S. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

203

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controlling NOx emissions from lean engines is challenging. Traditionally, for the stoichiometric gasoline engine vehicles that dominate the U.S. passenger car market, a three-way...

204

A compact electron cyclotron resonance proton source for the Paul Scherrer Institute's proton accelerator facility  

SciTech Connect

A compact electron cyclotron resonance proton source has been developed and installed recently at thePaul Scherrer Institute's high intensity proton accelerator. Operation at the ion source test stand and the accelerator demonstrates a high reliability and stability of the new source. When operated at a 10 - 12 mA net proton current the lifetime of the source exceeds 2000 h. The essential development steps towards the observed performance are described.

Baumgarten, C.; Barchetti, A.; Einenkel, H.; Goetz, D.; Schmelzbach, P. A. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Memory device using movement of protons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An enhancement of an electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure during an anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. Device operation is enhanced by concluding this anneal step with a sudden cooling. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronics elements on the same silicon substrate.

Warren, William L. (900 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (8401 Spain Rd., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (5513 Estrellita del Norte, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Devine, Roderick A. B. (12 Impasse de la Liberation, 38950 St. Martin le Vinoux, FR); Archer, Leo B. (3108 Vicky Ct., Garland, TX 75044); Brown, George A. (1512 Ridgeview Dr., Arlington, TX 76012-1940); Wallace, Robert M. (428 Park Bend Dr., Richardson, TX 75081)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Resolution of the Proton Spin Problem  

SciTech Connect

A number of lines of investigation into the structure of the nucleon have converged to the point where we believe that one has a consistent explanation of the well known proton spin crisis.

F. Myhrer; A. W. Thomas

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

207

Low energy neutron-proton interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been few measurements of cross sections for neutron-proton scattering and radiative capture below 1 MeV. Those measurements which do exist are at a small number of energies and are often inconsistent with ...

Daub, Brian (Brian Hollenberg)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Magellan Tackles the Mysterious Proton Spin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magellan Tackles Magellan Tackles Mysterious Proton Spin Magellan Tackles Mysterious Proton Spin July 28, 2011 | Tags: Accelerator Science, Data Transfer, ESnet, Magellan Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 The STAR experiment's detector records the decay of subatomic smash-ups to uncover how the fundamental building blocks of the universe work. What makes a proton spin? That is one of the biggest mysteries in physics. Although researchers do not fully understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, they do know that it contributes to the stability of the universe, magnetic interactions, and are a vital component of technologies like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines that are used in hospitals around the globe. To solve this mystery, researchers are smashing together polarized proton

209

Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Memory device using movement of protons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element.

Warren, William L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vanheusden, Karel J. R. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleetwood, Daniel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Devine, Roderick A. B. (St. Martin le Vinoux, FR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

FIRST POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180{sup o} about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV.

ROSER,T.; AHRENS,L.; ALESSI,J.; BAI,M.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BROWN,K.A.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.D.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; FLILLER,R.,III: GLENN,W.; HUANG,H.; LUCCIO,A.U.; MACKAY,W.W.; MAKDISI,Y.; MONTAG,C.; PILAT,F.; PTITSYN,V.; SATOGATA,T.

2002-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Cross section and recoil properties of copper isotopes from uranium bombarded with 12-GeV protons  

SciTech Connect

Cross sections and thick-target recoil properties have been measured on of /sup 238/U with protons. The kinetic energies are much smaller than expected From a conventional fission process, even for the neutron-rich /sup 67/Cu. It is proposed thai these Cu nuclides are produced at proton energies above 3 GeV by the fission of low mass nuclei which are the residues of an intranuclear cascade process involving high deposition energy and the emission of fragments prior to fission both in the fast cascade and the evaporation stage. (auth)

Chang, S.K.; Sugarman, N.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

214

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

215

SSPC (Solid State Proton Conductors 15 Meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field of solid state protonics has had a small but dedicated following for the past several decades. The collection of papers compiled in this special issue of Solid State Ionics were presented at the most recent international conference focused specifically on this topic, the 15th International Conference on Solid State Proton Conductors (SSPC-15) held in Santa Barbara, California, United States, August 15-20, 2010. Early recognition of the importance of proton transport in solids led to the establishment of the first meeting in this series in 1981, held in Paris in the form of a Danish-Frenchworkshop. The subsequent thirteen meetingswere all held inWestern Europe,with increasing participation from Asian, Eastern European and North and South American researchers. In recognition of the growing international interest in the field, SSPC-14 was held in Kyoto, Japan. SSPC-15, the first North American meeting in this series, built on the momentum of internationalization achieved in SSPC-14, ensuring that the best and brightest minds continue to contribute to the important problems still facing the understanding and manipulation of proton transport in solids. This occasion warrants an update to the SSPC history, and is given. Overall, the oxide proton conductors were the topic of greatest interest, reflecting the deep history of Japanese involvement in these materials. Critical advances were described in both the understanding of the transport properties and the fabrication of technological devices, with particular emphasis on fuel cells. Interest in polymer and oxyacid proton conductors was also high, as with previous meetings. Again, advances in fundamental mechanistic understanding of proton transport pathways were reported in parallel with advances in device development. While only a subset of papers presented at SSPC-15 are included in this special issue, the articles reflect the breadth of topics covered. The reader is encouraged to browse the papers beyond his or her area of expertise to experience directly the remarkable breakthroughs reported at SSPC-15.

Speakers; Shu Yamaguchi; George Rossman; M. Saiful Islam; Maria Gomez; Stephen Paddison

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

Proton damage effects on light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the effects of 16-MeV proton irradiation on the performance of a variety of light emitting diodes (LED's) emitting between 820 and 1300 nm. Total light output and current were measured at room temperature as a function of forward bias prior to and following a sequence of room temperature 16-MeV proton irradiations. Our results indicate that the relative amount of proton-induced degradation from one LED type to another is similar to that observed for neutron and gamma irradiations. More specifically, the most sensitive device is the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED which is characterized by a long preirradiation minority carrier lifetime. The most resistant LEDs are the high radiance GaAlAs (820 nm) and InGaAsP (1300 nm) LEDs. As in the case of Si devices, the degradation rate per irradiating particle fluence is significantly greater for proton irradiation of these LEDs than it is for neutron exposure. Neutron damage data presented herein indicate that the ratio of proton-to-neutron degradation rates can be as high as 100. Lifetime-damage constant products for constant current operation are calculated for each LED type and vary from 1.5 x 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 2//p for the InGaAsP LED to 1.1 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//p for the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED.

Rose, B.H.; Barnes, C.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Upgrade of the Proton West secondary beamline  

SciTech Connect

As originally designed and operated, protons entering PW6 were steered by a series of EPB dipoles into a single interaction length beryllium target, some 43 feet from the enclosure wall. Ensuing secondary beams, either p{sup +}/{pi}{sup +} or p{sup -}/{pi}{sup -}, were collected by a string of quadrupoles following the target, steered westward, away from the Proton Center line, through PW6 and PW7, and ultimately focussed on experiment production targets located within the large PW8 hall. Around the Spring of 1988 it was decided to upgrade the existing Proton West secondary beamline to allow for transport of a primary proton beam, anticipated to be either 800 or 900 GeV/c, through PW8. This upgrade project, which is now nearing completion, was largely motivated by the then recent approval of E-771, a hadronic beauty production experiment located in PW8. E-771 represents the third in a series of experiments for the large-acceptance dimuon spectrometer presently located at the end of the Proton West beamline. This Technical Memo is a summary of the upgrade --- an explanation of the underlying strategy and a documentation of the final locations of the secondary beamline elements. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Spiegel, L.

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26-29, 1979 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INLBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INl. LBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN

Gullberg, G.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Oorja Protonics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oorja Protonics Inc Oorja Protonics Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Oorja Protonics Inc Place Fremont, California Zip 94538 Product Manufacturer of direct methanol fuel cells. Coordinates 44.2605°, -88.880509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.2605,"lon":-88.880509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Proton radius puzzle and large extra dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a theoretical scenario to solve the proton radius puzzle which recently arises from the muonic hydrogen experiment. In this framework, 4 + n dimensional theory is incorporated with modified gravity. The extra gravitational interaction between the proton and muon at very short range provides an energy shift which accounts for the discrepancy between spectroscopic results from muonic and electronic hydrogen experiments. Assuming the modified gravity is a small perturbation to the existing electromagnetic interaction, we find the puzzle can be solved with stringent constraint on the range of the new force. Our result not only provides a possible solution to the proton radius puzzle but also suggest a direction to test new physics at very small length scale.

Li-Bang Wang; Wei-Tou Ni

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

222

Excess Emissions (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

223

Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen Separation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Proton) (Proton) Transport Hydrogen Separation Systems Summary Session Participants -- Ionic Transport Balachandran, Balu Cornelius, Chris Fleming, Greg Glass, Robert Hartvigsen, Joseph Higgins, Richard King, David Paster, Mark Paul, Dilo Robbins, John Samells, Anthony Schwartz, Michael Schinski, Bill Smith, Ronald Van Bibber, Lawrence Zalesky, Rick Argonne National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Air Liquide Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Cerametec, Inc. CeraMem Corporation Battelle, PNNL DOE Science Applications International Corporation ExxonMobil Eltron Research, Inc. ITN Energy Systems ChevronTexaco SRI Consulting SAIC ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures Performance Goals 4-5 years (5 years upper limit) (100,000 hrs is 12 years) High durability 250-350

224

RHIC OPERATION WITH LONGITUDINALLY POLARIZED PROTONS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polarized proton beams have been accelerated, stored and collided at 100GeV per beam in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with longitudinal polarization. The essential equipment includes four Siberian snakes, eight spin rotators and fast relative polarimeters in each of the two RHIC rings as well as local polarimeters at the STAR and PHENIX detectors. This paper summarizes the performance of RHIC as a polarized proton collider in the FY03 run with emphasis on polarization issues. Preliminary data from the FY04 run is also shown.

HUANG,H.BAI,M.BEEBE-WANG,J.ET AL.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

225

Photo-Production of Proton Antiproton Pairs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are reported on the reaction gammap --> ppp-bar . A high statistic data set was obtained at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility utilizing the CLAS detector and a tagged photon beam of 4.8 to 5.2 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The focus of this study was to search for possible intermediate resonances which decay to proton-antiproton. Both final state protons were detected in the CLAS apparatus whereas the antiproton was identified via missing mass. General features of the data are presented along with results on narrow and broad resonance studies.

Paul Eugenio; Burnham Stokes

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear fusion of protons with boron  

SciTech Connect

Two methods are investigated in this paper to convert the released fusion energy directly in electric power. The first is very simply the use of a beam of protons traversing a fixed target of Boron. Unfortunately this method cannot be made to work, but its investigation naturally yields to the second method which makes use of two beams, one of protons and one of ions of Boron, colliding with each other. This second method is feasible but it requires a significant amount of research and development in accelerator technology.

Ruggiero, A.G.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Binary Pulsar Shock Emissions as Galactic Gamma-Ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address several issues regarding the interpretation of galactic \\ggg-ray sources. We consider powerful pulsars in binaries producing X-ray and gamma-ray {\\it unpulsed} emission from the shock interaction of relativistic pulsar winds with circumbinary material. Nebular mass outflows from companion stars of binary pulsars can provide the right {\\it calorimeters} to transform a fraction of the electromagnetic and kinetic energy of pulsar winds into high energy radiation. We discuss the physics of interaction of relativistic pulsar winds with gaseous material and show that the conditions in pulsar binary systems might be ideal to constrain shock acceleration mechanisms and pulsar wind composition and structure. We briefly discuss the example of the 47~ms pulsar PSR~1259-63 orbiting around a massive Be~star companion and monitored by X-ray and gamma-ray instruments during its recent periastron passage. In addition to young pulsars in massive binaries, also a class of recycled millisecond pulsars in low-mass binaries can be interesting high energy emitters.

M. Tavani

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

Binary pulsar shock emissions as galactic gamma-ray sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address several issues regarding the interpretation of galactic \\ggg-ray sources. We consider powerful pulsars in binaries producing X-ray and gamma-ray {\\it unpulsed} emission from the shock interaction of relativistic pulsar winds with circumbinary material. Nebular mass outflows from companion stars of binary pulsars can provide the right {\\it calorimeters} to transform a fraction of the electromagnetic and kinetic energy of pulsar winds into high energy radiation. We discuss the physics of interaction of relativistic pulsar winds with gaseous material and show that the conditions in pulsar binary systems might be ideal to constrain shock acceleration mechanisms and pulsar wind composition and structure. We briefly discuss the example of the 47~ms pulsar PSR~1259-63 orbiting around a massive Be~star companion and monitored by X-ray and gamma-ray instruments during its recent periastron passage. In addition to young pulsars in massive binaries, also a class of recycled millisecond pulsars in low-mass bin...

Tavani, M

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

CO2 Emissions - Guinea Bissau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guinea Bissau Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea Bissau...

230

CO2 Emissions - Peninsular Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Far East Peninsular Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia image Per...

231

CO2 Emissions - New Caledonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Caledonia Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Caledonia...

232

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

233

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

234

Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Departmen

235

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Proton Power Systems Plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Proton Power Systems Plc Proton Power Systems Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Proton Power Systems Plc Place Starnberg, Bavaria, Germany Zip D-82319 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product UK-based parent company of Proton Motor GmbH, which operates in Germany. The Company is engaged in developing hydrogen fuel cells and fuel cell hybrid systems. Coordinates 47.99959°, 11.342172° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.99959,"lon":11.342172,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

237

Proton Energy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Proton Energy Systems Inc Proton Energy Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Proton Energy Systems Inc Place Wallingford, Connecticut Zip 6492 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Develops, manufactures and sells proprietary Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) cell stacks and incorporates them into products that serve existing industrial infrastructure and the emerging hydrogen economy. Coordinates 43.473755°, -72.976925° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.473755,"lon":-72.976925,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

238

CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

Plum, Michael A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

C. MORRIS

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Polarized proton target-IV. Operations manual  

SciTech Connect

Standard operating procedures are presented for the vacuum, cryogenic, and electronic systems of a polarized proton target. The systems are comprised of (1) a target cryostat; (2) a $sup 4$He pumping system; (3) a $sup 3$He pumping system; (4) a microwave system; (5) a magnet and power supply; (6) a computerized polarization monitor; and (7) miscellaneous auxiliary equipment. (PMA)

Hill, D.; Fletcher, O.; Moretti, A.; Onesto, F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

242

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 31 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 24 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 25 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 26 43.7 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 27 260 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with

243

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

244

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

245

Angular distribution and azimuthal asymmetry for pentaquark production in proton-proton collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Angular distributions for production of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark are calculated for the collisions of polarized protons with polarized target protons. We compare calculations based on different assumptions concerning spin and parity ($J=1/2^\\pm,3/2^\\pm$) of the $\\Theta^+$ state. For a wide class of interactions the spin correlation parameters describing the asymmetric angular distributions are calculated up to 250 MeV above production threshold. The deviations from the near threshold behavior are investigated.

H. W. Barz; M. Zetenyi

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Laser-seeded modulation instability within LHC proton beams  

SciTech Connect

A new method for seeding the modulation instability (MI) within an SPS-LHC proton beam using a laser pulse is presented. Using simulations, we show that a laser pulse placed ahead of a proton beam excites axially symmetric selfmodulation modes within the proton beam and leads to peak accelerating fields that are comparable to previously proposed seeding methods.

Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Yi, S. Austin; Pukhov, Alexander; Shvets, Gennady [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, 80805 Muenchen (Germany); University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Parity nonconservation in proton-proton and proton-water scattering at 1. 5 GeV/c  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments searching for parity nonconservation in the scattering of 1.5 GeV/c (800 MeV) polarized protons from an unpolarized water target and a liquid hydrogen target are described. The intensity of the incident proton beam was measured upstream and downstream of the target by a pair of ionization detectors. The beam helicity was reversed at a 30-Hz rate. Auxiliary detectors monitored beam properties that could give rise to false effects. The result for the longitudinal asymmetry from the water is A/sub L/ = (1.7 +- 3.3 +- 1.4) x 10/sup -7/, where the first error is statistical and the second is an estimate of systematic effects. The hydrogen data yield a preliminary result of A/sub L/ = (1.0 +- 1.6) x 10/sup -7/. The systematic errors for p-p are expected to be < 1 x 10/sup -7/.

Mischke, R.E.; Bowman, J.D.; Carlini, R.; MacArthur, D.; Nagle, D.E.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R.W.; Yuan, V.; McDonald, A.B.; Talaga, R.L.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

250

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

251

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

252

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

253

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

254

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

255

Mercury Emissions Data Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the visual materials included in presentations given at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on April 3, 2002. Participants included representatives from EPRI, DOE, RMB Consulting & Research, and EERC. The MACT Working Group gave a presentation on "Variability in Hg Emissions Based on SCEM Data." The visuals in the report are a set of graphs documenting results of mercury emissions over time, using semi-continuous emissions monitor (SCEM) data. The EPA Utility Working Group gave a ...

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

256

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

SF6 Emissions Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emissions Overview Joanna Eckstein and Penny Avery Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned...

258

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

259

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

260

Annihilation Emission from the Galactic Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both diffuse high energy gamma-rays and an extended electron-positron annihilation line emission have been observed in the Galactic Center (GC) region. Although X-ray observations indicate that the galactic black hole Sgr A$^*$ is inactive now, we suggest that Sgr A$^*$ can become active when a captured star is tidally disrupted and matter is accreted into the black hole. As a consequence the galactic black hole could be a powerful source of relativistic protons. We are able to explain the current observed diffuse gamma-rays and the very detailed 511 keV annihilation line of secondary positrons by $p-p$ collisions of such protons, with appropriate injection times and energy. Relativistic protons could have been injected into the ambient material if the black hole captured a 50M$_\\odot$ star at several tens million years ago. An alternative possibility is that the black hole continues to capture stars with $\\sim$1M$_\\odot$ every hundred thousand years. Secondary positrons produced by $p-p$ collisions at energies $\\ga 30$ MeV are cooled down to thermal energies by Coulomb collisions, and annihilate in the warm neutral and ionized phases of the interstellar medium with temperatures about several eV, because the annihilation cross-section reaches its maximum at these temperatures. It takes about ten million years for the positrons to cool down to thermal temperatures so they can diffuse into a very large extended region around the Galactic center. A much more recent star capture may be also able to account for recent TeV observations within 10 pc of the galactic center as well as for the unidentified GeV gamma-ray sources found by EGRET at GC. The spectral difference between the GeV flux and the TeV flux could be explained naturally in this model as well.

K. S. Cheng; D. O. Chernyshov; V. A. Dogiel

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8  

SciTech Connect

During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

Proton decay matrix elements on the lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hadronic matrix elements of proton decay are essential ingredients to bridge the grand unification theory to low energy observables like proton lifetime. In this paper we non-perturbatively calculate the matrix elements, relevant for the process of a nucleon decaying into a pseudoscalar meson and an anti-lepton through generic baryon number violating four-fermi operators. Lattice QCD with 2+1 flavor dynamical domain-wall fermions with the {\\it direct} method, which is direct measurement of matrix element from three-point function without chiral perturbation theory, are used for this study to have good control over the lattice discretization error, operator renormalization, and chiral extrapolation. The relevant form factors for possible transition process from an initial proton or neutron to a final pion or kaon induced by all types of three quark operators are obtained through three-point functions of (nucleon)-(three-quark operator)-(meson) with physical kinematics. In this study all the relevant systematic uncertainties of the form factors are taken into account for the first time, and the total error is found to be the range 30%-40% for $\\pi$ and 20%-40% for $K$ final states.

Y. Aoki; E. Shintani; A. Soni

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying sub-process expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function psi(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the psi(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phenomena of particle production in high transverse momentum and high multiplicity region at proton-proton colliders RHIC and LHC.

I. Zborovsky; M. Tokarev

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

265

Bounds in proton-proton elastic scattering at low momentum transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a bound on the imaginary part of the single helicity-flip amplitude for spin 1/2-spin 1/2 scattering at small momentum transfer. The variational method of Lagrange multipliers is employed to optimize the single-flip amplitude using the values of the total cross section, the elastic cross section and diffraction slope as equality constraints in addition to the inequality constraints resulting from unitarity. Such bounds provide important information related to the determination of polarization of a proton beam. In the case of elastic proton collisions the analyzing power at small scattering angles inside the Coulomb Nuclear Interference region offers a method of measuring the polarization of a proton beam, the accuracy of the polarization measurement depending on the single helicity-flip amplitude. The bound obtained on the imaginary part of the single helicity-flip amplitude indicates that the analyzing power for proton-proton collisions in the Coulomb nuclear interference region should take positive nonzero values at high energies.

A. T. Bates; N. H. Buttimore

2000-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for controlling NOx from lean engines are studied in great detail at FEERC. Lean NOx Traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are two catalyst technologies of interest. Catalysts are studied from the nanoscale to full scale. On the nanoscale, catalyst powders are analyzed with chemisorptions techniques to determine the active metal surface area where catalysis occurs. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is used to observe the chemical reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during catalyst operation. Both powder and coated catalyst samples are analyzed on bench flow reactors in controlled simulated exhaust environments to better characterize the chemical

267

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

270

Quarkonium production in high energyproton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarization studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

del Valle, Z C; Corcella, G; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B; Lansberg, J P; Lourenco, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Proton-Proton Fusion in Effective Field Theory to Fifth Order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proton-proton fusion process p p->d e^+ nu_e is calculated at threshold to fifth order in pionless effective field theory. There are two unknown two-body currents contributing at the second and fourth orders. Combined with the previous results for neutrino-deuteron and antineutrino-deuteron scattering, computed to third order in the same approach, we conclude that a 10% measurement of reactor antineutrino-deuteron scattering measurement could constrain the p p->d e^+ nu_e rate to ~7% while a ~3% measurement of nu_e d-> e^- p p could constrain the pp rate to ~2%.

Butler, M; Butler, Malcolm; Chen, Jiunn-Wei

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear like effects in proton-proton collisions at high energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that several effects considered nuclear effects are not nuclear in the sense that they do not only occur in nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus collisions but, as well, they are present in hadron-hadron (proton-proton) collisions. The matter creation mechanism in hh, hA and AA collisions is always the same. The pT suppression of particles produced in large multiplicity events compared to low multiplicity events, the elliptic flow and the Cronin effect are predicted to occur in pp collisions at LHC energies as a consequence of the obtained high density partonic medium.

L. Cunqueiro; J. Dias de Deus; C. Pajares

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Proton-Proton Fusion in Effective Field Theory to Fifth Order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proton-proton fusion process p p->d e^+ nu_e is calculated at threshold to fifth order in pionless effective field theory. There are two unknown two-body currents contributing at the second and fourth orders. Combined with the previous results for neutrino-deuteron and antineutrino-deuteron scattering, computed to third order in the same approach, we conclude that a 10% measurement of reactor antineutrino-deuteron scattering measurement could constrain the p p->d e^+ nu_e rate to ~7% while a ~3% measurement of nu_e d-> e^- p p could constrain the pp rate to ~2%.

Malcolm Butler; Jiunn-Wei Chen

2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Laser-driven proton acceleration using a conical nanobrush target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conical nanobrush target is proposed to improve the total proton energy-conversion efficiency in proton beam acceleration and investigated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulations. Results indicate a significant enhancement of the number and energies of hot electrons through the target rear side of the conical nanobrush target. Compared with the plain target, the field increases several times. We observe enhancements of the average proton energy and total laser-proton energy conversion efficiency of 105%. This enhancement is attributed to both nanobrush and conical configurations. The proton beam is well collimated with a divergence angle less than 28{sup Degree-Sign }. The proposed target may serve as a new method for increasing laser to proton energy-conversion efficiency.

Yu Jinqing [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhao Zongqing; Yan Yonghong; Zhou Weimin; Cao Leifeng; Gu Yuqiu [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Jin Xiaolin; Li Bin [Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Wu Fengjuan [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Laboratory of Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

CO2 Emissions - New Zealand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania New Zealand Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Zealand Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Zealand image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Zealand...

276

CO2 Emissions - Hong Kong  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Hong Kong CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hong Kong...

277

CO2 Emissions - Wake Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Wake Island Graphics CO2 Emissions from Wake Island Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Wake Island image Per capita CO2...

278

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

279

Low energy proton storage ring with longitudinal magnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton energy 1,75 MeV Energy spread ±3,2 % = ±56 keV (2) Current (DC) 100 mkA Transverse size ±10 mm (2Low energy proton storage ring with longitudinal magnetic field and electron cooling M.I. Bryzgunov energy protons. In this particular case it is reaction for production of resonant gamma-quant (9.17 Me

280

Observation of Spin Flips with a Single Trapped Proton  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radio-frequency induced spin transitions of one individual proton are observed. The spin quantum jumps are detected via the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, which is used in an experiment with a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap. This is an important milestone towards a direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton and a new test of the matter-antimatter symmetry in the baryon sector.

Ulmer, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); Rodegheri, C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); Kracke, H.; Mooser, A.; Walz, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Quint, W. [Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI--Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Proton scattering on an electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown in the case of proton scattering on an electron gas target that the Closed Time Path formalism can handle final state interactions of the target in equilibrium in a simple and natural manner. The leading order cross section is proportional to the photon density of states. The scattering needs a partial resummation of the perturbation series when the electron gas forms long living quasi-particles with high density of state during the collision. A strong cancellation between real and virtual electron-hole pairs is found in this case.

Mansouri, F; Zazoua, K; Zekri, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Proton scattering on an electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown in the case of proton scattering on an electron gas target that the Closed Time Path formalism can handle final state interactions of the target in equilibrium in a simple and natural manner. The leading order cross section is proportional to the photon density of states. The scattering needs a partial resummation of the perturbation series when the electron gas forms long living quasi-particles with high density of state during the collision. A strong cancellation between real and virtual electron-hole pairs is found in this case.

F. Mansouri; J. Polonyi; K. Zazoua; N. Zekri

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

284

The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modelling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

Porter, T A; Grenier, I A; Moskalenko, I V; Strong, A W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modeling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Digel, S.W.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Grenier, I.A.; /Saclay; Moskalenko, I.V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Strong, A.W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

Hard Collisions of Spinning Protons - History and Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There will be a review of the history of polarized proton beams, and a discussion of the unexpected and still unexplained large transverse spin effects found in several high energy proton-proton spin experiments at the ZGS, AGS, Fermilab and RHIC. Next there will be a discussion of possible future experiments on the violent collisions elastic collisions of polarized protons at the 70 GeV U-70 accelerator at IHEP-Protvino in Russia and the new high intensity 50 GeV J-PARC at Tokai in Japan.

A. D. Krisch

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Optimization of Proton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

density for future scenarios of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology; estimate manufacturing cost of PEMFCs. Performer Principal Investigator: Suresh Sriramulu...

288

Search for the Dirac Monopole with 30-bev Protons  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A search was made at the Brookhaven alternating gradient synchrotron for magnetic monopoles produced either in collisions of 30-Bev protons with light nuclei, or produced by gamma rays secondary to these protons in the Coulomb field of protons or of carbon nuclei. In runs using 5.7 x 10{sup 15} circulating protons, no monopole-like event was found. This implies an upper limit for production in protonnucleon interactions of about 2 x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}. Experimental limits are also derived for the photoproduction of pole pairs. (auth)

Purcell, E.M.; Collins, G.B.; Fujii, T.; Hornbostel, J.; Turkot, F.

1963-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Design on Elevated-Temperature and Methanol-Blocking Proton ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Design on Elevated-Temperature and Methanol-Blocking Proton Exchange Membrane for Fuel Cell Application. Author(s), Yan Xiang.

290

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic...

291

Dynamical effects in proton breakup from exotic nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This contribution discusses dynamical effects in proton breakup from a weakly bound state in an exotic nucleus on a heavy target. The Coulomb interactions between the proton and the core and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. A number of experimentally measurable observables such as parallel momentum distributions, proton angular distributions and total breakup cross sections can be calculated. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra 'effective energy' is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies.

Bonaccorso, Angela; Kumar, Ravinder [INFN, Sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa and Department of Physics, Deenbandhu Chhoturam University of Science and Technology, Murthal, Sonepat, Haryana, 131039 (India)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fast timing detectors for forward protons at the LHC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author discusses the development of high precision timing detectors for high momentum protons at the LHC, and their application in studying exclusive Higgs boson production.

Albrow, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

294

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles Graphics CO2 Emissions from Netherland Antilles Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherland...

295

CO2 Emissions - Ryukyu Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Ryukyu Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands image...

296

CO2 Emissions - Leeward Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Leeward Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands image...

297

carbon emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity carbon emissions energy demand Energy Generation fossil fuels GHG emissions UK Data applicationvnd.openxmlformats-office...

298

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Advanced NOx Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Advanced NOx Emissions Control Adv....

299

Engines - Emissions Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions EPRI Hybrid Electric Vehicle Working Group: HEV Costs and Emissions Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are attractive options for increasing vehicle fuel economy and reducing emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases. Two automobile manufacturers have already introduced HEVs, and other manufacturers are planning to introduce their own models. One available HEV combines mass reduction (also applicable to conventional vehicles) with idle-stop, regenerative braking, and electric-drive assist to achieve a fuel economy more than 2.5 times the current Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard. The second HEV combines idle-stop, regenerative braking, electric assist acceleration, and continuously variable transmission (CVT) to achieve a fuel economy of more than twice the current CAFÉ standard, qualifying as a super ultra-low emissions vehicle (SULEV).

300

Pulsar Emission Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission spectrum is calculated for a weak axisymmetric pulsar. Also calculated are the observed spectrum, efficiency, and the observed efficiency. The underlying flow of electrons and positrons turns out to be curiously intricate.

Gruzinov, Andrei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

China Energy and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2 nd Edition) David Fridley, Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou, Jing Ke, Ali Hasanbeigi, Bill Morrow, and Lynn Price China Energy Group, Energy...

302

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N{sub 2}O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N{sub 2}O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N[sub 2]O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N[sub 2]O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies are getting a better grasp of emissions, but there are still problem areas, particularly CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The lag in data has resulted in the imposition of a CO reactor as BACT for the gas turbine. With the renewed concern about the environment, air permits will have a high profile with offsets being the next fix beyond BACT. 'The manner in which technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry....' (1) Therefore, it becomes increasingly important that the proponents of gas turbine-based facilities establish more reliable data on their proposed emissions. This paper addresses the gas turbine emissions experiences of eight cogeneration plants utilizing: 1) steam injection for both NOx control and power augmentation, 2) CO reactors, 3) selective catalytic reduction units. It also looks at possible regulatory actions.

Frederick, J. D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The determination of protonation states in proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The protonation states of aspartic acids and glutamic acids as well as histidine are investigated in four X-ray cases: Ni,Ca concanavalin A at 0.94 {angstrom}, a thrombin-hirugen binary complex at 1.26 {angstrom} resolution and two thrombin-hirugen-inhibitor ternary complexes at 1.32 and 1.39 {angstrom} resolution. The truncation of the Ni,Ca concanavalin A data at various test resolutions between 0.94 and 1.50 {angstrom} provided a test comparator for the 'unknown' thrombin-hirugen carboxylate bond lengths. The protonation states of aspartic acids and glutamic acids can be determined (on the basis of convincing evidence) even to the modest resolution of 1.20 {angstrom} as exemplified by our X-ray crystal structure refinements of Ni and Mn concanavalin A and also as indicated in the 1.26 {angstrom} structure of thrombin, both of which are reported here. The protonation-state indication of an Asp or a Glu is valid provided that the following criteria are met (in order of importance). (i) The acidic residue must have a single occupancy. (ii) Anisotropic refinement at a minimum diffraction resolution of 1.20 {angstrom} (X-ray data-to-parameter ratio of 3.5:1) is required. (iii) Both of the bond lengths must agree with the expectation (i.e. dictionary values), thus allowing some relaxation of the bond-distance standard uncertainties required to 0.025 {angstrom} for a '3' determination or 0.04 {angstrom} for a '2' determination, although some variation of the expected bond-distance values must be allowed according to the microenvironment of the hydrogen of interest. (iv) Although the F{sub o}-F{sub c} map peaks are most likely to be unreliable at the resolution range around 1.20 {angstrom}, if admitted as evidence the peak at the hydrogen position must be greater than or equal to 2.5 and in the correct geometry. (v) The atomic B factors need to be less than 10 {angstrom}2 for bond-length differentiation; furthermore, the C=O bond can also be expected to be observed with continuous 2F{sub o}-F{sub c} electron density and the C-OH bond with discontinuous electron density provided that the atomic B factors are less than approximately 20 {angstrom}{sup 2} and the contour level is increased. The final decisive option is to carry out more than one experiment, e.g. multiple X-ray crystallography experiments and ideally neutron crystallography. The complementary technique of neutron protein crystallography has provided evidence of the protonation states of histidine and acidic residues in concanavalin A and also the correct orientations of asparagine and glutamine side chains. Again, the truncation of the neutron data at various test resolutions between 2.5 and 3.0 {angstrom}, even 3.25 and 3.75 {angstrom} resolution, examines the limits of the neutron probe. These various studies indicate a widening of the scope of both X-ray and neutron probes in certain circumstances to elucidate the protonation states in proteins.

Ahmed, H.U.; Blakeley, M.P.; Cianci, M.; Cruickshank, D.W. J.; Hubbard, J.A.; Helliwell, J.R. (EMBL); (SCF); (Manchester); (GSK)

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); INTEGRIS Cancer Insititute, 5911 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

Johnstone, C.J.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

309

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Sulfonated Nanoplates in Proton Conducting Membranes for Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface-functionalized nanoplates are synthesized by anchoring sulfonic acid containing siloxanes on zirconium phosphate, and in turn blended with Nafion to fabricate proton conducting membranes. The effects of these sulfonated nanoplates on proton conduction, hydro-characteristics and fuel cell performance are reported.

Chen, W.F.; Nimah, H.; Yu-Cheng Shen, Y.-C.; Kuo, P.-L.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Different Protonation Equilibria of 4-Methylimidazole and Acetic Acid  

SciTech Connect

The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dynamic protonation equilibria in water of one 4-methylimidazole molecule as well as for pairs and groups consisting of 4- methylimidazole, acetic acid and bridging water molecules are studied using Q-HOP molecular dynamics simulation. We find a qualitatively different protonation behavior of 4-methylimidazole compared to that of acetic acid. On one hand, deprotonated, neutral 4-methylimidazole cannot as easily attract a freely diffusing extra proton from solution. Once the proton is bound, however, it remains tightly bound on a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. In a linear chain composed of acetic acid, a separating water molecule and 4-methylimidazole, an excess proton is equally shared between 4-methylimidazole and water. When a water molecule is linearly placed between two acetic acid molecules, the excess proton is always found on the central water. On the other hand, an excess proton in a 4-methylimidazole-water- 4-methylimidazole chain is always localized on one of the two 4- methylimidazoles. These findings are of interest to the discussion of proton transfer along chains of amino acids and water molecules in biomolecules.

Gu, Wei; Helms, Volkhard H.

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

GHG emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GHG emissions GHG emissions Dataset Summary Description These datasets include GHG and CO2 emissions statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2 Emissions for EU (xls, 853.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions by Sector, all member countries (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions from Transport, all member countries (xls, 1.3 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by sector, all member countries (xls, 2.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by transport, all member countries (xls, 1.5 MiB)

313

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

314

Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

The LHC as a Proton-Nucleus Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following its initial operation as a proton-proton (p-p) and heavy-ion (208Pb82+-208Pb82+) collider, the LHC is expected to operate as a p-Pb collider. Later it may collide protons with other lighter nuclei such as 40Ar18+ or 16O8+. We show how the existing proton and lead-ion injector chains may be efficiently operated in tandem to provide these hybrid collisions. The two-in-one magnet design of the LHC main rings imposes different revolution frequencies for the two beams in part of the magnetic cycle. We discuss and evaluate the consequences for beam dynamics and estimate the potential performance of the LHC as a proton-nucleus collider.

Carli, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Gamma-ray Emission from Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found "GeV-bright" supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Strange Electric Form Factor of the Proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By combining the constraints of charge symmetry with new chiral extrapolation techniques and recent low-mass quenched lattice QCD simulations of the individual quark contributions to the electric charge radii of the baryon octet, we obtain an accurate determination of the strange electric charge radius of the proton. While this analysis provides a value for G_E^s(Q^2=0.1 GeV^2) in agreement with the best current data, the theoretical error is comparable with that expected from future HAPPEx results from JLab. Together with the earlier determination of G_M^s, this result considerably constrains the role of hidden flavor in the structure of the nucleon.

D. B. Leinweber; S. Boinepalli; A. W. Thomas; P. Wang; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; J. M. Zanotti; J. B. Zhang

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

Nanostructured polymer membranes for proton conduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymers having an improved ability to entrain water are characterized, in some embodiments, by unusual humidity-induced phase transitions. The described polymers (e.g., hydrophilically functionalized block copolymers) have a disordered state and one or more ordered states (e.g., a lamellar state, a gyroid state, etc.). In one aspect, the polymers are capable of undergoing a disorder-to-order transition while the polymer is exposed to an increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. In some aspects the polymer includes a plurality of portions, wherein a first portion forms proton-conductive channels within the membrane and wherein the channels have a width of less than about 6 nm. The described polymers are capable of entraining and preserving water at high temperature and low humidity. Surprisingly, in some embodiments, the polymers are capable of entraining greater amounts of water with the increase of temperature. The polymers can be used in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes in fuel cells.

Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Park, Moon Jeong

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

319

Ion-/proton-conducting apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A c-axis-oriented HAP thin film synthesized by seeded growth on a palladium hydrogen membrane substrate. An exemplary synthetic process includes electrochemical seeding on the substrate, and secondary and tertiary hydrothermal treatments under conditions that favor growth along c-axes and a-axes in sequence. By adjusting corresponding synthetic conditions, an HAP this film can be grown to a controllable thickness with a dense coverage on the underlying substrate. The thin films have relatively high proton conductivity under hydrogen atmosphere and high temperature conditions. The c-axis oriented films may be integrated into fuel cells for application in the intermediate temperature range of 200-600.degree. C. The electrochemical-hydrothermal deposition technique may be applied to create other oriented crystal materials having optimized properties, useful for separations and catalysis as well as electronic and electrochemical applications, electrochemical membrane reactors, and in chemical sensors.

Yates, Matthew (Penfield, NY); Liu, Dongxia (Rochester, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at {radical}(s) = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV.

Surrow, Bernd [Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Generalized z-scaling in proton-proton collisions at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New generalization of z-scaling in inclusive particle production is proposed. The scaling variable z is fractal measure which depends on kinematical characteristics of the underlying sub-process expressed in terms of the momentum fractions x1 and x2 of the incoming protons. In the generalized approach, the x1 and x2 are functions of the momentum fractions ya and yb of the scattered and recoil constituents carried out by the inclusive particle and recoil object, respectively. The scaling function psi(z) for charged and identified hadrons produced in proton-proton collisions is constructed. The fractal dimensions and heat capacity of the produced medium entering definition of the z are established to obtain energy, angular and multiplicity independence of the psi(z). The scheme allows unique description of data on inclusive cross sections of charged particles, pions, kaons, antiprotons and lambdas at high energies. The obtained results are of interest to use z-scaling as a tool for searching for new physics phe...

Zborovsk, I

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Doppler-shift proton fraction measurement on a CW proton injector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer/Optical Multi-channel Analyzer has been used to measure the proton fraction of the cw proton injector developed for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) and the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Los Alamos. This technique, pioneered by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), was subsequently adopted by the international fusion community as the standard for determining the extracted ion fractions of neutral beam injectors. Proton fractions up to 95 {+-} 3% have been measured on the LEDA injector. These values are in good agreement with results obtained by magnetically sweeping the ion beam, collimated by a slit, across a Faraday cup. Since the velocity distribution of each beam species is measured, it also can be used to determine beam divergence. While divergence has not yet been ascertained due to the wide slit widths in use, non-Gaussian distributions have been observed during operation above the design-matched perveance. An additional feature is that the presence of extracted water ions can be observed. During ion source conditioning at 75 kV, an extracted water fraction > 30% was briefly observed.

Kamperschroer, J.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Sherman, J.D.; Zaugg, T.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Arvin, A.H.; Bolt, A.S.; Richards, M.C. [Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Pion production in proton-proton collisions in a covariant one boson exchange model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the renewed interest in studying the pion production on nuclei with protons at few GeV incident energies, we investigate the pion production in proton-proton collisions over an energy range of 300 MeV to 2 GeV. Starting from a realistic one-boson exchange model with parameters fitted to the amplitudes of the elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering, we perform fully covariant calculations for the total, double and triple differential cross-sections of the p(p,n\\pi^+)p and p(p,p\\pi^0)p reactions. The calculations incorporate the exchange of \\pi, \\rho,\\omega and \\sigma mesons and treat nucleon and delta isobar as intermediate states. We obtain a reasonably good agreement with the experimental data in the entire range of beam energies. The form of the covariant delta propagator, the cut-off parameter for the \\pi NN and \\pi N\\Delta vertex form factors and the energy dependence of the delta isobar decay width is investigated.

Engel, A; Shyam, R; Mosel, U

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Pion production in proton-proton collisions in a covariant one boson exchange model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the renewed interest in studying the pion production on nuclei with protons at few GeV incident energies, we investigate the pion production in proton-proton collisions over an energy range of 300 $MeV$ to 2 $GeV$. Starting from a realistic one-boson exchange model with parameters fitted to the amplitudes of the elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering, we perform fully covariant calculations for the total, double and triple differential cross-sections of the $p(p,n\\pi^+)p$ and $p(p,p\\pi^0)p$ reactions. The calculations incorporate the exchange of $\\pi, \\rho,\\omega$ and $\\sigma$ mesons and treat nucleon and delta isobar as intermediate states. We obtain a reasonably good agreement with the experimental data in the entire range of beam energies. The form of the covariant delta propagator, the cut-off parameter for the $\\pi NN$ and $\\pi N\\Delta$ vertex form factors and the energy dependence of the delta isobar decay width is investigated.

A. Engel; A. K. Dutt-Mazumder; R. Shyam; U. Mosel

1996-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

327

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

328

ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24  

SciTech Connect

High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

Li, C.; Sun, L. P. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Firoz, Kazi A. [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Miroshnichenko, L. I., E-mail: lic@nju.edu.cn [N. V. Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN), Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, 142190 Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions of Protons in Host Metals at Picometre Distance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is given for the explanation of the measurements of Miley et al. of a fully reproducible generation of nuclei of the whole periodic table by protons in host metals during a several-weeks reaction. Similar low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) were observed by other groups. The fact that the heavy nuclides are not due to pollution can be seen from the fact that such very rare elements as thulium and terbium were detected by unique K-shell X-ray spectra. The nuclear reaction energy goes into the heavy nuclei as measured from much bigger traces in CR39 than from alphas. The fact that any reaction of the protons results in stable daughter nuclei is confirmed by the fact that the highest energy gain is resulting with stable reaction products. This has been explained in Ref. 2, and the energy gain for the heavy element generation by a compound reaction was discussed. The explanation is based on the model of the authors from 1989 to assume free motion of the protons contrary to localized crystalline states. A relation of the reaction time U on distance d of the reacting nuclei by a power law with an exponent 34.8 was derived. Based on few reproducible D-D reactions, a reaction time near the range of megaseconds and a reaction distance of nanometers was concluded. A splendid confirmation of the picometre-megasecond reactions was achieved by Li et al. from his direct quantum mechanical calculations of the hot fusion D-T reactions based on a one-step selective resonance tunneling model. Li et al. were able for the first time to derive the cross sections of the hot fusion. Li's application to picometre distance showed megasecond reaction times with no neutron or gamma emission. Because of the imaginary part in the Schroedinger potential, the problem of the level width is reduced by damping.

Heinrich Hora; George H. Miley; Jak C. Kelly

2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

330

Imaging atherosclerotic plaque inflammation with [18F]- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tracer CI Confidence interval CO2 Carbon dioxide CRP C-reactive protein CT Computed tomography DPM Decays per minute eNOS Endothelial nitric oxide synthase EDTA Ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid ETL Echo train... rabbit p Probability PBMC Peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBS Phosphate-buffered saline PDGF Platelet-derived growth factor PDW Proton density-weighted PET Positron emission tomography PK11195 1-(2-chlorophenyl...

Rudd, James H. F.

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

331

Constraints on proton structure from precision atomic physics measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ground-state hyperfine splittings in hydrogen and muonium are extremely well measured. The difference between them, after correcting for the different magnetic moments of the muon and proton and for reduced mass effects, is due solely to the structure of the proton - the large QED contributions for a pointlike nucleus essentially cancel. A major contribution to the rescaled hyperfine difference is proportional to the Zemach radius, a fundamental measure of the proton which can be computed as an integral over the product of the elastic electric and magnetic form factors of the proton. The remaining proton structure corrections, the polarization contribution from inelastic states in the spin-dependent virtual Compton amplitude and the proton size dependence of the relativistic recoil corrections, have small uncertainties. The resulting high precision determination of the Zemach radius (1.013 {+-} 0.016) fm from atomic physics provides an important constraint on fits to accelerator measurements of the proton electric and magnetic form factors. Conversely, the authors use the muonium data to extract an 'experimental' value for the QED corrections to the hyperfine splitting of hydrogenic atoms. There is a significant discrepancy between measurement and theory which is in the same direction as a corresponding discrepancy in positronium.

Brodsky, S

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electron and proton heating by solar wind turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous formulations of heating and transport associated with strong magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are generalized to incorporate separate internal energy equations for electrons and protons. Electron heat conduction is included. Energy is supplied by turbulent heating that affects both electrons and protons, and is exchanged between them via collisions. Comparison to available Ulysses data shows that a reasonable accounting for the data is provided when (i) the energy exchange timescale is very long and (ii) the deposition of heat due to turbulence is divided, with 60% going to proton heating and 40% into electron heating. Heat conduction, determined here by an empirical fit, plays a major role in describing the electron data.

Breech, B; Cranmer, S R; Kasper, J C; Oughton, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Self-Excitation and Feedback Cooling of an Isolated Proton  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first one-proton self-excited oscillator (SEO) and one-proton feedback cooling are demonstrated. In a Penning trap with a large magnetic gradient, the SEO frequency is resolved to the high precision needed to detect a one-proton spin flip. This is after undamped magnetron motion is sideband cooled to a 14 mK theoretical limit, and despite random frequency shifts (typically larger than those from a spin flip) that take place every time sideband cooling is applied. The observations open a possible path towards a million-fold improved comparison of the p and p magnetic moments.

Guise, N.; DiSciacca, J.; Gabrielse, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

335

ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.  

SciTech Connect

One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

2002-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

336

Monoenergetic Proton Beams Accelerated by a Radiation Pressure Driven Shock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on the acceleration of impurity-free quasimononenergetic proton beams from an initially gaseous hydrogen target driven by an intense infrared ({lambda} = 10 {micro}m) laser. The front surface of the target was observed by optical probing to be driven forward by the radiation pressure of the laser. A proton beam of MeV energy was simultaneously recorded with narrow energy spread ({sigma}-4%), low normalized emittance (-8 nm), and negligible background. The scaling of proton energy with the ratio of intensity over density (I/n) confirms that the acceleration is due to the radiation pressure driven shock.

Palmer, C.A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Dover, N.P.; Babzien, M.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Ispiriyan, M.; Polyanskiy, M.N.; Schreiber, J.; Shkolnikov, P.; Yakimenko, V.; Najmudin, Z.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

CO2 Emissions - Puerto Rico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Puerto Rico Graphics CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico image Per capita...

338

Reducing SF6 Emissions @ PPPL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

96.4 88.4 Fuel Consumption Emissions 2015 1823.8 Fugitive Emissions Refrigerant 160 241.2 SF6 38360 21042.8 Scope 2 -Indirect Electricity Purchase 13816 13855 Scope 3 -...

339

BPA SF6 Emission Info  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPA SF 6 Emission Info Steve Lowder - 2012.12 slide 1 Discovering Emission Locations slide 2 BPA uses a FLIR leak detection camera (other methods available) Allows leaks to...

340

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTON CONDUCTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The morphological and electrical properties of yttrium (Y) and indium (In) doped barium cerate perovskites of the form BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} (with x=0-0.3) prepared by a modified Pechini method were investigated as potential high temperature proton conductors with improved chemical stability. The sinterability increased with the increase of In-doping, and the perovskite phase was found in the BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} solid solutions over the range 0 {le} x {le} 0.3. The conductivities decreased (from x to x, insert quantitative values) while the tolerance to wet CO{sub 2} improved for BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} samples with an increase of In-doping.

Brinkman, K.

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Concerning mechanisms for the zebra pattern formation in the solar radio emission  

SciTech Connect

The nature of the zebra patterns in continuous type-IV solar radio bursts is discussed. The most comprehensively developed models of such patterns involve mechanisms based on the double plasma resonance and plasma wave-whistler interaction. Over the last five years, there have appeared a dozen papers concerning the refinement of the mechanism based on the double plasma resonance, because, in its initial formulation, this mechanism failed to describe many features of the zebra pattern. It is shown that the improved model of this mechanism with a power-law distribution function of hot electrons within the loss cone is inapplicable to the coronal plasma. In recent papers, the formation of the zebra pattern in the course of electromagnetic wave propagation through the solar corona was considered. In the present paper, all these models are estimated comparatively. An analysis of recent theories shows that any types of zebra patterns can form in the course of radio wave propagation in the corona, provided that there are plasma inhomogeneities of different scales on the wave path. The superfine structure of zebra stripes in the form of millisecond spikes with a strict period of {approx}30 ms can be attributed to the generation of continuous radio emission in the radio source itself, assuming that plasma inhomogeneities are formed by a finite-amplitude wave with the same period.

Laptukhov, A. I.; Chernov, G. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio-Wave Propagation (Russian Federation)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via hydrogen bonds. Recently, a team of Berkeley Lab and University of Southern California researchers, using the ALS, discovered to their surprise that in some cases, protons can find ways to transfer even when hydrogen bonds are blocked. Sometimes You Have to

343

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond...

344

Higher Moments of Net Proton Multiplicity Distributions at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first measurements of the kurtosis (? [kappa]), skewness (S), and variance (? [sigma] [superscript 2]) of net-proton multiplicity (N [subscript p]-N [subscript p?] ) distributions at midrapidity for Au+Au ...

Balewski, Jan T.

345

RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. and Gupta, R. , Radiation Resistant Magnets for the RIARADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS A. F.HTS materials in high radiation environments requires that

Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph. [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print A Surprising Path for Proton Transfer Without Hydrogen Bonds Print Hydrogen bonds are found everywhere in chemistry and biology and are critical in DNA and RNA. A hydrogen bond results from the attractive dipolar interaction of a chemical group containing a hydrogen atom with a group containing an electronegative atom, such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine, in the same or a different molecule. Conventional wisdom has it that proton transfer from one molecule to another can only happen via hydrogen bonds. Recently, a team of Berkeley Lab and University of Southern California researchers, using the ALS, discovered to their surprise that in some cases, protons can find ways to transfer even when hydrogen bonds are blocked. Sometimes You Have to

348

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

349

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Diesel hybridization and emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CO2 Emissions - Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Graphics CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah image Per capita CO2 Emission...

353

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the public from airborne radionuclide emissions. We requestfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-470E-201 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromFugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse Sources

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

Engineering Design of a Continuous Duty $\\gamma$ -Production Proton Target for the Contraband Detection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Design of a Continuous Duty $\\gamma$ -Production Proton Target for the Contraband Detection System

Rathke, J; Klein, J

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Low-lying Proton Intruder State in 13B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neturon rich nucleus 13B was studied via the proton transfer reaction 4He(12Be,13B \\gamma) at 50AMeV. The known 4.83-MeV excited state was strongly populated and its spin and parity were assigned to 1/2+ by comparing the angular differential cross section data with DWBA calculations. This low-lying 1/2+ state is interpreted as a proton intruder state and indicates a deformation of the nucleus.

S. Ota; S. Shimoura; H. Iwasaki; M. Kurokawa; S. Michimasa; N. Aoi; H. Baba; K. Demichi; Z. Elekes; T. Fukuchi; T. Gomi; S. Kanno; S. Kubono; K. Kurita; H. Hasegawa; E. Ideguchi; N. Iwasa; Y. U. Matsuyama; K. L. Yurkewicz; T. Minemura; T. Motobayashi; T. Murakami; M. Notani; A. Odahara; A. Saito; H. Sakurai; E. Takeshita; S. Takeuchi; M. Tamaki; T. Teranishi; Y. Yanagisawa; K. Yamada; M. Ishihara

2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nonperturbative Vacuum-Polarization Effects in Proton-Laser Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the collision of a high-energy proton beam and a strong laser field, merging of laser photons can occur due to the polarization of vacuum. The probability of photon merging is calculated by exactly accounting for the laser field which involves a highly nonperturbative dependence on the laser intensity and frequency. It is shown that the nonperturbative vacuum-polarization effects can be experimentally measured by combining the next generation of tabletop petawatt lasers with proton accelerators presently available.

Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

POLARIZED PROTON OPERATIONS IN THE AGS AND RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polarized proton beam has been accelerated and stored at 100 GeV in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to study spin effects in the hadronic reactions. The essential equipment includes four Siberian snakes and eight spin rotators in two RHIC rings, a partial snake in the AGS, fast relative polarimeters, and ac dipoles in the AGS and RHIC. This paper summarizes the performance of RHIC as a polarized proton collider and of AGS as the injector to RHIC.

HUANG,H.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; ALESSI,J.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BRARVAR,S.; BRENNAN,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; GARDNER,C.; GLENN,W.; IGO,G.; JINNOCHI,O.; LUCCIO,A.; MACKAY,W.; MONTAG,C.; PILAT,F.; PTITSYN,V.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; SPINKA,H.; SVIRIDA,D.; TEPIKIAN,S.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; UNDERWOOD,D.; VANZEIJTS,J.; WOOD,J.; ZELENSKI,A.; ZENO,K.; ZHANG,S.Y.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption J I N B A I Y A N G A N D B O H U M I L V O L E, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B2 Biosorption of uranium metal ions by a nonliving protonated Sargassum fluitans seaweed biomass was used to remove the heavy metal uranium from the aqueous solution. Uranium biosorption

Volesky, Bohumil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Spin structure functions: Proton / deuteron measurements in the resonance region  

SciTech Connect

The RSS experiment ran in Hall C at Jefferson Lab and measured the proton and deuteron beam-target asymmetries for parallel and perpendicular target fields over a W range from pion threshold to 1.9 GeV at Q{sup 2} {approx} 1.3 GeV{sup 2}. Preliminary results for the proton spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} are presented.

Mark Jones; RSS Collaboration

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Trace element emissions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

364

Protonation enthalpies of metal oxides from high temperature electrophoresis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface protonation reactions play an important role in the behavior of mineral and colloidal systems, specifically in hydrothermal aqueous environments. However, studies addressing the reactions at the solid/liquid interface at temperatures above 100 C are scarce. In this study, newly and previously obtained high temperature electrophoresis data (up to 260 C) - zeta potentials and isoelectric points - for metal oxides, including SiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, were used in thermodynamic analysis to derive the standard enthalpies of their surface protonation. Two different approaches were used for calculating the protonation enthalpy: one is based on thermodynamic description of the 1-pKa model for surface protonation, and another one - on a combination of crystal chemistry and solvation theories which link the relative permittivity of the solid phase and the ratio of the Pauling bond strength and bond length to standard protonation enthalpy. From this analysis, two expressions relating the protonation enthalpy to the relative permittivity of the solid phase were obtained.

Rodriguez-Santiago, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Fedkin, Mark V [ORNL; Lvov, Serguei N. [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Protonation enthalpies of metal oxides from high temperature electrophoresis  

SciTech Connect

Surface protonation reactions play an important role in the behavior of mineral and colloidal systems, specifically in hydrothermal aqueous environments. However, studies addressing the reactions at the solid/liquid interface at temperatures above 100 C are scarce. In this study, newly and previously obtained high temperature electrophoresis data (up to 260 C) zeta potentials and isoelectric points for metal oxides, including SiO2, SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, and Fe3O4, were used in thermodynamic analysis to derive the standard enthalpies of their surface protonation. Two different approaches were used for calculating the protonation enthalpy: one is based on thermodynamic description of the 1-pKa model for surface protonation, and another one on a combination of crystal chemistry and solvation theories which link the relative permittivity of the solid phase and the ratio of the Pauling bond strength and bond length to standard protonation enthalpy. From this analysis, two expressions relating the protonation enthalpy to the relative permittivity of the solid phase were obtained.

Rodriguez-Santiago, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Fedkin, Mark V. [Pennsylvania State University; Lvov, Serguei N. [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Velocity-Space Proton Diffusion in the Solar Wind Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a velocity-space quasilinear diffusion of the solar wind protons driven by oblique Alfven turbulence at proton kinetic scales. Turbulent fluctuations at these scales possess properties of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) that are efficient in Cherenkov resonant interactions. The proton diffusion proceeds via Cherenkov kicks and forms a quasilinear plateau - nonthermal proton tail in the velocity distribution function (VDF). The tails extend in velocity space along the mean magnetic field from 1 to (1.5-3) VA, depending on the spectral break position, turbulence amplitude at the spectral break, and spectral slope after the break. The most favorable conditions for the tail generation occur in the regions where the proton thermal and Alfven velocities are about the same, VTp/VA = 1. The estimated formation times are within 1-2 h for typical tails at 1 AU, which is much shorter than the solar wind expansion time. Our results suggest that the nonthermal proton tails, observed in-situ at all heliocentric distan...

Voitenko, Yuriy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dijet production in polarized proton-proton collisions at [the square root of sigma] = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarized deep inelastic scattering (DIS) experiments indicate that quarks only carry approximately 30% of the proton spin, which led to interest in measuring the contributions of other components. Through polarized ...

Walker, Matthew (Matthew Hsing Hung)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Infrared renormalons and single meson production in proton-proton collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, we investigate the contribution of the higher-twist Feynman diagrams to the large-p{sub T} inclusive pion production cross section in proton-proton collisions and present the general formulas for the higher-twist differential cross sections in the case of the running coupling and frozen coupling approaches. The structure of infrared renormalon singularities of the higher-twist subprocess cross section and the resummed expression (the Borel sum) for it are found. We compared the resummed higher-twist cross sections with the ones obtained in the framework of the frozen coupling approach and leading-twist cross section. We obtain, that ratio R=({sigma}{sub {pi}{sup +}}{sup HT}){sup res}/({sigma}{sub {pi}{sup +}}{sup HT}){sup 0}, for all values of the transverse momentum p{sub T} of the pion identically equivalent to ratio r=({delta}{sub {pi}}{sup HT}){sup res}/({delta}{sub {pi}}{sup HT}){sup 0}. It is shown that the resummed result depends on the choice of the meson wave functions used in calculation. Phenomenological effects of the obtained results are discussed.

Ahmadov, A. I. [Institute for Physical Problems, Baku State University, Z. Khalilov Street 23, AZ-1148, Baku (Azerbaijan); Aydin, Coskun; Hakan, Yilmaz A. [Department of Physics, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Nagiyev, Sh. M.; Dadashov, E. A. [Institute of Physics of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, H. Javid Avenue, 33, AZ-1143, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Measurement of the Strange Quark Contribution to Proton Structure through Parity Violating Electron-Proton Scattering  

SciTech Connect

The G0 (G-Zero) forward angle experiment completed in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) has measured the parity violating asymmetries in elastic electron-proton scattering over a Q2 range of 0.12 < Q2 < 1.0 (GeV/c)2. A linear combination of the strange electric (GsE) and magnetic (GsM) form factors calculated from these asymmetries indicate a non-zero contribution of the strange quark to the charge and magnetization structure of the proton in the above kinematic range at a 89% confidence level. The results show a previously unmeasured Q2 dependence of the strange form factors. Combining the G0 results with previous parity violating experiments show that at Q2 = 0.1 (GeV/c)2 GsM = 0.62+-0.31 GsE = -0.013+-0.028 At intermediate Q2 of about 0.23 (GeV/c)2, a consistent value of GsM is seen compared to previous experiments, together with a measurement that may imply a negative value of GsE. For Q2 above 0.5 (GeV/c)2 a consistently positive value for the linear combination of the strange form factors is seen.

Kazutaka Nakahara

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

371

Environmental software systems for emission inventories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric emission inventories are important tools for environmental decision making. The need to include transparency and reproducibility in emission calculation also fostered the development of environmental software systems for emission inventories. ... Keywords: Emission inventory theory, Model validation, Upper Austria

Wilfried Winiwarter; Gerald Schimak

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

373

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

374

Calculations of Branching Ratios for Radiative-Capture, One-Proton, and Two-Neutron Channels in the Fusion Reaction $^{209}$Bi+$^{70}$Zn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of the non-one-neutron emission channels in the cold fusion reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi to produce the element Z=113. For this purpose, we calculate the evaporation-residue cross sections of one-proton, radiative-capture, and two-neutron emissions relative to the one-neutron emission in the reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi. To estimate the upper bounds of those quantities, we vary model parameters in the calculations, such as the level-density parameter and the height of the fission barrier. We conclude that the highest possibility is for the 2n reaction channel, and its upper bounds are 2.4$%$ and at most less than 7.9% with unrealistic parameter values, under the actual experimental conditions of [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. {\\bf 73} (2004) 2593].

Takatoshi Ichikawa; Akira Iwamoto

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Calculations of Branching Ratios for Radiative-Capture, One-Proton, and Two-Neutron Channels in the Fusion Reaction $^{209}$Bi+$^{70}$Zn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of the non-one-neutron emission channels in the cold fusion reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi to produce the element Z=113. For this purpose, we calculate the evaporation-residue cross sections of one-proton, radiative-capture, and two-neutron emissions relative to the one-neutron emission in the reaction $^{70}$Zn + $^{209}$Bi. To estimate the upper bounds of those quantities, we vary model parameters in the calculations, such as the level-density parameter and the height of the fission barrier. We conclude that the highest possibility is for the 2n reaction channel, and its upper bounds are 2.4$%$ and at most less than 7.9% with unrealistic parameter values, under the actual experimental conditions of [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. {\\bf 73} (2004) 2593].

Ichikawa, Takatoshi; 10.1143/JPSJ.79.074201

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Robust optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to range uncertainties and uncertainties caused by setup variation. The conventional inverse treatment planning of IMPT optimized based on the planning target volume (PTV) is not often sufficient to ensure robustness of treatment plans. In this paper, a method that takes the uncertainties into account during plan optimization is used to mitigate the influence of uncertainties in IMPT. Methods: The authors use the so-called ''worst-case robust optimization'' to render IMPT plans robust in the face of uncertainties. For each iteration, nine different dose distributions are computed--one each for {+-} setup uncertainties along anteroposterior (A-P), lateral (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions, for {+-} range uncertainty, and the nominal dose distribution. The worst-case dose distribution is obtained by assigning the lowest dose among the nine doses to each voxel in the clinical target volume (CTV) and the highest dose to each voxel outside the CTV. Conceptually, the use of worst-case dose distribution is similar to the dose distribution achieved based on the use of PTV in traditional planning. The objective function value for a given iteration is computed using this worst-case dose distribution. The objective function used has been extended to further constrain the target dose inhomogeneity. Results: The worst-case robust optimization method is applied to a lung case, a skull base case, and a prostate case. Compared with IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods based on the PTV, our method yields plans that are considerably less sensitive to range and setup uncertainties. An interesting finding of the work presented here is that, in addition to reducing sensitivity to uncertainties, robust optimization also leads to improved optimality of treatment plans compared to the PTV-based optimization. This is reflected in reduction in plan scores and in the lower normal tissue doses for the same coverage of the target volume when subjected to uncertainties. Conclusions: The authors find that the worst-case robust optimization provides robust target coverage without sacrificing, and possibly even improving, the sparing of normal tissues. Our results demonstrate the importance of robust optimization. The authors assert that all IMPT plans should be robustly optimized.

Liu Wei; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Zero emission coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

379

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

380

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

382

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Proton Channel Orientation in Block-Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes Print Fuel cells have the potential to provide power for a wide variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. Cells operating with H2 and air as inputs and electric power and water as the only outputs are of particular interest because of their ability to produce power without degrading the environment. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), with hydrophilic, proton-conducting channels embedded in a structurally sound hydrophobic matrix, play a central role in the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PEMs are humidified by contact with air (the presence of water in PEMs is essential for proton transport). In addition, PEMs must transport protons to catalyst sites, which are typically crystalline solids such as platinum. The arrangement of the hydrophilic domains in the vicinity of both air and solid substrates is thus crucial. A University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab group has now provided the first set of data on morphology of PEMs at interfaces by a combination of x-ray scattering and microscopy.

383

PROTON-CONDUCTING DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is aimed at preparation of thin (1-10? m) membranes of a modified strontium ceramic material with improved hydrogen permeance on mesoporous substrates. The research work conducted in this reporting period was focused on the following three aspects: (1) preparation of thick proton-conducting ceramic membranes and synthesis of porous substrates as support for thin proton-conducting ceramic film, (2) setting up RF sputter deposition unit for deposition of thin ceramic films and performing deposition experiments with the sputter deposition unit, and (3) modeling hydrogen permeation through the proton-conducting ceramic membranes. Proton-conducting thulium doped strontium cerate membranes were reproducibly prepared by the citrate method. Mesoporous ceria membranes were fabricated by a sol-gel method. The membranes will be used as the substrate for coating thin strontium cerate films. A magnetron sputter deposition unit was set up and good quality thin metal alloy films were formed on the mesoporous substrates by an alternative deposition method with the sputter deposition unit. A theoretical model has been developed for hydrogen permeation through proton conducting ceramic membranes. This model can be used to quantitatively describe the hydrogen permeation data.

Jerry Y.S. Lin

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

The proton form factor ratio results from Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of the proton form factors, GE p/GMp, has been measured extensively, from Q2 of 0.5 GeV2 to 8.5 GeV2, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The polarization transfer results are of unprecedented high precision and accuracy, due in large part to the small systematic uncertainties associated with the experimental technique. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(5), to continue the ratio measurements to 12 GeV2. A dedicated experimental setup, the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS), will be built for this purpose. It will be equipped with a focal plane polarimeter to measure the polarization of the recoil protons. The scattered electrons will be detected in an electromagnetic calorimeter. In this presentation, I will review the status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors and discuss a number of theoretical approaches to describe nucleon form factors.

Vina Punjabi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Questions and Answers - Why do protons and neutrons stay together in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge of proton and neutron? Charge of proton and neutron? Previous Question (Charge of proton and neutron?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How many times bigger is a proton than an electron?) How many times bigger isa proton than an electron? Why do protons and neutrons stay together in the nucleus? The nucleus of an atom is held together by the strong nuclear force that binds together protons and neutrons. Although the strong nuclear force is the strongest of the four fundamental forces, it acts only over very short - typically nuclear - distances. It binds together the protons and neutrons in the nucleus. It also holds together the quarks that make up those protons and neutrons and the other hadrons. Author: Mac Mestayer, Staff Scientist (Other answers by Mac Mestayer)

386

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

387

Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface  

SciTech Connect

We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

Archubi, C. D. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gravielle, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Silkin, V. M. [Donostia International Physics Center, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

389

Emissions trading and technological change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Emissions trading programmes have grown in number and scope over the last forty years, and in the last decade they have become a centrepiece of (more)

Calel, Raphael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Petroleum and Coal Products Industry, 1994. Petroleum refining is by far the largest component of the petroleum and ...

391

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

392

Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

EPA Revises Emissions Estimation Methodology  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The changes to the historical emission estimates are the result of revisions to the data and estimation ... b K.D . Smythe, RAND ... RAND Environmental Science and ...

394

High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Power Superconducting Continuous Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions

395

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project ID: 196 Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Keywords: Fuel cells, fuel cell vehicles (FCV), transportation, costs Purpose Assess the cost of an 80 kW direct hydrogen fuel cell system relative to the DOE 2005 target of $125/kW. The system includes the fuel cell stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) components for water, thermal, and fuel management, but not hydrogen storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2328 Telephone: 617-498-5903 Email: carlson.e@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: P. Kopf, TIAX, LLC; J. Sinha, TIAX, LLC; S. Sriramulu, TIAX, LLC

396

The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Path a Proton Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemistry, Franklin, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Ram.jpg The cover represents the environment around the side chain. The right side is the water network that exists between the sulfonate groups shown in yellow. The left side is the short chain with the sulfonate group. Many experts believe that fuel cells may someday serve as revolutionary clean energy conversion devices for transportation and other portable power applications. Because they generate electricity by converting chemical hydrogen and oxygen into water, fuel cells generate energy much more efficiently than combustion devices, and with near-zero pollutant

397

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BY BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS: SPOTLIGHT ON GINER AND PROTON US DOE WEBINAR (May 23, 2011) 2 Webinar Outline *Water Electrolysis H 2 Production Overview DOE-EERE-FCT: Eric L. Miller *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Giner Giner Electrochemical Systems: Monjid Hamdan *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Proton Proton OnSite: Kathy Ayers *Q&A 3 DOE EERE-FCT Goals and Objectives Develop technologies to produce hydrogen from clean, domestic resources at a delivered and dispensed cost of $2-$4/gge Capacity (kg/day) Distributed Central 100,000,000 100,000 50,000 10,000 1,000 10 Natural Gas Reforming Photo- electro- chemical Biological Water Electrolysis (Solar) 2015-2020 Today-2015 2020-2030 Coal Gasification (No Carbon Capture) Electrolysis Water (Grid) Coal Gasification (Carbon Capture)

398

OBSERVATION OF HIGH MOMENTUM PROTONS FROM LIMITING TARGET FRAGMENTATION  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the inclusive distributions of protons produced at 180{sup o} in the momentum range 0.3 {le} p {le} 1.0 GeV/c are reported. Proton, {alpha}-particle, carbon, and argon beams in the range of kinetic energies 0.4 {le} T {le} 2.1 GeV/nucleon (4.89 GeV for protons) were incident on C, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets. The dependences of the cross sections on the projectile and target mass and on the incident energy are presented. Limiting behavior is found at energies above 1-2 GeV/nucleon. Features suggestive of nuclear correlations are discussed.

Geaga, J.V.; Chessin, S.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Harris, J.W.; Hendrie, D.L.; Schroeder, L.S.; Treuhaft, R.N.; Bibber, K. Van

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes  

SciTech Connect

The research carried out under grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46371, "The State of Water in Proton Conducting Membranes", during the period June 1, 2008 -May 31, 2010 was comprised of three related parts. These are: 1. An examination of the state of water in classical proton conduction membranes with the use of deuterium T1 NMR spectroscopy (Allcock and Benesi groups). 2. A dielectric relaxation examination of the behavior of water in classical ionomer membranes (Macdonald program). 3. Attempts to synthesize new proton-conduction polymers and membranes derived from the polyphosphazene system. (Allcock program) All three are closely related, crucial aspects of the design and development of new and improved polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes on which the future of fuel cell technology for portable applications depends.

Allcock, Harry R., Benesi, Alan, Macdonald, Digby, D.

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

R and D on Proton Extinction Monitor for COMET Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The COMET experiment searches for a muon to electron conversion process that is one of the lepton flavor violation processes. We use an 8-GeV pulsed proton beam. The proton extinction ratio is an important parameter. In order to measure this ratio pulse-by-pulse, we are developing a monitoring device. This device is called Proton Extinction Monitor and is a gas Cerenkov detector with gating photomultiplier tubes(PMT). The result of the investigation is that ethane is a promising gas for the Cerenkov radiator gas. A gating PMT is under development. We fabricated a divider circuit which switches at 10-kHz and has a cutoff ratio of 10{sup -6}.

Nakadozono, N.; Masaharu, A.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, A.; Yano, T.; Ito, N. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka (Japan); Taniguchi, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Galambos, John D [ORNL; Plum, Michael A [ORNL; Shishlo, Andrei P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Baseline scenario(s) for muon collider proton driver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of the various muon collider scenarios and the requirements they put on the Proton Driver. The required proton power is about 4-6MW in all the scenarios, but the bunch repetition rate varies between 12 and 65Hz. Since none of the muon collider scenarios have been simulated end-to-end, it would be advisable to plan for an upgrade path to around 10MW. Although the proton driver energy is flexible, cost arguments seems to favor a relatively low energy. In particular, at Fermilab 8GeV seems most attractive, partly due to the possibility of reusing the three existing fixed energy storage rings for bunch manipulations.

Jansson, Andreas; /Fermilab

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Source Emissions and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation Source Emissions and Transport Investigators conduct research here to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment. This research includes studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential human health effects. Contacts Randy Maddalena RLMaddalena@lbl.gov (510) 486-4924 Mark Mendell MJMendell@lbl.gov (510) 486-5762 Links Pollutant Sources, Dynamics and Chemistry Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy Technologies Environmental Impacts

404

Low emission combustor  

SciTech Connect

A low emission combustor assembly particularly suited for an automotive gas turbine engine has an inlet plenum supplied with regenerated compressor discharge, an exhaust plenum, a diffusion flame combustion chamber disposed between the inlet and exhaust plenums, and a catalytic combustion chamber also disposed between the inlet and exhaust plenums so that parallel flow paths are established between the inlet and exhaust plenums. During engine start-up, fuel is supplied only to the diffusion flame combustion chamber and regenerated compressor discharge simultaneously flowing through the catalytic combustion chamber heats the catalyst to operating temperature and cools and dilutes exhaust from the diffusion flame combustion chamber. When the catalyst reaches operating temperature fuel is directed only to the catalytic combustion chamber wherein an ultra lean air/fuel ratio mixture is catalytically oxidized, the exhaust from this reaction being cooled and diluted by regenerated compressor discharge simultaneously flowing through the diffusion flame combustion chamber.

Cornelius, W.; Klomp, E.D.; Kosek, T.P.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin flip?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss polarizing a proton beam in a storage ring, either by selective removal or by spin flip of the stored ions. Prompted by recent, conflicting calculations, we have carried out a measurement of the spin flip cross section in low-energy electron-proton scattering. The experiment uses the cooling electron beam at COSY as an electron target. The measured cross sections are too small for making spin flip a viable tool in polarizing a stored beam. This invalidates a recent proposal to use co-moving polarized positrons to polarize a stored antiproton beam.

D. Oellers; L. Barion; S. Barsov; U. Bechstedt; P. Benati; S. Bertelli; D. Chiladze; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; J. Dietrich; N. Dolfus; S. Dymov; R. Engels; W. Erven; A. Garishvili; R. Gebel; P. Goslawski; K. Grigoryev; H. Hadamek; A. Kacharava; A. Khoukaz; A. Kulikov; G. Langenberg; A. Lehrach; P. Lenisa; N. Lomidze; B. Lorentz; G. Macharashvili; R. Maier; S. Martin; S. Merzliakov; I. N. Meshkov; H. O. Meyer; M. Mielke; M. Mikirtychiants; S. Mikirtychiants; A. Nass; M. Nekipelov; N. N. Nikolaev; M. Nioradze; G. d'Orsaneo; M. Papenbrock; D. Prasuhn; F. Rathmann; J. Sarkadi; R. Schleichert; A. Smirnov; H. Seyfarth; J. Sowinski; D. Spoelgen; G. Stancari; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; H. J. Stein; H. Stockhorst; H. Straatmann; H. Stroeher; M. Tabidze; G. Tagliente; P. Thoerngren Engblom; S. Trusov; A. Vasilyev; Chr. Weidemann; D. Welsch; P. Wieder; P. Wuestner; P. Zupranski

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

406

Flexible, durable proton energy degraders for the GE PETtrace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to limit the formation of radioisotopic impurities during proton bombardments of solid targets, two methods of introducing degrader foils into the beam upstream of the target were tested. The first design uses a 445 {mu}m thick fixed degrader machined from a single piece of aluminum. The second design permits introduction of foils made of any material and was tested with foils as thick as 635 {mu}m (also aluminium). In both cases, the foils are cooled with by water flowing through an annular channel outside the radius of the beam. Both designs proved durable and tolerated proton beam currents in excess of 80 {mu}A.

Engle, J. W.; Gagnon, K.; Severin, G. W.; Valdovinos, H. F.; Nickles, R. J.; Barnhart, T. E. [Chemistry Division - Isotopes, Inorganics and Actinides, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hevesy Laboratory, Danish Technical University, Risoe (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, WI, Madison (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Proton structure corrections to electronic and muonic hydrogen hyperfine splitting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a precise determination of the polarizability and other proton structure dependent contributions to the hydrogen hyperfine splitting, based heavily on the most recent published data on proton spin dependent structure functions from the EG1 experiment at the Jefferson Laboratory. As a result, the total calculated hyperfine splitting now has a standard deviation slightly under 1 part-per-million, and is about 1 standard deviation away from the measured value. We also present results for muonic hydrogen hyperfine splitting, taking care to ensure the compatibility of the recoil and polarizability terms.

Carlson, Carl; Nazaryan, Vahagn; Griffioen, Keith

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p (~ 0 ~ p) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

David Hamilton

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM AGROECOSYSTEMS: SIMULATING MANAGEMENT EFFECTS ON DAIRY FARM EMISSIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How does agriculture contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and what farm management scenarios decrease net emissions from agroecosystems? The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is (more)

Sedorovich, Dawn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Search for Gluino-Mediated Supersymmetry in Events With Bottom-Quark Jets and Missing Transverse Energy With the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Proton Collisions at 8 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-ProtonDetector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Protonthe CMS detec- tor at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The

Nguyen, Harold

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Transition Paths CO2 Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aantal van hen hier niet onvermeld laten. Het proefschrift heeft zijn oorsprong in het MATTER-project (Materials Technologies for CO2-reduction). Het project werd gecoördineerd vanuit het ECN door Dolf Gielen en costs 72 4.4.2 System emissions 72 4.4.3 Parameters 73 4.5 Costs and emissions, technical and economic

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

412

Update on CO2 emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

Friedingstein, P. [University of Exeter, Devon, England; Houghton, R.A. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hackler, J. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Canadell, J.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Raupach, Mike [GCP, Canberra, Australia; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Le Quere, Corrine [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

414

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Origin of the high energy proton component below the geomagnetic cutoff in near earth orbit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high flux proton component observed by AMS below the geomagnetic cutoff can be well accounted for by assuming these particles to be secondaries originating from the interaction of Cosmic Ray protons with the atmosphere. Simulation results are reported

L. Derome; M. Buenerd; A. Barrau; A. Bouchet; A. Menchaca-Rocha; T. Thuillier

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layer Title Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layer Publication Type...

417

COMMISSIONING AND FUTURE PLANS FOR POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polarized protons were injected and accelerated in the clockwise ring of RHIC to commission the first full helical Siberian snake ever used in an accelerator. With the snake turned on, the stable spin direction is in the horizontal plane. Vertically polarized protons were injected with the snake off. The snake was adiabatically ramped to give a spin rotation of 180{degree} around a horizontal rotation axis about 13{degree} from the longitudinal. When the beam was accelerated from injection G{sub {gamma}} = 46.5 to G{sub {gamma}} = 48 the spin flipped sign as expected and polarization was preserved. At G{sub {gamma}} = 48 without the snake, no polarization was observed since several spin resonances were crossed. Eventually polarized beam was accelerated to G{sub {gamma}} = 55.7 (29.1 GeV). In the next proton running period we plan to run with two full helical snakes in each ring and collide both transversely and longitudinally polarized protons at an energy around 100 GeV per beam.

MACKAY,W.W.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; BUNCE,G.; COURANT,E.; DESHPANDE,A.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; HUANG,H.; KURITA,K.; LUCCIO,A.U.; ET AL

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

Critical design issues of high intensity proton linacs  

SciTech Connect

Medium-energy proton linear accelerators are being studied as drivers for spallation applications requiring large amounts of beam powder. Important design factors for such high-intensity linacs are reviewed, and issues and concerns specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

Lawrence, G.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Experiments on stochastic cooling of 200 MeV protons  

SciTech Connect

Equipment for the stochastic cooling of 200 MeV protons in the Fermilab cooler ring has been installed and operated. Vertical and longitudinal cooling systems were installed by early 1980 and had successfully operated by May 1980. Traveling-wave structures particularly effective for the sub-relativistic beam velocities were used for the pickup and kicker electrodes.

Lambertson, G.R.; Bisognano, J.; Flood, W.; Kim, K.; Leeman, C.; Leskovar, B.; Lo, C.C.; Main, R.; Reimers, R.; Smith, L.; Staples, J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development of proton-conducting membranes for hydrogen separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can efficiently and economically separate hydrogen from gaseous mixtures (e.g., syngas, coal gas, etc.). Toward this end, materials with suitable electronic and protonic conductivities will be identified, and methods for fabricating thin, dense ceramic membranes from such materials will be developed. The chemical and mechanical stability of the membranes will be determined to estimate the expected lifetime of the membranes. Scoping-level evaluations will be performed to identify potential applications of proton membrane technology. Areas that will be evaluated include overall market scale, typical site operating scale, process integration opportunities and issues, and alternative-source economics. The literature on mixed electronic/protonic conductors was surveyed to identify suitable candidate materials. SrCe{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}} and BaCe{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}} (where M is a fixed-valent dopant such as Ca, Y, Yb, In, Nd, or Gd) were selected for further investigation on the basis of their reported total conductivities and proton transference numbers.

Balachandran, U.; Guan, J.; Dorris, S.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Proton-induced fission of heavy nuclei at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intermediate energy proton-induced fission of 241Am, 238$U and 237$Np is studied. The inelastic interactions of protons and heavy nuclei are described by a CRISP model, in which the reaction proceeds in two steps. The first one corresponds fast cascade, where a series of individual particle-particle collisions occurs within the nucleus. It leaves a highly excited cascade residual nucleus, assumed to be in thermal equilibrium. Subsequently, in the second step the excited nucleus releases its energy by evaporation of neutrons and light charged particles as well. Both the symmetric and asymmetric fission are regarded, and the fission probabilities are obtained from CRISP code calculations, by means of statistical weighting factors. The fission cross sections, the fissility of the fissioning nuclei, and the number of nucleons lost by the target - before and after fission - are calculated and compared to experiments for 660 MeV protons incident on 241Am, 238$U and 237$Np. Some of the model predictions are in full compliance to the experiments. We conclude that our two step model provides a reasonable description of the medium energy proton-induced fission.

A. Deppman; E. Andrade-II; V. Guimaraes; G. S. Karapetyan; A. R. Balabekyan; N. A. Demekhina

2013-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

Model-based diagnosis for proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) systems are more and more presented as a good alternative to current energy converters such as internal combustion engines. They suffer however from insufficient reliability and durability for stationary and ... Keywords: Diagnosis, Elman neural network, Flooding, PEM fuel cell, Water management

N. Yousfi Steiner; D. Candusso; D. Hissel; P. Mooteguy

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers  

SciTech Connect

Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; /Michigan State U.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Assessment of Proton Deflectometry for Exploding Wire Experiments  

SciTech Connect

This project provides the first demonstration of the application of proton deflectometry for the diagnosis of electromagnetic field topology and current-carrying regions in Z-pinch plasma experiments. Over the course of this project several milestones were achieved. High-energy proton beam generation was demonstrated on the short-pulse high-intensity Leopard laser, (10 Joules in ~350 femtoseconds, and the proton beam generation was shown to be reproducible. Next, protons were used to probe the electromagnetic field structure of short circuit loads in order to benchmark the two numerical codes, the resistive-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code, Gorgon, and the hybrid particle-in-cell code, LSP for the interpretation of results. Lastly, the proton deflectometry technique was used to map the magnetic field structure of pulsed-power-driven plasma loads including wires and supersonic jets formed with metallic foils. Good agreement between the modeling and experiments has been obtained. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the understanding of current flow and electromagnetic field topology in pulsed power driven high energy density plasmas. Proton probing with a high intensity laser was for the first time implemented in the presence of the harsh debris and x-ray producing z-pinch environment driven by a mega-ampere-scale pulsed-power machine. The intellectual merit of the program was that it investigated strongly driven MHD systems and the influence of magnetic field topology on plasma evolution in pulsed power driven plasmas. The experimental program involved intense field-matter interaction in the generation of the proton probe, as well as the generation of plasma subjected to 1 MegaGauss scale magnetic fields. The computational aspect included two well-documented codes, in combination for the first time to provide accurate interpretation of the experimental results. The broader impact included the support of 2 graduate students, one at UCSD and one at NTF, who were exposed to both the experimental physics work, the MHD and PIC modeling of the system. A first generation college undergraduate student was employed to assist in experiments and data analysis throughout the project. Data resulting from the research program were broadly disseminated by publication in scientific journals, and presentation at international and national conferences and workshops.

Beg, Farhat Nadeem [University of California San Diego] [University of California San Diego

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

425

Proton and heavy ion upsets in GaAs MESFET devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on proton and heavy SEU data that has been obtained for devices made by several GaAs MESFET manufacturers. Proton energy dependence and proton and heavy ion upset cross sections are reported. Measurements of charge collection from latches designed with various gate widths show that charge collection depths appear deeper than the 1 {mu}m depth expected. Critical charge does not scale linearly with area. Proton upset cross sections are reduced with increased device width.

Weatherford, T.R.; Tran, L. (Sachs/Freeman Associates, Inc., Bowie, MD (United States)); Stapor, W.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Langworthy, J.B.; McMorrow, D. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)); Abdel-Kader, W.G.; McNulty, P.J. (Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

How It's Made - Polarized Proton Beam (444th Brookhaven Lecture)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments with polarized beams at RHIC will provide fundamental tests of QCD, and the electro-weak interaction reveal the spin structure of the proton. Polarization asymmetries and parity violation are the strong signatures for identification of the fundamental processes, which are otherwise inaccessible. Such experiments require the maximum available luminosity and therefore polarization must be obtained as an extra beam quality without sacrificing intensity. There are proposals to polarize the high-energy proton beam in the storage rings by the Stern-Gerlach effect or spin-filter techniques. But so far, the only practically available option is acceleration of the polarized beam produced in the source and taking care of polarization survival during acceleration and storage. Two major innovations -- the "Siberian Snake" technique for polarization preservation during acceleration and high current polarized proton sources make spin physics with the high-energy polarized beams feasible. The RHIC is the first high-energy collider, where the "Siberian Snake" technique allowed of polarized proton beam acceleration up-to 250 GeV energy. The RHIC unique Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source produces sufficient polarized beam intensity for complete saturation of the RHIC acceptance. This polarization technique is based on spin-transfer collisions between a proton or atomic hydrogen beam of a few keV beam energy and optically pumped alkali metal vapors. From the first proposal and feasibility studies to the operational source this development can be considered as example of successful unification of individual scientists ingenuity, international collaboration and modern technology application for creation of a new polarization technique, which allowed of two-to-three order of magnitude polarized beam intensity increase sufficient for loading the RHIC to its full capacity for polarization studies.

Zelenski, Anatoli

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

427

THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE SOLAR WIND INCLUDING PICKUP PROTONS AND TURBULENCE TRANSPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons. We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 Degree-Sign -90 Degree-Sign and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, Melvyn L., E-mail: arcadi.usmanov@nasa.gov [Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute (2009), Reducing Emissions from Deforestation andbenefits of reducing carbon emissions from deforestation andreference levels for reducing emissions from deforestation,

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Adv. Low-NOx Burner Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization The goal of this work is to develop a comprehensive, high-quality database characterizing PM2.5 emissions from utility plants firing high sulfur coals. The specific objectives are to: 1) develop and test an ultra low-NOx pulverized coal burner for plug-in retrofit applications without boiler wall tube modifications, 2) assess the impact of low-NOx PC burner operation on NOx and PM2.5 emissions, and 3) provide high-quality data to ensure that future PM2.5 regulations are based on good scientific information. The work will be performed in the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF), a 100 million Btu/hr near-full-scale facility located at the Alliance Research Center. Related Papers and Publications:

430

CO2 Emissions - the Republic of Moldova  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe the Republic of Moldova CO2 Emissions from the Republic of Moldova Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Republic of Moldova image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

431

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda-Urundi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rwanda-Urundi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda-Urundi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda-Urundi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda-Urundi...

432

CO2 Emissions - Republic of Cameroon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Republic of Cameroon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Republic of Cameroon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Republic of Cameroon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

433

CO2 Emissions - East and West Pakistan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East East and West Pakistan CO2 Emissions from East and West Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from East and West Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

434

CO2 Emissions - Rhodesia-Nyasaland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhodesia-Nyasaland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rhodesia-Nyasaland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rhodesia-Nyasaland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

435

CO2 Emissions - Papua New Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Papua New Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Papua New Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Papua New Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Papua New...

436

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions - Niue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Niue Graphics Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Niue Data graphic Data Total Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Niue image Per Capita...

437

Results on transverse spin asymmetries in the polarized proton?proton elastic scattering in the CNI region at STAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastic scattering of polarized protons at small four momentum transfer squared t is described by interference of Coulomb and nuclear amplitudes. Coulomb amplitude is well calculable by QED and such interference provides a unique opportunity to study the nuclear amplitude. At high energies this amplitude is believed to be dominated by Pomeron exchange. Measurement of asymmetries can provide evidence for contribution of other Reggeons

D. Svirida; The STAR Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

APPENDIX X: PATHWAY DIAGRAMS An Appendix to the Report "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions Centralized electrolytic H2 transmission Electrolysis Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions Electrolytic H2 Nuclear power plant Electrolysis Truck transport emissions Uranium conversion & enrichment emissions

Delucchi, Mark

439

High energy photon emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this work was to initiate the use of BaF2 arrays for detection of high energy photon emission from nuclear reactions. A beam from the Texas A&M University K-500 Superconducting Cyclotron, and a variety of detectors for hard photons, neutrons, charged particles, and fission fragments were used to study the reaction 160 + 238 U at a projectile energy of 50 MeV/u. Inverse slope values of the photon spectra were extracted for inclusive data and data of higher multiplicities at angles of 90' and 135'. Two 19-element barium fluoride (BaF2) arrays, an array of liquid scintillation fast neutron detectors and plastic scintillation charged-particle veto detectors, together with a silicon-cesium iodide (Si-CsI) telescope and a silicon fission fragment detector allowed the possibility of impact parameter selection through neutron and charged particle multiplicities. The associated multiplicity distributions of photon and fast neutron triggers were compared at 30' and 90' angles. The hardware and electronics layout of the experimental set up are described. Fundamental properties of the various detectors are explained and typical spectra are shown as examples for each detector system. The data acquisition and data compression is described in Chap. III, and followed by the calibration methods used for the BaF2 and Nal(TI) detectors. A description of a dynamic pedestal (zero level) correction mechanism, is followed by a description of several cosmic ray background reduction methods, including the highly effective centrality condition. A summary is given to compare the various methods. After a description of the other types of detectors used in the experiment, an example is given how the final photon spectra were produced. In Chap. IV the measured results are presented and compared to those in the literature. The last chapter provides the conclusions of this work.

Jabs, Harry

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

carbon dioxide emissions, total greenhouse gas emissions, sector-specific emissions, and emissions by fuel type. Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels, principally petroleum,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces Title China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and...

442

Treatment of Gas Emissions in Potrooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the solutions developed by Fives to eliminate two of the main sources of HF emissions in the potrooms: - Emissions from pots, when they...

443

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Emissions Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Analysis Photo of researcher weighing a clean particulate filter. Emissions that result in pollution from engines are strictly regulated. The next generation of...

444

CO2 Emissions - Lao People's Democratic Republic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Lao People's Democratic Republic CO2 Emissions from Lao People's Democratic Republic Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lao People's Democratic Republic image Per...

445

CO2 Emissions - Republic of South Vietnam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Republic of South Vietnam CO2 Emissions from Republic of South Vietnam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Republic of South Vietnam...

446

CO2 Emissions - Panama Canal Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Canal Zone Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone...

447

CO2 Emissions - Occupied Palestinian Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Occupied Palestinian Territory CO2 Emissions from the Occupied Palestinian Territory Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Occupied Palestinian Territory image...

448

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles and Aruba  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles and Aruba Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Netherland...

449

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during pulse excimer laser interaction with materials Title Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...

450

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait Oil Fires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Middle East Kuwait Oil Fires Graphics CO2 Emissions from the 1991 Kuwait Oil Fires Data graphic Data...

451

Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines -- 2002 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2002 update to the "Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines" reflects information learned from current utility continuous emission monitoring (CEM) system (CEMS) installations and practices.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Emissions and Fuel Consumption Impacts of IntelligentTravel Time, Fuel Consumption and Weigh Station Efficiency.EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION - Sustainable Approaches for

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

FEWG beyond SF6: Managing Halocarbon Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEWG beyond SF6: Managing Halocarbon Emissions Corrie Clark, Ph.D. Environmental Science Division Fugitive Emissions Working Group November 15, 2011 Review of Progress to Date ...

454

SF6 Emissions Management at Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emissions Management at Jefferson Lab Kevin Jordan PE Jefferson Lab November 16, 2010 Emissions Management Overview * SF 6 Gas Usage * SF 6 Transfer System * Remote Cesiator *...

455

Fugitive Emissions in 2010 Site Sustainability Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fugitive Emissions in 2010 Site Sustainability Plans Josh Silverman Chair, Fugitive Emissions Working Group Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (HS-22) April 14, 2011 2...

456

Progress Report on SF6 Emissions Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Report on SF 6 Emissions Management Greg Barrett Environmental Engineer Argonne National Laboratory October 14, 2010 Fugitive Emissions Working Group Assessment of SF 6...

457

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited)...

458

CO2 emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data applicationvnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2...

459

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

Information Center

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EMISS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three types of emission factors are currently included: carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide. Emissions factors are specified separately for six different end-use...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "milliseconds proton emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

462

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. urban trees, yard trimmings, and food scraps : 35: Emissions of carbon dioxide from biofuel/bioenergy use by sector and fuel

463

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

464

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

465

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Emissions Control - Program Goals and Targets The Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) is currently pursuing the demonstration of 1st-Generation Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)...

466

The Value of Emissions Trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing attention on a here-to-fore neglected component: its value as a hedge against uncertainty. Much analysis has been done of the Kyoto Protocol and ...

Webster, Mort David.

467

Methane Emissions - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent; Estimated 2003 ... for about 8.7 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions when weighted by methanes global warming potential factor.

468

Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shan Zhang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Hong Xueren [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Hongyu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd, Shanghai 200136 (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Boron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon Isotopes of the Element Boron [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 10 19.9% STABLE 11 80.1% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 6 No Data Available Double Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 7 3.255×10-22 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 8 770 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 100.00% 9 8.439×10-19 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Double Alpha Decay 100.00%

470

Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

471

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Credits Any state mobile emissions reduction credits program must allow credits for emissions reductions achieved by converting a vehicle to operate on an

472

Rationale for and Preliminary Results of Proton Beam Therapy for Mediastinal Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the potential of three-dimensional proton beam therapy (3D-PBT) for reducing doses to normal structures in patients with mediastinal lymphomas compared with conventional photon radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We treated 10 consecutive patients with mediastinal masses from lymphomas with 3D-PBT between July 2007 and February 2009 to 30.6-50.4 cobalt-Gray equivalents (CGE). Of those patients, 7 had primary refractory or recurrent disease, and 8 had Hodgkin lymphoma. Dosimetric endpoints were compared with those from conventional RT plans. Results: PBT delivered lower mean doses to the lung (6.2 vs. 9.5 Gy), esophagus (9.5 vs. 22.3 Gy), and heart (8.8 vs. 17.7 Gy) but not the breasts (5.9 vs. 6.1 Gy) than did conventional RT. Percentages of lung, esophagus, heart, and coronary artery (particularly the left anterior descending artery) volumes receiving radiation were consistently lower in the 3D-PBT plans over a wide range of radiation doses. Of the 7 patients who had residual disease on positron emission tomography before PBT, 6 (86%) showed a complete metabolic response. Conclusions: In patients with mediastinal lymphomas, 3D-PBT produced significantly lower doses to the lung, esophagus, heart, and coronary arteries than did the current conventional RT. These lower doses would be expected to reduce the risk of late toxicities in these major organs.

Li Jing; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Reed, Valerie; Allen, Pamela K.; Cai, Haihong; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D., E-mail: jcox@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Water-Mediated Proton Hopping on an Iron Oxide Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H3O+-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO2(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion.

Merte, L. R.; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Grabow, Lars C.; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefen; Laegsgaard, E.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Ballistic Focusing of Polyenergetic Protons Driven by Petawatt Laser Pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using a thick (250 {mu}m) target with 350 {mu}m radius of curvature, the intense proton beam driven by a petawatt laser is focused at a distance of {approx}1 mm from the target for all detectable energies up to {approx}25 MeV. The thickness of the foil facilitates beam focusing as it suppresses the dynamic evolution of the beam divergence caused by peaked electron flux distribution at the target rear side. In addition, reduction in inherent beam divergence due to the target thickness relaxes the curvature requirement for short-range focusing. Energy resolved mapping of the proton beam trajectories from mesh radiographs infers the focusing and the data agree with a simple geometrical modeling based on ballistic beam propagation.

Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Zepf, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Markey, K. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Carroll, D. C; McKenna, P.; Quinn, M. N. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

475

Polarized Proton Collisions at 205 GeV at RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of 2 stronger than those below 100 GeV making it important to examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were first accelerated to the record energy of 205 GeV in RHIC with a significant polarization measured at top energy in 2005. This Letter presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival to orbit distortions.

Bai, M.; Roser, T.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Courant, E.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gill, R.; Glenn, J.; Huang, H.; Kewisch, J.; Luccio, A.; Luo, Y.; Pilat, F. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] (and others)

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

476

Nuclear spin response studies in inelastic polarized proton scattering  

SciTech Connect

Spin-flip probabilities S/sub nn/ have been measured for inelastic proton scattering at incident proton energies around 300 MeV from a number of nuclei. At low excitation energies S/sub nn/ is below the free value. For excitation energies above about 30 MeV for momentum transfers between about 0.35 fm/sup /minus/1/ and 0.65 fm/sup / minus/1/ S/sub nn/ exceeds free values significantly. These results suggest that the relative ..delta..S = 1(..delta..S = 0 + ..delta..S = 1) nuclear spin response approaches about 90% in the region of the enhancement. Comparison of the data with slab response calculations are presented. Decomposition of the measured cross sections into sigma(..delta..S = 0) and sigma(..delta..S = 1) permit extraction of nonspin-flip and spin-flip dipole and quadrupole strengths. 29 refs., 11 figs.

Jones, K.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

High Energy Gamma Rays from Protons Hitting Compact Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a previous paper the spectrum of positrons produced by matter initially at rest falling onto a massive compact object was calculated. In this paper this calculation is generalized to obtain both the spectrum of in-flight positron annihilation and pi0 decay gamma rays produced when protons with a cosmic ray-like spectrum hit the surface. The resulting pi0 decay gamma ray spectrum reflects the high energy proton energy spectrum, and is largely independent of the mass of the compact object. One notable prediction for all compact objects is a dip in the spectrum below 70 MeV. As applied to the 10^6 solar mass massive compact object near to the center of our galaxy, our theory shows promise for explaining the gamma rays coming from the galactic center as observed by both the Compton satellite and HESS ground based array.

J. Barbieri; G. Chapline

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

478

Higher moments of net-proton multiplicity distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher moments of event-by-event net-proton multiplicity distributions have been applied to search for the QCD critical point. Model results are used to provide a baseline for this search. The measured moment products, {kappa}{sigma}{sup 2} and S{sigma} of net-proton distributions, which are directly connected to the thermodynamical baryon number susceptibility ratio in Lattice QCD and Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model, are compared to the transport and thermal model results. We argue that a non-monotonic dependence of {kappa}{sigma}{sup 2} and S{sigma} as a function of beam energy can be used to search for the QCD critical point.

Luo Xiaofeng, E-mail: xfluo@lbl.gov [Central China Normal University, Institute of Particle Physics (China); Mohanty, Bedangadas [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (India); Ritter, Hans Georg; Xu Nu [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Advanced proton-exchange materials for energy efficient fuel cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Advanced Proton-Exchange Materials for Energy Efficient Fuel Cells'' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project began in October 2002 and ended in September 2005. This LDRD was funded by the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy strategic business unit. The purpose of this LDRD was to initiate the fundamental research necessary for the development of a novel proton-exchange membranes (PEM) to overcome the material and performance limitations of the ''state of the art'' Nafion that is used in both hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. An atomistic modeling effort was added to this LDRD in order to establish a frame work between predicted morphology and observed PEM morphology in order to relate it to fuel cell performance. Significant progress was made in the area of PEM material design, development, and demonstration during this LDRD. A fundamental understanding involving the role of the structure of the PEM material as a function of sulfonic acid content, polymer topology, chemical composition, molecular weight, and electrode electrolyte ink development was demonstrated during this LDRD. PEM materials based upon random and block polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes were created and evaluated for improvements in proton conductivity, reduced swelling, reduced O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} permeability, and increased thermal stability. Results from this work reveal that the family of polyphenylenes potentially solves several technical challenges associated with obtaining a high temperature PEM membrane. Fuel cell relevant properties such as high proton conductivity (>120 mS/cm), good thermal stability, and mechanical robustness were demonstrated during this LDRD. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and results of this LDRD.

Fujimoto, Cy H.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Hickner, Michael A.; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Hibbs, Michael R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

[Mechanisms of proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin]. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of two parts namely a brief statement of the progress made during the past four years of the project and more extensive discussion of the current state of understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling the proton pump (bacteriorhodopsin). Detailed descriptions are provided of how the protein undergoes conformational changes on absorbing a photon. Studies are described where the protein structure has been manipulated and the biochemical properties are assessed.

Ebrey, T.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Studies of Di?proton production at ANKE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of NN?interactions with production of 1 S 0 proton pairs (diprotons) provides a new approach to hadron interactions at intermediate energies. The use of the polarised COSY beams and the ANKE polarised internal target allows one to conduct single and double polarization experiments. A number of processes including pd?{pp} s n production of one and two pions in pN collisions

Sergey Dymov; The ANKE collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Exact Solution of the Isovector Neutron-Proton Pairing Hamiltonian  

SciTech Connect

The complete exact solution of the T=1 neutron-proton pairing Hamiltonian is presented in the context of the SO(5) Richardson-Gaudin model with nondegenerate single-particle levels and including isospin symmetry-breaking terms. The power of the method is illustrated with a numerical calculation for {sup 64}Ge for a pf+g{sub 9/2} model space which is out of reach of modern shell-model codes.

Dukelsky, J.; Errea, B.; Lerma, S.H. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC. Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Gueorguiev, V.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Van Isacker, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Dimitrova, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

483

Medium modification of the proton form-factor  

SciTech Connect

I argue that the double ratio of proton-recoil polarization-transfer coefficients, P{prime}{sub x} and P{prime}{sub z}, of the quasielastic {sup 4}He(e,e{prime}p){sup 3}H reaction with respect to the elastic {sup 1}H(e,e{prime}p) reaction is sensitive to possible medium modifications of the proton form factor in {sup 4}He. Recent measurements at both Mainz and Jefferson Lab of this double ratio at four-momentum transfers squared between 0.4 (GeV/c){sup 2} and 2.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} are discussed. I show that the data challenge state-of-the-art conventional meson-nucleon calculations, as these are unable to describe the results. The data hint at the need to include medium modifications of the proton form factor, as predicted by a quark-meson-coupling model, in the calculations. A recently approved follow-up experiment at a Q{sup 2} of 0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} and 1.3 (GeV/c){sup 2} with unprecedented precision will provide one of the most stringent tests of the applicability of various calculations.

Steffen Strauch

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Revealing dressed-quarks via the proton's charge distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proton is arguably the most fundamental of Nature's readily detectable building blocks. It is at the heart of every nucleus and has never been observed to decay. It is nevertheless a composite object, defined by its valence-quark content: u+u+d -- i.e., two up (u) quarks and one down (d) quark; and the manner by which they influence, inter alia, the distribution of charge and magnetisation within this bound-state. Much of novelty has recently been learnt about these distributions; and it now appears possible that the proton's momentum-space charge distribution possesses a zero. Experiments in the coming decade should answer critical questions posed by this and related advances; and we explain how such new information may assist in charting the origin and impact of key emergent phenomena within the strong interaction. Specifically, we show that the possible existence and location of a zero in the proton's electric form factor are a measure of nonperturbative features of the quark-quark interaction in the Standard Model, with particular sensitivity to the running of the dressed-quark mass.

Ian C. Cloet; Craig D. Roberts; Anthony W. Thomas

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

485

Examining exotic structure of proton-rich nucleus $^{23}$Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The longitudinal momentum distribution (P_{//}) of fragments after one-proton removal from ^{23} Al and reaction cross sections (\\sigma_R) for ^{23,24} Al on carbon target at 74A MeV have been measured. The ^{23,24} Al ions were produced through projectile fragmentation of 135 A MeV ^{28} Si primary beam using RIPS fragment separator at RIKEN. P_{//} is measured by a direct time-of-flight (TOF) technique, while \\sigma_R is determined using a transmission method. An enhancement in \\sigma_R is observed for ^{23} Al compared with ^{24} Al. The P_{//} for ^{22} Mg fragments from ^{23} Al breakup has been obtained for the first time. FWHM of the distributions has been determined to be 232 \\pm 28 MeV/c. The experimental data are discussed by using Few-Body Glauber model. Analysis of P_{//} demonstrates a dominant d-wave configuration for the valence proton in ground state of ^{23} Al, indicating that ^{23} Al is not a proton halo nucleus.

D. Q. Fang; W. Guo; C. W. Ma; K. Wang; T. Z. Yan; Y. G. Ma; X. Z. Cai; W. Q. Shen; Z. Z. Ren; Z. Y. Sun; J. G. Chen; W. D. Tian; C. Zhong; M. Hosoi; T. Izumikawa; R. Kanungo; S. Nakajima; T. Ohnishi; T. Ohtsubo; A. Ozawa; T. Suda; K. Sugawara; T. Suzuki; A. Takisawa; K. Tanaka; T. Yamaguchi; I. Tanihata

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Sequestration ..... 199 62 Halogenated Substances ..... 22 18 Other Emissions Reductions ..... 59 45 Total ...

487

Implementation of SB 1368 Emission Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................... 8 Chapter 4: Emissions Performance Standard .....................13 Coal................................................................................................ 16 Renewables/Non-Renewables Blended Contracts................................................. 17

488

Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington, DC). 31. US Environmental Protection Agency (2007) EGRID Emission Data for 2005 (Clean Energy

Michalek, Jeremy J.

489

Performance of the ATLAS Tau and Missing Energy triggers with 7 TeV proton proton collisions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the performance of the ATLAS tau and missing energy triggers with data collected in spring 2010 at {\\surd}s = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presented. A comparison was performed between data and Monte Carlo simulations for the tau and missing transverse energy triggers. As well as a comparison between missing transverse energy trigger quantities and their offline reconstructed counterparts. Tau trigger results compare well with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. Slight deviations are observed for tau shower shape quantities. Possible sources contributing to the discrepancy such as the simulation of the underlying event are currently being studied. The missing transverse energy reconstructed by the Event Filter is well correlated with the offline result. In addition, there is good agreement between the results obtained with collision data and Monte Carlo simulations.

Hooft van Huysduynen, L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Performance of the ATLAS Tau and Missing Energy triggers with 7 TeV proton proton collisions at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the performance of the ATLAS tau and missing energy triggers with data collected in spring 2010 at {\\surd}s = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presented. A comparison was performed between data and Monte Carlo simulations for the tau and missing transverse energy triggers. As well as a comparison between missing transverse energy trigger quantities and their offline reconstructed counterparts. Tau trigger results compare well with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. Slight deviations are observed for tau shower shape quantities. Possible sources contributing to the discrepancy such as the simulation of the underlying event are currently being studied. The missing transverse energy reconstructed by the Event Filter is well correlated with the offline result. In addition, there is good agreement between the results obtained with collision data and Monte Carlo simulations.

L. Hooft van Huysduynen

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

491

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

M. J. Holmes

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z