National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for military outer continental

  1. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  2. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Wind induced circulation on the outer continental shelf of Texas, spring 1982 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Daniel Walker

    1984-01-01

    in the record is offshore, to the southeast. On the 29th of March, in the wake of strong northeast winds, the current shifted to the west. In general, the westward direction was maintained throughout the deployment period. However, there was one occurrence... WIND INDUCED CIRCULATION ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OF TEXAS, SPRING 1982 A Thesis by DANIEL WALKER BEARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AE M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  4. Regulations Related to the Outer Continental Shelf Moratoria and Implications of Not Renewing the Moratoria (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    From 1982 through 2008, Congress annually enacted appropriations riders prohibiting the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior from conducting activities related to leasing, exploration, and production of oil and natural gas on much of the federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Further, a separate executive ban (originally put in place in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush and later extended by President William J. Clinton through 2012) also prohibited leasing on the OCS, with the exception of the Western Gulf of Mexico, portions of the Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico, and Alaska. In combination, those actions prohibited drilling along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and in portions of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) imposed yet a third ban on drilling through 2022 on tracts in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico that are within 125 miles of Florida, east of a dividing line known as the Military Mission Line, and in the Central Gulf of Mexico within 100 miles of Florida.

  5. Outer continental shelf development and the North Carolina coast: a guide for local planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, D.J.; McElyea, W.D.; Godschalk, D.R.; Lofaro, N.D.

    1981-08-01

    This guide supplies local governments in North Carolina's coastal region with information on (1) the facilities and activities associated with outer continental shelf (OCS) oil and gas development, (2) their impacts on coastal communities, and (3) how local governments can manage these impacts. Offshore activities and onshore facilities accompanying each stage of OCS development (leasing, exploration, field development, production, and shutdown) are described, including factors influencing facility siting, local economies, and local natural resources. The guide helps local governments apply this information by presenting ways in which they can influence the development process.

  6. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  7. military

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2%2A en Military Academic Collaborations http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdefenseprogramsmilitaryacademiccollaborations

  8. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Information Program. Update 2, August 1981, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: a summary report, July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    In July 1980, the Office of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Information issued an initial report called Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: A Summary Report, July 1980. The purpose of this report was to provide State and local governments with current information about offshore oil and gas resources and onshore activity in the area extending from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to Cape Canaveral, Florida. This information was designed to assist in socioeconomic planning for the onshore impacts of oil and gas development in the affected areas. This report, Update 2, discusses Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities and their onshore impacts for the period of February 1981 to August 1981. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the South Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Very little, if any, development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. Even though the South Atlantic OCS does contain large areas with hydrocarbon potential, little optimism has been generated by exploration associated with Lease Sale 43. Lease Sale 56 included tracts with geologic conditions more favorable to the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, especially the deepwatr tracts, but industry showed moderate interest in the first deepwater lease sale. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with Lease Sale 56. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of exploration efforts.

  9. military

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afedkcp |field2/%2A en Military

  10. Proposed 1986 outer continental shelf oil and gas lease sale offshore the Mid-Atlantic states, OCS Sale No. 111

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Sale of oil and gas development leases is proposed for 3561 lease tracts containing 20.3 million acres of outer continental shelf lying off the coasts of Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. The lease tracts are located beneath 132 to 10,560 feet of water within an area 24 to 140 miles offshore. Oil would become available in 1994, with production peaking in 1999. Gas production would begin in 1998, peak in 1999, and decline by approximately 50% by the year 2005. Development of the hydrocarbon field would involve approximately 22 exploratory wells, 9 delineation wells, 5 platforms, 27 subsea completions, and 54 production wells. If implemented, the lease offering would be held in October 1985.

  11. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic and their onshore impacts. Atlantic summary report, July 1, 1983-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, R.W.; Havran, K.J.

    1984-12-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Atlantic continues. Hydrocarbon exploration efforts have been and probably will continue to be concentrated on four major sedimentary basins: the Georges Bank Basin, the Baltimore Canyon Trough, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau Basin. To date, 46 exploratory wells have been drilled in these areas, most of them in the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area where resource estimates indicate the hydrocarbon potential is the greatest of the three Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Currently, no operators are involved in exploration efforts in the Atlantic. No commercial discoveries have been announced. Since the first and most successful sale of Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf blocks in Lease Sale 40 in August 1976, there have been eight other sales bringing total revenues of almost $3 billion to the Federal Treasury. The current tentative milestone chart for the 5-year offshore leasing schedule calls for four additional lease sales to be held in the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Although no firm plans have been made for the transportation of potential offshore hydrocarbons to onshore processing facilities, it is believed that oil would be transported by tanker or tug-barge system to existing refineries on the Raritan and Delaware Bays. Gas probably would be transported by pipeline to one of several onshore landfalls identifed by Atlantic Coast States and in Federal environmental impact documents. Recent onshore support for Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf exploration came from Davisville, Rhode Island, the only shore support base for the Atlantic that was active during 1984. Three maps are provided in the back pocket of this report for the North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning areas. 29 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 states Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

  13. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts. South Atlantic summary report update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    An update of the South Atlantic Summary Report 2, this report provides current information about Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil- and gas-related activities and their onshore impacts for the period June 1982 to February, 1983. The geographical area covered by the report extends from north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Cape Canaveral, Florida. The information is designed to assist in planning for the onshore effects associated with offshore oil and gas development. It covers lease and transportation strategies and the nature and location of onshore facilities. An appendix summarizes related state and federal studies. 11 references, 2 tables.

  14. South Atlantic summary report 2. Revision of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, J.L.; Kurz, F.N.; Porter, E.O.

    1982-05-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the South Atlantic Region began in 1960, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. In 1977, a Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test (COST) well was drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. In March 1978, the first lease sale, Sale 43, was held, resulting in the leasing of 43 tracts. Approximately a year later, in May 1979, the first exploratory drilling began, and by February 1980, six exploratory wells had been drilled by four companies. Hydrocarbons were not found in any of these wells. Lease Sale 56, the second lease sale in the South Atlantic Region, was held in August 1981. The sale resulted in the leasing of 47 tracts. Most of the leased tracts are in deep water along the Continental Slope off North Carolina. To date, no drilling has occurred on these tracts, but it is likely that two wells will be drilled or will be in the process of being drilled by the end of 1982. Reoffering Sale RS-2 is scheduled for July 1982, and it will include tracts offered in Lease Sale 56 that were not awarded leases. Lease Sale 78 is scheduled to be held in July 1983. The most recent (March 1982) estimates of risked resources for leased lands in the South Atlantic OCS are 27 million barrels of oil and 120 billion cubic feet of gas. To date, onshore impacts resulting from OCS exploration have been minimal, and they were associated with Lease Sale 43 exploratory activities. In June 1981, the South Atlantic Regional Technical Working Group prepared a Regional Transportation Management Plan for the South Atlantic OCS. The plan is principally an integration of regulatory frameworks, policies, and plans that are applicable to pipeline siting from each of the South Atlantic coastal States and Federal agencies with jurisdiction in the area.

  15. Oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, September 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The hearing addressed oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Testimony is given by Department of Energy officials on the United States oil and gas leasing program. Congressional questions and agency responses are provided. Statements and documents prepared for the record are included.

  16. Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This analysis was updated for Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO): Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the states of Alaska and Virginia have asked the federal government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

  17. Military Band 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    , because American military officers allowed the militarization of the police forces to become institutionalized without also establishing normative constraints on the use of military power. The thesis contends that American military authorities undermined...

  18. Partnering with the Military 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    and intensity, reduced sediment loss from train- ing areas by as much as 90 percent and improved the training areas? sustainability, Hoffman said. The compost project, federally funded through the NRCS, is an example of the military?s foresight and interest... project is another example of the military working to protect the ecosystem surrounding its training areas.? Now the project is moving into its next phase?large- scale application and refining the specific recommen- dations of using the compost...

  19. Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. military academic programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afedkcp |field2/%2A en Military

  1. Sandia Energy - Military

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power&Grid Action NetworkMilitary Home

  2. On Military Innovation: Toward an Analytical Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Andrew L

    2010-01-01

    emphasis on hardware in- novation or on software innovation?Is technological innovation being ac- companied bying spent on military innovation? 8. Have China’s military

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating Military Bases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Military Bases and Fleet Readiness for Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating Military Bases and Fleet Readiness for Electric Vehicles The Vehicle...

  4. Armed forces, states and threats : civil-military institutions and military power in modern democracies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVore, Marc Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Two longstanding questions preoccupying political scientists, military officers and policymakers alike are how should and how do political leaders interact with military professionals? This thesis argues that historic ...

  5. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  6. Modeling the Alaskan Continental Shelf waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.K.; Leendertse, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional ocean circulation model and two dimensional stochastic weather model used to calculate hypothetical oil-spill trajectories over the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas. Special consideration is given to the movement of sea ice in areas characterized by the presence of seasonal ice, and to ice/water interaction under different current and wind conditions. Spreading, dispersion, and weathering of crude oil, and probable landfalls of trajectories are calculated under hypothetical scenarios of oil spills from tanker accidents and well blow-outs. The report also provides comparisons between simulated data on water and sea ice motion with available field observations.

  7. CIVIL-MILITARY GAP AND MILITARY EFFECTIVENESS: THE IMPACT OF IDEOLOGY AND MILITARY EXPERIENCE GAP ON DEFENSE SPENDING IN THE UNITED STATES, 1952-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Byeonggu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of civil-military gap have argued that the difference in values, perspectives, and opinions between civilians and the military matters because it determines military effectiveness, but empirical analyses ...

  8. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  9. Military Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  10. Cicero de re militari: a civilian perspective on military matters in the late Republic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liong, Katherine Amie

    2011-06-30

    Cicero‘s value as a military commentator has traditionally been obscured by his reputation as an unmilitary figure. This focus ignores the considerable quantity – and quality – of references to military matters in his ...

  11. Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department is taking steps to leverage the skill sets of our military veterans in support of the wind energy industry.

  12. Frameworks for Analyzing Chinese Defense and Military Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Tai Ming; Mahnken, Thomas G; Ross, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    include those between product innovation (improved means)defense and military innovation and its concrete products.products, processes, and services for military and dual-use applications, and military innovation

  13. Explaining civil-military relations in Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, Jia-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Civil-military relations describe the interactions and balance of power between the civilians and the military in a nation state. Due to the organizational apparatus and capacity for forcible coercion that the military ...

  14. Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals May 30-31, 2013 Image of a speaker at...

  15. Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money May 7, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis A retirement...

  16. Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Substantial increases in brake power and...

  17. War Upon the Map: The Politics of Military User Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Jon R.

    2006-07-18

    While military personnel are often involved in the design of information technology, the literature on military innovation generally assumes defense contractors are the primary producers. Furthermore, general organizational ...

  18. Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2010 Military...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Military Energy and Alternative Fuels Conference Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2010 Military Energy and Alternative Fuels Conference This presentation by DOE's...

  19. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities. Pacific update: August 1987 - November 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slitor, Douglas L.; Wiese, Jeffrey D.; Karpas, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    This Pacific Update focuses on the geology and petroleum potential of the Central California and Washington-Oregon OCS Planning Areas. This report discusses the following topics: offshore oil and gas resources of the Pacific region; project-specific developments and status; and magnitude and timing of offshore developments. (CBS)

  20. Shelf-edge deltas and drowned barrierisland complexes on the northwest Florida outer continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    barrier­island system developed on its south and southwestern rims. The deltas appear to have formed

  1. The North American Atlantic outer continental margin landslides data base: Summary and observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, J.S.; O'Leary, D.W. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A compilation of published data from 179 Quaternary mass movement features was analyzed to determine the common attributes of the slides, to reveal general trends, and to classify and compare slide types. The data set was derived primarily from high-resolution, seismic-reflection data and sidescan-sonar images. In general, evidence of slope failure is found throughout the length of the margin and in all water depths. Slides have occurred on slope angles ranging from 1{degree} to 30{degree} (avg.{approximately}5{degree}); they vary in width from 0.2 to 50 km (avg. {approximately}4 km) and in length from 0.3 to 380 km (avg. {approximately}10 km) and have been reported to be as thick as 650 m. They are slightly more prevalent on open slopes than in other physiographic settings (e.g., canyons, ridges, spurs) and more commonly translational than rotational (i.e., slumps). The slides show no striking affinity for a particular depth range, either in the data set as a whole or when analyzed in terms of physiographic setting, size, slope angle, or other basis for classification. Comparison of slides found on the open slope with those found within canyons shows that the average open slope slide tends to occur at lower slope angles and is much larger (by an order of magnitude) than the average canyon slide. Regardless of the physiographic setting or other characteristic, large-scale slides (area >100 km{sup 2}) rather than small-scale slides (area <10 km{sup 2}) tend to be associated with gentle slopes ({approximately}3-4{degree}) Similarly, slides generated on steep slopes ({>=}10{degree}), regardless of other attributes, tend to be small (avg. area <5 km{sup 2}). With few exceptions, comparisons between slide categories show only minor differences.

  2. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  3. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Carpenter, G.B.; Amato, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region declined slightly in 1983. Four wells were spudded during the year: 2 in the offshore Baltimore Canyon area and 2 onshore in Lee County, North Carolina. One North Carolina well was drilled, and the other was being tested at year end. In April, 4050 tracts were offered in the mid-Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 76), the first area-wide offering of offshore oil and gas leases under the Department of the Interior's new streamlined leasing system. Bids of $86,822,680 were exposed on 40 tracts, and 37 tracts were subsequently leased. In July 3, 082 tracts were offered in the south Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 78). Bids of $14,562,040 were exposed on 11 tracts, and all high bids were accepted. Seismic data acquisition decreased 64% below the 1982 level to 13,166 line-mi (21,189 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  5. Title 43 USC 1331 Definitions for Subchapter III - Outer Continental Shelf

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film Solar TechnologiesCFR 1201 General JumpWaterbodies |

  6. Information friction : information technology and military performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Jon Randall

    2011-01-01

    Militaries have long been eager to adopt the latest technology (IT) in a quest to improve knowledge of and control over the battlefield. At the same time, uncertainty and confusion have remained prominent in actual experience ...

  7. ITAM SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the public. Geographic Information System (GIS) provides spatial information that assists military trainers

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  10. Upper Plio-Pleistocene salt tectonics and seismic stratigraphy on the lower continental slope, Mississippi Canyon OCS Area, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jia-Yuh

    1993-01-01

    of the Mississippi Canyon and the northern part of the Atwater OCS (outer continental shelf) areas. The study area covers Shell's Mars prospect (M.C. Block 763) and Conoco's discovery (M.C. Block 243). From Lenticulina 1 (-2.2 Ma) to present, eight seismic...

  11. Radio Wave Emission from the Outer Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    Radio Wave Emission from the Outer Planets P. Zarka LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon #12;All outer planets) produce intense nonthermal radio emissions potentially interesting remote sensing tool of magnetospheric plasma(s) we can "see" magnetospheres directly, but do we understand what we see ? #12;"Radio

  12. ARPA-E: Improving Military Energy Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, Bryan; Mahvi, Allison; Stepien, Tom; Wasco, Mick

    2014-02-24

    The U.S. military has a vested interest in advancing microgrid technologies that can power forward operating bases. These technologies could not only help the military significantly reduce its energy demand both at home and abroad, but also they could reduce the number of fuel-supply convoys required on the battlefield and the number of troops killed in fuel-supply convoy attacks. This video highlights two ARPA-E projects that have formed strategic partnerships with the military to enable these microgrids at forward operating bases. Georgia Tech is developing an innovative absorption heat pump that utilizes exhaust heat to provide heating and cooling, which could cut the amount of energy used to heat and cool forward operating bases by 50%. Primus Power is developing a low-cost, energy-dense storage system that could store enough energy to operate a base for several days in the event of a disruption.

  13. ARPA-E: Improving Military Energy Security

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Willson, Bryan; Mahvi, Allison; Stepien, Tom; Wasco, Mick

    2014-03-13

    The U.S. military has a vested interest in advancing microgrid technologies that can power forward operating bases. These technologies could not only help the military significantly reduce its energy demand both at home and abroad, but also they could reduce the number of fuel-supply convoys required on the battlefield and the number of troops killed in fuel-supply convoy attacks. This video highlights two ARPA-E projects that have formed strategic partnerships with the military to enable these microgrids at forward operating bases. Georgia Tech is developing an innovative absorption heat pump that utilizes exhaust heat to provide heating and cooling, which could cut the amount of energy used to heat and cool forward operating bases by 50%. Primus Power is developing a low-cost, energy-dense storage system that could store enough energy to operate a base for several days in the event of a disruption.

  14. Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy June 12, 2013 - 7:06pm Addthis The DOE Office...

  15. United States military posture for FY 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of this statement on the military posture of the United States is to supplement testimony by the Chairman and other members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at congressional hearings in support of the FY 1989 Defense Budget. Chapter I is an overview that describes the main challenges to US national security, outlines objectives and elements of US military strategy, and highlights continuing efforts to field the best possible armed forces for the protection of US national interests. Chapter II compares US defense requirements and resource commitment with those of the Soviet Union. Chapter III provides an overview of the global military environment by comparing US and allied forces with Soviet and Warsaw Pact forces. Chapter IV assesses the current and projected capability of the US Armed Forces to meet the Soviet nuclear threat. Chapter V assesses the current and projected capability of the US Armed Forces, in concert with friends and allies, to meet the Soviet conventional military threat. This chapter deals primarily with joint perspectives that have increased the capabilities and efficiency of our forces. Chapter VI addresses other topics of interest. Unless otherwise noted, data shown in this report have used operational as opposed to treaty inventories for strategic weapon systems, a fiscal year cutoff date of 30 September 1987, and mobilized forces. Additionally, data have been developed based on a global as opposed to regional war scenario.

  16. Nanowarriors: Military Nanotechnology and Comic Books

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanowarriors: Military Nanotechnology and Comic Books Colin Milburn U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I with nanotechnology. The Army Research Office had issued broad agency solicitations for such a center in October 2001 what became dubbed the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN). MIT's proposal out- lined

  17. Frameworks for Analyzing Chinese Defense and Military Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Tai Ming; Mahnken, Thomas G; Ross, Andrew L

    2011-01-01

    in China. ” Figure 2. Military innovation matrix IncrementalDiscontinuous Sustaining innovation TechnologicalDoctrine/organization) Disruptive, revolutionary innovation

  18. Cultural intelligence support for military operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthormsen, Amy M.; MacKerrow, Edward P; Merritt, Terence M; Morgart, Ruth E

    2010-04-08

    It has long been recognized that military success relies on knowledge of the enemy. In the context of standard warfare, adequate knowledge of the enemy may be gained by analyzing observable, measurable data. In the context of modern counterinsurgency operations and the global war on terror, the task of predicting the behavior of the enemy is vastly more complex and difficult. Without an understanding of the ways individuals in the host nation interpret and react to events, no amount of objective information can provide the insight required to accurately predict behavior. US military doctrine has begun to recognize the importance of the many ways that local culture can affect operation success. Increasingly military decision makers use cultural information in the service of operation planning, and troops are provided with pre-deployment cultural training. However, no amount of training can cover the breadth and depth of potentially useful cultural information, and no amount of careful planning can avoid the need to adapt as situations develop. Therefore, a critical challenge is to provide useful tools to US personnel in their efforts to collect, analyze, and utilize cultural information. Essential functions for cultural support tools include the following: (1) to narrow down a broad range of available data and focus the user's attention on context-relevant information, (2) to present cultural information in an easily understood form, (3) to prompt the user to seek relevant information in the environment, (4) to synthesize information, and (5) to predict outcomes based on possible courses of operation. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the ways in which military operations can benefit from cultural intelligence. We then discuss frameworks for analyzing cultural information in the context of a military operation. We conclude with a demonstration of our current efforts to develop a tool that meets the aforementioned functional challenges.

  19. New Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: New Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New Opportunities for Outer...

  20. Continental Lower Crust Bradley R. Hacker,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    Continental Lower Crust Bradley R. Hacker,1 Peter B. Kelemen,2 and Mark D. Behn3 1 Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106; email: hacker@geol.ucsb.edu 2

  1. Military housing foam application and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in sustainable communities. This project consists of two activities conducted in Hawaii that focus on performance, integration and application of energy saving technologies. Hawaii has many energy challenges, making this location an excellent testbed for these activities. Under this project, spray foam technology was applied at military housing on Oahu and the consumption data collected. A cost benefit and operational analysis of the foam was completed. The second phase of this project included design, integration, and analysis of photovoltaic systems at a military community on Oahu. This phase of the project was conducted as part of Forest City's second Solar America Showcase Award.

  2. Political Stability and Military Intervention in Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Casey; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2013-01-01

    Policy choices in the wake of recent mass protests in Egypt will determine the likelihood of civil war in the short run and the prospects for democracy in the long run. Economic conditions can be improved by international action to reduce grain-based biofuel production and finance employment generation. Creating the conditions for stable democracy requires accepting power-sharing mechanisms in which the military will have an important role.

  3. Baseline Microstructural Characterization of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zapp, Phillip E.; Dunn, Kerry A

    2005-07-31

    Three DOE Standard 3013 outer storage containers were examined to characterize the microstructure of the type 316L stainless steel material of construction. Two of the containers were closure-welded yielding production-quality outer 3013 containers; the third examined container was not closed. Optical metallography and Knoop microhardness measurements were performed to establish a baseline characterization that will support future destructive examinations of 3013 outer containers in the storage inventory. Metallography revealed the microstructural features typical of this austenitic stainless steel as it is formed and welded. The grains were equiaxed with evident annealing twins. Flow lines were prominent in the forming directions of the cylindrical body and flat lids and bottom caps. No adverse indications were seen. Microhardness values, although widely varying, were consistent with annealed austenitic stainless steel. The data gathered as part of this characterization will be used as a baseline for the destructive examination of 3013 containers removed from the storage inventory.

  4. Collaborative Military Vehicle Design | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P rMilitary Vehicle Design Click to

  5. Loyalty for Sale? Military Spending and Coups d'Etat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, Gabriel

    2012-02-27

    other causes are present. This is consistent with the experience of Peru between 1912 and 1964, when "every civilian government that reduced the proportion of the national budget assigned to the Peruvian military was overthrown, and this despite... that the size of the military and the type of regime (whether democratic or whether a military dictatorship) lose their predictive power once country ?xed e¤ects are included. Only instability remains signi?cant, with its coe¢ cient largely unchanged.21...

  6. Resources for Military Families and Students Military Family Resources: Links to each armed service's support site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    http://www.commissaries.com/stores/html/store.cfm?dodaac=HQCSK5 #12;· Defense Department Family Web Reserve Affairs Family Readiness http://www.defenselink.mil/ra/html/familyreadiness.html Assistance for Mobilized Student Reservists http://www.defenselink.mil/ra/html/student.html Military Spouse Resources http

  7. Defining Behavior Of Computational Agents Based On Military Doctrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    involving several logistical, personnel, materials, supplies, etc. Combat simulations have an important role, ammunition, maintenance, etc. A military training can carried out in various hierarchical lev- els, since

  8. SMART BRIDGE: A Tool for Estimating the Military Load

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    information is described in the next section. Finally, the last section summarizes the SMART BRIDGE efforts. BIUDGE AND VEHICLE CLASSIFICATION The U . S . military uses the...

  9. Updated May 2012 MILITARY ACCESSIONS VITAL TO NATIONAL INTEREST (MAVNI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Updated May 2012 MILITARY ACCESSIONS VITAL TO NATIONAL INTEREST (MAVNI) RECRUITMENT PILOT are considered to be vital to the national interest. Those holding critical skills ­ physicians, nurses

  10. Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolkov, Benjamin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Galya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-26

    In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options. Below are a new definition of what doctrine meant in 2000 and an outline of the 2000 doctrine. An overview of the 2000 doctrine is: (1) The 2000 doctrine was a return to a more defensive posture; the threat of nuclear retaliation, rather than that of preemptive force, would be its deterrence; (2) In order to strengthen its nuclear deterrence, Russia extended and redefined the cases in which nuclear weapons could be used to include a wider range of conflict types and a larger spectrum of attackers; and (3) Russia's threats changed to reflect its latest fear of engaging in a limited conflict with no prospect of the use of nuclear deterrence. In 2006, the defense minister and deputy prime minister Sergei Ivanov announced that the government was starting on a draft of a future doctrine. Four years later, in 2010, the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation was put into effect with the intent of determining Russian doctrine until 2020. The 2010 doctrine, like all previous doctrines, was a product of the times in which it was written. Gone were many of the fears that had followed Russia for the past two decades. Below are an examination of the 2010 definition of doctrine as well as a brief analysis of the 2010 doctrine and its deviations from past doctrines. An overview of the 2010 doctrine is: (1) The new doctrine emphasizes the political centralization of command both in military policy and the use of nuclear weapons; (2) Nuclear doctrine remains the same in many aspects including the retention of first-use; (3) At the same time, doctrine was narrowed to using nuclear weapons only when the Russian state's existence is in danger; to continue strong deterrence, Russia also opted to follow the United States by introducing precision conventional weapons; (4) NATO is defined as Russia's primary external threat because of its increased global presence and its attempt to recruit states that are part of the Russian 'bloc'; and (5) The 2000 doctrine's defensive stance was left out of the doctrine; rumored options for use of nuclear weapons in local wars and in preemptive strikes were also left out.

  11. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  12. Russian military in the year 2000. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIlmail, J.F.; Jaworski, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    Through the use of content analysis, this paper attempts to paint a picture of the Russian military in the year 2000 and its impact on the US national security strategy. The research begins by defining the origin of Russian national security policy and how that translates into military policy and doctrine. A framework for evaluating Russian military doctrines is provided with a chronology of the military reform process and the related doctrinal reforms that has its birth in the 1987 announcement of a defensive-defense. Following from the doctrinal variant framework the new strategic missions of the 1992 draft military doctrine are presented with an analysis that shows they are a clear departure from the past and truly represent a defensive-defense type doctrine. Additionally, a comparison is made with the current military reform ongoing in Russia with the historical precedent of the Russian military reform of 1924-25. A rough outline of the separate branches of the Russian military both present and future is provided based on the ongoing trends in the reform process. This thumbnail sketch of the Russian military then assists in the analysis and conclusion that even after a possible 50% cutback in US military spending, in the year 2000 the Russian military will not pose a threat to US national security. The major caveat to this conclusion is in the realm of nuclear weapons and this issue is therefore discussed in some length....Former Soviet Union, Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), Conventional Forces in Europe treaty (CFE), European Security, New National Security Strategy, Nuclear Weapons, Nuclear Strategy.

  13. NEW HAMPSHIRE 4-H MILITARY PARTNERSHIP The Military 4-H Club Program is a component of the UNH Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth and Family Program.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    NEW HAMPSHIRE 4-H MILITARY PARTNERSHIP The Military 4-H Club Program is a component of the UNH-H member shows off her project with a smile! #12;NEW HAMPSHIRE MILITARY 4-H PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM · 4,139 New Hampshire youth age 18 and under living in military families, with 2,577 ages 6 through 18 · 221

  14. WILDLAND FIRE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products and services to assist military land managers and range operations personnel in protecting against is already in place. Fire Management Planning CEMML provides high quality fire management planning adviceWILDLAND FIRE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML | 1490 Campus

  15. Detecting Inaccurate Response Patterns in Korean Military Personality Inventory: An Application of Item Response Theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Seunghwa

    2013-07-27

    inaccurate responses results in the selection of inappropriate personnel or allows enlistment dodgers to avoid their military duty. This study conducted IRT-based person-fit analysis with the dichotomous military dataset in the Korean Military Personality...

  16. The Iranian Legacy in the 2011 Egyptian Revolution: Military Endurance and US Foreign Policy Priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alimagham, Pouya

    2013-01-01

    Egyptian military to power in Egypt and its proximity to thematter of the military’s power in Egypt highlights the corereal center of power in Egypt. ” Every Egyptian president

  17. Asymmetry of will : the effect of religious radicalism on state military doctrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Patrick (Patrick Joseph)

    2012-01-01

    How is a state's military doctrine affected by the presence of radical religious ideology in its military? Using analysis of satellite imagery, recent military exercises, and a series of source interviews, I examine the ...

  18. A critical appraisal of Byzantine military strategy, 400 - 1000 A.D. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacon, Peter Kirk

    1998-01-01

    Byzantine military strategy has been a neglected subject within the discipline of military history. For many years, examination of the military writings and the abilities of Byzantine commanders has been hampered by the ...

  19. Military implications of global warming. Strategy research project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, P.E.

    1999-05-20

    The 1998 National Security Strategy repeatedly cites global environmental issues as key to the long-term security of the United States. Similarly, US environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current US Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate change. It discusses related economic factors and environmental concerns. It assesses current White House policy as it relates to the US military. It reviews the Department of Defense strategy for energy conservation and reduction of greenhouse gases. Finally, it offers recommendations and options for military involvement to reduce global warming. Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the US military. As the United States leadership in environmental matters encourages global stability, the US military will be able to focus more on readiness and on military training and operations.

  20. Outlook of the Officers: Military Thought in Chile, 1960-1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bawden, John Richard

    2009-01-01

    national ideology. ECONOMIC OUTLOOK ‘Whether you like it orOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Outlook of the Officers: MilitaryOF THE DISSERTATION Outlook of the Officers: Military

  1. The military lens : doctrinal differences, misperception, and deterrence failure in Sino-American relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twomey, Christopher P

    2005-01-01

    Nations, because of their different strategic situations, histories, and military cultures can have dramatically different beliefs about the nature of effective military doctrine, strategy, and capabilities. This dissertation ...

  2. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Military housing privatization & the promise of design innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jason (Jason Robert)

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to answer the question, "Has the military housing privatization process produced design innovation?" Secondary questions are, "What specific role has the Army's Residential Communities ...

  4. 17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote, Owen R., 1960-

    A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the ...

  5. 17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations, Spring 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posen, Barry

    Explores the origins, rate, and impact of innovations in military organizations, doctrine, and weapons. Emphasis on organization theory approaches. Comparisons with nonmilitary and non-US experience included. From the ...

  6. UNIT TYPE MILITARY PROVIDES IIT PROVIDES (Navy/Marines)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    UNIT TYPE MILITARY PROVIDES IIT PROVIDES Naval (Navy/Marines) 4 year­Type 1 Full tuition and fees. Room and board* for all 4 years. Navy (Must be currently enlisted personnel) STA-21 Seaman to Admiral

  7. Ukraine's Military Role in the Black Sea Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffman, Amy Beth; Crump, James Andrew; Dickson, Robbi K.; Mueller, Meaghan; Pulis, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    Only Ukraine's civilian and military leadership can determine the best course of action Ukraine should undertake to secure the Black Sea region (BSR). By analyzing Ukraine's precarious security environment and assessing the current security...

  8. 17.952 Great Power Military Intervention, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posen, Barry

    The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states ...

  9. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML | 1490@cemml.colostate.edu | http://www.cemml.colostate.edu A Geographic Information System (GIS) is a necessary tool for effective

  10. Shooting up : the impact of illicit economics on military conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felbab-Brown, Vanda

    2007-01-01

    The study explores the nexus between illicit economies and military conflicts. It investigates when and how access by belligerents to the production and trafficking of illicit substances affects the strength of belligerents ...

  11. Needs of Military Families: Family and Educator Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classen, Audra I.

    2014-08-31

    strengths and generates unique ideas for overcoming obstacles. This study suggests partnerships between the school leadership and military command could assist families with the challenges of relocation and deployment when they also have children...

  12. Report: U.S. Military Accelerates Deployment of Clean Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy research partner for this report, 384 megawatts of installed renewable energy capacity are intalled on military facilities in mid-2013. By the end of 2018, it is estimated...

  13. Establishing a virtual manufacturing environment for military robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Ryan J. (Ryan John)

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the robotics industry have given the military an opportunity to capitalize on industry's innovation. Not only has core robotics technology improved but robotics manufacturing technology has also made ...

  14. Development Methodology for Power-Dense Military Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Laboratory data and modeling results are presented on a military auxiliary power unit engine that has a peak efficiency of 35.3% at an output shaft power of 25 kW.

  15. First War Syndrome : military culture, professionalization, and counterinsurgency doctrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Austin G

    2010-01-01

    Counterinsurgency was a persistent and important challenge to military organizations in the second half of the 20th century and seems likely to continue to pose a challenge in the 21st century. This makes understanding how ...

  16. Poliheuristic Theory and Alliance Dependence: Understanding Military Coalitions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Joon Guan

    2012-07-16

    This dissertation examines an increasingly common phenomenon in the post-Cold War context, the military coalition. At the heart of the dissertation is thus the question: what explains political leaders’ participation and ...

  17. Continental breakup and the dawn of humankind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformation AdministrationContactContinental breakup and the dawn

  18. Continental Biofuels Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,CoalConcordiaConsumer Connection Jump to:web (SmartContinental

  19. INTRODUCTION The continental promontory of the Eurasian plate in SE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    ­Java Trench, to the southeast Australian continental crust is colliding in eastern Indonesia University of London, Egham, Surrey, U.K. Christopher K. Morley Department of Petroleum Geoscience

  20. The occurrence of military coups in Latin America: some speculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cediel, Maria Cecilia Canals de

    1981-01-01

    THE OCCURRENCE OF MILITARY COUPS IN LATIN AMERICA: SOME SPECULATIONS A Thesis by MARIA CECILIA CANALS DE CEDIEL Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF ARTS Mav 1981 Major Subiect: Political Science THE OCCURRENCE OF MILITARY COUPS IN LATIN AMERICA: SOME SPECULATIONS A Thesis by MARIA CECILIA CANALS DE CEDIEL Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of Committee) / (Member) (Member...

  1. Organization charts of the Haitian judiciary and military

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01

    Occasional Paper N° 9 Organization Charts of the Haitian Judiciary and Military Institute of Haitian Studies University of Kansas Occasional Paper N° 9 Bryant C. Freeman, Ph.D. General Editor Organization Charts of the Haitian Judiciary... Tel.: (913) 864-4431 Occasional Paper N° 9 May 1995 ORGANIZATION CHARTS OF THE HAITIAN JUDICIARY AND MILITARY This is the ninth in a series of documents concerning Haiti to be made more readily available through the University of Kansas Institute...

  2. Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kemeny, George A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Churchill Boro, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

  3. New Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion Noble, Robert J.; SLAC; Amini, Rashied; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Caltech, JPL; Bennett, Gary...

  4. Wireless Transfer of Electricity in Outer Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolonkin, A

    2007-01-01

    Author offers conclusions from his research of a revolutionary new idea - transferring electric energy in the hard vacuum of outer space wirelessly, using a plasma power cord as an electric cable (wire). He shows that a certain minimal electric currency creates a compressed force that supports the plasma cable in the compacted form. A large energy can be transferred hundreds of millions of kilometers by this method. The required mass of the plasma cable is only hundreds of grams. He computed the macroprojects: transference of hundreds kilowatts of energy to Earth's Space Station, transferring energy to the Moon or back, transferring energy to a spaceship at distance 100 million of kilometers, the transfer energy to Mars when one is located at opposed side of the distant Sun, transfer colossal energy from one of Earth's continents to another continent (for example, between Europe-USA) wirelessly-using Earth's ionosphere as cable, using Earth as gigantic storage of electric energy, using the plasma ring as huge...

  5. Wireless Transfer of Electricity in Outer Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-05-07

    Author offers conclusions from his research of a revolutionary new idea - transferring electric energy in the hard vacuum of outer space wirelessly, using a plasma power cord as an electric cable (wire). He shows that a certain minimal electric currency creates a compressed force that supports the plasma cable in the compacted form. A large energy can be transferred hundreds of millions of kilometers by this method. The required mass of the plasma cable is only hundreds of grams. He computed the macroprojects: transference of hundreds kilowatts of energy to Earth Space Station, transferring energy to the Moon or back, transferring energy to a spaceship at distance 100 million of kilometers, the transfer energy to Mars when one is located at opposed side of the distant Sun, transfer colossal energy from one of Earth's continents to another continent (for example, between Europe-USA) wirelessly-using Earth ionosphere as cable, using Earth as gigantic storage of electric energy, using the plasma ring as huge MagSail for moving of spaceships. He also demonstrates that electric currency in a plasma cord can accelerate or brake spacecraft and space apparatus.

  6. Promoting Behavior-Based Energy Efficiency in Military Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AH McMakin; EL Malone; RE Lundgren

    1999-09-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) helps agencies reduce the cost of doing business through energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of solar and other renewable energy. As a large energy user, the U.S. military has been one of the government sectors of focus. Several military installations have shown substantial energy savings in past years. Most of these efficiency projects, however, have focused primarily on physical upgrades, technologies, and purchasing habits. Furthermost projects have focused on administrative and operational areas of energy use. Military residential housing, in particular, has received little formal attention for energy efficiency involving behaviors of the residents themselves. Behavior-based change is a challenging, but potentially fruitful area for energy conservation programs. However, behavioral change involves links with values, social networks and organizations, and new ways of thinking about living patterns. This handbook attempts to fill a gap by offering guidance for promoting such efforts.

  7. A perspective on safeguarding and monitoring of excess military plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-10-02

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective and framework for the development of safeguarding and monitoring procedures for the various stages of disposition of excess military plutonium. The paper briefly outlines and comments on some of the issues involved in safeguarding and monitoring excess military plutonium as it progresses from weapons through dismantlement, to fabrication as reactor fuel, to use in a reactor, and finally to storage and disposal as spent fuel. {open_quotes}Military{close_quotes} refers to ownership, and includes both reactor-grade and weapon-grade plutonium. {open_quotes}Excess{close_quotes} refers to plutonium (in any form) that a government decides is no longer needed for military use and can be irrevocably removed from military stockpiles. Many of the issues and proposals presented in this paper are based on, or are similar to, those mentioned in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on excess military plutonium. Safeguards for plutonium disposition are discussed elsewhere in terms of requirements established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Here, the discussion is less specific. The term {open_quotes}safeguarding{close_quotes} is used broadly to refer to materials control and accountancy (MC&A), containment and surveillance (C&S), and physical protection of nuclear materials by the state that possesses those materials. This is also referred to as material protection, control, and accountancy (MPCA). The term {open_quotes}safeguarding{close_quotes} was chosen for brevity and to distinguish MPCA considered in this paper from international or IAEA safeguards. {open_quotes}Monitoring{close_quotes} is used to refer to activities designed to assure another party (state or international organization) that the nuclear materials of the host state (the United States or Russia) are secure and not subject to unauthorized use.

  8. Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A

    2005-01-01

    The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

  9. Continental heat gain in the global climate system Hugo Beltrami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    from deep borehole profiles to quantify the continental component of Earth's changing energy budget. Although there has been considerable work on the determination of GSTHs from geothermal data [Beltrami

  10. Geotechnical characterization of sediments from Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Brian B. (Brian Bautista), 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Eight whole core sediment samples were obtained from ODP Site 1244, Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin with the goal of understanding the stress history, consolidation behavior and strength characteristics of the ...

  11. Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 1 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 1 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A. Proposition de 2015 Rémunération : 800 par mois (montant brut mensuel) Lieu: Continental Automotive France, 1 avenue.daurenjou@continental-corporation.com #12;Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 2 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A. Internship

  12. Synchronization of system-of-systems interfaces in military satellite communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark J. (Mark Jeffrey)

    2008-01-01

    Military systems continue to become more complex and nearly all are now part of one or more system of systems (SoS). Military satellite communications programs have expanded over the last decade from three distinct satellite ...

  13. A Survey of NASA and Military Standards on Fault Tolerance and Reliability Applied to Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice University - Center for Cooperative Autonomous Robots for Hazardous Environments

    A Survey of NASA and Military Standards on Fault Tolerance and Reliability Applied to Robotics of relevant Military and NASA standards for reliability and fault toler­ ance is included. 1 Introduction

  14. Essays on regional and firm-level productivity, military spending, and technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goudie, Bryan Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Oil Shocks, Military Spending, and Other Driving Forces”, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, International FinanceOil Shocks, Military Spending, and other Driving Forces”, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, International Finance

  15. Active Duty Military Tuition Waiver UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Active Duty Military Tuition Waiver UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO SEMESTER: __________ YEAR of the (DUTY STATION) State of New Mexico. This active duty assignment is for the period from _______________________________________________________ ORGANIZATION Return waiver to: The University of New Mexico Division of Enrollment Management Office

  16. Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.

    2012-05-01

    Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A net zero energy installation (NZEI) is one that produces as much energy from on-site renewable sources as it consumes. NZEI assessment provides a systematic approach to energy projects.

  17. Inter-Korean military confidence building after 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tae-woo, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Littlefield, Adriane C.; Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Sang-beom, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Koelm, Jennifer Gay; Olsen, John Norman; Myong-jin, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Sung-tack, Shin (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

    2003-08-01

    Tensions on the Korean Peninsula remain high despite a long-term strategy by South Korea to increase inter-Korean exchanges in economics, culture, sports, and other topics. This is because the process of reconciliation has rarely extended to military and security topics and those initiatives that were negotiated have been ineffective. Bilateral interactions must include actions to reduce threats and improve confidence associated with conventional military forces (land, sea, and air) as well as nuclear, chemical, and biological activities that are applicable to developing and producing weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The purpose of this project is to develop concepts for inter-Korean confidence building measures (CBMs) for military and WMD topics that South Korea could propose to the North when conditions are right. This report describes the historical and policy context for developing security-related CBMs and presents an array of bilateral options for conventional military and WMD topics within a consistent framework. The conceptual CBMs address two scenarios: (1) improved relations where construction of a peace regime becomes a full agenda item in inter-Korean dialogue, and (2) continued tense inter-Korean relations. Some measures could be proposed in the short term under current conditions, others might be implemented in a series of steps, while some require a higher level of cooperation than currently exists. To support decision making by political leaders, this research focuses on strategies and policy options and does not include technical details.

  18. forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil Compaction Using Hand-Held Soil Fort Collins, CO 80523-1490 January 2004 #12;#12;1 Guide to Sampling Soil Compaction Using Hand-Held Soil Penetrometers1 Prepared by Dave Jones and Matt Kunze Center for Environmental Management

  19. Royal Military College of Canada Collge militaire royal du Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    to study the toxicity of diluted bitumen in fish At the 2012-13 National Energy Board hearings to reviewRoyal Military College of Canada · Collège militaire royal du Canada Position for a Master student, Biotechnology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, or in any other program that is relevant to the proposed research

  20. Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Civilian Control over the Military

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a distaste for power, maintaining the integrity of civilian rule. However, subsequent history suggests centuries Latin American countries such as Ar- gentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru were run for long periods powerful the military, the greater the threat it would be to civilian governments. Yet, in fact

  1. 2013 NASFAA 1 Military and Veterans Tips Tip Sheet for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and will be starting college soon. My dad, an Army officer, died in Iraq in 2007. I just filed a FAFSA on the Web programs for students like me? Yes. You may be eligible to receive an Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant your parent or guardian died as a result of military service in Iraq or Afghanistan after 9/11/01 while

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML@cemml.colostate.edu | http://www.cemml.colostate.edu Environmental compliance and pollution prevention are critical aspects of any successful environmental program. The Center provides technical support in these key areas. CEMML

  3. Swords into plowshares: Military geology and national security projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    Military geology and national security projects are often comparable, achieving their rai-son d`etre in support of national goals, military operations, and/or systems-all for vital national interests. The application of Geoscience to these ends, especially engineering geology, has occurred from pole to pole and included every conceivable environment and natural condition. In the conduct of such projects, the Geosciences have advanced, and vice versa. Desert trafficability, most notably regarding playa surfaces, is both temporary and variable and not a persistent condition as some early authors believed. Playas in Australia, Iran, and the US show that saline efflorescence is removed following surface water dissolution and subsequent deflation, resulting in very hard crusts. Magadiite, a hydrous sodium silicate and possible precursor of bedded chert, was first discovered in North America at Alkali Lake, OR, during a military project. Pleistocene Lake Trinity, a small and mostly buried evaporate basin in the northern Jornada del Muerto, NM, was discovered during exploratory drilling in support of a military test program.

  4. [?/Fe] ABUNDANCES OF FOUR OUTER M31 HALO STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla; Tollerud, Erik J. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kirby, Evan N. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra, E-mail: luis.vargas@yale.edu [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We present alpha element to iron abundance ratios, [?/Fe], for four stars in the outer stellar halo of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The stars were identified as high-likelihood field halo stars by Gilbert et al. and lie at projected distances between 70 and 140 kpc from M31's center. These are the first alpha abundances measured for a halo star in a galaxy beyond the Milky Way. The stars range in metallicity between [Fe/H] = –2.2 and [Fe/H] = –1.4. The sample's average [?/Fe] ratio is +0.20 ± 0.20. The best-fit average value is elevated above solar, which is consistent with rapid chemical enrichment from Type II supernovae. The mean [?/Fe] ratio of our M31 outer halo sample agrees (within the uncertainties) with that of Milky Way inner/outer halo stars that have a comparable range of [Fe/H].

  5. Outer radiation belt boundary location relative to the magnetopause: Implications for magnetopause shadowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Outer radiation belt boundary location relative to the magnetopause: Implications for magnetopause fluxes of the outer radiation belt often decrease rapidly in response to solar wind disturbances. If the MPS is essential for outer radiation belt electron losses, a close relationship between the outer edge

  6. "The Second American School of Arms": the Virginia Military Institute and the advent of state military education, 1835-1851 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wineman, Bradford Alexander

    2001-01-01

    with other early narrative histories such as Jennings Wise's Milit Histo of VMI from 1839 and Superintendent Francis H. Smith's Histo of the Vir 'a Militar Institute, are all hindered by personal biases that often interrupt their narratives to exalt... years later. Chapter Three traces VMI's development from an abstract proposal initiated by the local townspeople to a fully functioning military academy. The Institute's three founders, J. T. L. Preston, Colonel Claudius Crozet, and Francis H. Smith...

  7. Plasma in the outer heliosphere and the heliosheath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    from from 2004 to 2006.1. The top panel shows the solar wind speed, the middle panel the solar wind dynamic pressure, and the bottom panel the >0.5 MeV ion counting rate. From mid-2002 to mid-2005 the solar in the outer heliosphere. We present recent data which shows that the solar wind speed is decreasing

  8. Outer inverses: Jacobi type identities and nullities of submatrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bapat, Ravindra B.

    Outer inverses: Jacobi type identities and nullities of submatrices@isid.ac.in Abstract According to the Jacobi identity, if A is an invertible matrix then any min* *or of A-1 for special generalized * *in- verses. A permanental analog of the Jacobi identity is proved. Bounds

  9. Large-Eddy Observation of Post-Cold-Frontal Continental Stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.; Schultz, David M.

    2010-10-01

    and continental stratocumulus to each other, the approach of large-eddy observation (LEO) was applied to a case of nocturnal continental stratocumulus observed over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the central...

  10. Stratigraphic architecture and evolution of the continental slope system in offshore Hainan, northern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Stratigraphic architecture and evolution of the continental slope system in offshore Hainan the evolution of the stratigraphic architecture of two siliciclastic northern South China Sea continental slope structures, and slump deposits. The associated stratigraphic architecture in slope clinoforms is chaotic

  11. Continental ood basalts: episodic magmatism above long-lived hotspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Stephen T.

    November 1999 Abstract The eruption of continental flood basalt (CFB) may reflect episodic magmatism above long-lived mantle plumes. The Iceland and Yellowstone hotspots have generated successive CFB provinces in subducting oceanic lithosphere led to subsequent breakthrough and eruption of CFB. Since both mantle plume

  12. From Lithospheric Thickening and Divergent Collapse to Active Continental Rifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey, Patrice F.

    -thickening lithosphere), provided that gravitational collapse is accommodated by the passive displacement be important (Houseman andThermal thinning of the lithospheric mantle (above a mantle plume for instance) has of the lithosphere by the plume may be important (Houseman and England, 1986), active continental rifting is usually

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Marine flooding event in continental Triassic facies identified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    representing a high-energy event and records exceptional marine flooding in a distal fluvial environmentORIGINAL ARTICLE Marine flooding event in continental Triassic facies identified by a nothosaur Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Sudden marine flooding within otherwise con- tinental

  14. The cooperative monitoring of military forces: An exercise in strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This exercise examines a hypothetical security problem associated with conventional military forces and border security: a surprise attack. The goal of the exercise is to provide an opportunity to think about how cooperative monitoring can be part of regional security. Two hypothetical countries, VOLCANOES and MOUNTAINS, have been created for this exercise based on the US states of Arizona and New Mexico. They were selected for their size and variety of terrain. Hypothetical background information and characteristics of the two countries are provided. An outline of activities is given, including prioritization of security concerns and monitoring of objectives for security concerns. 6 tabs.

  15. Military students access top R&D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7 Assessment ofLana7, atScienceWasteMilitary students

  16. Essays on regional and firm-level productivity, military spending, and technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goudie, Bryan Daniel

    2008-01-01

    than small companies to a military prime contract award.However, these contracts make up a very small fraction ofaside contracts are competitive, but only certified small

  17. Behavioral representation of military tactics for single-vehicle autonomous rotorcraft via statecharts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickie, Mark M

    2005-01-01

    Over the past several years, aerospace companies have developed unmanned helicopters suitable for integration into military operations as reconnaissance platforms. These rotorcraft, however, require ground-based human ...

  18. Power Triangle: Military, Security, and Politics in the Shaping of the Egyptian, Iranian, and Turkish Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandil, Hazem Khaled

    2012-01-01

    on the Liquidation of Feudalism),” in Al-Tali’ah 3 (3): 124-economic enticements. Under feudalism, military commandersafter eradicating feudalism and manipulative capitalism,

  19. Understanding Military Innovation: Chinese Defense S&T in Historical and Theoretical Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahnken, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    ABILITY TO DETECT INNOVATION There are several additionaland recog- nize Chinese innovation. These include: Thomas G.Understanding Military Innovation: Chinese Defense S&T in

  20. Unproven screening devices threaten the lives of police and military.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Dale W.

    2010-07-01

    In a world plagued with improvised explosive devices, drugs and dangerous people, the desire to field technology to protect our police and military is providing a fertile market for the proliferation of protection technologies that range from the unproven to the disproven. The market place is currently being flooded with detection equipment making inflated and inaccurate marketing claims of high reliably, high detection probabilities, and ease of operation - all while offering detection capabilities at safe distances. The manufacturers of these devices have found a willing global marketplace, which includes some of the most dangerous places in the world. Despite a wealth of contradictory performance and testing data available on the Internet, sales of these devices remain brisk and profitable. Rather than enhancing the security of police and military personnel, the reliance on these unproven and disproven devices is creating a sense of false security that is actually lowering the safety of front-line forces in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. This paper addresses the development and distribution history of some of these devices and describes the testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, and other reputable testing agencies that illustrate the real danger in using this kind of unproven technology.

  1. On the outer boundary of the sunspot penumbra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kalman

    2002-02-06

    Comparison of photographic observations and vector-magnetograph measurements demonstrate, that the outer boundary of the sunspot penumbra --even in complex sunspot groups-- closely follows the 0.075T isogauss line of the total value of the magnetic field, corresponding approximately to the equipartition value in the photosphere. Radio observations also show this feature. The thick penumbra model with interchange convection (Jahn and Schmidt, 1994) gives the best explanation of the penumbral structure.

  2. Structural Basis for Alginate Secretion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Whitney; I Hay; C Li; P Eckford; H Robinson; M Amaya; L Wood; D Ohman; C Bear; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  3. Structural basis for alginate secretion across the bacterial outer membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, J.C.; Robinson, H.; Hay, I. D.; Li, C.; Eckford, P. D. W.; Amaya, M. F.; Wood, L. F.; Ohman, D. E.; Bear, C. E.; Rehm, B. H.; Howell, P. L.

    2011-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  4. New mineralogy of the outer solar system and the high-pressure behaviour of methane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard-Casely, Helen E.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis will introduce the study of methane as a mineral. Along with ammonia and water, methane is one of the main planetary-forming materials in the outer solar system. The topic of `new mineralogy of the outer solar ...

  5. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  6. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  9. Radial distributions of equatorial phase space density for outer radiation belt electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Radial distributions of equatorial phase space density for outer radiation belt electrons D. L throughout the outer radiation belt using data from the Solid State Telescopes on THEMIS-D. We estimate for the relativistic and non-relativistic populations. Specifically, the PSD distribution of outer belt relativistic

  10. SAID/SAPSrelated VLF waves and the outer radiation belt boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    SAID/SAPSrelated VLF waves and the outer radiation belt boundary Evgeny Mishin,1 Jay Albert,1 for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms. Citation: Mishin, E., J. Albert, and O. Santolik (2011), SAID/SAPSrelated VLF waves and the outer radiation belt boundary, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38

  11. Assessing the impacts of military vehicle traffic on natural areas. Introduction to the special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

    Assessing the impacts of military vehicle traffic on natural areas. Introduction to the special issue and review of the relevant military vehicle impact literature Alan B. Anderson a,*, Antonio J, and the International Society for Terrain-Vehicle Systems cosponsored a symposium titled ``Assessing the Impacts

  12. Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 LCTA Relational Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 LCTA Relational Database Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands No. 5 - 1997 The LCTA data is stored in a relational database, currently SQLBase from Gupta Technologies Inc. To the inexperienced user the LCTA database can seem very complex with 45

  13. License for Non-Military Software Implementations of OCB January 10, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogaway, Phillip

    License for Non-Military Software Implementations of OCB January 10, 2013 1 Definitions 1.1 "Licensor" means Phillip Rogaway. 1.2 "Licensed Patents" means any patent that claims priority to United invention claimed in the Licensed Patents. 1.4 "Military Use" means any Use by, in cooperation with

  14. Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Handheld Data Files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Handheld Data Files Understanding the Process Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands No. 10 - 1998 The purpose of this document Data File Requirements Three criteria are checked by the loading program before the import process

  15. Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Data from Mixed Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Data from Mixed Data Collection Techniques Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands No. 7 - 1997 Currently the LCTA data logger has, for example, plot 1 will have an additional file marked as 301. Follow the procedures below to load the data

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING / NEPA SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING / NEPA SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML@cemml.colostate.edu | http://www.cemml.colostate.edu Effective environmental planning and management of military and testing. The Center develops environmental planning documents for installations to incorporate

  17. Miocene structure of Mustang Island, Mustang Island East Addition and part of Matagorda Island, Outer Continental Shelf areas, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasande, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the Miocene structure of Mustang Island and the neighboring areas in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico helps to increase knowledge of the geology and hence contribute to petroleum exploration and production in the area. Interpretation...

  18. Mesozoic stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the Exxon 975-1 well, Georges Bank Basin, U. S. North Atlantic outer continental shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W. . Quissett Labs.)

    1993-03-01

    The Exxon 975--1 well, located in the southeastern part of the Georges Bank Basin, was drilled to a total depth of 4,452 m relative to the Kelly Bushing. The oldest sediments penetrated by the well are Middle Jurassic (Bajocian-Early Bathonian), but unambiguous seismic correlations with the COST G--1 and G--2 wells show that about 6,860 m of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks rest on the Paleozoic basement at the 975--1 wellsite. The Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary in the well is placed at 1,673 m; the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary occurs at 384 m. Limestone is predominant below 3,966 m (Iroquois Formation), and at the intervals 3,810--3,246 m and 1,897--1,654 m (lower and upper tongues of the Abenaki Formation). Siliciclastics of the Mohican, undivided Mic Mac-Mohawk, Missisauga, Logan Canyon, and Dawson Canyon Formations dominate the remainder of the Mesozoic section. The Exxon 975--1 well penetrated updip, more terrestrial lithofacies than the COST G--2, Conoco 145--1, and Mobil 312--1 wells. Salt, anhydrite, dolomite, and the micritic textures of the carbonates in the Iroquois Formation of the Exxon 975--1 well suggest hypersaline restricted marine and supratidal depositional environments. The predominantly nonmarine deltaic siliciclastics of the Mohican, Misaine Shale, and Mic Mac-Mohawk units are thicker in the Exxon 975--1 well, whereas marine carbonates of the Scatarie and Bacarro Limestones are usually thinner than at the downdip (seaward) wellsites. Similarly, the Early Cretaceous Missisauga and Logan Canyon Formations represent lower delta plain (alluvial and swamp) and delta front (beach, bar, and lagoon) facies at the Exxon 975--1 wellsite, whereas correlative downdip facies represent shallow marine to delta front deposition.

  19. EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Loan Programs Office is proposing to offer a loan guarantee to Cape Wind Associates, LLC for the construction and start-up of the Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, offshore of Massachusetts. The proposed Cape Wind Energy Project would consist of up to 130, 3.6-MW turbine generators, in an area of roughly 25-square miles, and would include 12.5 miles of 115-kilovolt submarine transmission cable and an electric service platform. To inform DOE's decision regarding a loan guarantee, DOE adopted the Department of the Interior’s 2009 Final Cape Wind Energy Project EIS, in combination with two Cape Wind Environmental Assessments dated May 2010 and April 2011 (per 40 CFR 1506.4), as a DOE Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0470). The adequacy of the Department of the Interior final EIS adopted by DOE is the subject of a judicial action. This project is inactive.

  20. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Mid-Atlantic and their onshore impacts: a summary report, November 1979. Update 3, August 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    At the present, there are no operators drilling in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The prime targets for future exploration will be in areas of 3000 to 6000 feet (914 to 1829 m) depth of water, seaward of previously leased tracts. No commercial discoveries have been found during the 4-year drilling history of the area. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Little development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with upcoming Lease Sale 59. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of future exploration efforts. After Lease Sale 59, the next sale is Lease Sale 76, which is tentatively scheduled for March 1983.

  1. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, July 1980. Update 1, February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1981-02-01

    Lease Sale 43, in the Southeast Georgia Embayment, was the first lease sale to be held in the South Atlantic. Two additional sales are scheduled between now and 1985: Sale 56 is scheduled for August 1981 and Sale 78, for January 1984. All leases from Sale 43 remain active, but no drilling has taken place since the last of six dry holes was plugged and abandoned. There are no additional plans for drilling on Sale 43 leases in the immediate future. Future exploration may shift away from previous Sale 43 leased tracts to deep-water areas after Sale 56. One hundred thirty of the 286 proposed Sale 56 tracts are in deep-water. The geologic conditions in the deep-water areas are more favorable for hydrocarbon accumulation than those under shallower waters. Structures that may provide trapping mechanisms have been shown to exist in the area. Because leases in deep-water areas take longer and are more costly to explore and develop than those in areas of shallower water, industry consensus is that longer primary lease terms may be required and some delays in acquiring rigs may be experienced. The Sale 43 area appears to be a region of relatively low hydrocarbon-bearing potential. However, the Bureau of Land Management's Intergovernmental Planning Program is preparing the necessary Regional Transportation Management Plan for the entire South Atlantic OCS Region. Nearly all the support facilities associated with Sale 43 have been removed or converted to other uses. Temporary support facilities are likely to be reactivated only if Sale 56 results in further exploration of the South Atlantic OCS.

  2. Application of discrete event simulation techniques for prioritization of U.S. Air Force Military Family Housing Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krukenberg, Harry J.

    1996-01-01

    This study, through the use of discrete event simulation and modeling, explores various prioritization disciplines for U.S. Air Force Military Family Housing maintenance, repair, and renovation projects. Actual data from the Military Family Housing...

  3. The weight of an assassin's mace : vulnerabilities in the US military's satellite communications and China's information warfare threat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Benjamin M

    2005-01-01

    Believing that an information Revolution of Military Affairs has occurred, the US military is currently transforming to achieve dominance over the full spectrum of deployment scenarios with a lighter, more mobile, and more ...

  4. Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orosa, John

    2014-03-11

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

  5. UNIT COSTS fot ARMY FACILITIES -MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PAX NEWSLETTER NO. 3.2.2, dated 30 Mar 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ENGLISH UNIT COSTS fot ARMY FACILITIES - MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PAX NEWSLETTER NO. 3.2.2, dated 30-Service Military Construction Program (MCP) Index, and Table 1, Size Adjustment Factors, contained in TM 5-800-4, Programming Cost Estimates for Military Construction, dated May 1994. It may be used as a guide

  6. Testing outer boundary treatments for the Einstein equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Rinne; Lee Lindblom; Mark A. Scheel

    2007-07-25

    Various methods of treating outer boundaries in numerical relativity are compared using a simple test problem: a Schwarzschild black hole with an outgoing gravitational wave perturbation. Numerical solutions computed using different boundary treatments are compared to a `reference' numerical solution obtained by placing the outer boundary at a very large radius. For each boundary treatment, the full solutions including constraint violations and extracted gravitational waves are compared to those of the reference solution, thereby assessing the reflections caused by the artificial boundary. These tests use a first-order generalized harmonic formulation of the Einstein equations. Constraint-preserving boundary conditions for this system are reviewed, and an improved boundary condition on the gauge degrees of freedom is presented. Alternate boundary conditions evaluated here include freezing the incoming characteristic fields, Sommerfeld boundary conditions, and the constraint-preserving boundary conditions of Kreiss and Winicour. Rather different approaches to boundary treatments, such as sponge layers and spatial compactification, are also tested. Overall the best treatment found here combines boundary conditions that preserve the constraints, freeze the Newman-Penrose scalar Psi_0, and control gauge reflections.

  7. Sale of US military aircraft to Saudi Arabia. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bents, E.R.

    1995-05-01

    The end of the Cold War in the late 1980s resulted in a gigantic downsizing and consolidation of America`s defense industries, as domestic demand plummeted and the volume of international arms trading fell. However, in total world arms exports the United States exports more arms than any other nation. The country of Saudi Arabia has been the destination of a disproportionate amount of these weapons. The following account is an examination of the US military aerospace industry, the world military aerospace market, US government policy concerning arms exports, and the Saudi aerospace market. Each of these entities profoundly impacts US-Saudi military aerospace commerce. By individually analyzing the above factors, it will be demonstrated that the supply relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia is dependent on the convergence of several long standing and deep seated aspirations on the part of the three major players: the US Aerospace Industry, the US Government, and the Saudi Government. The US military aerospace industry`s exports are critical to ensure its independent survival, help fund crucial RD programs, and maintain a viable defense high tech industrial base in the U.S. In addition, it wishes to exert a military presence in the Gulf area and nurture relations with Saudi Arabia in particular, as the world`s leading oil producer. The Saudi government requires a military defense anchored in high tech aerospace systems, as well as a dependable and capable military ally such as the US.

  8. Affect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on military facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trembly, L.A. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    EPA has promulgated a number of NESHAPs in accordance with Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) that have affected military installations. This paper provides a survey of NESHAP applicability on military installations and where feasible outlines compliance efforts and quantifies the emission reductions achieved. This paper focuses on NESHAPs promulgated since CAAA90. Specific NESHAPs that will be discussed include Halogenated Solvent Cleaners, Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaners, Chromium Electroplating and Anodizing Tanks, Ship Building and Repair Operations and Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Operations. Other NESHAPs affecting military installations may be addressed if data are available.

  9. Any Base USA: The Significance of Military Culture in the Construction of Identity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girard, Jessica Nichole

    2014-05-02

    if they are enrolled full time in a university or college. Military children- Children who are living with their active duty military parent at the parent’s current duty station. Emerging adulthood is a time when individuals have left the dependency of childhood... and adolescence, but have not yet entered the enduring responsibilities that are normative of adulthood (Arnett 2000). Deployment- This is the period when the active duty service member is away from the family due to military obligations PCS- Permanent Change...

  10. Energy efficiency in military housing: Monitoring to support revitalization guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

    1994-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working with the US Army, the US Air Force, and the US Department of Energy to develop a guidebook to be used by architectural and engineering firms in the design phases of military family housing revitalization projects. The purpose of the guidebook is to ensure that energy efficiency is properly addressed in revitalization projects. Monitoring space-heating and cooling energy used in houses both before and after they are revitalized is necessary in order to assess the amount of energy saved by the revitalization process. Three different methods of conducting monitoring experiments are discussed, as well as the methods of data analysis to be used. Houses will be monitored individually using standard gas and electric meters to obtain heating and cooling data for the houses. The authors recommend conducting monitoring programs at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, and Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, because of their project schedules and potential for savings. They do not recommend doing any monitoring at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, because of the relatively small savings that they expect revitalization to accomplish there. They do not recommend seeking out alternative sites for monitoring because of the time required to become familiar with the installation and also because revitalization schedules at alternative sites may be no better than those at the sites they inspected.

  11. Corrosion investigation of coatings for surface protection of military hardware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, N.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1996-10-01

    A product improvement program (PIP) for the surface finish of some steel military hardware has been recently initiated by the Navy. Presently the metal cleaning methods, interior and exterior surface finishes and corrosion protection requirements for such hardware are specified in MIL-P-18948. The coated hardware are stored in a warehouse structure for long durations. Because these storage places are not environmentally controlled (that is, no temperature or humidity control) the corrosion protection has not been adequate. The exterior surfaces of the hardware are coated with a corrosion inhibiting alkyd primer coating (TT-P-664) or a rust inhibiting lacquer primer coating (MIL-P-11414) to a thickness of 0.4 to 0.6 mils. The exterior color paint, (MIL-E-52891 or MIL-P11195), is applied to a thickness of 1.5 mils. The investigation of various coatings to replace the present system is an ongoing effort. The coatings have been examined from a corrosion protection vantage point and results have been correlated. The coatings were evaluated by exposing them to natural marine atmosphere and seawater wetdown tests. The coatings were also exposed to a 5.0% sodium chloride solution in a laboratory environmental salt fog chamber for 500 hours. Selected coatings were examined using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The results obtained from field tests, salt fog, and EIS measurements are discussed.

  12. Energy output from a single outer hair cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwasa, Kuni H

    2016-01-01

    Electromotility of outer hair cells (OHCs) has been extensively studied with in vitro experiments because of its physiological significance in the cochlear amplifier, which provides the exquisite sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian ear. However, these studies have been performed largely under load-free conditions or with static load, while these cells function in vivo in a dynamic environment, receiving electrical energy to enhance mechanical oscillation in the inner ear. This gap leaves uncertainties in addressing a key issue, how much mechanical energy an OHC provides. The present report is an attempt of bridging the gap by introducing a simple one-dimensional model for electromotility of OHC in a dynamic environment. This model incorporates a feedback loop involving the receptor potential and the mechanical load on OHC, and leads to an analytical expression for the membrane capacitance, which explicitly describes the dependence on the elastic load, viscous drag, and the mass. The derived...

  13. Coalescence of bubbles and drops in an outer fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph D. Paulsen; Rémi Carmigniani; Anerudh Kannan; Justin C. Burton; Sidney R. Nagel

    2014-07-24

    When two liquid drops touch, a microscopic connecting liquid bridge forms and rapidly grows as the two drops merge into one. Whereas coalescence has been thoroughly studied when drops coalesce in vacuum or air, many important situations involve coalescence in a dense surrounding fluid, such as oil coalescence in brine. Here we study the merging of gas bubbles and liquid drops in an external fluid. Our data indicate that the flows occur over much larger length scales in the outer fluid than inside the drops themselves. Thus we find that the asymptotic early regime is always dominated by the viscosity of the drops, independent of the external fluid. A phase diagram showing the crossovers into the different possible late-time dynamics identifies a dimensionless number that signifies when the external viscosity can be important.

  14. Coalescence of bubbles and drops in an outer fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulsen, Joseph D; Kannan, Anerudh; Burton, Justin C; Nagel, Sidney R

    2014-01-01

    When two liquid drops touch, a microscopic connecting liquid bridge forms and rapidly grows as the two drops merge into one. Whereas coalescence has been thoroughly studied when drops coalesce in vacuum or air, many important situations involve coalescence in a dense surrounding fluid, such as oil coalescence in brine. Here we study the merging of gas bubbles and liquid drops in an external fluid. Our data indicate that the flows occur over much larger length scales in the outer fluid than inside the drops themselves. Thus we find that the asymptotic early regime is always dominated by the viscosity of the drops, independent of the external fluid. A phase diagram showing the crossovers into the different possible late-time dynamics identifies a dimensionless number that signifies when the external viscosity can be important.

  15. Two new basaltic asteroids in the Outer Main Belt?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Duffard; F. Roig

    2008-01-14

    The identification of basaltic asteroids in the asteroid Main Belt and the description of their surface mineralogy is necessary to understand the diversity in the collection of basaltic meteorites. Basaltic asteroids can be identified from their visible reflectance spectra and are classified as V-type in the usual taxonomies. In this work, we report visible spectroscopic observations of two candidate V-type asteroids, (7472) Kumakiri and (10537) 1991 RY16, located in the outer Main Belt (a > 2.85 UA). These candidate have been previously identified by Roig and Gil-Hutton (2006, Icarus 183, 411) using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey colors. The spectroscopic observations have been obtained at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain, during observational runs in November and December 2006. The spectra of these two asteroids show the steep slope shortwards of 0.70 microns and the deep absorption feature longwards of 0.75 microns that are characteristic of V-type asteroids. However, the presence of a shallow but conspicuous absorption band around 0.65 microns opens some questions about the actual mineralogy of these two asteroids. Such band has never been observed before in basaltic asteroids with the intensity we detected it. We discuss the possibility for this shallow absorption feature to be caused by the presence of chromium on the asteroid surface. Our results indicate that, together with (1459) Magnya, asteroids (7472) Kumakiri and (10537) 1991 RY16 may be the only traces of basaltic material found up to now in the outer Main Belt.

  16. 17.953 U.S. Military Budget and Force Planning, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Cindy

    The United States is spending about $400 billion this year on national defense, some $40 billion on homeland security, and $85 billion on military operations and nation-building in Iraq and Afghanistan. This course is for ...

  17. Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (970) 491-2748 cemml@cemml.colostate.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to provide training realism while minimizing risk to natural and cultural resources. Damage repair and Reconfiguration CEMML staff work closely with military trainers and installation staff to reconfigure training

  18. Politicized armies, militarized politics : civil-military relations in Turkey and Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liaras, Evangelos

    2007-01-01

    Despite their common Ottoman heritage, Greece and Turkey have diverged widely in their modem history of civil-military relations. The armed forces have a long record of intervention in both countries, but there is a crucial ...

  19. Post-Traumatic Stress Innovations: U.S. Military Enterprise Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Deborah

    2011-01-26

    This presentation covers the analysis of policy formulation in the U.S. Military health enterprise, the process for feedback between research and care delivery, and the enterprise interview for current state analysis.

  20. Puritan Military Justice: American War Crimes and the Global War on Terrorism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo, Ronald

    2012-07-16

    Exploring Puritanical cultural habits in the 21st century American military, the following study focuses on U.S. Army courts-martial in the Global War on Terrorism. The study uses Emile Durkheim's original sociological ...

  1. Implementing technical transitions through schedule-based policy : insights from the Military's Airborne Tactical Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrbach, Amanda K. (Amanda Kaye)

    2013-01-01

    Due to a need for congestion relief, as well as a projected increase in capacity constraints, the US Military's Airborne Tactical Network (ATN) is at the onset of a technical transition of their communication hardware and ...

  2. Regime legitimacy and military resilience : lessons from World War II and Yugoslavia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Jacob Hale

    2008-01-01

    This thesis argues that regime legitimacy creates military resilience. A regime is legitimate when its constituents believe-whether because of ideological solidarity, patriotism, nationalism, or good governance-that a ...

  3. Borderland Intimacies: GIs, Koreans, and American Military Landscapes in Cold War Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Whitney Taejin

    2010-01-01

    1994. Fischer, Hannah. “American War and Military OperationsThe Origins of the Korean War: Liberation and the EmergenceThe Origins of the Korean War: The Roaring of the Cataracts,

  4. ErikaCheck,Washington Scientists at a military medical facility in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ErikaCheck,Washington Scientists at a military medical facility in Washington DC have lashed out on the campus of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center and at several smaller facilities in the Washington area

  5. Outlook of the Officers: Military Thought in Chile, 1960-1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bawden, John Richard

    2009-01-01

    balance of power strongly favored Peru and Argentina. Thismilitary balance of power in favor of Peru and Argentina andBrazil, Argentina, and Peru’ s militaries seized power from

  6. A comparative study of the life satisfaction of early retirement military officers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Russ Thomas

    2005-11-01

    This study compared the life satisfaction of early retirement military officers with several comparison groups on the basis of Retirement Descriptive Index (RDI) scale scores. The RDI is a self-report instrument that ...

  7. Military Voting and the Law: Procedural and Technological Solutions to the Ballot Transit Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, R. Michael

    2007-03-08

    During the 2000 presidential election controversy in Florida, the ballots submitted by individuals living overseas—especially military voters—were seen as crucial to the election outcome as the margin of potential victory ...

  8. The Legal-Military Dilemma in the Response to International Terrorism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Matthew W.

    2010-07-14

    of Department, James Rogers December 2009 Major Subject: Political Science iii ABSTRACT The Legal-Military Dilemma in the Response to International Terrorism. (December 2009) Matthew Wesley Allan, B.A., Carleton College; J.D., The University...

  9. Demographic study of military selection in the state of Ohio, 1917-1919 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saberian, Michael Reza

    2006-04-12

    groups or activities at a specific military base. Nancy Gentile Ford?s American?s All examines the assimilative activities at Camp Gordon, Georgia where conscripts from various ethnic enclaves underwent a program of acculturation. Christopher Sterba...

  10. Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (970) 491-2748 cemml@cemml.colostate.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and frequency · Woody plant density and basal area · Plant productivity · Disturbance and land uses, disturbance, soil erosion, and wildlife on military installations as part of the Land Condition-Trend Analysis

  11. EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security to use the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina, for military training purposes.

  12. Francis H. Smith: architect of antebellum southern military schools and educational reform 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wineman, Bradford Alexander

    2006-10-30

    This study examines the historical significance of the Virginia Military Institute�s (VMI) first superintendent, Francis Henney Smith, and his influence not only at his home institution but also on his broader social, educational, and political...

  13. EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – EM employee James Hawkins is currently serving the U.S. military in Afghanistan, where he is administering a $5.8 billion task order for the Army.

  14. A review of "English Military News Pamphlets, 1513-1637" by David Randall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenspan, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    , and the importance of pursuing the con?ict. In turn, each of these characteristics was tied to contemporary conceptions of truth and credibility. ?e collection comprises a total of ?fteen texts spanning the years ???? to ? ??. It begins with two pamphlets... on Anglo-Scottish military con?icts during the reign of Henry VIII. ?e ?rst, Hereafter ensue the trewe encountre, is the earliest extant printed military news pamphlet and treats the battle of Flodden Field in ????. ?e second pamphlet, published...

  15. Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005 (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    H.R. 4837, The Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005, was signed into law on October 13, 2004. The Act provides for construction to support the operations of the U.S. Armed Forces and for military family housing. It also provides funds to help citizens in Florida and elsewhere in the aftermath of multiple hurricanes and other natural disasters. In addition, it authorizes construction of an Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline.

  16. Acting alone: U.S. unilateral uses of force, military revolutions, and hegemonic stability theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podliska, Bradley Florian

    2009-06-02

    -1 ACTING ALONE: U.S. UNILATERAL USES OF FORCE, MILITARY REVOLUTIONS, AND HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY A Dissertation by BRADLEY FLORIAN PODLISKA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2007 Major Subject: Political Science ACTING ALONE: U.S. UNILATERAL USES OF FORCE, MILITARY REVOLUTIONS, AND HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY A Dissertation...

  17. A Comprehensive Program for Measurement of Military Aircraft Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2009-11-01

    Emissions of gases and particulate matter by military aircraft were characterized inplume by 'extractive' and 'optical remote-sensing (ORS)' technologies. Non-volatile particle size distribution, number and mass concentrations were measured with good precision and reproducibly. Time-integrated particulate filter samples were collected and analyzed for smoke number, elemental composition, carbon contents, and sulfate. Observed at EEP the geometric mean diameter (as measured by the mobility diameter) generally increased as the engine power setting increased, which is consistent with downstream observations. The modal diameters at the downstream locations are larger than that at EEP at the same engine power level. The results indicate that engine particles were processed by condensation, for example, leading to particle growth in-plume. Elemental analysis indicated little metals were present in the exhaust, while most of the exhaust materials in the particulate phase were carbon and sulfate (in the JP-8 fuel). CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, HCHO, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, and alkanes were measured. The last five species were most noticeable under engine idle condition. The levels of hydrocarbons emitted at high engine power level were generally below the detection limits. ORS techniques yielded real-time gaseous measurement, but the same techniques could not be extended directly to ultrafine particles found in all engine exhausts. The results validated sampling methodology and measurement techniques used for non-volatile particulate aircraft emissions, which also highlighted the needs for further research on sampling and measurement for volatile particulate matter and semi-volatile species in the engine exhaust especially at the low engine power setting.

  18. Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power by Richard W. Garvine1,2 and Willett Kempton1,3,4 ABSTRACT To assess the wind power resources of a large continental for the comparison period) that the near-coast phase advantage is obviated. We also find more consistent wind power

  19. Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Roberta L.

    Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from in revised form 6 July 2004 Abstract The lithium concentration and isotopic composition of two saprolites the behavior of lithium isotopes during continental weathering. Both saprolites show a general trend

  20. The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

  1. Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage climate system sim- ulated by earth system models (ESMs). The continental freshwater reservoirs represent

  2. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  3. Turbulence transport modeling of the temporal outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Dosch, A.

    2014-09-20

    The solar wind can be regarded as a turbulent magnetofluid, evolving in an expanding solar wind and subject to turbulent driving by a variety of in situ sources. Furthermore, the solar wind and the drivers of turbulence are highly time-dependent and change with solar cycle. Turbulence transport models describing low-frequency magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind have so far neglected solar cycle effects. Here we consider the effects of solar cycle variability on a turbulence transport model developed by Zank et al. This model is appropriate for the solar wind beyond about 1 AU, and extensions have described the steady-state dependence of the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature throughout the outer heliosphere. We find that the temporal solar wind introduces a periodic variability, particularly beyond ?10 AU, in the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature. The variability is insufficient to account for the full observed variability in these quantities, but we find that the time-dependent solutions trace the steady-state solutions quite well, suggesting that the steady-state models are reasonable first approximations.

  4. Mass segregation in the outer halo globular cluster Palomar 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Matthias J; Kuepper, Andreas H W

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence for mass segregation in the outer-halo globular cluster Palomar 14, which is intuitively unexpected since its present-day two-body relaxation time significantly exceeds the Hubble time. Based on archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we analyze the radial dependence of the stellar mass function in the cluster's inner 39.2 pc in the mass range of 0.53-0.80 M_sun, ranging from the main-sequence turn-off down to a V-band magnitude of 27.1 mag. The mass function at different radii is well approximated by a power law and rises from a shallow slope of 0.6+/-0.2 in the cluster's core to a slope of 1.6+/-0.3 beyond 18.6 pc. This is seemingly in conflict with the finding by Beccari et al. (2011), who interpret the cluster's non-segregated population of (more massive) blue straggler stars, compared to (less massive) red giants and horizontal branch stars, as evidence that the cluster has not experienced dynamical segregation yet. We discuss how both results can be reconciled. Our findings indicate...

  5. Outer membrane protein A of E. coli folds into detergent micelles, but not in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.

    Outer membrane protein A of E. coli folds into detergent micelles, but not in the presence-barrel membrane proteins, folding of OmpA was studied as a function of the hydrophobic chain length, the chemical; membrane protein folding; outer membrane protein A; porin; protein­detergent interaction; protein

  6. The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere at Solar John D. Richardson and Chi Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere at Solar Maximum John D. Richardson and Chi Wang Center solar wind observations in the outer heliosphere, concentrating on the recent data near solar maximum. The speed and temperature tend to be lower at solar maximum, due to the lack of coronal holes. The near

  7. 1Tracy K. Steinbach April 5, 2014 The outer crust of an accreting neutron star is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    , proposed to heat the crust of neutron stars and allow 12C fusion, is the fusion of neutron-rich light1Tracy K. Steinbach April 5, 2014 ² The outer crust of an accreting neutron star is an unique burst) ² X-ray superbursts thought to be fueled by 12C + 12C fusion in the outer crust ² Temperature

  8. Are energetic electrons in the solar wind the source of the outer radiation belt?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    . Mewaldt6 Abstract. Using data from WIND, SAMPEX (Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer the outer radiation belt electrons. Al- though lower energy electrons in the solar wind could be a seedAre energetic electrons in the solar wind the source of the outer radiation belt? Xinlin Li,1 D. N

  9. New HampsHire 4-H partNersHip militaRY 4-h ClUB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    New HampsHire 4-H partNersHip militaRY 4-h ClUB 2012 aNNual report The Military 4-H Club Program of 4-H programs in New Hampshire as well as targeted military youth and family programs · BUild o rockingham 655 strafford 395 sullivan 90 Total Youth Ages 5-18 3020 · 5,433 New Hampshire youth living

  10. Gays and Lesbians at War: Military Service in Iraq and Afghanistan Under “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Nathaniel

    2004-01-01

    AT WAR: MILITARY SERVICE IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN UNDER “DON’wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Despite widespread knowledgeused before sites in Iraq and Afghanistan were improved, as

  11. Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Wong

    2004-09-28

    This report was prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). This report provides information on the phase stability of Alloy 22, the current waste package outer barrier material. The goal of this model is to determine whether the single-phase solid solution is stable under repository conditions and, if not, how fast other phases may precipitate. The aging and phase stability model, which is based on fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic concepts and principles, will be used to provide predictive insight into the long-term metallurgical stability of Alloy 22 under relevant repository conditions. The results of this model are used by ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' as reference-only information. These phase stability studies are currently divided into three general areas: Tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) phase and carbide precipitation in the base metal; TCP and carbide precipitation in welded samples; and Long-range ordering reactions. TCP-phase and carbide precipitates that form in Alloy 22 are generally rich in chromium (Cr) and/or molybdenum (Mo) (Raghavan et al. 1984 [DIRS 154707]). Because these elements are responsible for the high corrosion resistance of Alloy 22, precipitation of TCP phases and carbides, especially at grain boundaries, can lead to an increased susceptibility to localized corrosion in the alloy. These phases are brittle and also tend to embrittle the alloy (Summers et al. 1999 [DIRS 146915]). They are known to form in Alloy 22 at temperatures greater than approximately 600 C. Whether these phases also form at the lower temperatures expected in the repository during the 10,000-year regulatory period must be determined. The kinetics of this precipitation will be determined for both the base metal and the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The TCP phases (P, {mu}, and {sigma}) are present in the weld metal in the as-welded condition. It may be possible to eliminate these phases through a solution anneal heat treatment, but that may not be possible for the closure weld because the spent nuclear fuel cladding cannot be heated to more than 350 C. The effects of any stress mitigation techniques (such as laser peening or solution heat treating) that may be used to reduce the tensile stresses on the closure welds must also be determined. Cold-work will cause an increase in dislocation density, and such an increase in dislocation density may cause an increase in diffusion rates that control precipitation kinetics (Porter et al. 1992 [DIRS 161265]; Tawancy et al. 1983 [DIRS 104991]). Long-range order (LRO) occurs in nickel (Ni)-Cr-Mo alloys (such as Alloy 22) at temperatures less than approximately 600 C. This ordering has been linked to an increased susceptibility of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement (Tawancy et al. 1983 [DIRS 104991]). These analyses provide information on the rate at which LRO may occur in Alloy 22 under repository conditions. Determination of the kinetics of transformations through experimental techniques requires that the transformations being investigated be accelerated due to the fact that the expected service life is at least 10,000 years. Phase transformations are typically accelerated through an increase in temperature. The rate of transformation is determined at the higher temperature and is extrapolated to the lower temperatures of interest.

  12. An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borglin, S.; Shore, J.; Worden, H.; Jain, R.

    2009-08-15

    Sustainable municipal solid waste management at military solutions necessitates a combined approach that includes waste reduction, alternative disposal techniques, and increased recycling. Military installations are unique because they often represent large employers in the region in which they are located, thereby making any practices they employ impact overall waste management strategies of the region. Solutions for waste sustainability will be dependent on operational directives and base location, availability of resources such as water and energy, and size of population. Presented in this paper are descriptions of available waste strategies that can be used to support sustainable waste management. Results presented indicate source reduction and recycling to be the most sustainable solutions. However, new waste-to-energy plants and composting have potential to improve on these well proven techniques and allow military installations to achieve sustainable waste management.

  13. Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, S.; Barnett, J.; Burman, K.; Hambrick, J.; Westby, R.

    2010-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) recognizes the strategic importance of energy to its mission, and is working to reduce energy consumption and enhance energy self-sufficiency by drawing on local clean energy sources. A joint initiative formed between DoD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to address military energy use led to a task force to examine the potential for net zero energy military installations, which would produce as much energy on site as they consume in buildings, facilities, and fleet vehicles. This report presents an assessment and planning process to examine military installations for net zero energy potential. Net Zero Energy Installation Assessment (NZEIA) presents a systematic framework to analyze energy projects at installations while balancing other site priorities such as mission, cost, and security.

  14. Destructive gravitational encounters: outcome and implications of catastrophic collisions and tidal splitting in the post-formation outer solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Movshovitz, Naor

    2015-01-01

    Cratering rates in the outer Solar System, Icarus, 163 (2),iii an outer Solar System data and scaling 3.4.3 LeinhardtAncient Massive Rings in the Solar System, Science, 338.

  15. Quantifying the Intergration of LEED Ratings to Military High Performance Sustainable Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walewski, J.

    2013-01-01

    of LEED ratings to Military High Performance Sustainable Buildings CATEE 2013 MAJ Autumn Leveridge, U.S. Army CPT Brian Schonefeld, U.S. Navy CPT Jared Solether, U.S. Navy Dr. John Walewski Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University CCLD... & Coatings / Carpet Systems Thermal Comfort, Design Daylight & Views Daylight 75% of Spaces Innovation & Design Process (ID) NA 18 Key LEED Credits for Military High Performance Sustainable Buildings ESL-KT-13-12-08 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

  16. Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-04-10

    A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

  17. Rates of tectonic and magmatic processes in the North Cascades continental magmatic arc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matzel, Jennifer E. Piontek, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Continental magmatic arcs are among the most dynamic. geologic systems, and documentation of the magmatic, thermal, and tectonic evolution of arcs is essential for understanding the processes of magma generation, ascent ...

  18. Seismic investigation of the transition from continental to oceanic subduction along the western Hellenic Subduction Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Frederick Douglas

    The western Hellenic subduction zone (WHSZ) exhibits well-documented along-strike variations in lithosphere density (i.e., oceanic versus continental), subduction rates, and overriding plate extension. Differences in slab ...

  19. Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense G. C. Chang physical and optical measurements have captured sediment resuspension associated with two hurricanes. Sediment resuspension associated with Hurricane Edouard was forced by combined current and wave processes

  20. Remote sensing of submerged objects and geomorphology in continental shelf waters with acoustic waveguide scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratilal, Purnima, 1971-

    2002-01-01

    The long range imaging of submerged objects, seafloor and sub-seafloor geomorphology in continental shelf waters using an active sonar system is explored experimentally and theoretically. A unified model for 3-D object ...

  1. The evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to oceanic spreading centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behn, Mark Dietrich, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis investigates the evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to mid-ocean ridges. The first part (Ch. 2) examines the style of segmentation along the U.S. East Coast ...

  2. Electrical conductivity of continental lithospheric mantle from integrated geophysical and petrological modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Electrical conductivity of continental lithospheric mantle from integrated geophysical; published 11 October 2011. [1] The electrical conductivity of mantle minerals is highly sensitive, and compositional variations. The bulk electrical conductivity model has been integrated into the software package

  3. The effect of LNG on the relationship between UK and Continental Europena natural gas markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenig, Philipp

    2012-12-10

    the structural relationship between UK and Continental European markets. (ii) The effect of UK import capacity extensions since 2005, through both pipeline and LNG regasification capacity, on this long-term relationship will be analyzed. The results suggest...

  4. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the ...

  5. continental shelf bivalves and its paleoecologic significance. Paleobiology 6:331-340.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    continental shelf bivalves and its paleoecologic significance. Paleobiology 6:331-340. 1981 shell growth patterns in ecology and paleoecology. Lethaia 3:143-161. RoSENBERG, G. D.. AND S. K

  6. Version: 2009 January 15 The distance to a star forming region in the Outer arm of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunthaler, Andreas

    Version: 2009 January 15 The distance to a star forming region in the Outer arm of the Galaxy K performed astrometric observations with the VLBA of WB89-437, an H2O maser source in the Outer spiral arm is considerably smaller than the kinematic distance of 8.6 kpc. This confirms the presence of a faint Outer arm

  7. MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Melanie 1989-

    2011-05-02

    fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA Approved by... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON iii ABSTRACT Monitoring Stratification and Currents at the Continental Slope of the Scotia Sea, Antarctica. (April 2011...

  8. Turbine airfoil with dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell; Christian X. (Oviedo, FL), Morrison; Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

    2011-12-20

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure. The compliant structure may be configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand without limitation by the inner layer. The compliant structure may be formed from a plurality of pedestals positioned generally parallel with each other. The pedestals may include a first foot attached to a first end of the pedestal and extending in a first direction aligned with the outer layer, and may include a second foot attached to a second end of the pedestal and extending in a second direction aligned with the inner layer.

  9. Distribution and abundance of endangered Florida Key deer on outer islands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Dominque Elijah

    2007-04-25

    -based survey data. All outer islands exhibited estimated abundances considerably below carrying capacities, with larger populations occurring closer to Big Pine Key. Results indicated that other islands and complexes such as Ramrod Key, Water Key...

  10. CREDO: a Military Decision-Support System based on Credal Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonucci, Alessandro

    CREDO: a Military Decision-Support System based on Credal Networks Alessandro Antonucci David Huber (Sect. V). These ideas have been implemented in a Java software tool, called CREDO, as part of a project for space security based on a credal network, which have been developed and tested with CREDO during

  11. Self-Organizing Relay Network Supporting Remotely Deployed Sensor Nodes in Military Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliassen, Frank

    Self-Organizing Relay Network Supporting Remotely Deployed Sensor Nodes in Military Operations Dalimir Orfanus, Frank Eliassen Department of Informatics University of Oslo Oslo, Norway dalimir.orfanus@no.abb. Thus, alternative communications approaches have to be used, such as relay links via unmanned aerial

  12. The Relationship Between Perceived Resilience and Perceived Motivation on the Educational Pursuits of the Military Spouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Laurie Lynn

    2014-07-29

    A IRB APPROVAL LETTER ................................................................... 109 APPENDIX B PAO AUTHORIZATION ...................................................................... 110 vii Page APPENDIX C PRE-NOTICE EMAIL... Procedures ....................................................... 38 Table 2 Gender of Respondents and Rank of Respondents' Spouses (n=110) .......... 40 Table 3 Gender and Educational Attainment of Military Spouses ............................ 46...

  13. The Military Tuition Benefit: A North Carolina resident does not lose his/her resident status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Jiancheng

    The Military Tuition Benefit: A North Carolina resident does not lose his/her resident status for tuition purposes solely by serving in the armed forces outside this State. Under a special North Carolina Statute, members of the armed services stationed in North Carolina on active duty and their dependents who

  14. CEMP-EC 13 February 1995 TRI-SERVICE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM (MCP) INDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    CEMP-EC 13 February 1995 TABLE IV TRI-SERVICE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM (MCP) INDEX FOR FY 1996 ------------- 1893 1 JUL 1994 ------------- 1908 2.6% 1 OCT 1994 ------------- 1923 --------------- 1 JAN 1995 ------------- 1937 FY 1995 1 APR 1995 ------------- 1945 1 JUL 1995 ------------- 1962 2.9% 1 OCT 1995

  15. Personality Predictors of First-Year Attrition From A Military Training Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalupa, Samantha Brooke

    2013-09-24

    In military training programs, program attrition is a problem not only financially but also in terms of its effects on the team environment and team morale. The purpose of this study is to compare freshmen cadets who choose to stay in the Corps...

  16. ERDCTR-12-10 Index of Available Research on Military Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

    ERDCTR-12-10 Index of Available Research on Military Impacts Optimal Allocation of Land Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;#12;ERDC TR-12-10 June 2012 Index of Available, and to recommend the implementation of a more cost-effective, regional strategic approach for future land

  17. Operational Experience and Research Directions in Military Night Vision Equipment Chris Johnson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    to the human eye. Living and man-made objects tend to emit radiation, for instance in the form of heatOperational Experience and Research Directions in Military Night Vision Equipment Chris Johnson resolution. A second area of interest focuses on detecting electro-magnetic radiation that is not visible

  18. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed Military Personnel After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed a retrospective probabilistic risk assessment for military personnel potentially exposed to insecticides during, and cypermethrin used for residual sprays. We used the risk quotient (RQ) method for our risk assessment (estimated

  19. The future of components for high reliability military and space applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanlon, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Component Information and Management Dept.

    1996-02-01

    Military specified, ceramic packaged and radiation hardened components will disappear before the end of the century. The only long-term sustainable alternative may well be to use plastic packaged Commercial Components. The material in this report comes from the Defense Logistics Agency sponsored Plastic Package Availability Program and from an AT and T field reliability study. It summarizes Case Studies from companies which have been building and fielding highly reliable commercial and DOD military systems using plastic commercial components. Findings are, that when properly selected commercial components are operated within the true limitations of their design and packaging, they are as reliable as today`s Mil Spec components. Further, they offer cost, space and weight savings, shared manufacturing and field test experience with industry, and access to the most modern technology. Also reported are potential problems that may be encountered when using commercial components, their long term storage and use reliability characteristics, recommended design processes and supplier selection practices, commercial best business practices, and a semiconductor manufacturer`s view of the military`s switch to commercial plastic microcircuits.

  20. Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (970) 491-2748 cemml@cemml.colostate.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on responsible management of natural resources and ecosystems. Effective planning and management sustains to incorporate the protection of natural resources with military training objectives. CEMML has a knowledgeable staff with the capability and experience to complete Integrated Natural Resources Management Plans

  1. A system architecture for long duration free floating flight for military applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epley, L.E. )

    1990-08-31

    Accessibility is today's space frontier. Our need for wide-band global communications, earth imaging an sensing, atmospheric measurements and military reconnaissance is endless but growing dependence on space-based systems raises concerns about potential vulnerability. Military commanders want space assets more accessible and under direct local control. As a result, a robust and low cost access to space-like capability has become a national priority. Buoyant vehicles, free floating in the middle stratosphere could provide the kind of cost effective access to space-like capability needed for a verity of missions. These vehicles are inexpensive, invisible and easily launched. Developments in payload electronics, atmospheric wind modeling and materials combined with ever-improving communications and navigation infrastructure are making balloon-borne concepts more attractive. The fundamental question is whether a free floating balloon, used in a pseudo-satellite role, has value in a military system. Flight tests are ongoing under NASA sponsorship. Following these tests NASA intends to use the vehicles for research in the Antarctic. The concept is being reviewed by other agencies interested in stratospheric research. We believe that LDFFF systems have applications in areas of communications, surveillance and other traditional satellite missions. Dialogue with the broader community of space users is needed to expand the applications. This report reviews the status of the recent flight tests and presents an overview of the concept of Long Duration Free Floating Flight for military applications. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  3. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  4. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; et al

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have includedmore »a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.« less

  5. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; Kallmeyer, J.; Kiel Reese, B.; Lin, L.-H.; Long, P. E.; Moser, D. P.; Mills, H.; Sar, P.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Stan-Lotter, H.; Wagner, D.; Wang, P.-L.; Westall, F.; Wilkins, M. J.

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have included a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.

  6. Understanding the EPA guidance on major source determinations for military installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, A.D. [Dept. of the Navy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In August 1996, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the first ever Clean Air Act (CAA) guidance directed specifically at military facilities. The Guidance, titled Major Source Determinations for Military Installations under the Air Toxics, New Source Review and Title V Operating Permit Programs of the Clean Air Act, was negotiated by an EPA/DoD workgroup that included field and headquarters EPA and DoD representatives, and was led by the Navy. This paper describes the development and contents of the guidance and the significant legal and policy issues raised. By statute and rule, all sources under common control on contiguous or adjacent property and belonging to the same two digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code must be aggregated when determining if the source is a major source. DoD requested that EPA develop the guidance because of a move by EPA to impose a fenceline-to-fenceline interpretation of what constitutes a major source for purposes of the three programs identified above. Such an interpretation could and did result in more stringent regulation of industrial sources on military installations than of similar industrial plants. The guidance establishes EPA`s allowable interpretation of two of the three key elements of the major source definition. First, the guidance specifies that common control occurs at the military service level; therefore, sources belonging to the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, the National Guard or a Defense Agency that are located on the same installation could each be treated separately. Second, the guidance allows the military to assign SIC codes to functional industrial groupings in a manner similar to the private sector. Past practice grouped all national defense activities under the same SIC code.

  7. A review of "Military Migration and State Formation: The British Military Community in Seventeenth-Century Sweden." by Mary Elizabeth Ailes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Sather

    2003-01-01

    -Century Sweden. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2002. xiv + 192 pp. + 8 figs. + 2 tables. $50.00. Review by LEE SATHER, WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY. The period roughly stretching from 1600 to the early 1700s is generally referred to as Sweden?s Age... and to the creation of the ?military state.? Given Sweden?s particularly limited resources, it was also forced to re- cruit relatively large numbers of foreign troops both as ordinary soldiers and officers. Professor Ailes in this work examines the 119 British...

  8. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

  9. Inference of human continental origin and admixture proportions using a highly discriminative ancestry informative 41-SNP panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    continental origin and admixture proportions using a highlyorigin and admixture proportions in common populations inAfrican American admixture proportions by use of population-

  10. Origin of dwarf irregular galaxies with outer early-type structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Bekki

    2008-05-15

    Recent observations have reported that some gas-rich dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies appear to have spherical distributions in the outer underlying old and intermediate-age stellar populations (e.g., NGC 6822). These observations imply that some dIrr's have two distinct (or ``two-component'') structures, i.e., inner disky and outer spherical ones, though the number fraction of dIrr's with such structures remains observationally unclear. We discuss how such two distinct structures are formed during dIrr formation based on observations and simulations. Our numerical simulations show that the remnants of mergers between two gas-rich dIrr's with initially extended gas disks can have both extended spheroids composed of older stellar populations and disks composed mostly of gas and young stars. The simulated remnants with two distinct structures can be still identified as dIrr's owing to the presence of star-forming regions. The structural properties of outer spherical structures in dIrr's formed from dIrr-dIrr merging depend on initial conditions of merging, which suggests that outer structures in dIrr's can be diverse. We also discuss other possible physical mechanisms for the formation of outer spherical structures composed of older stars in dIrr's.

  11. Conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-04-10

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed perpendicular to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

  12. Military Base Off-Taker Opportunities for Tribal Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nangle, J.

    2013-05-01

    This white paper surveys DOD installations that could have an increased potential interest in the purchase of energy from renewable energy projects on tribal lands. Identification of likely purchasers of renewable energy is a first step in the energy project development process, and this paper aims to identify likely electricity customers that tribal commercial-scale projects could serve. This white paper builds on a geospatial analysis completed in November 2012 identifying 53 reservations within 10 miles of military bases (DOE 2012). This analysis builds on those findings by further refining the list of potential opportunity sites to 15 reservations (Table ES-1), based on five additional factors: 1) The potential renewable resources required to meet the installation energy loads; 2) Proximity to transmission lines; 3) Military installation energy demand; 4) State electricity prices; 5) Local policy and regulatory environment.

  13. The campaign of mud: a military-political analysis of the Third Battle of Ypres 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Stephen Mark

    1989-01-01

    , Bri. tain, Prussia and Russia guaranteeing Belgium's security) plunged Britain into the war in 1914 with the aim of restoring Belgium as a sovereign and neutral State. &4 The deliverance of the Belgian people from the clutc2&es of a tyrannical... but also render great military advant- ages by resting the flank of the British armies on the Dutch border. Communications could then be shortened and the whole German position in France turned without an appreciable lengthening of the battle line...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Evaluating Military Bases and Fleet Readiness for Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Through the AVTA, Idaho National Laboratory also does fleet and other analysis to evaluate readiness for plug-in electric vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles. The following reports describe analysis studies Idaho National Laboratory conducted for the military to evaluate readiness for plug-in electric vehicles.

  15. Maps of Salinity, Nitrate and Chlorophyll over the Gulf of Alaska Continental Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to enhanced salinity (inner shelf) and thermal (outer shelf) stratification. SeaWiFS and shipboard chlorophyll Point density section shows reduced, but not vanishing stratification, due to tidal mixing over Portlock

  16. An Archaeological Survey for the Military Water Supply Corporation North System 12" Waterline Loop Project in Cameron County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-30

    An archaeological survey of a proposed water transmission line in southern Cameron County, Texas was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) on March 10, 2010 under Antiquities Permit 5558 for the Military Highway Water Supply...

  17. Secure Military Social Networking and Rapid Sensemaking in Domain Specific Concept Systems: Research Issues and Future Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garside, Debbie

    This paper identifies the need for a secure military social networking site and the underlying research issues linked to the successful development of such sites. The paper further proposes a solution to the most basic ...

  18. Unit Social Cohesion in the Israeli Military as a Case Study of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Danny; Rosenmann, Amir

    2012-01-01

    for Social Research. Kaplan and Rosenmann Frank, N. (2009).38(4), 133–162. Kaplan, D. (2000). The military as a secondColumbia University Press. Kaplan and Rosenmann Wong, L. ,

  19. Identifying and estimating the distributional effects of unionization and the long-term consequences of military service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Brigham R

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the economic consequences for individuals of two important U.S. labor market institutions: unionization and the military draft. The first chapter develops an econometric procedure for estimating ...

  20. THE ABONGO ABROAD: MILITARY INTERNATIONALISM, TRAVEL, TRAINING, AND PEACE IN GHANA AND THE UNITED STATES, 1960-1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clune, John Valentine

    2014-08-31

    This dissertation searches the global commodities of military education and training assistance and international peacekeeping missions between the 1960s and 1980s for the meaning people on both the sending and receiving ends made...

  1. Exposure to risk and its impact on human capital : essays on combat exposure, military labor, and conflict duration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yankovich, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the impact of contemporaneous American participation in war on military labor and conflict duration. Chapter one uses variation in occupation-specific retention bonuses and mortality risks observed ...

  2. Enhancing the estimation of continental-scale snow water equivalent by assimilating MODIS snow cover with the ensemble Kalman filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Enhancing the estimation of continental-scale snow water equivalent by assimilating MODIS snow cover with the ensemble Kalman filter Hua Su,1 Zong-Liang Yang,1 Guo-Yue Niu,1 and Robert E. Dickinson2-quality continental-scale snow water equivalent (SWE) data sets are generally not available, although

  3. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry wave generation in a laboratory model of oscillating tidal flow on a continental margin. Waves waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  4. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  5. A nonstorm time enhancement of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    A nonstorm time enhancement of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt Quintin Schiller (based on the Dst index), relativistic electron fluxes were enhanced over 2.5 orders of magnitude Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), onboard the Van Allen Probes; Relativistic Electron and Proton

  6. Structure of Earth's outer radiation belt inferred from long-term electron flux dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliadis, Dimitrios

    mapped the radiation-belt structure by quantifying the electron flux variability over the entire radialStructure of Earth's outer radiation belt inferred from long-term electron flux dynamics D September 2003; published 15 October 2003. [1] We map the spatial structure of the electron belts over

  7. Evaluation of outer flaws in titanium alloys using eddy current measuring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chady, T.; Psuj, G.; Kowalczyk, J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, ul. Sikorskiego 37, 70-313 Szczecin (Poland)

    2011-06-23

    In this paper results of shallow outer flaw detection in thick titanium alloy specimens is presented. In order to increase efficiency of inspections of minor defects an eddy current measuring system with a lock-in amplifier was used. The measurements were carried out for flat and cylindrical specimens with artificial flaws.

  8. Development of a strong shock in the outer heliosphere and J. D. Richardson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    flow and heats the solar wind protons in the outer heliosphere. The impact of pickup ions that the solar wind stream structures associ- ated with the April solar events observed at Earth have merged of the heliospheric radio emission. 1. Introduction Spacecraft observations of the solar wind from Pi- oneers 10

  9. 1. THE RADIATION BELTS The outer zone radiation belts consist of energetic elec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkington, Scot R.

    1. THE RADIATION BELTS The outer zone radiation belts consist of energetic elec- trons trapped in the geomagnetic field. The dynamics of the belts are dictated by the global and local electric and mag- netic, A Review of ULF Interactions with Radiation Belt Electrons Scot R. Elkington Laboratory for Atmospheric

  10. The energization of relativistic electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS The energization of relativistic electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt YUE CHEN online: 1 July 2007; doi:10.1038/nphys655 The origin and dynamics of the Van Allen radiation belts is one. These observations represent an important step towards a more complete physical understanding of radiation belt

  11. Gas & Stars Aging low-mass stars eject their outer layers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Joshua Edward

    Recycling Gas & Stars #12;Aging low-mass stars eject their outer layers. M57:The Ring Nebula #12;Thor's Emerald Helmet Winds from high-mass stars blow bubbles of hot gas. #12;Supernova blast waves in stars are mixed back into the gas. NGC 6992: Filaments of theVeil Nebula #12;Bubbles blown by high

  12. Membrane protein folding on the example of outer membrane protein A of Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.

    Membrane protein folding on the example of outer membrane protein A of Escherichia coli J. H and mechanisms by which membrane proteins insert and fold into a biomem- brane have mostly been studiedA that involves at least three struc- turally distinct folding intermediates. Key words. Membrane protein folding

  13. Planetary Nebula Planetary Nebula Planetary Nebula The bright glowing outer layers of gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtold, Jill

    produced by fusion and in the heat of the explosion are scattered into space. Mass: 3 - 60 SM Star from a red giant star. The explosion occurs when the hydrogen fuel in the core is depleted. Mass: 0.5 - 1.0 SM StarPower Points: 5 The bright glowing outer layers of gas ejected from a red giant star

  14. Rotation-Robust Math Symbol Recognition and Retrieval Using Outer Contours and Image Subsampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Rotation-Robust Math Symbol Recognition and Retrieval Using Outer Contours and Image Subsampling the system with original Turning Function on the rotated InftyCDB-3 dataset. Keywords: Machine-Printed Math Symbol Recognition, Content-Based Math Symbol Retrieval 1. INTRODUCTION Recognition of math expression

  15. Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . SPE SPE 23442 Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer, Richardson, TX 7S0834S36 U.5A. Telex, 730989 SPEDAL. ABSTRACT A family of pressure and production decline as gas reservoirs which produce substan- tial amounts of water together with ~as. Production of water

  16. Feasibility study of extracting runoff data from satellite altimetry over continental surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    the feasibility of extracting runoff data using satellite altimetry over all possible continental surface waters- ered algorithm for extracting runoff from the satellite altimetry is based on making water level. not feasible be- cause of bad quality of extracted water level time series class 4. impossible. Computed runoff

  17. The Unpredictable Nature of Internal Tides on Continental Shelves JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Unpredictable Nature of Internal Tides on Continental Shelves JONATHAN D. NASH College of Earth (Dushaw et al. 2011). Corresponding author address: Jonathan D. Nash, 104 CEOAS Admin. Bldg., Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331. E-mail: nash@coas.oregonstate.edu NOVEMBER 2012 N A S H E T A L . 1981 DOI

  18. Mid-Miocene cooling and the extinction of tundra in continental Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    Mid-Miocene cooling and the extinction of tundra in continental Antarctica Adam R. Lewisa of a tundra community that inhabited the mountains before stepped cooling that first brought a full polar inferences from glaciological modeling together sug- gest that mean summer temperatures in the region cooled

  19. The thermal structure of continental crust in active orogens: insight fromMioceneeclogiteandgranulitexenolithsofthePamirMountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    The thermal structure of continental crust in active orogens: insight from in the Pamir Mountains, southeastern Tajikistan, preserve a compositional and thermal record at mantle depths. The extraction depths exceed the present-day Pamir Moho at 65 km depth and suggest an average thermal gradient

  20. Mobile Agent Gain Scheduler Control in Inter-Continental Intelligent Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Mo-Yuen

    other to provide intelligent services to inhabitants [1, 3]. The mobile agents have sensors andMobile Agent Gain Scheduler Control in Inter-Continental Intelligent Space Rangsarit - Intelligent Space (iSpace) is a space (room, corridor, or street), which has distributed sensory and mobile

  1. Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Audrey D.

    Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA ABSTRACT The tectonic evolution of the North Amer- ican Gulf of Mexico margin, including the Interior Salt Basin, outboard unextended Wiggins arch, and an unusually

  2. Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental margins: Impact on gas. Gregory F. Moore, University of Hawaii (USA) http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/moore/ Key Words Gas Hydrates, Faults, Fluid Flow, gas prospectivity Overview Fig. 1. Research on gas hydrates is often undertaken

  3. High particle export over the continental shelf of the west Antarctic Peninsula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    in surface waters. High fluxes also result in a large supply of sinking organic matter to support sub- surface and benthic food webs on the continental shelf. These new findings call into question of a food web for top predators [Knox, 2006], for its support of a rich benthos [Smith et al., 2006

  4. Continental Shelf Research 0 (2001) 123 Effects of seismic air guns on marine fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    U N C O R R EC TED PR O O F Continental Shelf Research 0 (2001) 1­23 Effects of seismic air guns G. airgun (three synchronised airguns, each gun 2.5 l and 2000 psi) was deployed and repeatedly fired. The guns were fired once/min for eight periods on four days at different positions. The structure

  5. Nonlinear internal waves over New Jersey's continental shelf E. L. Shroyer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2011. [1] Ship and mooring data collected off the coast of New Jersey are used to describeNonlinear internal waves over New Jersey's continental shelf E. L. Shroyer,1,2 J. N. Moum,1 and J to neap barotropic conditions, but when the shoreward baroclinic energy flux was elevated. During the time

  6. Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    uranium-bearing fine-grained sediment component, is easily fulfilled for most lithologic compositions and deposituranium-series comminution age method, we applied the method to the glacigenic alluvial depositsuranium-series comminution age dating method differs from many existing methods for dating continental detrital sediment deposits

  7. Z .Lithos 48 1999 5780 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Z .Lithos 48 1999 57­80 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic methods Alan G, such as olivine, are presented. q 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Electrical for such flow models, as shown in the paper by De Smet Z .et al. 1999, this issue . Deductions about the depth

  8. 18512004 annual heat budget of the continental landmasses Shaopeng Huang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    1851­2004 annual heat budget of the continental landmasses Shaopeng Huang1 Received 22 November landmasses. When the temperature at ground surface rises, more heat will be deposited to the rocks beneath the ground subsurface, whereas when ground surface temperature falls, certain amount of heat will escape from

  9. Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale GUO-YUE NIU) ABSTRACT The presence of ice in soil dramatically alters soil hydrologic and thermal properties. Despite computes soil ice content and its modifications to soil hydrologic and thermal properties. However

  10. DISTRIBUTION OF SAND LANCE, AlVIMODYTES SP., LARVAE ON THE CONTINENTAL SHELF FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTION OF SAND LANCE, AlVIMODYTES SP., LARVAE ON THE CONTINENTAL SHELF FROM CAPE COD TO CAPE of one species of sand lance, which rasembled AlIllllodytes lIlarillUS exactly, were collected along abundance of sand lance larval' occurred in winter off the mouths of the principal estuaries (southern New

  11. Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a April 2008 Accepted 5 June 2008 Editor: B. Bourdon Keywords: Lithium Isotope fractionation Deep. Lithium concentrations of granulite xenoliths also vary widely (0.5 to 21 ppm) and are, on average, lower

  12. Z .Lithos 48 1999 5780 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    . Jones Geological SurÕey of Canada, 615 Booth St., Room 218, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0E9 Received 27 are complementary in that the seismic parameters usually represent bulk properties of the rock, whereas electrical the state of knowledge of the continental upper mantle obtained primarily from the natural-source

  13. Differences in flower visitation networks between an oceanic and a continental island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    communities of each of two different island systems: the Canary Islands (oceanic origin) and the BalearicDifferences in flower visitation networks between an oceanic and a continental island ROCÍO CASTRO, Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain Received 27 May 2013; revised 28 October 2013; accepted for publication

  14. Belt-parallel mantle flow beneath a halted continental collision: The Western Alps Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Belt-parallel mantle flow beneath a halted continental collision: The Western Alps Guilhem Barruol belts, is a particularly important objective of "mantle tectonics" that may bring a depth extent a coherent picture of upper mantle anisotropy beneath the belt. The large-scale anisotropy pattern

  15. Iberia versus Europe - Effects of continental break-up and round-up on hydrocarbon habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourrouilh, R.; Zolnai, G.

    1988-08-01

    Based on the continuity of foldbelts and the positions of intermountain continental nuclei and transcontinental megashears, a close Pangea fit is proposed for the central and north Atlantic borderlands. The Variscan arch segment missing between Brittany and Galicia in the Gulf of Gascony (Biscaye) can tentatively be identified with the Flemish Cap block off Newfoundland. At the same time the northwest African-Gondwana border (central Morocco) was located some 800 km farther to the west-northwest, as compared to its present position in southwestern Europe (Iberia). During the opening of the central and northern segments of the Atlantic Ocean (Jurassic and Cretaceous) and during the closure of the western Mediterranean basin, i.e., the thrust of Africa toward southern Europe (Tertiary), the European continental mass underwent deformation in the transtensive and transpressive modes, which reactivated parts of its inherited structural network. The trailing south European continental margin was partially dismembered into loosely bound continental blocks, to be assembled again during the subsequent Alpine orogenic cycle. These events can be compared with processes known in the northernmost and western segments of the North American continent. Mechanisms are proposed for the formation and deformation of inter- and intraplate basins by way of moderate shifts (wrenching) and slight rotations, the direction of which changed during the Mesozoic-Tertiary according to the global stress field. The above evolution and mechanisms had multiple and decisive effects on hydrocarbon generation, habitat, and accumulation.

  16. Cyanobacterial macrophytes in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomescu, Alexandru MF

    , lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA ALEXANDRU M. F. TOMESCU, GAR W. ROTHWELL AND ROSMARIE in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA, in the lower Massanutten Sandstone (Virginia, USA). Filaments are predominantly multiseriate and consist

  17. Propagation of continental break-up in the southwestern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France 2present address: Gdosciences Azur, Pierre & Marie Curie University on the southwestern tip of the South China Sea oceanic basin, where propagation of continental break-up occurred of the South China Sea basin, one of the best examples of an ocea- nic basin with a propagating ridge geometry

  18. U^Pb geochronology of Seychelles granitoids: a Neoproterozoic continental arc fragment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    U^Pb geochronology of Seychelles granitoids: a Neoproterozoic continental arc fragment R.D. Tucker reserved. Keywords: U/Pb; geochronology; Neoproterozoic; magmatism; Rodinia; reconstruction; Seychelles 1 of these rocks was ¢rst established [2^4]. Since then, numerous geochronological studies of Sey- chelles

  19. Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

  20. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.

  1. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutronmore »reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.« less

  2. The Major Outer Membrane Protein of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) Folds and Inserts into Lipid Bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.

    The Major Outer Membrane Protein of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) Folds and Inserts into Lipid-5020 Bergen, Norway Membrane protein insertion and folding was studied for the major outer membrane observation of parallel membrane insertion and folding pathways of a b-barrel membrane protein from

  3. Stresses and Deformations in Outer & Inner Shielding Vessels of IDS120 Bob Weggel, M.O.R.E., LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Stresses and Deformations in Outer & Inner Shielding Vessels of IDS120 Bob Weggel, M.O.R.E., LLC December 5, 2011 Fig. 1: Cross section of resistive coils, superconducting coils, shielding vessels and shielding. Vessels start at -3 meters (upstream) and end at +3 meters (downstream). Outer vessel: rmax = 1

  4. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 JANUARY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2185 Explaining sudden losses of outer radiation belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    of outer radiation belt electrons during geomagnetic storms Drew L. Turner1,2 *, Yuri Shprits1,2,3 , Michael Hartinger1 and Vassilis Angelopoulos1,2 The Van Allen radiation belts were first discovered in 1958 by the Explorer series of spacecraft1 . The dynamic outer belt consists primarily of relativistic

  5. Version: 2009 January 15 The distance to a star forming region in the Outer arm of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunthaler, Andreas

    Version: 2009 January 15 The distance to a star forming region in the Outer arm of the Galaxy K spiral arm of the Galaxy. We measure an annual parallax of 0.167±0.006 mas, corresponding the presence of a faint Outer arm toward l = 135 # . We also measured the full space motion of the object

  6. A Single-Arm Circular Spiral Antenna with Inner/Outer Feed Circuitry for Changing Polarization and Beam Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Flaviis, Franco

    A Single-Arm Circular Spiral Antenna with Inner/Outer Feed Circuitry for Changing Polarization and Computer Engineering University of California, Irvine Irvine, CA, 92697, USA Abstract: A single-arm and LHCP in outer feed at 10GHz, where L is a horizontal arm length. The frequency bandwidth for a 3-d

  7. Folding and Insertion of the Outer Membrane Protein OmpA Is Assisted by the Chaperone Skp and by Lipopolysaccharide*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.

    Folding and Insertion of the Outer Membrane Protein OmpA Is Assisted by the Chaperone Skp have studied the folding pathway of a -barrel membrane protein using outer membrane protein A (Omp membrane proteins of bacteria. We investigated how Skp facilitates the insertion and folding of com

  8. Military Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Personnel from the Power Systems Engineering Department have been involved with the U.S. Air Force Space Command since 1987. Ascension Island - in conjuction with other partners,...

  9. Military funeral 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Today, as never before, American industry needs to identify and control their most critical resources. One of these is energy. In 1973 and again in 1976, the American public and business was confronted with critical energy supply problems. As a...

  10. Emissions characteristics of Military Helicopter Engines Fueled with JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corporan, E.; DeWitt, M.; Klingshirn, Christopher D; Striebich, Richard; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in aviation activities and more stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations have increased concerns regarding aircraft emissions, due to their harmful health and environmental impacts, especially in the vicinity of airports and military bases. In this study, the gaseous and particulate-matter emissions of two General Electric T701C engines and one T700 engine were evaluated. The T700 series engines power the U.S. Army's Black Hawk and Apache helicopters. The engines were fueled with standard military JP-8 fuel and were tested at three power settings. In addition, one of the T701C engines was operated on a natural-gas-derived Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene jet fuel. Test results show that the T701C engine emits significantly lower particulate-matter emissions than the T700 for all conditions tested. Particulate-matter mass emission indices ranged from 0.2-1.4 g/kg fuel for the T700 and 0.2-0.6 g/kg fuel for the T701C. Slightly higher NOx and lower CO emissions were observed for the T701C compared with the T700. Operation of the T701C with the Fischer-Tropsch fuel rendered dramatic reductions in soot emissions relative to operation on JP-8, due primarily to the lack of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuel. The Fischer-Tropsch fuel also produced smaller particles and slight reductions in CO emissions.

  11. THE CLASSIFICATION OF DEHN FILLINGS ON THE OUTER TORUS OF A 1-BRIDGE BRAID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ying-Qing

    THE CLASSIFICATION OF DEHN FILLINGS ON THE OUTER TORUS OF A 1-BRIDGE BRAID EXTERIOR WHICH PRODUCE SOLID TORI Ying-Qing Wu1 Abstract. Let K = K(w, b, t) be a 1-bridge braid in a solid torus V , and let for such Dehn fillings. 1. Introduction A knot K in a 3-manifold M is a 0-bridge knot if it is isotopic

  12. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  13. Outer irregular satellites of the planets and their relationship with asteroids, comets and Kuiper Belt objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott S. Sheppard

    2006-05-01

    Outer satellites of the planets have distant, eccentric orbits that can be highly inclined or even retrograde relative to the equatorial planes of their planets. These irregular orbits cannot have formed by circumplanetary accretion and are likely products of early capture from heliocentric orbit. The irregular satellites may be the only small bodies remaining which are still relatively near their formation locations within the giant planet region. The study of the irregular satellites provides a unique window on processes operating in the young solar system and allows us to probe possible planet formation mechanisms and the composition of the solar nebula between the rocky objects in the main asteroid belt and the very volatile rich objects in the Kuiper Belt. The gas and ice giant planets all appear to have very similar irregular satellite systems irrespective of their mass or formation timescales and mechanisms. Water ice has been detected on some of the outer satellites of Saturn and Neptune whereas none has been observed on Jupiter's outer satellites.

  14. DETECTING THE RAPIDLY EXPANDING OUTER SHELL OF THE CRAB NEBULA: WHERE TO LOOK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiang; Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Baldwin, J. A.; Loh, E. D.; Richardson, C. T., E-mail: xiang.wang@uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We present a range of steady-state photoionization simulations, corresponding to different assumed shell geometries and compositions, of the unseen postulated rapidly expanding outer shell to the Crab Nebula. The properties of the shell are constrained by the mass that must lie within it, and by limits to the intensities of hydrogen recombination lines. In all cases the photoionization models predict very strong emissions from high ionization lines that will not be emitted by the Crab's filaments, alleviating problems with detecting these lines in the presence of light scattered from brighter parts of the Crab. The near-NIR [Ne VI] {lambda}7.652 {mu}m line is a particularly good case; it should be dramatically brighter than the optical lines commonly used in searches. The C IV {lambda}1549 doublet is predicted to be the strongest absorption line from the shell, which is in agreement with Hubble Space Telescope observations. We show that the cooling timescale for the outer shell is much longer than the age of the Crab, due to the low density. This means that the temperature of the shell will actually ''remember'' its initial conditions. However, the recombination time is much shorter than the age of the Crab, so the predicted level of ionization should approximate the real ionization. In any case, it is clear that IR observations present the best opportunity to detect the outer shell and so guide future models that will constrain early events in the original explosion.

  15. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    A number of blocks off Cape Hatteras have been leased by Mobil Oil, which has requested permission to drill an exploratory well, at 820-m depth, in a block identified as Manteo 467. The proposed well location is 39 miles from the coast of North Carolina. The possibility of extracting gas from the continental slope off the coast of North Carolina, particularly at slope depths, has raised a number of environmental concerns that cannot be addressed from existing data. The present study was developed by the Minerals Management Service to better define the nature of the continental slope benthic communities off Cape Hatteras and to delineate their areal extent. Emphasis was placed on the area around the proposed drill site in the Manteo 467 lease block.

  16. The distribution and optical response of particles on the continental shelf and their relationship to cross-isopycnal mixing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakey, Joshua C.

    1999-01-01

    The relationships of optics, particles, and hydrography to shelf mixing processes were analyzed on a mid-continental shelf south of New England. The objectives were to characterize the types, sizes and sources of particles ...

  17. Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontempi, Paula Susan

    1995-01-01

    Phytoplankton abundance and species composition were examined over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during May 1992 and May 1993, as part of a phytoplankton diversity study funded by the Office of Naval Research. ...

  18. Cross-shelf circulation and momentum and heat balances over the inner continental shelf near Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fewings, Melanie Rinn

    2007-01-01

    The water circulation and evolution of water temperature over the inner continental shelf are investigated using observations of water velocity, temperature, density, and bottom pressure; surface gravity waves; wind stress; ...

  19. Subduction zone processes and continental crust formation in the southern Central Andes: insights from geochemistry and geochronology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Rosemary Ellen

    2014-06-30

    Subduction zones, such as the Andean convergent margin, are the sites at which new continental crust is generated, and where subducting material is either recycled to the crust via arc magmatism or transferred to the ...

  20. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System Phase 6 report: The potential impacts of a worst-case military conflict on world petroleum availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.; Das, S.; Leiby, P.N.

    1991-01-01

    A major Middle East and European military confrontation would cause an extremely large disruption in the supply of oil worldwide. There would be imbalances between oil supply and demand. These imbalances can only be solved by rationing and by military actions to ensure an adequate flow of crude oil and products. 25 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. The use of stellar occultations to study the figures and atmospheres of small bodies in the outer solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Person, Michael James

    2006-01-01

    The methods of analyzing stellar occultations by small bodies in the outer solar system are discussed with examples from Triton, Pluto, and Charon. Simulations were performed characterizing the analysis of multi-chord ...

  2. Analysis of photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis in zebrafish ift57, ift88 and ift172 intraflagellar transport mutants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukumaran, Sujita

    2009-05-15

    Vertebrate photoreceptors are polarized cells that consist of a specialized sensory structure termed the outer segment required for phototransduction and an inner segment that contains the cellular organelles. Proteins synthesized in the inner...

  3. Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-04-24

    A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.

  4. Understanding Civil War Violence through Military Intelligence: Mining Civilian Targeting Records from the Vietnam War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglass, Rex W

    2015-01-01

    Military intelligence is underutilized in the study of civil war violence. Declassified records are hard to acquire and difficult to explore with the standard econometrics toolbox. I investigate a contemporary government database of civilians targeted during the Vietnam War. The data are detailed, with up to 45 attributes recorded for 73,712 individual civilian suspects. I employ an unsupervised machine learning approach of cleaning, variable selection, dimensionality reduction, and clustering. I find support for a simplifying typology of civilian targeting that distinguishes different kinds of suspects and different kinds targeting methods. The typology is robust, successfully clustering both government actors and rebel departments into groups that mirror their known functions. The exercise highlights methods for dealing with high dimensional found conflict data. It also illustrates how aggregating measures of political violence masks a complex underlying empirical data generating process as well as a comple...

  5. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? W–Ni–Co induces a greater oxidative burst response than W–Ni–Fe in lung macrophages.

  6. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF MILITARY SPENDING ON ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THE WORLD SYSTEM FROM 1870 TO 1950 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Nahua 1990-

    2012-05-08

    ……………………………………………………………………….….37 CONTACT INFORMATION……………………………………………………………38 v LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1: Argentina…………………………………...…………………………………………..8 2: Australia……………………………………………………...………………………..9 3: Austria... or weak correlation between military spending and economic growth. The result of my research is that Group 1 consists of 31 countries, and Group 2 of 3 countries, and Group 3 of 5 countries. Group 1 consists of Austria, Australia, Argentina, Belgium...

  7. Sustainable Military Lands Enroll in this one-of-a-kind online educational program to learn the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Military Lands Management Enroll in this one-of-a-kind online educational program of natural and cultural resources on Department of Defense lands. After completing this certificate, you in the Warner College of Natural Resources. Courses are offered on a regular semester basis using a 16-week

  8. The Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    Risk Management and Associated Techniques Provide the Predicted Benefits? Chris. W. Johnson, Glasgow: Johnson@dcs.gla.ac.uk; http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~johnson Keywords: Safety; Composite Risk Management, ERAM, Risk Assessment; Military Systems Engineering. Abstract Risk management provides the most important

  9. ARCHITECTURE AND ALGORITHM FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE FAULT-TOLERANT REPLICATION OF SENSITIVE MILITARY AND HOMELAND SECURITY C3I DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guturu, Parthasarathy

    AND HOMELAND SECURITY C3I DATABASE MESSAGES Parthasarathy Guturut Electrical Engineering Department, University ofNorth Texas, Denton, TX 76203-0470 ABSTRACT Replicated databases are used by Military and Homeland. In this paper, we propose a rep- licated database nodal architecture in which nodes are organized into multiple

  10. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):251260, Fall 2014 Wildlife strikes with U.S. military rotary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during deployments in the Middle East (e.g., Iraq), whereas, strikes to U.S. Air Force aircraft occurred, Iraq, military, rotary-wing aircraft, wildlife strikes During the last 2 decades, a great deal of armed conflict, and political upheaval has occurredintheMiddleEast(e.g.,Iraq)andsouth- central Asia (e

  11. Special Issue on Development of Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles In support of military operations and civil applications, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    Editorial Special Issue on Development of Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles In support of military operations and civil applications, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have quickly emerged and practitioners in the fields of unmanned systems, with a common interest in the new challenges in platform design

  12. The 2011 Military Communications Conference -Track 3 -Cyber Security and Network Operations From Security to Vulnerability: Data Authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenye

    lines and transform ers [5], to perform critical functions of energy transmission and distributionThe 2011 Military Communications Conference - Track 3 - Cyber Security and Network Operations From Wang· Zhuo Lu* Jianfeng Mat "Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NC State University

  13. Transitions between turbulent and laminar superfluid vorticity states in the outer core of a neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Peralta; A. Melatos; M. Giacobello; A. Ooi

    2006-07-08

    We investigate the global transition from a turbulent state of superfluid vorticity to a laminar state, and vice versa, in the outer core of a neutron star. By solving numerically the hydrodynamic Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov equations for a rotating superfluid in a differentially rotating spherical shell, we find that the meridional counterflow driven by Ekman pumping exceeds the Donnelly-Glaberson threshold throughout most of the outer core, exciting unstable Kelvin waves which disrupt the rectilinear vortex array, creating a vortex tangle. In the turbulent state, the torque exerted on the crust oscillates, and the crust-core coupling is weaker than in the laminar state. This leads to a new scenario for the rotational glitches observed in radio pulsars: a vortex tangle is sustained in the differentially rotating outer core by the meridional counterflow, a sudden spin-up event brings the crust and core into corotation, the vortex tangle relaxes back to a rectilinear vortex array, then the crust spins down electromagnetically until enough meridional counterflow builds up to reform a vortex tangle. The turbulent-laminar transition can occur uniformly or in patches; the associated time-scales are estimated from vortex filament theory. We calculate numerically the global structure of the flow with and without an inviscid superfluid component, for Hall-Vinen and Gorter-Mellink forms of the mutual friction. We also calculate the post-glitch evolution of the angular velocity of the crust and its time derivative, and compare the results with radio pulse timing data, predicting a correlation between glitch activity and Reynolds number.

  14. An Outer Planet Beyond Pluto and Origin of the Trans-Neptunian Belt Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patryk Sofia Lykawka; Tadashi Mukai

    2007-12-13

    Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) are remnants of a collisionally and dynamically evolved planetesimal disk in the outer solar system. This complex structure, known as the trans-Neptunian belt (or Edgeworth-Kuiper belt), can reveal important clues about disk properties, planet formation, and other evolutionary processes. In contrast to the predictions of accretion theory, TNOs exhibit surprisingly large eccentricities, e, and inclinations, i, which can be grouped into distinct dynamical classes. Several models have addressed the origin and orbital evolution of TNOs, but none have reproduced detailed observations, e.g., all dynamical classes and peculiar objects, or provided insightful predictions. Based on extensive simulations of planetesimal disks with the presence of the four giant planets and massive planetesimals, we propose that the orbital history of an outer planet with tenths of Earth's mass can explain the trans-Neptunian belt orbital structure. This massive body was likely scattered by one of the giant planets, which then stirred the primordial planetesimal disk to the levels observed at 40-50 AU and truncated it at about 48 AU before planet migration. The outer planet later acquired an inclined stable orbit (>100 AU; 20-40 deg) because of a resonant interaction with Neptune (an r:1 or r:2 resonance possibly coupled with the Kozai mechanism), guaranteeing the stability of the trans-Neptunian belt. Our model consistently reproduces the main features of each dynamical class with unprecedented detail; it also satisfies other constraints such as the current small total mass of the trans-Neptunian belt and Neptune's current orbit at 30.1 AU. We also provide observationally testable predictions.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE ON THE STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION OF THE OORT CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Alexia R.; Quinn, Thomas; Kaib, Nathan A.

    2013-07-01

    We study the influence of outer solar system architecture on the structural evolution of the Oort Cloud (OC) and the flux of Earth-crossing comets. In particular, we seek to quantify the role of the giant planets as ''planetary protectors''. To do so, we have run simulations in each of four different planetary mass configurations to understand the significance of each of the giant planets. Because the outer planets modify the structure of the OC throughout its formation, we integrate each simulation over the full age of the solar system. Over this time, we follow the evolution of cometary orbits from their starting point in the protoplanetary disk to their injection into the OC to their possible re-entry into the inner planetary region. We find that the overall structure of the OC, including the location of boundaries and the relative number of comets in the inner and outer parts, does not change significantly between configurations; however, as planetary mass decreases, the trapping efficiency (TE) of comets into the OC and the flux of comets into the observable region increases. We determine that those comets that evolve onto Earth-crossing orbits come primarily from the inner OC but show no preference for initial protoplanetary disk location. We also find that systems that have at least a Saturn-mass object are effective at deflecting possible Earth-crossing comets but the difference in flux between systems with and without such a planet is less than an order of magnitude. We conclude by discussing the individual roles of the planets and the implications of incorporating more realistic planetary accretion and migration scenarios into simulations, particularly on existing discrepancies between low TE and the mass of the protoplanetary disk and on determining the structural boundaries of the OC.

  16. The Outer Structure of Galactic Disks: Connections Between Bars, Disks, and Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erwin, Peter; Beckman, John E; Gutíerrez, Leonel; Aladro, Rebeca

    2007-01-01

    Surface-brightness profiles for early-type (S0-Sb) disks exhibit three main classes (Type I, II, and III). Type II profiles are more common in barred galaxies, and most of the time appear to be related to the bar's Outer Lindblad Resonance. Roughly half of barred galaxies in the field have Type II profiles, but almost none in the Virgo Cluster do; this might be related to ram-pressure stripping in clusters. A strong \\textit{anti}correlation is found between Type III profiles ("antitruncations") and bars: Type III profiles are most common when there is no bar, and least common when there is a strong bar.

  17. The Outer Structure of Galactic Disks: Connections Between Bars, Disks, and Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Erwin; Michael Pohlen; John E. Beckman; Leonel Gutierrez; Rebeca Aladro

    2007-06-26

    Surface-brightness profiles for early-type (S0-Sb) disks exhibit three main classes (Type I, II, and III). Type II profiles are more common in barred galaxies, and most of the time appear to be related to the bar's Outer Lindblad Resonance. Roughly half of barred galaxies in the field have Type II profiles, but almost none in the Virgo Cluster do; this might be related to ram-pressure stripping in clusters. A strong \\textit{anti}correlation is found between Type III profiles ("antitruncations") and bars: Type III profiles are most common when there is no bar, and least common when there is a strong bar.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Central_Plateau_Outer_Zone.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms toPalladium wavyfamily of new lithium APolOuter

  19. New Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, Robert J.; Amini, Rashied; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Bennett, Gary L.; Brophy, John R.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Ervin, Joan; Fernandez, Yan R.; Grundy, Will; Khan, Mohammed Omair; King, David Q.; Lang, Jared; Meech, Karen J.; Newhouse, Alan; Oleson, Steven R.; Schmidt, George R.; Spilker, Thomas; West, John L.; ,

    2010-05-26

    Today, our questions and hypotheses about the Solar System's origin have surpassed our ability to deliver scientific instruments to deep space. The moons of the outer planets, the Trojan and Centaur minor planets, the trans-Neptunian objects (TNO), and distant Kuiper Belt objects (KBO) hold a wealth of information about the primordial conditions that led to the formation of our Solar System. Robotic missions to these objects are needed to make the discoveries, but the lack of deep-space propulsion is impeding this science. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) will revolutionize the way we do deep-space planetary science with robotic vehicles, giving them unprecedented mobility. Radioisotope electric generators and lightweight ion thrusters are being developed today which will make possible REP systems with specific power in the range of 5 to 10 W/kg. Studies have shown that this specific power range is sufficient to perform fast rendezvous missions from Earth to the outer Solar System and fast sample return missions. This whitepaper discusses how mobility provided by REP opens up entirely new science opportunities for robotic missions to distant primitive bodies. We also give an overview of REP technology developments and the required next steps to realize REP.

  20. Abstraction of Models for Pitting and Crevice Corrosion of Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Mon

    2001-08-29

    This analyses and models report (AMR) was conducted in response to written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). The purpose and scope of this AMR is to review and analyze upstream process-level models (CRWMS M and O 2000a and CRWMS M and O 2000b) and information relevant to pitting and crevice corrosion degradation of waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) and drip shield (Titanium Grade 7) materials, and to develop abstractions of the important processes in a form that is suitable for input to the WAPDEG analysis for long-term degradation of waste package outer barrier and drip shield in the repository. The abstraction is developed in a manner that ensures consistency with the process-level models and information and captures the essential behavior of the processes represented. Also considered in the model abstraction are the probably range of exposure conditions in emplacement drifts and local exposure conditions on drip shield and waste package surfaces. The approach, method, and assumptions that are employed in the model abstraction are documented and justified.

  1. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  2. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2014-06-03

    A two-dimensional model of a passive continental margin was adapted to the simulation of the methane cycle on Siberian continental shelf and slope, attempting to account for the impacts of glacial/interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to freezing conditions with deep permafrost formation during glacial times, and immersion in the ocean in interglacial times. The model is used to gauge the impact of the glacial cycles, and potential anthropogenic warming in the deep future, on the atmospheric methane emission flux, and the sensitivities of that flux to processes such as permafrost formation and terrestrial organic carbonmore »(Yedoma) deposition. Hydrological forcing drives a freshening and ventilation of pore waters in areas exposed to the atmosphere, which is not quickly reversed by invasion of seawater upon submergence, since there is no analogous saltwater pump. This hydrological pump changes the salinity enough to affect the stability of permafrost and methane hydrates on the shelf. Permafrost formation inhibits bubble transport through the sediment column, by construction in the model. The impact of permafrost on the methane budget is to replace the bubble flux by offshore groundwater flow containing dissolved methane, rather than accumulating methane for catastrophic release when the permafrost seal fails during warming. By far the largest impact of the glacial/interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is attenuation by dissolution of bubbles in the ocean when sea level is high. Methane emissions are highest during the regression (soil freezing) part of the cycle, rather than during transgression (thawing). The model-predicted methane flux to the atmosphere in response to a warming climate is small, relative to the global methane production rate, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. A slight increase due to warming could be completely counteracted by sea level rise on geologic time scales, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The methane cycle on the shelf responds to climate change on a long time constant of thousands of years, because hydrate is excluded thermodynamically from the permafrost zone by water limitation, leaving the hydrate stability zone at least 300 m below the sediment surface.« less

  3. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 3. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    The Point is an area that supports a most productive pelagic fishery, including tuna, swordfish, marlin, and more. The objective of the study is to analyze video tapes from near the Point, in order to provide data on epibenthic, megafaunal invertebrates including species composition, relative abundances, and large scale (1 km) distribution. The Point is not a defined spot on a chart. Although fishermen do use the steep shelf break for location, they generally look for the west wall of the Gulf Stream. The Point and the oil lease site coincidentally occur where the Gulf Stream parts the continental slope, just north of the eastern-most tip of Cape Hatteras.

  4. Non-binding conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a non-binding transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement and for moving without binding along corrugations of any slope less than vertical. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed parallel to the motion of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

  5. Geologic hazards on the Atlantic continental margin of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although 46 exploratory holes have failed to reveal commercial hydrocarbon accumulations on the US Atlantic margin, about twice that number were drilled on the contiguous Canadian margin before large reserves were discovered. Thus, despite the initial results, exploration on the US margin will probably continue and additional information will be needed to augment the extensive environmental data base acquired over the past 10 years. The extent, timing, causes, and importance of sediment instability of the Continental Slopes of Georges Bank, Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough--where future exploration will take place--remain controversial. Many question remain to be answered regarding such phenomena as creep on the upper slope, mass wasting in canyons and gullies, and slumping associated with faults and salt diapirs. Along the southeastern margin, the distribution of cavernous porosity below the shelf is only broadly known. Caverns pose a potential threat to drilling operations ranging from collapse of rigs to circulation loss and sheared drill strings. In deeper waters of the Continental Slope (700-2000 m), clathrates or frozen gas hydrates are common. The potential hazard of blow-outs from gas trapped beneath this layer are unknown. Additional information is needed to assess the bottom stresses imposed by tidal, storm, and geostrophically-driven currents on offshore rigs and structures, particularly in such areas as Georges Bank, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau.

  6. Final report for LDRD project 11-0783 : directed robots for increased military manpower effectiveness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Wagner, John S.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Morrow, James Dan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this LDRD is to develop technology allowing warfighters to provide high-level commands to their unmanned assets, freeing them to command a group of them or commit the bulk of their attention elsewhere. To this end, a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) was developed, incorporating novel and uniquely capable feature creation and reinforcement learning algorithms. BECCA was demonstrated on both a mobile manipulator platform and on a seven degree of freedom serial link robot arm. Existing military ground robots are almost universally teleoperated and occupy the complete attention of an operator. They may remove a soldier from harm's way, but they do not necessarily reduce manpower requirements. Current research efforts to solve the problem of autonomous operation in an unstructured, dynamic environment fall short of the desired performance. In order to increase the effectiveness of unmanned vehicle (UV) operators, we proposed to develop robots that can be 'directed' rather than remote-controlled. They are instructed and trained by human operators, rather than driven. The technical approach is modeled closely on psychological and neuroscientific models of human learning. Two Sandia-developed models are utilized in this effort: the Sandia Cognitive Framework (SCF), a cognitive psychology-based model of human processes, and BECCA, a psychophysical-based model of learning, motor control, and conceptualization. Together, these models span the functional space from perceptuo-motor abilities, to high-level motivational and attentional processes.

  7. Automation and optimization of the design parameters in tactical military pipeline systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frick, R.M.

    1988-12-01

    Tactical military petroleum pipeline systems will play a vital role in any future conflict due to an increased consumption of petroleum products by our combined Armed Forces. The tactical pipeline must be rapidly constructed and highly mobile to keep pace with the constantly changing battle zone. Currently, the design of these pipeline system is time consuming and inefficient, which may cause shortages of fuel and pipeline components at the front lines. Therefore, a need for a computer program that will both automate and optimize the pipeline design process is quite apparent. These design needs are satisfied by developing a software package using Advance Basic (IBM DOS) programming language and made to run on an IBM-compatible personal computer. The program affords the user the options of either finding the optimum pump station locations for a proposed pipeline or calculating the maximum operating pressures for an existing pipeline. By automating the design procedure, a field engineer can vary the pipeline length, diameter, roughness, viscosity, gravity, flow rate, pump station pressure, or terrain profile and see how it affects the other parameters in just a few seconds. The design process was optimized by implementing a weighting scheme based on the volume percent of each fuel in the pipeline at any given time.

  8. Searches for HI in the Outer Parts of Four Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Young

    1999-10-21

    Previous searches for atomic gas in our Galaxy's dwarf spheroidal companions have not been complete enough to settle the question of whether or not these galaxies have HI, especially in their outer parts. We present new observations of the dwarf spheroidals Sextans, Leo I, Ursa Minor, and Draco, using the NRAO 140-foot telescope to search much farther in radius than has been done before. The new data go out to at least 2.5 times the core radius in all cases, and well beyond even the tidal radius in two cases. These observations give HI column density limits of 2-6 x 10^17 atoms cm^-2. Unless HI is quite far from the galaxies' centers, we conclude that these galaxies don't contain significant amounts of atomic gas at the present time. We discuss whether the observations could have missed some atomic gas.

  9. Crystallographic Structure of SurA, a Molecular Chaperone that Facilitates Folding of Outer Membrane Porins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitto, E.

    2002-01-01

    The SurA protein facilitates correct folding of outer membrane proteins in gram-negative bacteria. The sequence of Escherichia coli SurA presents four segments, two of which are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases); the crystal structure reveals an asymmetric dumbbell, in which the amino-terminal, carboxy-terminal, and first PPIase segments of the sequence form a core structural module, and the second PPIase segment is a satellite domain tethered approximately 30 A from this module. The core module, which is implicated in membrane protein folding, has a novel fold that includes an extended crevice. Crystal contacts show that peptides bind within the crevice, suggesting a model for chaperone activity whereby segments of polypeptide may be repetitively sequestered and released during the membrane protein-folding process.

  10. What Can the Cosmic Microwave Background Tell Us About the Outer Solar System?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Babich; Cullen H. Blake; Charles Steinhardt

    2007-05-07

    We discuss two new observational techniques that use observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to place constraints upon the mass, distance, and size distribution of small objects in the Kuiper Belt and inner Oort Cloud, collectively known as Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs). The first new technique considers the spectral distortion of the isotropic, or monopole, CMB by TNOs that have been heated by solar radiation to temperatures above that of the CMB. We apply this technique to the spectral measurements of the CMB by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). The second technique utilizes the change in amplitude of the TNO signal due to the orbital motion of the observer to separate the TNO signal from the invariant extra-galactic CMB and construct a map of the mass distribution in the outer Solar System. We estimate the ability of future CMB experiments to create such a map.

  11. Apparatus and methods for relieving thermally induced stresses in inner and outer bands of thermally cooled turbine nozzle stages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Guilderland, NY); Itzel, Gary Michael (Clifton Park, NY); Correia, Victor H. S. (Milton Mills, NH)

    2002-01-01

    To control the temperature mismatch between the inner and outer bands and covers forming plenums with the inner and outer bands on sides thereof remote from the hot gas path, passages extend from the leading edge of the covers in communication with the hot gases of combustion to the trailing edge of the covers in communication with the hot gas flowpath. A mixing chamber is provided in each passage in communication with compressor discharge air for mixing the hot gases of combustion and compressor discharge air for flow through the passage, thereby heating the cover and minimizing the temperature differential between the inner and outer bands and their respective covers. The passages are particularly useful adjacent the welded or brazed joints between the covers and inner band portions.

  12. The LMC geometry and outer stellar populations from early DES data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balbinot, Eduardo; Plazas, A.; Santiago, B. X.; Girardi, L.; Pieres, A.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Gruendl, R. A.; Walker, A. R.; Yanny, B.; et al

    2015-03-20

    The Dark Energy Camera has captured a large set of images as part of Science Verification (SV) for the Dark Energy Survey. The SV footprint covers a large portion of the outer Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), providing photometry 1.5 magnitudes fainter than the main sequence turn-off of the oldest LMC stellar population. We derive geometrical and structural parameters for various stellar populations in the LMC disc. For the distribution of all LMC stars, we find an inclination of i = –38.14°±0.08° (near side in the North) and a position angle for the line of nodes of ?? = 129.51°±0.17°. Wemore »find that stars younger than ~4 Gyr are more centrally concentrated than older stars. Fitting a projected exponential disc shows that the scale radius of the old populations is R>4Gyr = 1.41 ± 0.01 kpc, while the younger population has R= 0.72 ± 0.01 kpc. However, the spatial distribution of the younger population deviates significantly from the projected exponential disc model. The distribution of old stars suggests a large truncation radius of Rt = 13.5 ± 0.8 kpc. If this truncation is dominated by the tidal field of the Galaxy, we find that the LMC is ?24+9–6 times less massive than the encircled Galactic mass. By measuring the Red Clump peak magnitude and comparing with the best-fit LMC disc model, we find that the LMC disc is warped and thicker in the outer regions north of the LMC centre. As a result, our findings may either be interpreted as a warped and flared disc in the LMC outskirts, or as evidence of a spheroidal halo component.« less

  13. A Particle Simulation for the Global Pulsar Magnetosphere: the Pulsar Wind linked to the Outer Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohide Wada; Shinpei Shibata

    2007-01-05

    Soon after the discovery of radio pulsars in 1967, the pulsars are identified as strongly magnetic (typically $10^{12}$G) rapidly rotating ($\\sim 10^{2}-0.1$ Hz) neutron stars. However, the mechanism of particle acceleration in the pulsar magnetosphere has been a longstanding problem. The central problem is why the rotation power manifests itself in both gamma-ray beams and a highly relativistic wind of electron-positron plasmas, which excites surrounding nebulae observed in X-ray. Here we show with a three dimensional particle simulation for the global axisymmetric magnetosphere that a steady outflow of electron-positron pairs is formed with associated pair sources, which are the gamma-ray emitting regions within the light cylinder. The magnetic field is assumed to be dipole, and to be consistent, pair creation rate is taken to be small, so that the model might be applicable to old pulsars such as Geminga. The pair sources are charge-deficient regions around the null surface, and we identify them as the outer gap. The wind mechanism is the electromagnetic induction which brings about fast azimuthal motion and eventually trans-field drift by radiation drag in close vicinity of the light cylinder and beyond. The wind causes loss of particles from the system. This maintains charge deficiency in the outer gap and pair creation. The model is thus in a steady state, balancing loss and supply of particles. Our simulation implies how the wind coexists with the gamma-ray emitting regions in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  14. The Outer Disks of Early-Type Galaxies. I. Surface-Brightness Profiles of Barred Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Erwin; Michael Pohlen; John E. Beckman

    2007-09-21

    We present a study of 66 barred, early-type (S0-Sb) disk galaxies, focused on the disk surface brightness profile outside the bar region and the nature of Freeman Type I and II profiles, their origins, and their possible relation to disk truncations. This paper discusses the data and their reduction, outlines our classification system, and presents $R$-band profiles and classifications for all galaxies in the sample. The profiles are derived from a variety of different sources, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data Release 5). For about half of the galaxies, we have profiles derived from more than one telescope; this allows us to check the stability and repeatability of our profile extraction and classification. The vast majority of the profiles are reliable down to levels of mu_R ~ 27 mag arcsec^-2; in exceptional cases, we can trace profiles down to mu_R > 28. We can typically follow disk profiles out to at least 1.5 times the traditional optical radius R_25; for some galaxies, we find light extending to ~ 3 R_25. We classify the profiles into three main groups: Type I (single-exponential), Type II (down-bending), and Type III (up-bending). The frequencies of these types are approximately 27%, 42%, and 24%, respectively, plus another 6% which are combinations of Types II and III. We further classify Type II profiles by where the break falls in relation to the bar length, and in terms of the postulated mechanisms for breaks at large radii ("classical trunction" of star formation versus the influence of the Outer Lindblad Resonance of the bar). We also classify the Type III profiles by the probable morphology of the outer light (disk or spheroid). Illustrations are given for all cases. (Abridged)

  15. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Geha, Marla; Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter; Simon, Joshua D.; Djorgovski, S. G. E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl

    2013-09-10

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  16. Deployment related mental health care seeking behaviors in the U.S. military and the use of telehealth to mitigate their impacts on access to care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, John (John Thomas)

    2012-01-01

    Interviewees report that groups of service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan often require substantial amounts of mental health care, causing surges in demand at military hospitals. These hospitals have difficulty ...

  17. The 'New Model' Armies of Africa?: The British Military Advisory and Training Team and the Creation of the Zimbabwe National Army 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitaker, Blake

    2014-03-05

    The British Army provided military assistance missions for friendly nations throughout the 20th century. The majority deployed to Africa during the decolonization process. By 1980 London had thirty-five years of institutional knowledge on how...

  18. Ecological Risk Assessment Framework for Low-Altitude Overflights by Fixed-Wing and Rotary-Wing Military Aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2001-01-12

    This is a companion report to the risk assessment framework proposed by Suter et al. (1998): ''A Framework for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources,'' hereafter referred to as the ''generic framework.'' The generic framework is an ecological risk assessment methodology for use in environmental assessments on Department of Defense (DoD) installations. In the generic framework, the ecological risk assessment framework of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1998) is modified for use in the context of (1) multiple and diverse stressors and activities at a military installation and (2) risks resulting from causal chains, e.g., effects on habitat that indirectly impact wildlife. Both modifications are important if the EPA framework is to be used on military installations. In order for the generic risk assessment framework to be useful to DoD environmental staff and contractors, the framework must be applied to specific training and testing activities. Three activity-specific ecological risk assessment frameworks have been written (1) to aid environmental staff in conducting risk assessments that involve these activities and (2) to guide staff in the development of analogous frameworks for other DoD activities. The three activities are: (1) low-altitude overflights by fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft (this volume), (2) firing at targets on land, and (3) ocean explosions. The activities were selected as priority training and testing activities by the advisory committee for this project.

  19. Evidence of the Galactic outer ring R1R2' from young open clusters and OB-associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, A M; Glushkova, E V; Dambis, A K

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of young open clusters in the Galactic plane within 3 kpc from the Sun suggests the existence of the outer ring R1R2' in the Galaxy. The optimum value of the solar position angle with respect to the major axis of the bar, theta_b, providing the best agreement between the distribution of open clusters and model particles is theta_b=35 +/- 10 degrees. The kinematical features obtained for young open clusters and OB-associations with negative Galactocentric radial velocity VR indicate the solar location near the descending segment of the outer ring R2.

  20. Model for the formation of longshore sand ridges on the Continental Shelf: The interaction of internal waves and the bottom topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restrepo, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bona, J.L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1994-01-05

    Longshore sand ridges are frequently observed to occur on the continental shelf where the overlying ocean is stratified. This study formulates a model for the formation and evolution of three-dimensional longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf. The model is based on the interaction of interfacial, weakly nonlinear waves in a stratified ocean with the sedimentary bottom topography.

  1. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility: Part I: Low-Level Cloud Macrophysical, Microphysical, and Radiative Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility: Part I: Low Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains Central Facility (SCF). The cloud properties include liquid- phase.563 for daytime (nighttime). A new conceptual model of midlatitude continental low clouds at the ARM SGP site has

  2. Feasibility of Partial ZrO[subscript 2] Coatings on Outer Surface of Annular UO[subscript 2] Pellets to Control Gap Conductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinroth, H.

    The viability of depositing a thin porous coating of zirconia on the outer surface of an annular UO[subscript 2] pellet

  3. Status of Design and Manufacture of the Upper Coils and Outer Poloidal Limiter Coils Subsystems for the JET-EP Magnetic Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Status of Design and Manufacture of the Upper Coils and Outer Poloidal Limiter Coils Subsystems for the JET-EP Magnetic Diagnostic

  4. Production and turnover of suspended organic detritus in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1988-12-01

    As one of a group cooperative research projects on the southeastern continental shelf, this project is concerned with specific aspects of microbial processes and related phenomena that influence the fate of particulate organic materials naturally produced on the continental shelf. The projects of other grantees encompass the dynamics of the shelf from physical oceanography to biology. The integrated information as a whole will be useful in understanding the potential fate of a variety of energy related pollutants that may be released in continental shelf waters. With a focus on events on the southeastern continental shelf and their boundary conditions (Gulf Stream dynamics; river and estuarine processes), we form an interface between studies of oceanic processes such as GOFS and WOCE, and studies of processes at the land-sea boundary. During this grant year we completed two research cruises on the southeastern continental shelf on R/V Blue Fin, and processed data from previous cruises.

  5. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  6. Suitability of Agent Technology for Military Command and Control in the Future Combat System Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potok, TE

    2003-02-13

    The U.S. Army is faced with the challenge of dramatically improving its war fighting capability through advanced technologies. Any new technology must provide significant improvement over existing technologies, yet be reliable enough to provide a fielded system. The focus of this paper is to assess the novelty and maturity of agent technology for use in the Future Combat System (FCS). The FCS concept represents the U.S. Army's ''mounted'' form of the Objective Force. This concept of vehicles, communications, and weaponry is viewed as a ''system of systems'' which includes net-centric command and control (C{sup 2}) capabilities. This networked C{sup 2} is an important transformation from the historically centralized, or platform-based, C{sup 2} function since a centralized command architecture may become a decision-making and execution bottleneck, particularly as the pace of war accelerates. A mechanism to ensure an effective network-centric C{sup 2} capacity (combining intelligence gathering and analysis available at lower levels in the military hierarchy) is needed. Achieving a networked C{sup 2} capability will require breakthroughs in current software technology. Many have proposed the use of agent technology as a potential solution. Agents are an emerging technology, and it is not yet clear whether it is suitable for addressing the networked C{sup 2} challenge, particularly in satisfying battlespace scalability, mobility, and security expectations. We have developed a set of software requirements for FCS based on military requirements for this system. We have then evaluated these software requirements against current computer science technology. This analysis provides a set of limitations in the current technology when applied to the FCS challenge. Agent technology is compared against this set of limitations to provide a means of assessing the novelty of agent technology in an FCS environment. From this analysis we find that existing technologies will not likely be sufficient to meet the networked C{sup 2} requirements of FCS due to limitations in scalability, mobility, and security. Agent technology provides a number of advantages in these areas, mainly through much stronger messaging and coordination models. These models theoretically allow for significant improvements in many areas, including scalability, mobility, and security. However, the demonstration of such capabilities in an FCS environment does not currently exist, although a number of strong agent-based systems have been deployed in related areas. Additionally, there are challenges in FCS that neither current technology nor agent technology are particularly well suited, such as information fusion and decision support. In summary, we believe that agent technology has the capability to support most of the networked C{sup 2} requirements of FCS. However, we would recommend proof of principle experiments to verify the theoretical advantages of this technology in an FCS environment.

  7. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2015-05-21

    A two-dimensional model of a sediment column, with Darcy fluid flow, biological and thermal methane production, and permafrost and methane hydrate formation, is subjected to glacial–interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to the cold atmosphere during glacial times and immersing it in the ocean in interglacial times. The glacial cycles are followed by a "long-tail" 100 kyr warming due to fossil fuel combustion. The salinity of the sediment column in the interior of the shelf can be decreased by hydrological forcing to depths well below sea level when the sediment is exposed to the atmosphere.more »There is no analogous advective seawater-injecting mechanism upon resubmergence, only slower diffusive mechanisms. This hydrological ratchet is consistent with the existence of freshwater beneath the sea floor on continental shelves around the world, left over from the last glacial period. The salt content of the sediment column affects the relative proportions of the solid and fluid H2O-containing phases, but in the permafrost zone the salinity in the pore fluid brine is a function of temperature only, controlled by equilibrium with ice. Ice can tolerate a higher salinity in the pore fluid than methane hydrate can at low pressure and temperature, excluding methane hydrate from thermodynamic stability in the permafrost zone. The implication is that any methane hydrate existing today will be insulated from anthropogenic climate change by hundreds of meters of sediment, resulting in a response time of thousands of years. The strongest impact of the glacial–interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is due to bubbles dissolving in the ocean when sea level is high. When sea level is low and the sediment surface is exposed to the atmosphere, the atmospheric flux is sensitive to whether permafrost inhibits bubble migration in the model. If it does, the atmospheric flux is highest during the glaciating, sea level regression (soil-freezing) part of the cycle rather than during deglacial transgression (warming and thawing). The atmospheric flux response to a warming climate is small, relative to the rest of the methane sources to the atmosphere in the global budget, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. The increased methane flux due to ocean warming could be completely counteracted by a sea level rise of tens of meters on millennial timescales due to the loss of ice sheets, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The model results give no indication of a mechanism by which methane emissions from the Siberian continental shelf could have a significant impact on the near-term evolution of Earth's climate, but on millennial timescales the release of carbon from hydrate and permafrost could contribute significantly to the fossil fuel carbon burden in the atmosphere–ocean–terrestrial carbon cycle.« less

  8. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Giangrande, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  11. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  12. NUMBER1,2005 Published by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    NUMBER1,2005 Published by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program No.14,September2012 ScientificDrilling ISSN: 1816-8957 Exp. 333: Nankai Trough Subduction Input and Records of Slope Instability 4 Lake Drilling In Eastern Turkey 18 Exp. 326 and 332: Nan

  13. Timber Harvest Impacts on Water Yield in the Continental/Maritime Hydroclimatic Region of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timber Harvest Impacts on Water Yield in the Continental/Maritime Hydroclimatic Region and two different harvest practices (50% clearcut, 50% partial cut). The change in water yield harvesting. Monthly and seasonal analyses revealed the largest impacts of harvest practices on water yield

  14. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate model2"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate, South Korea 120-749. Email:21" cyoo@cims.nyu.edu.22" #12;2" Abstract23" Understanding heat. This study analyzes the heat and freshwater budget using a regional25" coupled climate model, which has been

  15. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate model2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate exchange with the atmosphere and sea ice dominates the annual cycle in heat29 and freshwater content;2 Abstract23 Understanding heat and freshwater content change in the Antarctic shelf seas is important

  16. Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty continental shelf, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty Available online xxxx Keywords: Waipaoa River continental margin shelf sedimentation 210 Pb geochronology 239,240 Pu geochronology sediment budget The combination of high sediment yields and the prevalence

  17. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

  18. Radial gradients of phase space density of the outer radiation belt electrons prior to sudden solar wind pressure enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    PSD radial gradient at and beyond GEO prior to a sudden solar wind pressure impact based on the fact by a sudden solar wind pressure enhancement, dayside trapped electrons are transported radially inwards), Radial gradients of phase space density of the outer radiation belt electrons prior to sudden solar wind

  19. The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet J-similar turbulent jet at Re=2·103 is investigated ex- perimentally by means of combined particle image velo- cimetry (PIV) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. The jet fluid contains a fluorescent dye so

  20. Evolution of Early Triassic outer platform paleoenvironments in the Nanpanjiang Basin (South China) and their significance for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Evolution of Early Triassic outer platform paleoenvironments in the Nanpanjiang Basin (South China UMR 5143 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France e UMR 5563 CNRS of the Nanpanjiang Basin (Luolou Formation, Guangxi Province, South China). Extensive investigations on outcrops

  1. Solar wind structure in the outer heliosphere J.D. Richardson a,b,*, Y. Liu a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Solar wind structure in the outer heliosphere J.D. Richardson a,b,*, Y. Liu a , C. Wang b a Kavli form 8 February 2007; accepted 27 March 2007 Abstract A solar wind parcel evolves as it moves outward, interacting with the solar wind plasma ahead of and behind it and with the inter- stellar neutrals

  2. EXACT SOLUTION OF HEAT CONDUCTION IN A TWO-DOMAIN COMPOSITE CYLINDER WITH AN ORTHOTROPIC OUTER LAYER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. AVILES-RAMOS; C. RUDY

    2000-11-01

    The transient exact solution of heat conduction in a two-domain composite cylinder is developed using the separation of variables technique. The inner cylinder is isotropic and the outer cylindrical layer is orthotropic. Temperature solutions are obtained for boundary conditions of the first and second kinds at the outer surface of the orthotropic layer. These solutions are applied to heat flow calorimeters modeling assuming that there is heat generation due to nuclear reactions in the inner cylinder. Heat flow calorimeter simulations are carried out assuming that the inner cylinder is filled with plutonium oxide powder. The first objective in these simulations is to predict the onset of thermal equilibrium of the calorimeter with its environment. Two types of boundary conditions at the outer surface of the orthotropic layer are used to predict thermal equilibrium. The procedure developed to carry out these simulations can be used as a guideline for the design of calorimeters. Another important application of these solutions is on the estimation of thermophysical properties of orthotropic cylinders. The thermal conductivities in the vertical, radial and circumferential directions of the orthotropic outer layer can be estimated using this exact solution and experimental data. Simultaneous estimation of the volumetric heat capacity and thermal conductivities is also possible. Furthermore, this solution has potential applications to the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem in this cylindrical geometry. An interesting feature of the construction of this solution is that two different sets of eigenfunctions need to be considered in the eigenfunction expansion. These eigenfunctions sets depend on the relative values of the thermal diffusivity of the inner cylinder and the thermal diffusivity in the vertical direction of the outer cylindrical layer.

  3. The Spatially-Resolved Star Formation History of the M31 Outer Disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Edouard J; Chapman, Scott C; Ibata, Rodrigo A; Irwin, Mike J; Lewis, Geraint F; McConnachie, Alan W

    2015-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of the stellar populations in two fields lying at 20 and 23 kpc from the centre of M31 along the south-west semi-major axis. These data enable the construction of colour-magnitude diagrams reaching the oldest main-sequence turn-offs (~13 Gyr) which, when combined with another field at 25 kpc from our previous work, we use to derive the first precision constraints on the spatially-resolved star formation history of the M31 disc. The star formation rates exhibit temporal as well as field-to-field variations, but are generally always within a factor of two of their time average. There is no evidence of inside-out growth over the radial range probed. We find a median age of ~7.5 Gyr, indicating that roughly half of the stellar mass in the M31 outer disc was formed before z ~ 1. We also find that the age-metallicity relations (AMRs) are smoothly increasing from [Fe/H]~-0.4 to solar metallicity between 10 and 3 Gyr ago, contrary to the ...

  4. The LMC geometry and outer stellar populations from early DES data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinot, Eduardo; Girardi, L; Pieres, A; da Costa, L N; Maia, M A G; Walker, R A Gruendl A R; Yanny, B; Drlica-Wagner, A; Benoit-Levy, A; Abbott, T M C; Allam, S S; nnis, J A; Bernstein, J P; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Rosell, A Carnero; Cunha, C E; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; to, A Fausti Ne; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J A; Gruen, D; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; March, M; Marshall, J L; Miller, C; Ogando, R Miquel R; Peoples, J; Plazas, A; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Tucker, D L; Wechsler, R; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Camera has captured a large set of images as part of Science Verification (SV) for the Dark Energy Survey. The SV footprint covers a lar ge portion of the outer Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), providing photometry 1.5 magnitudes fainter than the main sequence turn-off of the oldest LMC stel lar population. We derive geometrical and structural parameters for various stellar populations in the LMC disk. For the distribution of all LMC stars, we find an inclination of $i=-38.14^{\\circ}\\pm0.08^{\\circ}$ (near side in the North) and a position angle for the line of nodes of $\\theta_0=129.51^{\\circ}\\pm0.17^{\\circ}$. We find that stars younger than $\\sim 4$ Gyr are more centrally concentrated than older stars. Fitting a projected exponential disk shows that the scale radius of the old populations is $R_{>4 Gyr}=1.41\\pm0.01$ kpc, while the younger population has $R_{projected exponent...

  5. The Outer Solar System Origins Survey: I. Design and First-Quarter Discoveries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bannister, Michele T; Petit, Jean-Marc; Gladman, Brett J; Gwyn, Stephen D J; Chen, Ying-Tung; Volk, Kathryn; Alexandersen, Mike; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey; Fraser, Wesley; Granvik, Mikael; Grundy, Will M; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie; Hestroffer, Daniel; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jakubik, Marian; Jones, Lynne; Kaib, Nathan; Lacerda, Pedro; Lawler, Samantha; Lehner, Matthew J; Lin, Hsing Wen; Lister, Tim; Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Monty, Stephanie; Marsset, Michael; Murray-Clay, Ruth; Noll, Keith; Parker, Alex; Pike, Rosemary E; Rousselot, Philippe; Rusk, David; Schwamb, Megan E; Shankman, Cory; Sicardy, Bruno; Vernazza, Pierre; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    We report 85 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the first 42 deg$^{2}$ of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS), an ongoing $r$-band survey with the 0.9 deg$^{2}$ field-of-view MegaPrime camera on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. A dense observing cadence and our innovative astrometric technique produced survey-measured orbital elements for these TNOs precise to a fractional semi-major axis uncertainty $<0.1\\%$ in two sequential years, instead of the 3-5 years needed with sparser observing strategies. These discoveries are free of ephemeris bias, a first for large Kuiper belt surveys. The survey's simulator provides full characterization, including calibrated detection efficiency functions, for debiasing the discovery sample. We confirm the existence of a cold "kernel" of objects within the main cold classical Kuiper belt, and imply the existence of an extension of the "stirred" cold classical Kuiper belt to at least several AU beyond the 2:1 mean motion resonance with Neptune. The popula...

  6. The extinction by dust in the outer parts of spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Peletier; E. A. Valentijn; A. F. M. Moorwood; W. Freudling; J. H. Knapen; J. E. Beckman

    1995-06-20

    To investigate the distribution of dust in Sb and Sc galaxies we have analyzed near-infrared and optical surface photometry for an unbiased sample of 37 galaxies. Since light in the $K$-band is very little affected by extinction by dust, the $B-K$ colour is a good indicator of the amount of extinction, and using the colour-inclination relation we can statistically determine the extinction for an average Sb/Sc galaxy. We find in general a considerable amount of extinction in spiral galaxies in the central regions, all the way out to their effective radii. In the outer parts, at D$_{K,21}$, or at 3 times the typical exponential scale lengths of the stellar distribution , we find a maximum optical depth of 0.5 in $B$ for a face-on galaxy. If we impose the condition that the dust is distributed in the same way as the stars, this upper limit would go down to 0.1.

  7. Mass segregation in the diffuse outer-halo globular cluster Palomar 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Matthias J; Küpper, Andreas H W

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the radial dependence of the stellar mass function in the diffuse outer-halo globular cluster Palomar 14. Using archival HST/WFPC2 data of the cluster's central 39 pc (corresponding to ~0.85*r_h) we find that the mass function in the mass range of 0.55 to 0.85 solar masses is well approximated by a power-law at all radii. The mass function steepens with increasing radius, from a shallow power-law slope of 0.66+/-0.32 in the cluster's centre to a slope of 1.61+/-0.33 beyond the core radius, showing that the cluster is mass-segregated. This is seemingly in conflict with its long present-day half-mass relaxation time of ~20 Gyr, and with the recent finding by Beccari et al. (2011), who interpret the cluster's non-concentrated population of blue straggler stars as evidence that dynamical segregation has not affected the cluster yet. We discuss this apparent conflict and argue that the cluster must have either formed with primordial mass segregation, or that its relaxation time scale must...

  8. Pre-accretional sorting of grains in the outer solar nebula

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Ishii, H. A.; Price, M. C.; Brownlee, D. E.

    2013-12-20

    Despite their micrometer-scale dimensions and nanogram masses, chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) are an important class of extraterrestrial material since their properties are consistent with a cometary origin and they show no evidence of significant post-accretional parent body alteration. Consequently, they can provide information about grain accretion in the comet-forming region of the outer solar nebula. We have previously reported our comparative study of the sizes and size distributions of crystalline silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs, in which we found these components exhibit a size-density relationship consistent with having been sorted together prior to accretion. Here we extend our data set and include GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide), the most abundant amorphous silicate phase observed in CP IDPs. We find that while the silicate and sulfide sorting trend previously observed is maintained, the GEMS size data do not exhibit any clear relationship to these crystalline components. Therefore, GEMS do not appear to have been sorted with the silicate and sulfide crystals. The disparate sorting trends observed in GEMS and the crystalline grains in CP IDPs present an interesting challenge for modeling early transport and accretion processes. They may indicate that several sorting mechanisms operated on these CP IDP components, or alternatively, they may simply be a reflection of different source environments.

  9. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; et al

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations revealmore »an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.« less

  10. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 96, NO. E2, PAGES 17,553-17,557, SEPTEMBER 25, 1991 IRRADIATION EFFECTS IN A COMET'S OUTER LAYERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    into the inner solar system. In this paper, the data relevant to irradiation effects and mantle formationV energies of interest for cosmic ray processing of the outer layers of the comet are not easily obtainable IRRADIATION EFFECTS IN A COMET'S OUTER LAYERS R. E. Johnson Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering

  11. Solar technical assistance provided to Forest City military communities in Hawaii for incorporation of 20-30 MW of solar energy generation to power family housing for US Navy personnel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, Jeff (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Merrigan, Tim (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Boudra, Will (Forest City Military Communities, Honolulu, HI); Miller, Ryan (CH2M Hill, Englewood, CO); Cisneros, Gabriela (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Rosenthal, Andrew L. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2010-06-01

    In May 2007, Forest City Military Communities won a US Department of Energy Solar America Showcase Award. As part of this award, executives and staff from Forest City Military Communities worked side-by-side with a DOE technical assistance team to overcome technical obstacles encountered by this large-scale real estate developer and manager. This paper describes the solar technical assistance that was provided and the key solar experiences acquired by Forest City Military Communities over an 18 month period.

  12. Source and distribution patterns of the Late Pleistocene-Holocene sands on the Central Texas-Louisiana continental shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reutter, David Christian

    1985-01-01

    I 0 0 1 C I 0 ICI 'I 0 lt *lbl- I lb I 0 OE ~ C DE I , 01 I CEO 0'I 'I 0 E 1 0 0 0" "OC CO PLEI' r. ' 1 , 0' 0 lb River during the last sea level regression (Curray, 1960). Lastly, the rapid deposition that is currently taking place... transgression are the dominant facies of the outer shelf region off the Texas and western Louisiana coast. Only in the eastern section off the Louisiana coast does the outer shelf have a silt-clay facies of modern age (Frazi er, 1974). These Recent sediments...

  13. Classification of KdV vessels with constant parameters and two dimensional outer space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Melnikov

    2014-07-06

    In this article we classify vessels producing solutions of some completely integrable PDEs, presenting a \\textit{unified} approach for them. The classification includes such important examples as Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and evolutionary Non Linear Schr\\" odingier (ENLS) equations. In fact, employing basic matrix algebra techniques it is shown that there are exactly two canonical forms of such vessels, so that each canonical form generalize either KdV or ENLS equations. Particularly, Dirac canonical systems, whose evolution was recently inserted into the vessel theory, are shown to be equivalent to the ENLS equation in the sense of vessels. This work is important as a first step to classification of completely integrable PDEs, which are solvable by the theory of vessels. We note that a recent paper of the author, published in Journal of Mathematical Physics, showed that initial value problem with analytic initial potential for the KdV equation has at least a "narrowing" in time solution. The presented classification, inherits this idea and a similar theorem can be easily proved for the presented PDEs. Finally, the the resuts of the work serve as a basis for the investigation of the following problems: 1. hierarchy of the generalized KdV, ENLS equations (by generalizing the vessel equations), 2. new completely integrable PDEs (by changing the dimension of the outer space), 3. addressing the question of integrability of a given arbitrary PDE (the future classification will create a list of solvable by vessels equations, which may eventually include many existing classes of PDEs).

  14. A DETAILED KINEMATIC MAP OF CASSIOPEIA A'S OPTICAL MAIN SHELL AND OUTER HIGH-VELOCITY EJECTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milisavljevic, Dan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Fesen, Robert A., E-mail: dmilisav@cfa.harvard.edu [6127 Wilder Lab, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting material in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). These Doppler maps have the highest spectral and spatial resolutions of any previous survey of Cas A and represent the most complete catalog of its optically emitting material to date. We confirm that the bulk of Cas A's optically bright ejecta populate a torus-like geometry tilted approximately 30 Degree-Sign with respect to the plane of the sky with a -4000 to +6000 km s{sup -1} radial velocity asymmetry. Near-tangent viewing angle effects and an inhomogeneous surrounding circumstellar material/interstellar medium environment suggest that this geometry and velocity asymmetry may not be faithfully representative of the remnant's true 3D structure or the kinematic properties of the original explosion. The majority of the optical ejecta are arranged in several well-defined and nearly circular ring-like structures with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). These ejecta rings appear to be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may be associated with post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive {sup 56}Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material. Our optical survey encompasses Cas A's faint outlying ejecta knots and exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of S-rich debris often referred to as ''jets''. These outer knots, which exhibit a chemical make-up suggestive of an origin deep within the progenitor star, appear to be arranged in opposing and wide-angle outflows with opening half-angles of Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign.

  15. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

  16. Advanced development of rotary stratified charge 750 and 1500 HP military multi-fuel engines at Curtiss-Wright

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.

    1984-01-01

    During the period from 1977 to 1982, two and four rotor naturally aspirated Stratified Charge Rotary Combustion engines were under development for the U.S. Marine Corps. These engines are described and highlights of work conducted under the government ''Advanced Development'' contracts are discussed. The basic direct injected and spark ignited stratified charge technology was defined during 1973-1976 for automotive engine applications. It was then demonstrated that the unthrottled naturally aspirated Rotary could match indirect injected diesel fuel consumption, without regard to fuel cetane or octane rating. This same technology was scaled from the 60''/sup 3//rotor automotive engine module to the 350''/sup 3//rotor military engine size. In addition, parallel company-sponsored research efforts were undertaken to explore growth directions. Tests showed significant thermal efficiency improvement at lean air-fuel ratios. When turbocharged, high exhaust energy recovery of this ported engine provided induction airflow sufficient for increased output plus excess for operation at the lean mixture strengths of best combustion efficiency. With additive improvements in mechanical efficiency accruing to higher BMEP operation, the potential for fuel economy in the same range as direct injected diesels was demonstrated. These lightweight, compact, multi-fuel engines are believed to open new possiblities for lightweight, reliable, highly mobile and agile military fighting vehicles of the future.

  17. A continental clastic depositional model for the Permian Unayzah formation, Hawtah field, central Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heine, C.J. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01

    The Permian Unayzah Formation lies unconformably on the Silurian Qusaiba Member of the Qalibah Formation. The pre-Unayzah unconformity (PUU) represents a Hercynian tectonic event responsible for uplift and erosion representing 100-150 m.y. worth of missing section along the Hawtah Trend. Overlying the PUU, the Unayzah clastic sequence is comprised of locally sourced sediments from the adjacent paleotopography. Above the thin veneer of locally sourced sediments is a more regionally sourced, confined braided stream sequence, which completely backfills the existing paleotopography. Once the paleotopographic surface had been leveled, the depositional environment changed from a confined braided stream to a broad braided plain. Within this sequence of vertically stacked and laterally migrating braided plain sediments, the bulk of the reservoirs within the Hawtah field are contained. As the transgressive Khuff seas continue to encroach on the Unayzah depositional system, the upper-most sediments of the broad braided plan environment are reworked by transgressive coastal processes. The resulting reworked shoreface and shallow-marine facies are genetically related to the Khuff transgression and lie unconformably on the Unayzah continental clastics.

  18. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.; Troyan, D.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Holdridge, D.; Kyrouac, J.; Schatz, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, S.

    2015-01-27

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the US Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a six-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriving model forcing data sets. Over the course of the 46-day MC3E campaign, a total of 1362 radiosondes were launched from the enhanced sonde network. This manuscript provides details on the instrumentationmore »used as part of the sounding array, the data processing activities including quality checks and humidity bias corrections and an analysis of the impacts of bias correction and algorithm assumptions on the determination of convective levels and indices. It is found that corrections for known radiosonde humidity biases and assumptions regarding the characteristics of the surface convective parcel result in significant differences in the derived values of convective levels and indices in many soundings. In addition, the impact of including the humidity corrections and quality controls on the thermodynamic profiles that are used in the derivation of a large-scale model forcing data set are investigated. The results show a significant impact on the derived large-scale vertical velocity field illustrating the importance of addressing these humidity biases.« less

  19. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.; Troyan, D.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Holdridge, D.; Kyrouac, J.; Schatz, J.

    2014-09-12

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a 6-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriving model forcing datasets. Over the course of the 46 day MC3E campaign, a total of 1362 radiosondes were launched from the enhanced sonde network. This manuscript describes the details of the instrumentationmore »used as part of the sounding array, the data processing activities including quality checks and humidity bias corrections and an analysis of the impacts of bias correction and algorithm assumptions on the determination of convective levels and indices. It is found that corrections for known radiosonde humidity biases and assumptions regarding the characteristics of the surface convective parcel result in significant differences in the derived values of convective levels and indices in many soundings.« less

  20. Phylogeography of Rhinichthys cataractae (Teleostei: Cyprinidae): pre-glacial colonization across the Great Continental Divide and Pleistocene diversification within the Rio Grande drainage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dae Min

    2013-09-16

    The longnose dace, Rhinichthys cataractae, is a primary freshwater fish inhibiting riffle habitats in small headwater rivers and streams across the North American continent, including drainages east and west of the Continental Divide. Phylogenetic...

  1. HIGH-ALBEDO C-COMPLEX ASTEROIDS IN THE OUTER MAIN BELT: THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasuga, Toshihiro [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kuroda, Daisuke, E-mail: toshi.kasuga@nao.ac.jp [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Primitive, outer-belt asteroids are generally of low albedo, reflecting carbonaceous compositions like those of CI and CM meteorites. However, a few outer-belt asteroids having high albedos are known, suggesting the presence of unusually reflective surface minerals or, conceivably, even exposed water ice. Here, we present near-infrared (1.1-2.5 {mu}m) spectra of four outer-belt C-complex asteroids with albedos {>=}0.1. We find no absorption features characteristic of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 {mu}m) in the objects. Intimate mixture models set limits to the water ice by weight {<=}2%. Asteroids (723) Hammonia and (936) Kunigunde are featureless and have (60%-95%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes that might explain the high albedos. Asteroid (1276) Ucclia also shows a featureless reflection spectrum with (50%-60%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes. Asteroid (1576) Fabiola shows a possible weak, broad absorption band (1.5-2.1 {mu}m). The feature can be reproduced by (80%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes or orthopyroxene (crystalline silicate), either of which is likely to cause its high albedo. We discuss the origin of high-albedo components in primitive asteroids.

  2. Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J.; Burress, R.V.

    1995-06-01

    The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

  3. On the stability of pick-up ion ring distributions in the outer heliosheath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summerlin, Errol J.; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Moore, Thomas E.; Christian, Eric R.; Cooper, John F., E-mail: errol.summerlin@nasa.gov, E-mail: adolfo.figueroa-vinas-1@nasa.gov, E-mail: thomas.e.moore@nasa.gov, E-mail: eric.r.christian@nasa.gov, E-mail: john.f.cooper@nasa.gov [Heliophysics Science Division, NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The 'secondary energetic neutral atom (ENA)' hypothesis for the ribbon feature observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) posits that the neutral component of the solar wind continues beyond the heliopause and charge exchanges with interstellar ions in the Outer Heliosheath (OHS). This creates pick-up ions that gyrate about the draped interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) lines at pitch angles near 90° on the locus where the ISMF lies tangential to the heliopause and perpendicular to the heliocentric radial direction. This location closely coincides with the location of the ribbon feature according to the prevailing inferences of the ISMF orientation and draping. The locally gyrating ions undergo additional charge exchange and escape as free-flying neutral atoms, many of which travel back toward the inner solar system and are imaged by IBEX as a ribbon tracing out the locus described above. For this mechanism to succeed, the pick-up ions must diffuse in pitch angle slowly enough to permit secondary charge exchange before their pitch angle distribution substantially broadens away from 90°. Previous work using linear Vlasov dispersion analysis of parallel propagating waves has suggested that the ring distribution in the OHS is highly unstable, which, if true, would make the secondary ENA hypothesis incapable of rendering the observed ribbon. In this paper, we extend this earlier work to more realistic ring distribution functions. We find that, at the low densities necessary to produce the observed IBEX ribbon via the secondary ENA hypothesis, growth rates are highly sensitive to the temperature of the beam and that even very modest temperatures of the ring beam corresponding to beam widths of <1° are sufficient to damp the self-generated waves associated with the ring beam. Thus, at least from the perspective of linear Vlasov dispersion analysis of parallel propagating waves, there is no reason to expect that the ring distributions necessary to produce the observed IBEX ENA flux via the secondary ENA hypothesis will be unstable to their own self-generated turbulence.

  4. Protein and microRNA biomarkers from lavage, urine, and serum in military personnel evaluated for dyspnea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Joseph N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brewer, Heather M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weitz, Karl K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Michael J. [San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Skabelund, Andrew J. [San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Adkins, Joshua N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cho, Ji -Hoon [Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA (United States); Gelinas, Richard [Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-10-05

    Background: We have identified candidate protein and microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for dyspnea by studying serum, lavage fluid, and urine from military personnel who reported serious respiratory symptoms after they were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods: Forty-seven soldiers with the complaint of dyspnea who enrolled in the STudy of Active Duty Military Personnel for Environmental Dust Exposure (STAMPEDE) underwent comprehensive pulmonary evaluations at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The evaluation included fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The clinical findings from the STAMPEDE subjects pointed to seven general underlying diagnoses or findings including airway hyperreactivity, asthma, low diffusivity of carbon monoxide, and abnormal cell counts. The largest category was undiagnosed. As an exploratory study, not a classification study, we profiled proteins or miRNAs in lavage fluid, serum, or urine in this group to look for any underlying molecular patterns that might lead to biomarkers. Proteins in lavage fluid and urine were identified by accurate mass tag (database-driven) proteomics methods while miRNAs were profiled by a hybridization assay applied to serum, urine, and lavage fluid. Results: Over seventy differentially expressed proteins were reliably identified both from lavage and from urine in forty-eight dyspnea subjects compared to fifteen controls with no known lung disorder. Six of these proteins were detected both in urine and lavage. One group of subjects was distinguished from controls by expressing a characteristic group of proteins. A related group of dyspnea subjects expressed a unique group of miRNAs that included one miRNA that was differentially overexpressed in all three fluids studied. The levels of several miRNAs also showed modest but direct associations with several standard clinical measures of lung health such as forced vital capacity or gas exchange efficiency. Conclusions: Candidate proteins and miRNAs associated with the general diagnosis of dyspnea have been identified in subjects with differing medical diagnoses. Since these markers can be measured in readily obtained clinical samples, further studies are possible that test the value of these findings in more formal classification or case–control studies in much larger cohorts of subjects with specific lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema, or some other well-defined lung disease.

  5. Protein and microRNA biomarkers from lavage, urine, and serum in military personnel evaluated for dyspnea

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Joseph N.; Brewer, Heather M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Morris, Michael J.; Skabelund, Andrew J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Cho, Ji -Hoon; Gelinas, Richard

    2014-10-05

    Background: We have identified candidate protein and microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for dyspnea by studying serum, lavage fluid, and urine from military personnel who reported serious respiratory symptoms after they were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Methods: Forty-seven soldiers with the complaint of dyspnea who enrolled in the STudy of Active Duty Military Personnel for Environmental Dust Exposure (STAMPEDE) underwent comprehensive pulmonary evaluations at the San Antonio Military Medical Center. The evaluation included fiber-optic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The clinical findings from the STAMPEDE subjects pointed to seven general underlying diagnoses or findings including airway hyperreactivity, asthma, low diffusivity of carbonmore »monoxide, and abnormal cell counts. The largest category was undiagnosed. As an exploratory study, not a classification study, we profiled proteins or miRNAs in lavage fluid, serum, or urine in this group to look for any underlying molecular patterns that might lead to biomarkers. Proteins in lavage fluid and urine were identified by accurate mass tag (database-driven) proteomics methods while miRNAs were profiled by a hybridization assay applied to serum, urine, and lavage fluid. Results: Over seventy differentially expressed proteins were reliably identified both from lavage and from urine in forty-eight dyspnea subjects compared to fifteen controls with no known lung disorder. Six of these proteins were detected both in urine and lavage. One group of subjects was distinguished from controls by expressing a characteristic group of proteins. A related group of dyspnea subjects expressed a unique group of miRNAs that included one miRNA that was differentially overexpressed in all three fluids studied. The levels of several miRNAs also showed modest but direct associations with several standard clinical measures of lung health such as forced vital capacity or gas exchange efficiency. Conclusions: Candidate proteins and miRNAs associated with the general diagnosis of dyspnea have been identified in subjects with differing medical diagnoses. Since these markers can be measured in readily obtained clinical samples, further studies are possible that test the value of these findings in more formal classification or case–control studies in much larger cohorts of subjects with specific lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema, or some other well-defined lung disease.« less

  6. Military and diplomatic roles and options for managing and responding to the proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction. Final report: Program on Stability and the Offense/Defense Relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallenbeck, R.A.; Gill, J.M.; Murray, B.L.

    1993-05-26

    The March seminar, ``Military and Diplomatic Roles and Options`` for managing and responding to proliferation, featured three presentations: the military and diplomatic implications of preemptive force as a counterproliferation option; an in-depth assessment of the threat posed by biological weapons; and, a new proposed US counterproliferation policy.

  7. Physical and computer modeling of military earth grounding practices in a HEMP (high-altitude electromagnetic pulse) environment. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuneo, A.A. Jr.; Loftus, J.J.; Perala, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    Military grounding practices compatible with hardening electronic systems to high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) illumination are considered. This study concerns the grounding practices outlined in MIL-STD-188-124, Common Long-Haul/Tactical Communications Systems. Three standard grounding schemes and one new scheme were chosen for study at a 10:1 scale, illuminated by a 59-V/m peak simulated HEMP. There were several significant results: (a) The theoretical technique in general agrees to within a factor of three with the experimental results, (b) The type end of earth ground system does not appear to be important, and (c) Intrasite transients tend to be dominated by electromagnetic coupling to completed conductive loops. When the loop is broken, the transient is characterized by the half-wavelength resonance of the conductor. Grounding paths which do not form part of the loop do not contribute significantly to the transient in the loop.

  8. An Ecological Data Specialist (Research Associate I Special) position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML). This position is located at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POSITION An Ecological Data Specialist (Research Associate I Special) position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML). This position is located at Pohakuloa. RESPONSIBILITIES This position will provide support for Geographic Information Systems (GIS), data management

  9. Texas Tech University Military & Veterans Programs My name is Josh Quigley. I'm originally from Lubbock, Texas and I'm a senior Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Texas Tech University Military & Veterans Programs My name is Josh Quigley. I'm originally from Lubbock, Texas and I'm a senior Wildlife Management major here at Texas Tech. My name is Todd Truesdell. I am classified as a senior and I'm from Carrollton, Texas. My name is Alex Robles. I'm a junior here

  10. A search for planetary Nebulae with the Sloan digital sky survey: the outer regions of M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kniazev, Alexei Y. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9 7935 (South Africa); Grebel, Eva K.; Martínez-Delgado, David [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Zucker, Daniel B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Snedden, Stephanie A., E-mail: akniazev@saao.ac.za [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to identify planetary nebula (PN) candidates in imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This method exploits the SDSS's five-band sampling of emission lines in PN spectra, which results in a color signature distinct from that of other sources. Selection criteria based on this signature can be applied to nearby galaxies in which PNe appear as point sources. We applied these criteria to the whole area of M31 as scanned by the SDSS, selecting 167 PN candidates that are located in the outer regions of M31. The spectra of 80 selected candidates were then observed with the 2.2 m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory. These observations and cross-checks with literature data show that our method has a selection rate efficiency of about 90%, but the efficiency is different for the different groups of PN candidates. In the outer regions of M31, PNe trace different well-known morphological features like the Northern Spur, the NGC 205 Loop, the G1 Clump, etc. In general, the distribution of PNe in the outer region 8 < R < 20 kpc along the minor axis shows the {sup e}xtended disk{sup —}a rotationally supported low surface brightness structure with an exponential scale length of 3.21 ± 0.14 kpc and a total mass of ?10{sup 10} M {sub ?}, which is equivalent to the mass of M33. We report the discovery of three PN candidates with projected locations in the center of Andromeda NE, a very low surface brightness giant stellar structure in the outer halo of M31. Two of the PNe were spectroscopically confirmed as genuine PNe. These two PNe are located at projected distances along the major axis of ?48 Kpc and ?41 Kpc from the center of M31 and are the most distant PNe in M31 found up to now. With the new PN data at hand we see the obvious kinematic connection between the continuation of the Giant Stream and the Northern Spur. We suggest that 20%-30% of the stars in the Northern Spur area may belong to the Giant Stream. In our data we also see a possible kinematic connection between the Giant Stream and PNe in Andromeda NE, suggesting that Andromeda NE could be the core or remnant of the Giant Stream. Using PN data we estimate the total mass of the Giant Stream progenitor to be ?10{sup 9} M {sub ?}. About 90% of its stars appear to have been lost during the interaction with M31.

  11. The complex structure of stars in the outer galactic disk as revealed by Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Schlafly, Edward F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Morganson, Eric [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Peñarrubia, Jorge; Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Martinez-Delgado, David [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Wyse, Rosemary F. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Magnier, Eugene A.; Tonry, John L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Price, Paul A., E-mail: ctslater@umich.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); and others

    2014-08-10

    We present a panoptic view of the stellar structure in the Galactic disk's outer reaches commonly known as the Monoceros Ring, based on data from Pan-STARRS1. These observations clearly show the large extent of the stellar overdensities on both sides of the Galactic disk, extending between b = –25° and b = +35° and covering over 130° in Galactic longitude. The structure exhibits a complex morphology with both stream-like features and a sharp edge to the structure in both the north and the south. We compare this map to mock observations of two published simulations aimed at explaining such structures in the outer stellar disk, one postulating an origin as a tidal stream and the other demonstrating a scenario where the disk is strongly distorted by the accretion of a satellite. These morphological comparisons of simulations can link formation scenarios to observed structures, such as demonstrating that the distorted-disk model can produce thin density features resembling tidal streams. Although neither model produces perfect agreement with the observations—the tidal stream predicts material at larger distances that is not detected while in the distorted disk model, the midplane is warped to an excessive degree—future tuning of the models to accommodate these latest data may yield better agreement.

  12. Tracking the evolution of a coherent magnetic flux rope continuously from the inner to the outer corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, J. Q.; Li, C.; Vourlidas, A.; Liu, Y. D.; Olmedo, O.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic flux rope (MFR) is believed to be the underlying magnetic structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, it remains unclear how an MFR evolves into and forms the multi-component structure of a CME. In this paper, we perform a comprehensive study of an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) MFR eruption on 2013 May 22 by tracking its morphological evolution, studying its kinematics, and quantifying its thermal property. As EUV brightenings begin, the MFR starts to rise slowly and shows helical threads winding around an axis. Meanwhile, cool filamentary materials descend spirally down to the chromosphere. These features provide direct observational evidence of intrinsically helical structure of the MFR. Through detailed kinematical analysis, we find that the MFR evolution has two distinct phases: a slow rise phase and an impulsive acceleration phase. We attribute the first phase to the magnetic reconnection within the quasi-separatrix layers surrounding the MFR, and the much more energetic second phase to the fast magnetic reconnection underneath the MFR. We suggest that the transition between these two phases is caused by the torus instability. Moreover, we identify that the MFR evolves smoothly into the outer corona and appears as a coherent structure within the white-light CME volume. The MFR in the outer corona was enveloped by bright fronts that originated from plasma pile-up in front of the expanding MFR. The fronts are also associated with the preceding sheath region followed by the outmost MFR-driven shock.

  13. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  14. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Ravens, Thomas M.; Cunningham, Keith W.; Scott, George

    2012-12-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

  15. The Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System: Spectral Variation on Kuiper Belt Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, Wesley C; Glass, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Here we present additional photometry of targets observed as part of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. 12 targets were re-observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 in optical and NIR wavebands designed to compliment those used during the first visit. Additionally, all observations originally presented by Fraser and Brown (2012) were reanalyzed through the same updated photometry pipeline. A reanalysis of the optical and NIR colour distribution reveals a bifurcated optical colour distribution and only two identifiable spectral classes, each of which occupies a broad range of colours and have correlated optical and NIR colours, in agreement with our previous findings. We report the detection of significant spectral variations on 5 targets which cannot be attributed to photometry errors, cosmic rays, point spread function or sensitivity variations, or other image artifacts capable of explaining the magnitude of the variation. The spectrally variable objects are found to have ...

  16. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 162, 2005, pp. 135146. Printed in Great Britain. Subsidence history of the north Indian continental margin, ZanskarLadakh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    . 135 Subsidence history of the north Indian continental margin, Zanskar­Ladakh Himalaya, NW India R. I of the tectonic subsidence and uplift through the pre- collisional history of the margin have been constructed.2. This model accounts for the general exponential decrease in the backstripped tectonic subsidence. The model

  17. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY 25 March 2012) ABSTRACT The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified. Observed transfer of tidal energy into high-mode internal tides is quantitatively consistent with observed

  18. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  19. Tectonic features associated with the overriding of an accretionary wedge on top of a rifted continental margin: An example from Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    continental margin: An example from Taiwan Andrew T. Lin a, , Char-Shine Liu b , Che-Chuan Lin a , Philippe,d a Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Taiwan b Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taiwan c Institute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan d CPC Corporation, Taiwan

  20. Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

  1. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functionsmore »for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, ?, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.« less

  2. Inward shift of outer radiation belt electrons as a function of Dst index and the influence of the solar wind on electron injections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    Inward shift of outer radiation belt electrons as a function of Dst index and the influence of the solar wind on electron injections into the slot region H. Zhao1 and X. Li1 Received 30 July 2012 electrons as a function of the Dst index and the controlling solar wind parameters for deep penetration

  3. A 10 kpc stellar stream at the edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud: evidence for tidal stripping of the outer disk?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Dougal; Erkal, Denis; Belokurov, Vasily; Da Costa, Gary S; Gómez, Facundo A

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a substantial stellar stream in the periphery of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), found using public imaging from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey. The stream appears to emanate from the edge of the outer LMC disk at a radius $\\approx 13.5$ degrees due north of its centre, and stretches more than $10$ kpc towards the east. It is roughly $1.5$ kpc wide and has an integrated $V$-band luminosity of at least $M_V = -7.4$. The stellar populations in the stream are indistinguishable from those in the outer LMC disk. We attempt to quantify the geometry of the outer disk using simple planar models, and find that only a disk with mild intrinsic ellipticity can simultaneously explain the observed stellar density on the sky and the azimuthal line-of-sight distance profile. We also see possible non-planar behaviour in the outer disk that may reflect a warp and/or flare. Based on all these observations, we conclude that the stream is most likely comprised of material that has been strip...

  4. THE OUTER EDGE OF THE KUIPER BELT. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston TX 77058, USA, (hahn@lpi.usra.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    THE OUTER EDGE OF THE KUIPER BELT. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston TX 77058, USA, (hahn@lpi.usra.edu). One of the more curious features of the Kuiper Belt is the apparent dearth of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) orbiting the Sun beyond 50 AU with modest eccentricities and incli- nations, e

  5. Fig. 1: (a) Tuning fork resonator with two electromechanical transistors on the outer tips of the nano-resonator, i.e. boxed region on the left.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Fig. 1: (a) Tuning fork resonator with two electromechanical transistors on the outer tips of the transistor: evaporated gold contacts on single crytalline silicon (purple) with spring constants k+/- . Nano-Electromechanical as a phase sensitive bi-polar current switch. Index Terms -- Nanotechnology, nano-electromechanical systems

  6. Quantification of Dune Response during a 6-Day Nor'easter, Outer Banks, NC Kate L. Brodie1, Nick J. Spore1, Christy Swann2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    using Coastal Lidar And Imaging System (CLARIS) during the first dune collision event following cross-shore erosion of recently pushed, un-vegetated dunes reached 2 m/day. Variations in foreduneQuantification of Dune Response during a 6-Day Nor'easter, Outer Banks, NC Kate L. Brodie1, Nick J

  7. hen comets are in the outer Solar System, beyond Neptune's and Pluto's orbit, they are small, dark, and so distant that detecting them is difficult. Still

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W hen comets are in the outer Solar System, beyond Neptune's and Pluto's orbit, they are small. This section examines the origin of comets and characterizes their elliptical orbit through the Solar System. 3 Voyage of Discovery - Walks students through a scale model of the Solar System over a 600 meter distance

  8. HERSCHEL-RESOLVED OUTER BELTS OF TWO-BELT DEBRIS DISKS AROUND A-TYPE STARS: HD 70313, HD 71722, HD 159492, AND F-TYPE: HD 104860

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales, F. Y.; Bryden, G.; Werner, M. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Stapelfeldt, K. R., E-mail: Farisa@jpl.nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    We present dual-band Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer imaging for four stars whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) suggest two-ring disk architectures that mirror that of the asteroid-Kuiper Belt geometry of our own solar system. The Herschel observations at 100 ?m spatially resolve the cold/outer-dust component for each star-disk system for the first time, finding evidence of planetesimals at >100 AU, i.e., a larger size than assumed from a simple blackbody fit to the SED. By breaking the degeneracy between the grain properties and the dust's radial location, the resolved images help constrain the dust grain-size distribution for each system. Three of the observed stars are A-type and one solar-type. On the basis of the combined Spitzer/IRS+MIPS (5-70 ?m), the Herschel/PACS (100 and 160 ?m) dataset, and under the assumption of idealized spherical grains, we find that the cold/outer belts of the three A-type stars are well fit with a mixed ice/rock composition rather than pure rocky grains, while the debris around the solar-type star is consistent with either rock or ice/rock grains. For the solar-type star HD 104860, we find that the minimum grain size is larger than expected from the threshold set by radiative blowout. The A-type stars HD 71722 and HD 159492, on the other hand, require minimum grain sizes that are smaller than blowout for inner- and outer-ring populations. In the absence of spectral features for ice, we find that the behavior of the continuum can help constrain the composition of the grains (of icy nature and not pure rocky material) given the Herschel-resolved locations of the cold/outer-dust belts.

  9. Discovery of star formation in the extreme outer galaxy possibly induced by a high-velocity cloud impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, Natsuko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Saito, Masao

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of star formation activity in perhaps the most distant molecular cloud in the extreme outer galaxy. We performed deep near-infrared imaging with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope, and found two young embedded clusters at two CO peaks of 'Digel Cloud 1' at the kinematic distance of D = 16 kpc (Galactocentric radius R {sub G} = 22 kpc). We identified 18 and 45 cluster members in the two peaks, and the estimated stellar densities are ?5 and ?3 pc{sup –2}, respectively. The observed K-band luminosity function suggests that the age of the clusters is less than 1 Myr and also that the distance to the clusters is consistent with the kinematic distance. On the sky, Cloud 1 is located very close to the H I peak of high-velocity cloud Complex H, and there are some H I intermediate velocity structures between the Complex H and the Galactic disk, which could indicate an interaction between them. We suggest the possibility that Complex H impacting on the Galactic disk has triggered star formation in Cloud 1 as well as the formation of the Cloud 1 molecular cloud.

  10. Nitrogen and Oxygen Abundance Variations in the Outer Ejecta of Eta Carinae: Evidence for Recent Chemical Enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith; Jon A. Morse

    2004-02-20

    We present optical spectra of the ionized `Outer Ejecta' of Eta Carinae that reveal differences in chemical composition at various positions. In particular, young condensations just outside the dusty Homunculus Nebula show strong nitrogen lines and little or no oxygen -- but farther away, nitrogen lines weaken and oxygen lines become stronger. The observed variations in the apparent N/O ratio may signify either that the various blobs were ejected with different abundances, or more likely, that the more distant condensations are interacting with normal-composition material. The second hypothesis is supported by various other clues involving kinematics and X-ray emission, and would suggest that Eta Car is enveloped in a ``cocoon'' deposited by previous stellar-wind mass loss. In particular, all emission features where we detect strong oxygen lines are coincident with or outside the soft X-ray shell. In either case, the observed abundance variations suggest that Eta Car's ejection of nitrogen-rich material is a recent phenomenon -- taking place in just the last few thousand years. Thus, Eta Carinae may be at a critical stage of evolution when ashes of the CNO cycle have just appeared at its surface. Finally, these spectra reveal some extremely fast nitrogen-rich material, with Doppler velocities up to 3200 km/s, and actual space velocities that may be much higher. This is the fastest material yet seen in Eta Car's nebula, but with unknown projection angles its age is uncertain.

  11. A study of the minimum wetting rate of isothermal films flowing down on outer surface of vertical pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Ueda, Tatsuhiro

    1999-07-01

    The minimum wetting rate (MWR) was investigated experimentally with an isothermal water film flowing down on the outer surface of test pipes arranged vertically. A dry patch was generated by blowing a small air jet onto the film temporally, and observation was made to discriminate whether the dry patch was rewetted or not. The contact angle of the film at the top edge of the dry patch and the amplitude, length and velocity of large waves on the film were measured. The MWR decreased rapidly as the film flowed down and reached a nearly constant value at a position around 0.6 m down from the film inlet. There were large waves on the film. The tendency of the variation of MWR with the distance coincided well with the growth of the amplitude of large waves with the distance. The contact angle at the top edge of the dry patch varied periodically in a range synchronizing with the arrival of the waves. When the contact angle exceeded the maximum advancing contact angle, the rewetting of the dry patch was initiated. The existing correlations where the smooth surface film was assumed considerably over-predicted the MWR. The MWR was properly given by supposing that the dry patch is rewetted when the maximum of the fluctuating dynamic pressure of the film exceeds the upward component of the surface tension corresponding to the maximum advancing contact angle at the top edge of the dry patch.

  12. SPACEWAR WIRE MILITARY SPACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arrest officer from Azerbaijan over brutal murder NATO chief hopes Putin will attend bloc's June summit

  13. SPACEWAR WIRE MILITARY SPACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project Nepal jails six soldiers for murder, human rights violations Ex-Peruvian spy chief wants CIA

  14. Military Parade 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    EMBARGO AND 2005 KATRINA ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY D. Paul Mehta, Ph.D. Professor & Chair Mechanical Engineering Department Director, Industrial Assessment Center Bradley University Peoria, IL 61625 ABSTRACT The need for energy efficiency... captured the attention of all sectors of our society in 1973 when an Oil Embargo was imposed by the oil producing and exporting countries. Interest in energy efficiency continued during the 1980s primarily due to environmental concerns and secondarily...

  15. Recruit Military Job Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location:FedEx Field, Landover, MD 20785POC: DOECorporateRecruitmentWebsite: https://events.recruitmilitary.com/ 

  16. Comments on: Military

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N

  17. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-06

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition ofmore »gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (?40 vs. ?8% for anthropogenics, and ?52 vs. ?11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm?1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = H* (CH3COOH); H* = 105 M atm?1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 35%/25%/10% compared to our best estimate.« less

  18. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-05-26

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the gas-phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the regional chemistry transport model WRF-Chem, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48% and 63% respectively over the continental US Dry deposition of gas-phasemore »SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (?40% vs. ?8% for anthropogenics, ?52% vs. ?11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas-phase (61% for anthropogenics, 76% for biogenics). A number of sensitivity studies shows that this is a robust feature of the modeling system. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = 105 M atm?1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 25% / 10% compared to our best estimate. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm?1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations.« less

  19. Superhydrophobic powder additives to enhance chemical agent resistant coating systems for military equipment for the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) Corrosion Prevention and Control (CPAC) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawel, Steven J.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Haynes, James A.

    2015-07-01

    The primary goal of the CPAC program at ORNL was to explore the feasibility of introducing various silica-based superhydrophobic (SH) powder additives as a way to improve the corrosion resistance of US Department of Defense (DOD) military-grade chemical agent resistant coating (CARC) systems. ORNL had previously developed and patented several SH technologies of interest to the USMC, and one of the objectives of this program was to identify methods to incorporate these technologies into the USMC’s corrosion-resistance strategy. This report discusses findings of the CPAC and their application.

  20. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent with the inherent complexity associated with correct heme insertion and acylation of MtrC that occurs in the periplasm prior to its targeting to the outer membrane. These latter results suggest that MtrC protein trafficking to the outer membrane and its subsequent degradation are tightly regulated, which is consistent with cellular processing pathways that target MtrC to extracellular structures and their possible role in promoting electron transfer from Shewanella to extracellular acceptors.

  1. Sequence stratigraphic-based reservoir architecture in late Jurrassic outer-ramp carbonates, Hanifa Formation, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markello, J.R.; Stockton, M.L. (Mobile E P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)); McGuire, M.; Al'Shammery, M.J.; Al'Amoudi M.O. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1996-01-01

    The Hanifa Formation (135-160m tk; Kimmeridgian age), in our study area, comprises one 3rd-order, coarsening-upward, type 2 stratigraphic sequence. Sediments formed in outer ramp, ramp-margin and basinal environments defining a transition between the Rimthan Arch carbonate platform and adjacent Arabian intrashelf basin. Quantification of Hanifa reservoir architecture for simulation involved development of field-scale geologic models based on sequence stratigraphic principles. No seismic and biostratigraphic data were available. Sequence interpretations were based on regional facies and parasequence analysis from 32 cores and 142 gamma-ray/porosity logs. In the study area, the Hanifa Formation has basinward-thinning tabular geometry, and contains (1) a lower member of organic-rich muddy carbonates and (2) an upper reservoir member of thick, medium to coarse-grained skeletal packstones, skeletal peloidal grainstones, skeletal intraclast conglomerates, and stromatoporoid boundstones. The Hanifa reservoir consists of, from oldest to youngest: (1) a highstand systems tract: aggrading and prograding, sigmoidal-shaped parasequences and parasequence sets of grainstrines, conglomerates and boundstones, capped by a subaqueous, type 2 sequence boundary; (2) a shelf margin wedge: prograding to aggrading, sigmoidal to tabular-shaped parasequences and parasequence sets of skeletal packstones, grainstones and local boundstones showing maximum basinward progradation; and (3) a transgressive systems tract: backstepping tabular-shaped parasequences of grainstones capped by a drowning surface. All facies are interpreted to have formed in subtidal settings of water depths from 5 to 150m. No evidence was found for shoal-water bank, lagoonal or peritidal deposition or for subaerial exposure in any facies.

  2. Sequence stratigraphic-based reservoir architecture in late Jurrassic outer-ramp carbonates, Hanifa Formation, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markello, J.R.; Stockton, M.L. [Mobile E & P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); McGuire, M.; Al`Shammery, M.J.; Al`Amoudi M.O. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31

    The Hanifa Formation (135-160m tk; Kimmeridgian age), in our study area, comprises one 3rd-order, coarsening-upward, type 2 stratigraphic sequence. Sediments formed in outer ramp, ramp-margin and basinal environments defining a transition between the Rimthan Arch carbonate platform and adjacent Arabian intrashelf basin. Quantification of Hanifa reservoir architecture for simulation involved development of field-scale geologic models based on sequence stratigraphic principles. No seismic and biostratigraphic data were available. Sequence interpretations were based on regional facies and parasequence analysis from 32 cores and 142 gamma-ray/porosity logs. In the study area, the Hanifa Formation has basinward-thinning tabular geometry, and contains (1) a lower member of organic-rich muddy carbonates and (2) an upper reservoir member of thick, medium to coarse-grained skeletal packstones, skeletal peloidal grainstones, skeletal intraclast conglomerates, and stromatoporoid boundstones. The Hanifa reservoir consists of, from oldest to youngest: (1) a highstand systems tract: aggrading and prograding, sigmoidal-shaped parasequences and parasequence sets of grainstrines, conglomerates and boundstones, capped by a subaqueous, type 2 sequence boundary; (2) a shelf margin wedge: prograding to aggrading, sigmoidal to tabular-shaped parasequences and parasequence sets of skeletal packstones, grainstones and local boundstones showing maximum basinward progradation; and (3) a transgressive systems tract: backstepping tabular-shaped parasequences of grainstones capped by a drowning surface. All facies are interpreted to have formed in subtidal settings of water depths from 5 to 150m. No evidence was found for shoal-water bank, lagoonal or peritidal deposition or for subaerial exposure in any facies.

  3. Operations of a Radioisotope-based Propulsion System Enabling CubeSat Exploration of the Outer Planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Steven Howe; Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru

    2014-05-01

    Exploration to the outer planets is an ongoing endeavor but in the current economical environment, cost reduction is the forefront of all concern. The success of small satellites such as CubeSats launched to Near-Earth Orbit has lead to examine their potential use to achieve cheaper science for deep space applications. However, to achieve lower cost missions; hardware, launch and operations costs must be minimized. Additionally, as we push towards smaller exploration beds with relative limited power sources, allowing for adequate communication back to Earth is imperative. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Research are developing the potential of utilizing an advanced, radioisotope-based system. This system will be capable of providing both the propulsion power needed to reach the destination and the additional requirements needed to maintain communication while at location. Presented here are a basic trajectory analysis, communication link budget and concept of operations of a dual-mode (thermal and electric) radioisotope-based propulsion system, for a proposed mission to Enceladus (Saturnian icy moon) using a 6U CubeSat payload. The radioisotope system being proposed will be the integration of three sub-systems working together to achieve the overall mission. At the core of the system, stored thermal energy from radioisotope decay is transferred to a passing propellant to achieve high thrust – useful for quick orbital maneuvering. An auxiliary closed-loop Brayton cycle can be operated in parallel to the thrusting mode to provide short bursts of high power for high data-rate communications back to Earth. Additionally, a thermal photovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion system will use radiation heat losses from the core. This in turn can provide the electrical energy needed to utilize the efficiency of ion propulsion to achieve quick interplanetary transit times. The intelligent operation to handle all functions of this system under optimized conditions adds to the complexity of the mission architecture.

  4. Reprocessing of X-rays in the outer accretion disc of the black hole binary XTE J1817--330

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Gierlinski; Chris Done; Kim Page

    2008-11-06

    We build a simple model of the optical/UV emission from irradiation of the outer disc by the inner disc and coronal emission in black hole binaries. We apply this to the broadband Swift data from the outburst of the black hole binary XTE J1817--330 to confirm previous results that the optical/UV emission in the soft state is consistent with a reprocessing a constant fraction of the bolometric X-ray luminosity. However, this is very surprising as the disc temperature drops by more than a factor 3 in the soft state, which should produce a marked change in the reprocessing efficiency. The easiest way to match the observed constant reprocessed fraction is for the disc skin to be highly ionized (as suggested 30 years ago by van Paradijs), so that the bulk of the disc flux is reflected and only the hardest X-rays heat the disc. The constant reprocessed fraction also favours direct illumination of the disc over a scattering origin as the optical depth/solid angle of any scattering material (wind/corona) over the disc should decrease as the source luminosity declines. By contrast, the reprocessed fraction increases very significantly (by a factor ~6) as the source enters the hard state. This dramatic change is not evident from X-ray/UV flux correlations as it is masked by bandpass effects. However, it does not necessarily signal a change in emission e.g. the emergence of the jet dominating the optical/UV flux as the reflection albedo must change with the dramatic change in spectral shape.

  5. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  6. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  11. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  12. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  13. EA-2011: Proposed Release of Three Parasitoids for the Biological Control of the Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus Planipennis) in the Continental United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service issued an EA (July 2007) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the release of three parasitoids into the continental U.S. for the biological control of the emerald ash borer, a nonnative invasive beetle. The DOE Oak Ridge Office reviewed the EA, adopted it, and issued a FONSI for the proposed release of the same parasitoids into the environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  14. Heat Transfer -1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 cm and outer diameter 10.6 cm subjected to an external

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 cm and outer diameter 10.6 cm subjected to an external constant uniform heat flux of 100,000 W/m2 . The composite material of the pipe has/mK in the axial direction. Both ends of the pipe are insulated from any heat loss. The pipe is cooled by water

  15. The Outer Disks of Early-Type Galaxies. II. Surface-Brightness Profiles of Unbarred Galaxies and Trends with Hubble Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Leonel; Aladro, Rebeca; Beckman, John E

    2011-01-01

    We present azimuthally averaged radial profiles of R-band surface brightness for a complete sample of 47 early-type, unbarred galaxies, as a complement to our previous study of early-type barred galaxies. Following very careful sky subtraction, the profiles can typically be determined down to brightness levels well below 27 mag arcsec^{-2} and in the best cases below 28 mag arcsec^{-2}. We classified the profiles according to the scheme used previously for the barred sample: Type I profiles are single unbroken exponential radial declines in brightness; Type II profiles ("truncations") have an inner shallow slope (usually exponential) which changes at a well defined break radius to a steeper exponential; and Type III profiles ("antitruncations") have an inner exponential that is steeper, giving way to a shallower outer (usually exponential) decline. By combining these profiles with previous studies, we can make the first clear statements about the trends of outer-disk profile types along the Hubble sequence (i...

  16. Binding and Direct Electrochemistry of OmcA, an Outer-Membrane Cytochrome from an Iron Reducing Bacterium, with Oxide Electrodes: A Candidate Biofuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggleston, Carrick M.; Voros, Janos; Shi, Liang; Lower, Brian H.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Colberg, Patricia J.

    2008-02-15

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria transfer electrons to solid ferric respiratory electron acceptors. Outer-membrane cytochromes expressed by these organisms are of interest in both microbial fuel cells and biofuel cells. We use optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) to show that OmcA, an 85 kDa decaheme outer-membrane c-type cytochrome from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, adsorbs to isostructural Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in similar amounts. Adsorption is ionic-strength and pH dependent (peak adsorption at pH 6.5–7.0). The thickness of the OmcA layer on Al2O3 at pH 7.0 [5.8 ± 1.1 (2r) nm] from OWLS is similar, within error, to that observed using atomic force microscopy (4.8 ± 2 nm). The highest adsorption density observed was 334 ng cm 2 (2.4 · 1012 molecules cm 2), corresponding to a monolayer or 9.9 nm diameter spheres or submonolayer coverage by smaller molecules. Direct electrochemistry of OmcA on Fe2O3 electrodes was observed using cyclic voltammetry, with cathodic peak potentials of 380 to 320 mV versus Ag/AgCl. Variations in the cathodic peak positions are speculatively attributed to redox-linked conformation change or changes in molecular orientation. OmcA can exchange electrons with ITO electrodes at higher current densities than with Fe2O3. Overall, OmcA can bind to and exchange electrons with several oxides, and thus its utility in fuel cells is not restricted to Fe2O3.

  17. The effect of sociocultural factors on the quality of relations of the United States with Hispaniola: analysis of the American military occupation of Haiti and the Dominican Republic (1915-1934) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Fausto B.

    1988-01-01

    with Hispaniola reveals a strong emphasis on economic and strategic interests (see, for example, Langley, 1983' Wiarda and Kryzanek, 1982; Langley, 1982; Lowenthal, 1972, 1969; Knight, 1970). Therefore, the sociological significance of this study... with the role of social and cultural factors involved in the application of this policy. Melvin Knight, an American historian who had first-hand acquaintance with and who wrote about the military occupation of Hispaniola, described this "dilemma" as follows...

  18. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  19. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

  20. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  1. PHASE II CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE USNS BRIDGE (T AOE 10), MILITARY SEALIFT FLEET SUPPORT COMMAND, NAVAL STATION, NORFOLK, VIRGINIA DCN 5180-SR-01-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NICK A. ALTIC

    2012-08-30

    In March 2011, the USNS Bridge was deployed off northeastern Honshu, Japan with the carrier USS Ronald Reagan to assist with relief efforts after the 2011 T?hoku earthquake and tsunami. During that time, the Bridge was exposed to air-borne radioactive materials leaking from the damaged Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant. The proximity of the Bridge to the air-borne impacted area resulted in the contamination of the ship’s air-handling systems and the associated components, as well as potential contamination of other ship surfaces due to either direct intake/deposition or inadvertent spread from crew/operational activities. Preliminary surveys in the weeks after the event confirmed low-level contamination within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ductwork and systems, and engine and other auxiliary air intake systems. Some partial decontamination was performed at that time. In response to the airborne contamination event, Military Sealift Fleet Support Command (MSFSC) contracted Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under provisions of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to assess the radiological condition of the Bridge. Phase I identified contamination within the CPS filters, ventilation systems, miscellaneous equipment, and other suspect locations that could not accessed at that time (ORAU 2011b). Because the Bridge was underway during the characterization, all the potentially impacted systems/spaces could not be investigated. As a result, MSFSC contracted with ORAU to perform Phase II of the characterization, specifically to survey systems/spaces previously inaccessible. During Phase II of the characterization, the ship was in port to perform routine maintenance operations, allowing access to the previously inaccessible systems/spaces.

  2. The shield block is a modular system made up of austenitic steel SS316 LN-IG whose main function is to provide thermal and nuclear shielding of outer components and to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    The shield block is a modular system made up of austenitic steel SS316 LN-IG whose main function is to provide thermal and nuclear shielding of outer components and to supply the FW panel with cooling water, Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 USA Blanket System R&D Shield Block

  3. Spitzer/IRAC view of Sh 2-284: Searching for evidence of triggered star formation in an isolated region in the outer Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puga, E; Neiner, C; Lenorzer, A; Hubert, A -M; Waters, L B F M; Cusano, F; Ripepi, V

    2009-01-01

    Using Spitzer/IRAC observations of a region to be observed by the CoRoT satellite, we have unraveled a new complex star-forming region at low metallicity in the outer Galaxy. We perform a study of S284 in order to outline the chain of events in this star-forming region. We used four-band Spitzer/IRAC photometry as well as Halpha imaging obtained with INT/WFC. Combining these data with the optical photometry obtained in the frame of CoRoTs preparation and the 2MASS catalog we analysed the properties and distribution of young stellar objects (YSOs) associated with point-like sources. We also studied the SEDs of regions of extended emission, complementing our dataset with IRAS and MSX data. We find that S284 is unique in several ways: it is very isolated at the end of a spiral arm and both the diffuse dust and ionized emission are remarkably symmetric. We have partially resolved the central clusters of the three bubbles present in this region. Despite the different scales present in its multiple-bubble morpholog...

  4. Increasing the rate of hydrogen oxidation without increasing the overpotential: A bio-inspired iron molecular electrocatalyst with an outer coordination sphere proton relay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmon, Jonathan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kumar, Neeraj [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hulley, Elliott B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, Charles J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Raugei, Simone [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bullock, R. Morris [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Helm, Monte L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of hydrogen (H?) to protons and electrons for energy production in fuel cells is catalyzed by platinum, but its low abundance and high cost present drawbacks to widespread adoption. Precisely controlled proton delivery and removal is critical in hydrogenase enzymes in nature that catalyze H? oxidation using earth-abundant metals (iron and nickel). Here we report a synthetic iron complex, (CpC5F4N)Fe(PEtN(CH2)3NMe2PEt)(Cl), that serves as a precatalyst for the oxidation of H?, with turnover frequencies of 290 s?¹ in fluorobenzene, under 1 atm of H? using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) as the exogenous base. The cooperative effect of the primary, secondary and outer coordination spheres for moving protons in this remarkably fast catalyst emphasizes the key role of pendant amines in mimicking the functionality of the proton pathway in the hydrogenase enzymes. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: THE COMPOSITIONAL CLASSES OF THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: fraserw@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    We present the first results of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. The purpose of this survey was to measure the surface properties of a large number of Kuiper Belt objects and attempt to infer compositional and dynamical correlations. We find that the Centaurs and the low-perihelion scattered disk and resonant objects exhibit virtually identical bifurcated optical color distributions and make up two well-defined groups of objects. Both groups have highly correlated optical and NIR colors that are well described by a pair of two-component mixture models that have different red components but share a common neutral component. The small, H{sub 606} {approx}> 5.6 high-perihelion excited objects are entirely consistent with being drawn from the two branches of the mixing model, suggesting that the color bifurcation of the Centaurs is apparent in all small excited objects. On the other hand, objects larger than H{sub 606} {approx} 5.6 are not consistent with the mixing model, suggesting some evolutionary process avoided by the smaller objects. The existence of a bifurcation amongst all excited populations argues that the two separate classes of object existed in the primordial disk before the excited Kuiper Belt was populated. The cold classical objects exhibit a different type of surface that has colors that are consistent with being drawn from the red branch of the mixing model, but with much higher albedos.

  6. Statement by Secretary W. Bodman on Senate Passage of S. 3711...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    will help strengthen our nation's energy security by expanding the development of crude oil and natural gas reserves along our Outer Continental Shelf. "Just by going to the...

  7. Secretaries Chu and Salazar to Convene Meeting on Strengthening...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    leaders to discuss how to strengthen capabilities for responding to potential blowouts of oil and gas wells in deepwaters on the Outer Continental Shelf. The September 22, 2010...

  8. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    ANL), 2011, “Offshore Wind Energy. ” Outer Continental Shelffocus on advancing offshore wind energy development. AfterOffshore Wind Development 27 3.5 Remaining Challenges for Wind Energy

  9. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    ANL), 2011, “Offshore Wind Energy. ” Outer Continental Shelffull_report_2010.pdf British Wind Energy Association (BWEA),on advancing offshore wind energy development. After the

  10. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Outer Continental Shelf Alternative Energy and Alternate Usealternative non-fossil and alternative energy technologiesbe effectively addressed and alternative energy development

  11. Retrofiting survivability of military vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, Gregory H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In Iraq the terrain was such that vehicles could be distributed horizontally, which reduced the effectiveness of mines. In the mountainous terrain of Pakistan and Afghanistan vehicles are forced to use the few, passable roads, which are dirt and easily seeded with plentiful, cheap, intelligent mines. It is desirable to reduce the losses to such mines, preferably by retrofit means that do not greatly increase weight or cost or reduce maneuverability. V-bottom vehicles - A known approach to reducing vulnerability is the Buffalo, a large vehicle developed by South Africa to address mine warfare. It has large tires, high axles, and a reinforced, v-shaped bottom that deflects the blast from explosions below. It is developed and tested in combat, but is expensive and has reduced off-road mobility. The domestic MRAP has similar cost and mobility issue. The addition of v-shaped blast deflectors to vehicles such as Humvees could act much as the deflector on a Buffalo, but a Humvee is closer to the ground, so the explosive's expansion would be reduced. The deflector would also reduce a Humvee's clearance for rough terrain, and a deflector of adequate thickness to address the blast by itself could further increase cost and reduce mobility. Reactive armor is developed and has proven effective against shaped and explosive charges from side or top attack. It detects their approach, detonates, and defeats them by interfering with jet formation. If the threat was a shaped charge from below, they would be a logical choice. But the bulk of the damage to Humvees appears to be from the blast from high explosive mines for which the colliding shock from reactive armor could increase that from the explosive. Porous materials such as sand can strongly attenuate the kinetic energy and pressure of a strong shock. Figure 1 shows the kinetic energy (KE), momentum (Mu), velocity (u), and mass (M) of a spherically expanding shock as functions of radius for a material with a porosity of 0.5. Over the range from 0.5 to 4.5 cm the shock KE is attenuated by a factor of {approx}70, while its momentum is changed little. The shock and particle velocity falls by a factor of 200 while the mass increases by a factor of 730. In the limit of very porous media u {approx} 1/M, so KE {approx} 1/M, which falls by a factor of {approx}600, while momentum Mu does not change at all. Figure 2 shows the KE, Mu, u, and M for a material with a porosity of 1.05, for which the KE changes little. In the limit of media of very low porosity, u {approx} 1/{radical}M, so KE is constant while Mu {approx} {radical}M, which increases by a factor of 15. Thus, if the goal is to reduce the peak pressure from strong explosions below, very porous materials, which strongly reduce pressure but do not increase momentum, are preferred to non-porous materials, which amplify momentum but do not decrease pressure. These predictions are in qualitative accord with the results of experiments at Los Alamos in which projectiles from high velocity, large caliber cannons were stopped by one to two sandbags. The studies were performed primarily to determine the effectiveness of sand in stopping fragments of various sizes, but could be extended to study sand's effectiveness in attenuating blast pressure. It would also be useful to test the above predictions on the effectiveness of media with higher porosity. Water barriers have been discussed but not deployed in previous retrofit survivability studies for overseas embassies. They would detect the flash from the mine detonation below, trigger a thin layer of explosive above a layer of water, and drive water droplets into the approaching blast wave. The blast loses energy in evaporating the droplets and loses momentum in slowing them. Under favorable conditions that could attenuate the pressure in the blast enough to prevent the penetration or disruption of the vehicle. However, such barriers would depend on prompt and reliable detonation detection and water droplet dispersal, which have not been tested. There is a large literature on the theoretical effec

  12. military | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryMIII: The ManhattanCO2mfsacademic programs ||

  13. Trends for Outer Disk Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Erwin; Michael Pohlen; Leonel Gutierrez; John E. Beckman

    2007-12-10

    The surface-brightness profiles of galaxy disks fall into three main classes, based on whether they are simple exponentials (Type I), bend down at large radii (Type II, "truncations") or bend up at large radii (Type III, "antitruncations"). Here, we discuss how the frequency of these different profiles depends on Hubble type, environment, and the presence or absence of bars; these trends may herald important new tests for disk formation models.

  14. Trends for Outer Disk Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erwin, Peter; Gutíerrez, Leonel; Beckman, John E

    2007-01-01

    The surface-brightness profiles of galaxy disks fall into three main classes, based on whether they are simple exponentials (Type I), bend down at large radii (Type II, "truncations") or bend up at large radii (Type III, "antitruncations"). Here, we discuss how the frequency of these different profiles depends on Hubble type, environment, and the presence or absence of bars; these trends may herald important new tests for disk formation models.

  15. C-Mod Outer Divertor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and radiation. * Multi-layer stacks of dimpled shim-stock sheets limit radiative heat transfer. * Multi-level structural plates utilize welded studs and standoffs to...

  16. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only amore »relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.« less

  17. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more »The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  18. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  19. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  20. First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program)/thermal regimes core hole project at Valles Caldera, New Mexico (VC-1): Drilling report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.; Hawkins, W.; Gardner, J. (comps.)

    1987-02-01

    This report is a review and summary of the core drilling operations of the first Valles Caldera research borehole (VC-1) under the Thermal Regimes element of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). The project is a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental scientific questions about magma, rock/water interactions, and volcanology through shallow (<1-km) core holes at Long Valley, California; Salton Sea, California; and the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy of the core hole, core quality description, core rig specifications, and performance. It is intended to guide future research on the core and in the borehole, as well as have applications to other areas and scientific problems in the Valles Caldera. The primary objectives of this Valles Caldera coring effort were (1) to study the hydrogeochemistry of a subsurface geothermal outflow zone of the caldera near the source of convective upflow, (2) to obtain structural and stratigraphic information from intracaldera rock formations in the southern ring-fracture zone, and (3) to obtain continuous core samples through the youngest volcanic unit in Valles Caldera, the Banco Bonito rhyolite (approximately 0.1 Ma). All objectives were met. The high percentage of core recovery and the excellent quality of the samples are especially notable. New field sample (core) handling and documentation procedures were successfully utilized. The procedures were designed to provide consistent field handling of the samples and logs obtained through the national CSDP.

  1. Frequency variations of quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions: A possible new ground-based diagnostic of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alford, J.; Engebretson, M. [Ausburg College, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [Ausburg College, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Arnoldy, R. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)] [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Inan, U. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic pulsations and quasi-periodic (QP) amplitude modulations of ELF-VLF waves at Pc 3-4 frequencies (15-50 mHz) are commonly observed simultaneously in cusp-latitude data. The naturally occurring ELF-VLF emissions are believed to be modulated within the magnetosphere by the compressional component of geomagnetic pulsations formed external to the magnetosphere. The authors have examined data from South Pole Station (L {approximately} 14) to determine the occurrence and characteristics of QP emissions. On the basis of 14 months of data during 1987 and 1988 they found that QP emissions typically appeared in both the 0.5-1 kHz and 1-2 kHz receiver channels at South Pole Station and ocassionally in the 2-4 kHz channel. The QP emission frequency appeared to depend on solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, and the months near fall equinox in both 1987 and 1988 showed a significant increase in the percentage of QP emissions only in the lowest-frequency channel. The authors present a model consistent with these variations in which high-latitude (nonequatorial) magnetic field minima near the magnetopause play a major role, because the field magnitude governs both the frequency of ELF-VLF emissions and the whistler mode propagation cutoffs. Because the field in these regions will be strongly influenced by solar wind and IMF parameters, variations in the frequency of such emissions may be useful in providing ground-based diagnostics of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere. 32 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Environmental Assessment for Central Power and Light Company`s proposed Military Highway-CFE tie 138/69-kV transmission line project Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Central Power and Light Company (CPL) intends to upgrade its existing transmission line ties with the Commision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) system in Mexico. CPL currently has a single 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Brownsville area which connects CPL`s system with the system of CFE. This existing line runs between the Brownsville Switching Station, located on Laredo Road in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, and an existing CFE 69-kV line at the Rusteberg Bend of the Rio Grande in Cameron County. Under current conditions of need, the existing 69-kV line does not possess sufficient capability to engage in appropriate power exchanges. Therefore, CPL is proposing to build a new line to link up with CFE. This proposed line would be a double-circuit line, which would (1) continue (on a slightly relocated route) the existing 69-kV tie from CPL`s Brownsville Switching Station to CFE`s facilities, and (2) add a 138-kV tie from the Military Highway Substation, located on Military Highway (US Highway 281), to CFE`s facilities. The proposed 138/69-kV line, which will be constructed and operated by CPL, will be built primarily on steel single-pole structures within an average 60-foot (ft) wide right-of-way (ROW). It will be approximately 6900--9200 ft (1.3--1.7 miles) in length, depending on the alternative route constructed.

  3. Dynamics of the continental margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    On 18--20 June 1990, over 70 oceanographers conducting research in the ocean margins of North America attended a workshop in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the Department of Energy with recommendations for future research on the exchange of energy-related materials between the coastal and interior ocean and the relationship between the ocean margins and global change. The workshop was designed to optimize the interaction of scientists from specific research disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics and geology) as they developed hypotheses, research questions and topics and implementation plans. The participants were given few restraints on the research they proposed other than realistic time and monetary limits. The interdisciplinary structure of the meeting promoted lively discussion and creative research plans. The meeting was divided into four working groups based on lateral, vertical, air/sea and sediment/water processes. Working papers were prepared and distributed before the meeting. During the meeting the groups revised the papers and added recommendations that appear in this report, which was reviewed by an Executive Committee.

  4. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  5. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  6. Thermal treatment of dyes from military munitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed thermal treatment equipment to treat Navy smoke and dye compounds. Navy smokes were burned in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) in the early 1980s. These test results were used in the development of a portable system consisting of a Thermal Treatment Unit (TTU), feed preparation and pumping skid, utility skid, and control trailer. This equipment was started up at Navy facilities at China Lake, CA where several destruction removal efficiency tests were completed in 1993 burning smoke compositions. The equipment was set up at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1996 where tests were completed burning green Navy spotting dyes. Operating and test results from the NTS efforts resulted in clearer understanding of equipment deficiencies, dye characteristics and composition, and secondary wastes generated. Future tests, scheduled for July, 1996 will demonstrate higher bum rates, better pH measurement and control, and stack emission test results for other colored dyes.

  7. MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; NUCLEAR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CONTAINERS; MATERIALS HANDLING EQUIPMENT The Weapon Container Catalog describes H-gear (shipping and storage containers, bomb hand trucks and the ancillary equipment required...

  8. EM Helps Military Families in Need

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LAS VEGAS – Six families from Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas recently received nearly $4,000 in donations — funds that helped provide a welcome relief during the holidays.

  9. The Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. A.G. Boyer and N.J. Gauthier (eds.), Proceedings of the 25th International Systems Safety Conference, Baltimore, USA, International Systems Safety Society, Unionville, VA, USA. pp 859-869

  10. JOHN HUTCHINSON apoleon Bonaparte's military excur-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Monica A.

    French naturalist, Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, to cross paths with a strange fish that had paired lungs and could `walk' on land on its stubby, lobe-like fins. In 1802, he dubbed this fish "Polyptère environment (Fig. 1). They then studied how the fish from the two groups moved on land, and how the shape

  11. Nanowarriors: Military Nanotechnology and Comic Books

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milburn, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Luckily, he injects med- ical nanobots into his blood beforerebuild his tissues, the nanobots restore him to life and

  12. ARPA-E University- Strategic Military Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will provide an inside look at how one ARPA-E project team, led by Primus Power, formed a strategic partnership with a major defense contractor to demonstrate its innovative energy storage system. Don’t miss the chance to learn more about Primus Power’s innovative EnergyPod and how the company has worked with Raytheon to advance the technology.

  13. EM Field Office Manager Receives Military Honor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco receives the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) Seven Seals Award in June at a ESGR recognition event in Carlsbad, N.M.

  14. Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Military Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic43,728 243,242 246,243 142,696 146,356 220,601

  15. Residual Fuel Oil Sales for Military Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand Cubic2009 2010 2011 2012 201314,609

  16. Massachusetts Military Reservation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to:Institute ofFund

  17. military academic programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryMIII: The ManhattanCO2mfsacademic programs |

  18. Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7 Assessment ofLana7, atScienceWaste shipmentAcademic

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Integrated Military Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuelInnovationScienceElectromagneticsNewsVideoSAR Sandia

  20. Military and Reservist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 |Department ofMay 2013EnergyIQAfrom