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1

Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Year 1953 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act pdf[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Enacted in 1953, the Outer Continental Lands Act provides for the jurisdiction of the United States over the submerged lands of the outer Continental Shelf, and authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to lease such lands for certain purposes. "It is hereby declared to be the policy of the United States that- (1) the subsoil and seabed of the outer Continental Shelf appertain to the United States and are subject to its jurisdiction, control, and power of disposition as provided in this Act..."

2

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags Minerals Management Service, MMS, Production, natural gas, gas, condensate, crude oil, oil, OCS production, Outer Continental Shelf, OSC, EIA, Energy Information...

3

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistics Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and...

4

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALASKA Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas...

5

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas...

6

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Pacific  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Pacific Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Pacific Dataset Summary Description Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics for the Pacific by month and summarized annually. Tags {"Minerals Management Service",MMS,Production,"natural gas",gas,condensate,"crude oil",oil,"OCS production","Outer Continental Shelf",OSC,EIA,"Energy Information Agency",federal,DOE,"Department of Energy",DOI,"Department of the Interior","Pacific "} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness

7

OIL AND GAS LEASING ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas Leasing, Exploration, & Development Process Solicit Comments 45-day Comment Period DraftOIL AND GAS LEASING ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF M i n e r a l s M a n a g e m e n t S e r v i c e www.mms.gov #12;OIL AND GAS LEASING ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Background The Minerals

Lotko, William

8

A Downscaled Wind Climatology on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 31-yr time series of boundary layer winds has been developed for a region on the outer continental shelf. This simulated time series was designed to be suitable to study the wind resources for a potential offshore wind farm. Reanalysis data were ...

Bryan K. Woods; Thomas Nehrkorn; John M. Henderson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

A 30-Year Wind Climatology on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 31-year time series of boundary layer winds has been developed for a region on the outer continental shelf. This simulated time series was designed to be suitable to study the wind resources for a potential offshore wind farm. Reanalysis data ...

Bryan K. Woods; Thomas Nehrkorn; John M. Henderson

10

Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs Published by U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs August 2013 iii FINDING OF NO SIGNIIFCANT IMPACT Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental

12

Observed Oceanic Response over the Upper Continental Slope and Outer Shelf during Hurricane Ivan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Ivan passed directly over an array of 14 acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed along the outer continental shelf and upper slope in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Currents in excess of 200 cm s?1 were generated during this ...

W. J. Teague; E. Jarosz; D. W. Wang; D. A. Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Gulf of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf of Gulf of Mexico Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Gulf of Mexico Dataset Summary Description Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics for the Gulf of Mexico by month and summarized annually. Tags {"Minerals Management Service",MMS,Production,"natural gas",gas,condensate,"crude oil",oil,"OCS production","Outer Continental Shelf",OSC,EIA,"Energy Information Agency",federal,DOE,"Department of Energy",DOI,"Department of the Interior","Gulf of Mexico"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility

14

Regulations Related to the Outer Continental Shelf Moratoria and Implications of Not Renewing the Moratoria (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

From 1982 through 2008, Congress annually enacted appropriations riders prohibiting the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior from conducting activities related to leasing, exploration, and production of oil and natural gas on much of the Federal OCS. Further, a separate executive ban (originally put in place in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush and later extended by President William J. Clinton through 2012) also prohibited leasing on the OCS, with the exception of the Western Gulf of Mexico, portions of the Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico, and Alaska. In combination, those actions prohibited drilling along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and in portions of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) imposed yet a third ban on drilling through 2022 on tracts in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico that are within 125 miles of Florida, east of a dividing line known as the Military Mission Line, and in the Central Gulf of Mexico within 100 miles of Florida.

Information Center

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

15

Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis was updated for AEO2009: Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental ShelfThe OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, Federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the States of Alaska and Virginia have asked the Federal Government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

Continental drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Continental Drilling was convened to prepare a report for submission to the US Geodynamics Committee with respect to the contribution that could be made by land drilling to resolve major problems of geodynamics and consider the mechanisms by which the responsibility for scientific planning, establishment of priorities, administration, and budgeting for a land-drilling program within the framework of the aims of the Geodynamics Project would best be established. A new and extensive program to study the continental crust is outlined in this report. The Workshop focused on the following topics: processes in the continental crust (mechanism of faulting and earthquakes, hydrothermal systems and active magma chambers); state and structure of the continental crust (heat flow and thermal structure of the crust; state of ambient stress in the North American plate; extent, regional structure, and evolution of crystalline continental crust); short hole investigations; present state and needs of drilling technology; drill hole experimentation and instrumentation; suggestions for organization and operation of drilling project; and suggested level of effort and funding. Four recommendations are set down. 8 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

Shoemaker, E.M. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Laboratory Model of Cooling over the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory experiment is conducted where hot water is cooled by exposure to air in a cylindrical rotating tank with a flat shallow outer continental shelf region next to a sloping continental slope bottom and a flat deep ocean center. It ...

J. A. Whitehead

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A Theory of Military Dictatorships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how nondemocratic regimes use the military and how this can lead to the emergence of military dictatorships. The elite may build a strong military and make the concessions necessary for the military to behave ...

Acemoglu, Daron

19

Continental Shelf Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do most commercial fisherman don't fish beyond the continental shelf? Replies: The deep waters of the ocean offer little food...

20

Live From Outer Space  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Live from Outer Space: How Cells Influence the Growth of Nanostructures Live from Outer Space: How Cells Influence the Growth of Nanostructures Far above the heads of Earthlings, arrays of single-cell creatures embedded in nanostructures ride on the International Space Station (courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico, NASA, and the U.S. Air Force) to test whether nanostructures whose formations were directed by yeast and other single cells can create more secure homes for their occupants-even in the vacuum and radiation of outer space-than those created by more standard chemical procedures. Cheap, tiny, and very lightweight sensors of chemical or biological agents could be made from long-lived cells that require no upkeep, yet sense and then communicate effectively with each other and their external

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ooo MILITARY HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in accordance with established procedure. 2. This publication was approved on 19 January 1978 for printing and inclusion in the military handbook series. 3. This document provides basic and fundamental information on the thermal design of military electronic equipment. It will provide information and guidance to personnel concerned with such design. The handbook is not intended to be referenced in purchase specifications except for informational purposes, nor shall it supersede any specification requirements. 4. This handbook will be reviewed periodically to insure its completeness and currency. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertipent data which may be of use in improving this document shoi$3d be addressed

unknown authors

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Military Initiative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Military Initiative Military Initiative Military Initiative 54% of the Tribes located in close proximity to military bases are located in the West, 18% in the Pacific Northwest, and 12% in New England and New York. Map from NREL 54% of the Tribes located in close proximity to military bases are located in the West, 18% in the Pacific Northwest, and 12% in New England and New York. Map from NREL The DOE Office of Indian Energy is working with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to help it obtain 25% of its energy from renewable energy and promote energy security by educating tribal leaders and military leaders on partnership opportunities as well as providing technical assistance to Tribes working with local military installations. More than 50 Tribes are located adjacent to or near military installations,

23

Corrosion in Military Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...occurs in many military applications, including power plants (coal, oil, natural gas, and nuclear), land-based gas turbine and diesel engines, gas turbine engines for aircraft, marine gas turbine engines for shipboard use, waste incineration, high-temperature fuel cells, and missile components....

24

Estimation of Continental Precipitation Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. ...

Kaye L. Brubaker; Dara Entekhabi; P. S. Eagleson

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

C-Mod Outer Divertor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outer Divertor Outer Divertor Upgrade - CDR 8/13/2010 MIT PSFC Contributions from: Jeff Doody, Soren Harrison, Dan Karnes, Bruce Lipschultz, Sam Pierson, Peter Titus, Rui Vieira, Jim Zaks, Han Zhang, Lihua Zhou 1 C-Mod Outer Divertor Upgrade - CDR * Motivation & requirements * Engineering design & analysis * Impact on vessel * Safety * Project plan & schedule * Budget 2 New divertor physics background and specification ! New divertor conceptual design review, August 13, 2010 ! B. Lipschultz ! Special thanks to R. Granetz, S. Wolfe and I. Hutchinson ! Motivation Specification of design goals Specification of load scenarios New divertor conceptual design review, August 13, 2010 ! General operation! * ICRF power: 0.5-1.0s of up to 6 MW! * Melting at leading edges of divertor sections (10)!

26

Outer bounds for user cooperation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We obtain a dependence balance based outer bound on the capacity region of the two-user multiple access channel with generalized feedback (MAC-GF). We investigate a Gaussian MAC with user-cooperation (MAC-UC), where each transmitter receives an additive ...

Ravi Tandon; Sennur Ulukus

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

Armed forces, states and threats : civil-military institutions and military power in modern democracies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two longstanding questions preoccupying political scientists, military officers and policymakers alike are how should and how do political leaders interact with military professionals? This thesis argues that historic ...

DeVore, Marc Ronald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

2013 Military Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Military Webinar 2013 Military Webinar May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis This Office of Indian Energy webinar originally presented on May 15, 2013, features a panel of U.S....

30

2013 Military Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Military Webinar 2013 Military Webinar May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis This Office of Indian Energy webinar originally presented on May 15, 2013, features a panel of U.S....

31

Tank vessels transferring Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil proposed design and equipment standards  

SciTech Connect

The US Coast Guard proposes to require US and foreign flag tank vessels engaged in the transfer of OCS oil in bulk as cargo from an offshore oil exploitation or production facility to shore to have segregated ballast tanks, dedicated clean ballast tanks, or special ballast arrangements by 6/1/80. This proposal would implement the Port and Tanker Safety Act of 1978 and would eliminate the mixing of ballast water and oil, thus reducing operational pollution that could occur if there was a substantial increase in vessel traffic. Comments must be received by 6/16/80.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Atomic Energy for Military Purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb member of the project, to draft a report about its activities. Smyth completed the report in the summer, in a censored version. On August 11, 1945, five days after the Allies dropped the first nuclear bomb on Japan

Landweber, Laura

33

Military and Reservist | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Military and Reservist Military and Reservist Military and Reservist Documents Available for Download March 10, 2010 Rights and Benefits of Reservists Called to Active Duty Detailed description of USERRA benefits and rights for Military employees called to active duty and the HR actions which need to occur. December 23, 2009 The Reemployment Checklist (USERRA) Reemployment works differently from service activation. To exercise reemployment right and benefits, the individual Federal employee leaving active service should use this checklist. December 23, 2009 National Service Activation Checklist Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act Career, Seniority, Pay, and Benefits information December 11, 2009 OPM Reservist Differential Briefing Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act Career,

34

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

Mike Jensen; Jennifer Comstock; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

35

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)  

SciTech Connect

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

Mike Jensen; Jennifer Comstock; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

36

Explaining civil-military relations in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Civil-military relations describe the interactions and balance of power between the civilians and the military in a nation state. Due to the organizational apparatus and capacity for forcible coercion that the military ...

Kwok, Jia-Chuan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Massachusetts Military Reservation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts Military Reservation Massachusetts Military Reservation Jump to: navigation, search Name Massachusetts Military Reservation Facility Massachusetts Military Reservation Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Air Force Center for Engineering & the Environment Energy Purchaser Air Force Center for Engineering & the Environment Location Massachusetts Military Reservation MA Coordinates 41.690386°, -70.550108° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.690386,"lon":-70.550108,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

EIS-0045: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest Industries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest Industries, Combustors 1,2, and 3, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, Georgia EIS-0045: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest...

39

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal...

40

War Upon the Map: The Politics of Military User Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While military personnel are often involved in the design of information technology, the literature on military innovation generally assumes defense contractors are the primary producers. Furthermore, general organizational ...

Lindsay, Jon R.

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses electric vehicle grid integration for sustainable military installations. Fort Carson Military Reservation in Colorado Springs is used as a case study.

Simpson, M.

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

Continental margin subsidence and heat flow: important parameters in formation of petroleum hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive continental margins have been shown to subside with a 50-My exponentially decaying rate which cannot be explained by isostatic compensation for sediment loading. This suggests that the subsidence is dominated by geodynamic processes similar to those in the deep ocean. Two simple geologic models for continental breakup are developed: (1) attenuation of continental lithosphere; and (2) intrusion of mantle diapirs. These models for rifting give a direct relation between subsidence of passive margins and their surface heat flow through time. On this basis we develop a method of reconstructing the thermal history of sedimentary strata from regional subsidence and sedimentation history. Because generation of petroleum hydrocarbons depends on the intergrated time/temperature history of buried organic material, this reconstruction technique can be used to determine the depth to the oil range of the hydrocarbon generation window in advance of drilling. By way of example, we reconstruct time/temperature/depth plots and estimate hydrocarbon maturity for one site in the Falkland Plateau and three sites in the North Atlantic near Cape Hatteras. In addition to providing a method for evaluating hydrocarbon potential in frontier regions where there is little or no well control, this approach suggests that there may be significant potential for oil and gas generation on the outer part of the continental rise and in deep-sea sedimentary basins. 13 figures, 1 table.

Royden, L. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge); Sclater, J.G.; Von Herzen, R.P.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Military Academic Collaborations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Military Academic Collaborations Military Academic Collaborations The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense

44

Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Persist of long time-scales * Impact on radiation budget - High SW albedo compared to land or ocean Klein and Hartmann 1993 But Why Continental Clouds? * They do exist -...

45

Mesoscale Evolution of a Continental Occluded Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic study of a continental occluding extratropical cyclone (ETC) during 12 November 1992 is presented using initializations from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Prediction System (MAPS), a hybrid sigmaisentropic coordinate model. Whereas ...

Patrick S. Market; James T. Moore

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Continental Slope Flow Northeast of Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic observations and current measurements with a Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler over the continental shelfslope junction northeast of Taiwan during 1017 August 1994 allow the construction of the mesoscale flow pattern ...

T. Y. Tang; Y. Hsueh; Y. J. Yang; J. C. Ma

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Drought Reconstructions for the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a 2 lat 3 long grid of summer drought reconstructions for the continental United States estimated from a dense network of annual tree-ring chronologies is described. The drought metric used is the Palmer Drought Severity ...

Edward R. Cook; David M. Meko; David W. Stahle; Malcolm K. Cleaveland

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Military - Tougher tanks | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Military - Tougher tanks Improving welds of heavy and light armored fighting vehicles is the target of a collaboration among Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the U.S. Army Tank...

49

Information friction : information technology and military performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Militaries have long been eager to adopt the latest technology (IT) in a quest to improve knowledge of and control over the battlefield. At the same time, uncertainty and confusion have remained prominent in actual experience ...

Lindsay, Jon Randall

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

NNSA's Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > NNSA's Military Academic Collaborations NNSA's Military Academic Collaborations NNSA's Military Academic Collaborations The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Programs offers a suite of activities to enhance collaboration between NNSA's eight sites and the U.S. Military Academies and ROTC programs at other universities. These programs are administered at NNSA and executed at NNSA sites, including the labs, production facilities and the Nevada National Security Site. At each location, leading-edge research and development is carried out on key national security technologies critical to the United States and its allies.

51

ALMA: Exploring theALMA: Exploring the Outer Limits ofOuter Limits of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z Machines ALMA: Exploring theALMA: Exploring the Outer Limits ofOuter Limits of Redshift Field Rich in Nearby Galaxies, Poor in Distant Galaxies Nearby galaxies in HDF Source: K. Lanzetta, SUNY-SB Distant galaxies in HDF #12;ALMA Deep Field Poor in Nearby Galaxies, Rich in Distant Galaxies Nearby

Groppi, Christopher

52

The basins on the Argentine continental margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

Urien, C.M. [Buenos Aires Technological Institute Petroleum School, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Continental Biofuels Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Continental Biofuels Corporation Continental Biofuels Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Continental Biofuels Corporation Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75240 Sector Biofuels Product Dallas-based company devoted to agribusiness in Southeast Asia. The firms focus its agribusiness acquisitions on crops, especially palm oil plantations, that can be used as biofuels. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Barotropic Continental Shelf Waves on a ?-Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the effect of the variation of the Coriolis parameter with latitude on barotropic shelf waves, using a ?-plane model. Solutions are constructed using the method of inner and outer asymptotic expansions, where the inner ...

A. Dorr; R. Grimshaw

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy June 12, 2013 - 7:06pm Addthis The DOE Office of...

56

Pantex honors military at Armed Forces Day celebration | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex honors military at Armed Forces Day celebration Pantex honors military at Armed Forces...

57

Military Munitions Waste Working Group report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cultural intelligence support for military operations  

SciTech Connect

It has long been recognized that military success relies on knowledge of the enemy. In the context of standard warfare, adequate knowledge of the enemy may be gained by analyzing observable, measurable data. In the context of modern counterinsurgency operations and the global war on terror, the task of predicting the behavior of the enemy is vastly more complex and difficult. Without an understanding of the ways individuals in the host nation interpret and react to events, no amount of objective information can provide the insight required to accurately predict behavior. US military doctrine has begun to recognize the importance of the many ways that local culture can affect operation success. Increasingly military decision makers use cultural information in the service of operation planning, and troops are provided with pre-deployment cultural training. However, no amount of training can cover the breadth and depth of potentially useful cultural information, and no amount of careful planning can avoid the need to adapt as situations develop. Therefore, a critical challenge is to provide useful tools to US personnel in their efforts to collect, analyze, and utilize cultural information. Essential functions for cultural support tools include the following: (1) to narrow down a broad range of available data and focus the user's attention on context-relevant information, (2) to present cultural information in an easily understood form, (3) to prompt the user to seek relevant information in the environment, (4) to synthesize information, and (5) to predict outcomes based on possible courses of operation. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the ways in which military operations can benefit from cultural intelligence. We then discuss frameworks for analyzing cultural information in the context of a military operation. We conclude with a demonstration of our current efforts to develop a tool that meets the aforementioned functional challenges.

Guthormsen, Nay M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Kerrow, Edward P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merritt, Terence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgart, Ruth E [INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Construction and applicability of military ontology for semantic data processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, ontology has been utilized as a crucial element in knowledge management and knowledge representation. In the military area, the importance of ontology is also increasing. If military ontology is provided, machines will be able to understand ... Keywords: ATCIS, MOBM, military ontology, semantic data processing, semantic web

Minyoung Ra; Donghee Yoo; Sungchun No

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Outer Bounds for User Cooperation Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outer Bounds for User Cooperation Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus Department of Electrical and Computer. New York:Wiley, 1991. [7] R. Tandon and S. Ulukus. Dependence balance based outer bounds for Gaussian

Ulukus, Sennur

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

In the next decade, planned U.S. military activities in outer space will cross several important  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite Plays Tag with GPS Delta," Aviation Week & Space Technology, February 3, 2003, p. 39. #12;Some U adversaries intent upon attacking U.S. satellites. An adversary state or terrorist might still attack to this problem seems to lie in the promise of retaliation against a state actor or a state aiding terrorists

Chen, Sow-Hsin

62

Marginally outer trapped surfaces in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the basic setup of Kaluza-Klein theory, namely a 5-dimensional vacuum with a cyclic isometry, which corresponds to Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in 4-dimensional spacetime. We first recall the behaviour of Killing horizons and its generators under bundle lift and projection. We then show that the property of compact surfaces of being (stably) marginally trapped is preserved under lift and projection provided the appropriate ("Pauli-") conformal scaling is used for the spacetime metric. We also discuss and compare recently proven area inequalities for stable axially symmetric 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional marginally outer trapped surfaces.

Tim-Torben Paetz; Walter Simon

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Shelf Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waters from 20 to 200m deep in the northern Gulf from the U.S.-Mexican border to the Florida Keys (Figure 1). Both coastal and offshore ecotypes of bottlenose dolphins occur in the Gulf of Mexico (Hersh and Duffield 1990; LeDuc and Curry 1998). The Continental Shelf Stock probably consists of a mixture of both the coastal and offshore ecotypes. The offshore and coastal ecotypes are genetically distinct using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers (Hoelzel et al. 1998). In the northwestern Atlantic, Torres et al. (2003) found a statistically significant break in the distribution of the ecotypes at 34 km from shore. The offshore ecotype was found exclusively seaward of 34km and in waters deeper than 34 m. Within 7.5km of shore, all animals were of the coastal ecotype. The continental shelf is much wider in the Gulf of Mexico so these results may not apply. The continental shelf stock range may extend into Mexican and Cuban territorial waters; however, there are no available estimates of either abundance or mortality from those countries. A stranded dolphin from the Florida Panhandle was rehabilitated and released over the shelf off western Florida, and traveled into the Atlantic Ocean (Wells et al. 1999). The bottlenose dolphins inhabiting waters <20m deep in

Bottlenose Dolphin (tursiops Truncatus Truncatus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Military Communities, Hawaii Military Communities, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search Name Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii Place Honolulu, HI Website http://www.fcnavyhawaii.com/ References Solar Technical Assistance Provided to Forest City Military Communities in Hawaii[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii is a company located in Honolulu, HI. References ↑ "Solar Technical Assistance Provided to Forest City Military Communities in Hawaii" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Forest_City_Military_Communities,_Hawaii&oldid=381670"

65

SCUBA Mapping of Outer Galaxy Protostellar Candidates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We aim to study dust properties of massive star forming regions in the outer Galaxy, in a direction opposite to the Galactic center. We present observations of six outer Galaxy point sources IRAS 01045+6505, 01420+6401, 05271+3059, 05345+3556, 20222+3541 and 20406+4555, taken with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) at 450 and 850 micron. Single temperature greybody models are fitted to the Spectral Energy Distribution of the detected sub-mm cores to derive dust temperature, dust emissivity index and optical depth at 250 micron. The observed radial intensity profiles of the sub-mm cores were fitted with power laws to derive the indices describing the density distribution. At a resolution of 15" all six IRAS point sources show multiple emission peaks. Only four out of fourteen detected sub-mm cores show associated mid-infrared emission. For the sub-mm cores we derive dust temperatures of 32+-5 K and dust emissivity indices between 0.9 and 2.5. The density profiles of the sub-mm cores can be fitted by a single power law distribution with indices -1.5+-0.3, with most cores showing an index of -1.5. This is consistent with most observations of massive star forming regions and supports predictions of models of star formation which consider non-thermal support against gravitational collapse.

B. Mookerjea; G. Sandell; J. Stutzki; J. G. A. Wouterloot

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

Military housing foam application and analysis  

SciTech Connect

Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in sustainable communities. This project consists of two activities conducted in Hawaii that focus on performance, integration and application of energy saving technologies. Hawaii has many energy challenges, making this location an excellent testbed for these activities. Under this project, spray foam technology was applied at military housing on Oahu and the consumption data collected. A cost benefit and operational analysis of the foam was completed. The second phase of this project included design, integration, and analysis of photovoltaic systems at a military community on Oahu. This phase of the project was conducted as part of Forest City's second Solar America Showcase Award.

Torres, J. J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

An Augmented Reality System for Military . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many future military operations are expected to occur in urban environments. These complex, 3D battlefields introduce many challenges to the dismounted warfighter. Better situational awareness is required for effective operation in urban environments. However, delivering this information to the dismounted warfighter is extremely difficult. For example, maps draw a user's attention away from the environment and cannot directly represent the threedimensional nature of the terrain.

Mark A. Livingston; Lawrence J. Rosenblum; Simon J. Julier; Dennis Brown; Yohan Baillot; J. Edward; Swan Ii; Joseph L. Gabbard; Deborah Hix

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Political Stability and Military Intervention in Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy choices in the wake of recent mass protests in Egypt will determine the likelihood of civil war in the short run and the prospects for democracy in the long run. Economic conditions can be improved by international action to reduce grain-based biofuel production and finance employment generation. Creating the conditions for stable democracy requires accepting power-sharing mechanisms in which the military will have an important role.

Friedman, Casey; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

In Outer Space without a Space Suit?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author proposes and investigates his old idea - a living human in space without the encumbrance of a complex space suit. Only in this condition can biological humanity seriously attempt to colonize space because all planets of Solar system (except the Earth) do not have suitable atmospheres. Aside from the issue of temperature, a suitable partial pressure of oxygen is lacking. In this case the main problem is how to satiate human blood with oxygen and delete carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide). The proposed system would enable a person to function in outer space without a space suit and, for a long time, without food. That is useful also in the Earth for sustaining working men in an otherwise deadly atmosphere laden with lethal particulates (in case of nuclear, chemical or biological war), in underground confined spaces without fresh air, under water or a top high mountains above a height that can sustain respiration.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment (MC3E) Experiment (MC3E) Campaign Links Science Plan MC3E Website Related Campaigns Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment: 2DVD Support 2011.04.22, Schwaller, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Airborne Instruments 2011.04.22, Poellot, AAF Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers 2011.04.22, Williams, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment: Parsivel Disdrometer Support 2011.04.22, Schwaller, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Inner Domain Thermodynamic Profiling during MC3E 2011.04.22, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

71

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL.

72

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL.

73

Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

Kemeny, George A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Churchill Boro, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Digital Offshore Cadastre (DOC) - Pacific83 ? Continental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continental Shelf Boundaries Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Digital...

75

Atlantic NAD 83 Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Atlantic NAD 83...

76

Loyalty for Sale? Military Spending and Coups d'Etat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the best suited for our purposes. The data on military spending and on the size of the military comes from the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, which is widely regarded as one of the most complete sources of historical military spending data... . Nordlinger (1977) claims that this is exactly what happened in Venezuela, where generous military allowances funded by oil revenue allowed Romulo Betancourt to avoid a coup "despite the adoption of expensive agrarian reforms and development programs" (p.70...

Leon, Gabriel

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) as Military APU Replacements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division Propulsion Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) as Military APU Replacements Cleared For Public For Public Release: 88ABW-2010-0196 2...

78

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning Samuel Booth, John Barnett, Kari Burman, Josh Hambrick and Robert Westby Technical Report NREL...

79

Distance learning in advanced military education: Analysis of joint operations course in the Taiwan military  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-ranking officers require advanced military education in war tactics for future combat. However, line officers rarely have time to take such courses on campus. The conventional solution to this problem used to take the inefficient correspondence ... Keywords: Applications in subject areas, Architectures for educational technology system, Distributed learning environments

Ming-Chih Tung; Jiung-yao Huang; Huan-Chao Keh; Shu-shen Wai

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options. Below are a new definition of what doctrine meant in 2000 and an outline of the 2000 doctrine. An overview of the 2000 doctrine is: (1) The 2000 doctrine was a return to a more defensive posture; the threat of nuclear retaliation, rather than that of preemptive force, would be its deterrence; (2) In order to strengthen its nuclear deterrence, Russia extended and redefined the cases in which nuclear weapons could be used to include a wider range of conflict types and a larger spectrum of attackers; and (3) Russia's threats changed to reflect its latest fear of engaging in a limited conflict with no prospect of the use of nuclear deterrence. In 2006, the defense minister and deputy prime minister Sergei Ivanov announced that the government was starting on a draft of a future doctrine. Four years later, in 2010, the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation was put into effect with the intent of determining Russian doctrine until 2020. The 2010 doctrine, like all previous doctrines, was a product of the times in which it was written. Gone were many of the fears that had followed Russia for the past two decades. Below are an examination of the 2010 definition of doctrine as well as a brief analysis of the 2010 doctrine and its deviations from past doctrines. An overview of the 2010 doctrine is: (1) The new doctrine emphasizes the political centralization of command both in military policy and the use of nuclear weapons; (2) Nuclear doctrine remains the same in many aspects including the retention of first-use; (3) At the same time, doctrine was narrowed to using nuclear weapons only when the Russian state's existence is in danger; to continue strong deterrence, Russia also opted to follow the United States by introducing precision conventional weapons; (4) NATO is defined as Russia's primary external threat because of its increased global presence and its attempt to recruit states that are part of the Russian 'bloc'; and (5) The 2000 doctrine's defensive stance was left out of the doctrine; rumored options for use of nuclear weapons in local wars and in preemptive strikes were also left out.

Wolkov, Benjamin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Galya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Problem structuring methods in military command and control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an authorized military hierarchy organization, the procedure of problem solving must be co-ordinated with the tasks of planning, directing, and controlling. In most combat situations, problem solving knowledge is acquired from an expert (commander) ... Keywords: Knowledge management, Knowledge-based system architecture, Military command and control, Problem structuring methods, Soft operational research

Shu-Hsien Liao

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Asymmetry of will : the effect of religious radicalism on state military doctrine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How is a state's military doctrine affected by the presence of radical religious ideology in its military? Using analysis of satellite imagery, recent military exercises, and a series of source interviews, I examine the ...

Lewis, Patrick (Patrick Joseph)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Military Personnel Claim Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2010 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2010 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V33 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4475

84

Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy June 12, 2013 - 7:06pm Addthis The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30–31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. Attendees included tribal, DOE, and U.S. Department of Defense representatives. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. Attendees included tribal, DOE, and U.S. Department of Defense

85

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LEVERAGING TRIBAL RENEWABLE RESOURCES TO LEVERAGING TRIBAL RENEWABLE RESOURCES TO SUPPORT MILITARY ENERGY GOALS May 30-31, 2013 WILD HORSE PASS HOTEL AND CASINO 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd. Chandler, Arizona The seventh in a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum is designed to provide information for western U.S. tribal leaders and military leaders on the renewable energy resource development potential on tribal lands, and the opportunities for partnerships between tribes and military installations to promote energy development on tribal lands to achieve military energy security goals. Tribal leaders will also have the opportunity to directly converse with each other and key military leadership by participating in a roundtable discussion to

86

Solar energy integrated at Hawaiian military housing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy integrated at Hawaiian military housing energy integrated at Hawaiian military housing Solar energy integrated at Hawaiian military housing December 9, 2009 - 11:27am Addthis What does this project do? Ohana Military Communities have applied for an additional award with the intention of installing photovoltaics on 2,317 military housing units on Oahu, as well as constructing a 3.6-megawatt solar photovoltaic farm to support 2,206 homes on the Big Island. If you ask most travelers, they would say Hawaii really is a very sunny chain of islands. Many Americans have enjoyed a relaxing day on the state's warm beaches or have been awe-inspired by its fascinating volcanoes. But that wealth of sunshine powers more than just the tourism economy - it's creating green jobs and clean, renewable solar energy.

87

Pantex honors military at Armed Forces Day celebration | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

military at Armed Forces Day celebration | National Nuclear military at Armed Forces Day celebration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex honors military at Armed Forces Day celebration Pantex honors military at Armed Forces Day celebration Posted By Office of Public Affairs Erhart Will Pantex honored employees for their military service May 16 with a flag

88

The military lens : doctrinal differences, misperception, and deterrence failure in Sino-American relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nations, because of their different strategic situations, histories, and military cultures can have dramatically different beliefs about the nature of effective military doctrine, strategy, and capabilities. This dissertation ...

Twomey, Christopher P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Outlook of the Officers: Military Thought in Chile, 1960-1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national ideology. ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Whether you like it orOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Outlook of the Officers: MilitaryOF THE DISSERTATION Outlook of the Officers: Military

Bawden, John Richard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

91

STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Cote, Stephanie [Canadian Gemini Office, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada); Schade, David, E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: Stephanie.Cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Climate Sensitivity to Continental Ice Sheet Size and Configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) has been used to carry out a study of climate sensitivity to the size and distribution of continental ice sheets by comparing two perpetual season, fixed sea surface temperature (SST), winter ...

Richard A. Shinn; Eric J. Barron

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sensitivity of 30-Day Dynamical Forecasts to Continental Snow cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several series of 30-day simulations with a global simulation model are used to evaluate the sensitivities to continental snow cover over North America and Eurasia. The model is initialized with National Meteorological Center analyses for ...

John E. Walsh; Becky Ross

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Countergradient vorticity Flux Generated in Continental Boundary Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that the inshore shear of continental boundary flows like the Florida Current can be accounted for by a countergradient vorticity flux, rather than by lateral diffusion to the shore. Two simple barotropic models with cross-stream ...

Melvin E. Stern

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multimodel Ensemble Reconstruction of Drought over the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retrospectively simulated soil moisture from an ensemble of six land surface/hydrological models was used to reconstruct drought events over the continental United States for the period 19202003. The simulations were performed at one-half-degree ...

Aihui Wang; Theodore J. Bohn; Sarith P. Mahanama; Randal D. Koster; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impact of Atmospheric Forcing on Antarctic Continental Shelf Water Masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antarctic continental shelf seas feature a bimodal distribution of water mass temperature, with the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas flooded by Circumpolar Deep Water that is several degrees Celsius warmer than the cold shelf waters prevalent ...

Alek A. Petty; Daniel L. Feltham; Paul R. Holland

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Selected data fron continental...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Selected data fron continental scientific drilling core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us...

98

Microphysics of Raindrop Size Spectra: Tropical Continental and Maritime Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work uses raindrop size spectra measured at the surface in tropical continental storms to determine the associated parameters of the best-fit gamma distributions. The physical processes responsible for those parameters and their relations to ...

Carlton W. Ulbrich; David Atlas

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Satellite Evidence of Enhanced Upwelling Along the European Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TIROS-N AVHRR imagery is used to describe a persistent but localized band of upwelling which follows the contours of the European continental slope from the Porcupine Seabight (southwest of Ireland) to the Bay of Biscay. Its persistent occurrence,...

Robert R. Dickson; Paul A. Gurbutt; V. Narayana Pillai

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Diffraction of Continental Shelf Waves by Irregular Alongshore Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffraction of continental shelf waves by irregular alongshore geometry, such as ridges, canyons and bumps, is examined. The full barotropic, shelf-wave equation is treated, and the solutions include forward and back scattering, and a description ...

Dong-Ping Wang

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Propagation of Barotropic Continental Shelf Waves over Irregular Bottom Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a geometry which roughly approximates that of a typical continental shelf and slope, the effects of a random bottom topography on free barotropic shelf waves are found. The bathymetric irregularity induces damping of the coherent wave due ...

K. H. Brink

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Continental Shelf Circulation Induced by a Moving, Localized Wind Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear, two-dimensional model of a rotating, stratified fluid is constructed to investigate the circulation induced by a moving, localized line of surface stress. This model is used to analyze the effect of moving cold fronts on continental ...

John M. Klinck; Leonard J. Pietrafesa; Gerald S. Janowitz

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Factors Governing the Total Rainfall Yield from Continental Convective Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several important factors that govern the total rainfall from continental convective clouds were investigated by tracking thousands of convective cells in Israel and South Africa. The rainfall volume yield (Rvol) of the individual cells that ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Abraham Gagin

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Propagation of Gravity Currents along Continental Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical method for computing the speed at which the nose of a light (rotating) intrusion advances along a continental shelf is proposed. The nonlinear model includes two active layer; the intrusion itself, which occupies the entire shelf (...

Doron Nof; Stephen Van Gorder

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Relative Humidity over the West Florida Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed relative humidity variations on the coastal ocean of the West Florida Continental Shelf (WFS) are examined over the 5-yr period 19982003. Despite considerable daily variability within seasons, the monthly mean values are nearly constant ...

J. I. Virmani; R. H. Weisberg

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Observations of Boundary Mixing over the Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of mixing over the continental slope using a towed body reveal a great lateral extent (several kilometers) of continuously turbulent fluid within a few hundred meters of the boundary at depth 1600 m. The largest turbulent dissipation ...

J. N. Moum; D. R. Caldwell; J. D. Nash; G. D. Gunderson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Continental Shelf Parameters Inferred from SAR Internal Wave Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results on the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to extract oceanographic information about the continental shelf. From late spring through early fall the thermocline on the shelf is fully developed and ...

D. L. Porter; D. R. Thompson

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hybrid power technology for remote military facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Defense (DoD) operates hundreds of test, evaluation, and training facilities across the US and abroad. Due to the nature of their missions, these facilities are often remote and isolated from the utility grid. The preferred choice for power at these facilities has historically been manned diesel generators. The DoD Photovoltaic Review Committee, estimates that on the order of 350 million gallons of diesel fuel is burned each year to generate the 2000 GWh of electricity required to operate these remote military facilities. Other federal agencies, including the National Park Service and the USDA Forest Service use diesel generators for remote power needs as well. The generation of power diesel generators is both expensive and detrimental to the environment. The augmentation of power from diesel generators with power processing and battery energy storage enhances the efficiency and utilization of the generator resulting in lower fuel consumption and lower generator run- time in proportion to the amount of renewables added. The hybrid technology can both reduce the cost of power and reduce environmental degradation at remote DoD facilities. This paper describes the expected performance and economics of photovoltaic/diesel hybrid systems. Capabilities and status of systems now being installed at DoD facilities are presented along with financing mechanisms available within DoD.

Chapman, R.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Military power requirements and backup power considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All US Air Force (USAF) facilities have certain critical power requirements that must be met in order to carry out their mission successfully. Internal USAF studies have shown that the mission can degrade precipitously as the available power decreases below the mission critical level. Now, more than ever before, the military and private industry are finding that certain functions, such as automated data processing and automated process control, respond catastrophically to power reductions. Furthermore, increased reliance on electrical power means, in the case of the Air Force, that critical power requirements are anticipated to increase by half over the next 15 yr. For these reasons and others, the USAF is investigating several means of improving the availability of electric power under adverse conditions above that which can be provided by an off-base supplier. Among the approaches to this problem being pursued at this time are a program to improve all sorts of generator sets on a service-wide basis and the Multimegawatt Terrestrial Power (MTP) Program, which is pursuing the design and testing of a small dedicated nuclear power source to provide critical mission power. The purpose of this paper is to provide some insight into some of the issues associated with USAF power programs.

Botts, T.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Military students access top R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Military students access top R&D Military students access top R&D Military students access top R&D Cadets and midshipmen spend summer expanding their scientific knowledge at world-class Los Alamos facilities August 27, 2013 Military students access top R&D Micah Dose, a midshipman at the U.S. Naval Academy and a SARA intern in the Laboratory's ARIES program, peers inside the glovebox where plutonium pits are dis-assembled at Los Alamos. ARIES is the only program in the nation that disassembles and destroys surplus plutonium pits. The pits are transformed into plutonium oxide powder suitable for being made into fuel for civilian nuclear reactors. "There are a lot of summer training programs out there, but most are class-like," said U.S. Air Force cadet Dale Becker, mentored by the Physics

111

Military Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program | National Nuclear Security Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Military Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Military Academic Collaborations > Military Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program Military Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program

112

Shooting up : the impact of illicit economics on military conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study explores the nexus between illicit economies and military conflicts. It investigates when and how access by belligerents to the production and trafficking of illicit substances affects the strength of belligerents ...

Felbab-Brown, Vanda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Military housing privatization & the promise of design innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to answer the question, "Has the military housing privatization process produced design innovation?" Secondary questions are, "What specific role has the Army's Residential Communities ...

Ellis, Jason (Jason Robert)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

First War Syndrome : military culture, professionalization, and counterinsurgency doctrine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Counterinsurgency was a persistent and important challenge to military organizations in the second half of the 20th century and seems likely to continue to pose a challenge in the 21st century. This makes understanding how ...

Long, Austin G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the ...

Cote, Owen R., 1960-

116

17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations, Spring 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Explores the origins, rate, and impact of innovations in military organizations, doctrine, and weapons. Emphasis on organization theory approaches. Comparisons with nonmilitary and non-US experience included. From the ...

Posen, Barry

117

An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso...

118

Colorado Total Distillate Adj Sales/Deliveries to Military ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Total Distillate Adj Sales/Deliveries to Military Consumers (Thousand Gallons) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

119

Establishing a virtual manufacturing environment for military robots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in the robotics industry have given the military an opportunity to capitalize on industry's innovation. Not only has core robotics technology improved but robotics manufacturing technology has also made ...

Andersen, Ryan J. (Ryan John)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Invisible Side of Military Careers : An Examination of Employment and Well-Being Among Military Spouses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The link between employment and well-being is well-documented. However, limited research is available examining how employment affects the well-being of military spouses. Using data from (more)

Easterling, Beth Allen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The LHCb Outer Tracker Detector Design and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Outer Tracker detector of the LHCb experiment is a gas filled detector based on straw tube technology. It comprises three stations each consisting of multiple layers of wires with both vertical orientation and $pm$5$^{mathbf{o}}$ stereo angles. The stations are designed to be built of modules which are mechanically stable, gas tight and capable of stand-alone operation. This paper describes the design and mass production procedures of Outer Tracker modules and discusses the quality assurance programme. Test results on the first modules produced are included.

Hommels, L B A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

InterContinental Hotels Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InterContinental Hotels Group InterContinental Hotels Group Jump to: navigation, search Name InterContinental Hotels Group Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84130 Website http://www.intercontinentalhot Coordinates 40.7°, -111.94° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7,"lon":-111.94,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences and Relationship to Adiabacity Kim, Byung-Gon Kangnung National University Schwartz, Stephen Brookhaven National Laboratory Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties The microphysical properties of continental stratus clouds observed over SGP appear to be substantially influenced by micrometeorological conditions, such as static stability and updraft velocity. These influences may contribute to the observed weak correlation of aerosol light scattering coefficient with cloud-drop effective radius [Kim et al., JGR, 2003], although aerosol light scattering coefficient is not necessarily the most suitable surrogate aerosol property for number concentration of cloud

124

ENERGY STAR® Operation Change Out - The Military Challenge Campaign Launch  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAR® Operation Change Out - The Military Challenge STAR® Operation Change Out - The Military Challenge Campaign Launch ENERGY STAR® Operation Change Out - The Military Challenge Campaign Launch April 22, 2008 - 11:31am Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Colonel Flatau. It's a true honor and a pleasure to be here today and to be able to take part in your energy-saving efforts here on base. I want to thank all the members of our nation's armed forces, as well as their families, who are with us. And I'm especially pleased to welcome all the students who are here in celebration of Earth Day. When I think about Camp Lejeune and the United States Marine Corps one word comes to mind above all others excellence. The history of this base and the units who train and live here is long and distinguished and your

125

EM Helps Military Families in Need | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Helps Military Families in Need EM Helps Military Families in Need EM Helps Military Families in Need January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here are the Christmas gifts purchased with donations raised by EM staff for families of Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. Pictured here are the Christmas gifts purchased with donations raised by EM staff for families of Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. LAS VEGAS - Six families from Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas recently received nearly $4,000 in donations - funds that helped provide a welcome relief during the holidays. Donations raised by EM staff at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) went toward Christmas gifts for the families' 12 collective children, ranging from age 12 months to 8 years old. Donations also provided each

126

Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans May 31, 2012 - 4:43pm Addthis Gemini's Wind Turbine Tower Rescue courses provide wind technicians with training in safety at height, emergency escape systems and rescue. This course is designed to prepare wind technicians with the knowledge and emergency procedures specific to wind turbines. | Photo by Claudia Trevizo. Gemini's Wind Turbine Tower Rescue courses provide wind technicians with training in safety at height, emergency escape systems and rescue. This course is designed to prepare wind technicians with the knowledge and emergency procedures specific to wind turbines. | Photo by Claudia Trevizo. Debbie Schultheis Technical Project Officer, Wind and Water Power Program

127

EM Helps Military Families in Need | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helps Military Families in Need Helps Military Families in Need EM Helps Military Families in Need January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here are the Christmas gifts purchased with donations raised by EM staff for families of Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. Pictured here are the Christmas gifts purchased with donations raised by EM staff for families of Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. LAS VEGAS - Six families from Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas recently received nearly $4,000 in donations - funds that helped provide a welcome relief during the holidays. Donations raised by EM staff at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) went toward Christmas gifts for the families' 12 collective children, ranging from age 12 months to 8 years old. Donations also provided each family with a $100 gift card to the Nellis Commissary as well as a $100

128

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2006 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/29/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4471 Public Access Level public

129

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money May 7, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner, CPS Energy Saver, to make energy efficiency upgrades to 189 single-family cottages. | Photo courtesy of CPS Energy. A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner, CPS Energy Saver, to make energy efficiency upgrades to 189 single-family cottages. | Photo courtesy of CPS Energy. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better

130

Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans May 31, 2012 - 4:43pm Addthis Gemini's Wind Turbine Tower Rescue courses provide wind technicians with training in safety at height, emergency escape systems and rescue. This course is designed to prepare wind technicians with the knowledge and emergency procedures specific to wind turbines. | Photo by Claudia Trevizo. Gemini's Wind Turbine Tower Rescue courses provide wind technicians with training in safety at height, emergency escape systems and rescue. This course is designed to prepare wind technicians with the knowledge and emergency procedures specific to wind turbines. | Photo by Claudia Trevizo. Debbie Schultheis Technical Project Officer, Wind and Water Power Program

131

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2009 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V32 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4474 Public Access Level public

132

Promoting Behavior-Based Energy Efficiency in Military Housing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) helps agencies reduce the cost of doing business through energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of solar and other renewable energy. As a large energy user, the U.S. military has been one of the government sectors of focus. Several military installations have shown substantial energy savings in past years. Most of these efficiency projects, however, have focused primarily on physical upgrades, technologies, and purchasing habits. Furthermost projects have focused on administrative and operational areas of energy use. Military residential housing, in particular, has received little formal attention for energy efficiency involving behaviors of the residents themselves. Behavior-based change is a challenging, but potentially fruitful area for energy conservation programs. However, behavioral change involves links with values, social networks and organizations, and new ways of thinking about living patterns. This handbook attempts to fill a gap by offering guidance for promoting such efforts.

AH McMakin; EL Malone; RE Lundgren

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

133

Nonpetroleum mobility fuels and military-energy self-sufficiency  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nonpetroleum hydrocarbon fuels will likely serve as transition fuels for a few decades after petroleum sources become scarce. But nonpetroleum hydrocarbon fuels are ultimately either nonrenewable (e.g., coal and oil shale synfuels) or are inefficient to produce. Nuclear sources (supplemented by solar, geothermal, etc., as available) for electric power generation and hydrogen production provide a combination that can be used for military energy needs including mobility fuels, namely liquid hydrogen. This approach can give the military energy self-sufficiency for stationary needs as well as ground vehicles, ships, and aircraft. System integration concepts are discussed, and concepts for a methodology to evaluate source-to-use pathways for different classes of military bases are outlined.

Freiwald, D.A.; Barattino, W.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Superior orders: when and how to dissent in the military  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to determine under what circumstances a military officer should disobey or refuse to follow a superior order and also what additional actions the officer should take if he does not follow the order. Within a profession in which loyalty and obedience are valued so highly, there is often a reluctance to discuss the problem of superior orders. The problem is discussed from the perspective of the junior officer. Immanuel Kant's ethics are used as the basis for determining whether or not the order should be followed. Case studies from engineering ethics are examined to determine what avenues of dissent are available in that field. Military examples are then used to determine which of these avenues may be useful and appropriate for military officers.

Hildahl, Jessica Lynn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money May 7, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner, CPS Energy Saver, to make energy efficiency upgrades to 189 single-family cottages. | Photo courtesy of CPS Energy. A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner, CPS Energy Saver, to make energy efficiency upgrades to 189 single-family cottages. | Photo courtesy of CPS Energy. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better

136

THE 21 cm 'OUTER ARM' AND THE OUTER-GALAXY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS: CONNECTED BY KINEMATICS, METALLICITY, AND DISTANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using high-resolution ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, we study the metallicity, kinematics, and distance of the gaseous 'outer arm' (OA) and the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the outer Galaxy. We detect the OA in a variety of absorption lines toward two QSOs, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907. We search for OA absorption toward eight Galactic stars and detect it in one case, which constrains the OA Galactocentric radius to 9 kpc absorption toward two stars; Complex G is therefore in the same region at R{sub G} = 8-10 kpc. HVC Complex C is known to be at a similar Galactocentric radius. Toward H1821+643, the low-ionization absorption lines are composed of multiple narrow components, indicating the presence of several cold clouds and rapid cooling and fragmentation. Some of the highly ionized gas is also surprisingly cool. Accounting for ionization corrections, we find that the OA metallicity is Z = 0.2-0.5 Z{sub Sun }, but nitrogen is underabundant and some species are possibly mildly depleted by dust. The similarity of the OA metallicity, Galactocentric location, and kinematics to those of the adjacent outer-Galaxy HVCs, including high velocities that are not consistent with Galactic rotation, suggests that the OA and outer-Galaxy HVCs could have a common origin.

Tripp, Todd M.; Song Limin, E-mail: tripp@astro.umass.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

"The Second American School of Arms": the Virginia Military Institute and the advent of state military education, 1835-1851  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virginia Military Institute, along with other Southern military colleges, is almost always historically viewed within the context of their contributions during the Civil War. VMI, and other "West Points of the Confederacy," were founded long before sectional tensions between North and South called these schools to provide officers for the Confederate armies. This thesis examines the social, political, and cultural factors leading to VMI's founding and initial success, not as a professional officer's school, but as a multi-faceted institution created as a solution to a collection of social, economic, and educational problems. The Institute sought to develop educated and honorable men who would provide the state with a new class of productive male citizens while using their military training to protect Virginia as officers in the militia. Those poorer youths who could not afford an education were offered a state supported tuition at VMI in exchange for teaching at a Virginia school for two years. While attending the Institute, cadets were also in charge of guarding the weapons stored in the arsenal from which the school was converted. VMI offered a multi-beneficial program in order to gain support from a state that was cynical of government-funded education. VMI was also created in response to national criticisms of the United States Military Academy at West Point. Using West Point as a model, VMI sought to create citizen-soldiers, not professionals, in their military training and aimed to educate cadets for various civilian occupations, not just that of army officers. The Institute also sought to counter the Academy's monopoly on engineering education by offering a similar curriculum to provide engineers for Virginia's internal improvements. In the decade following VMI's founding, other Southern states would utilize Virginia's archetype in creating their own state supported military schools in the hopes of reaping the same benefits.

Wineman, Bradford Alexander

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Generation of Topographic Waves over the Continental Margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments were carried out to simulate the generation of topographic waves by a Gulf Stream ring over the continental margin in a stratified ocean on an f-plane. The study was aimed at understanding the combined effect of density ...

Ping-Tung Shaw; S. Divakar

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ozone Destruction in Continental Stratus Clouds: An Aircraft Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparent depletion of ozone in a cold (0C), continental stratus cloud system was observed during in situ data collection on 30 April 1994 at the Department of Energy Clouds and Radiation Test Bed site in northern Oklahoma. Analyses of the ...

Zhien Wang; Kenneth Sassen

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Effects of Continental Slope on the Mean Shelf Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Csanady's (1978) theory on the mean shelf circulation in a homogeneous ocean was re-examined by including effects of a continental slope. The results suggested that the mean southwestward flow on the Mid-Atlantic Blight is driven by an inflow ...

Dong-Ping Wang

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

THE FUTURE OF CONTINENTAL SCIENTIFIC DRILLING U.S. PERSPECTIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, so cooperation and coordination between the continental and marine drilling community is critical, and should be managed in coordination with technological, database and other support capabilities currently models of the dynamics of the solar system, produce insolation curves for any arbitrary time period, tune

Peterson, Blake R.

142

Synchronization of system-of-systems interfaces in military satellite communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Military systems continue to become more complex and nearly all are now part of one or more system of systems (SoS). Military satellite communications programs have expanded over the last decade from three distinct satellite ...

Davis, Mark J. (Mark Jeffrey)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A net zero energy installation (NZEI) is one that produces as much energy from on-site renewable sources as it consumes. NZEI assessment provides a systematic approach to energy projects.

Burman, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Inter-Korean military confidence building after 2003.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tensions on the Korean Peninsula remain high despite a long-term strategy by South Korea to increase inter-Korean exchanges in economics, culture, sports, and other topics. This is because the process of reconciliation has rarely extended to military and security topics and those initiatives that were negotiated have been ineffective. Bilateral interactions must include actions to reduce threats and improve confidence associated with conventional military forces (land, sea, and air) as well as nuclear, chemical, and biological activities that are applicable to developing and producing weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The purpose of this project is to develop concepts for inter-Korean confidence building measures (CBMs) for military and WMD topics that South Korea could propose to the North when conditions are right. This report describes the historical and policy context for developing security-related CBMs and presents an array of bilateral options for conventional military and WMD topics within a consistent framework. The conceptual CBMs address two scenarios: (1) improved relations where construction of a peace regime becomes a full agenda item in inter-Korean dialogue, and (2) continued tense inter-Korean relations. Some measures could be proposed in the short term under current conditions, others might be implemented in a series of steps, while some require a higher level of cooperation than currently exists. To support decision making by political leaders, this research focuses on strategies and policy options and does not include technical details.

Tae-woo, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Littlefield, Adriane C.; Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Sang-beom, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Koelm, Jennifer Gay; Olsen, John Norman; Myong-jin, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Sung-tack, Shin (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil Compaction Using Hand-Held Soil Fort Collins, CO 80523-1490 January 2004 #12;#12;1 Guide to Sampling Soil Compaction Using Hand-Held Soil Penetrometers1 Prepared by Dave Jones and Matt Kunze Center for Environmental Management

146

Leaf seal for inner and outer casings of a turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of arcuate, circumferentially extending leaf seal segments form an annular seal spanning between annular sealing surfaces of inner and outer casings of a turbine. The ends of the adjoining seal segments have circumferential gaps to enable circumferential expansion and contraction of the segments. The end of a first segment includes a tab projecting into a recess of a second end of a second segment. Edges of the tab seal against the sealing surfaces of the inner and outer casings have a narrow clearance with opposed edges of the recess. An overlying cover plate spans the joint. Leakage flow is maintained at a minimum because of the reduced gap between the radially spaced edges of the tab and recess, while the seal segments retain the capacity to expand and contract circumferentially.

Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Leach, David (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 OCS have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Miocene structure of Mustang Island, Mustang Island East Addition and part of Matagorda Island, Outer Continental Shelf areas, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the Miocene structure of Mustang Island and the neighboring areas in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico helps to increase knowledge of the geology and hence contribute to petroleum exploration and production in the area. Interpretation of about 1465 miles of multifold, migrated seismic reflection data, integrated with 35 well log data, served to detail the Miocene structure and its evolution. Early Miocene sedimentation resulted in differential loading of mobile substrates of shale. This caused movement of the shale basinward. Further loading caused overlying sediments to yield, forming the Clemente-Tomas fault. This is a listric, down to the basin growth fault, lying on the seaward flanks of a shale ridge. Rollover anticlines characterize the hangingwall blocks of this fault especially in the southwestern part of the study area. These rollover anticlines could be potential hydrocarbon traps. Rapid sedimentation during the Middle Miocene was responsible for the formation of the contemporaneous growth faults of the Corsair-Wanda system. The Corsair fault is an extensive, listric, mostly concave up growth fault that diagonally runs through the area along a southwest-northeast trend. A salt withdrawal syncline separates the Wanda from the Corsair fault. This suggests that the Corsair formed as a result of primary salt withdrawal. Planar rotation of hangingwall blocks of the Corsair fault formed structural highs that are able to accumulate hydrocarbons. Continued sedimentation during the Middle-Upper Miocene caused the underlying salt to undergo secondary withdrawal. This withdrawal caused the overlying sediments to collapse into a half-turtle anticline upon which the Wanda fault appears to detach. The half-turtle anticlines and a series of horsts could be prospective zones of hydrocarbon accumulation. The Wanda fault zone appears to lie along the landward limit of salt deposition in this part of the Gulf of Mexico. The only salt diapir in the area lies immediately basinward of the Wanda fault.

Kasande, Robert

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Loan Programs Office is proposing to offer a loan guarantee to Cape Wind Associates, LLC for the construction and start-up of the Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, offshore of Massachusetts. The proposed Cape Wind Energy Project would consist of up to 130, 3.6-MW turbine generators, in an area of roughly 25-square miles, and would include 12.5 miles of 115-kilovolt submarine transmission cable and an electric service platform. To inform DOE's decision regarding a loan guarantee, DOE adopted the Department of the Interiors 2009 Final Cape Wind Energy Project EIS, in combination with two Cape Wind Environmental Assessments dated May 2010 and April 2011 (per 40 CFR 1506.4), as a DOE Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0470). The adequacy of the Department of the Interior final EIS adopted by DOE is the subject of a judicial action.

151

Formation and Quasi-Periodic Behavior of Outer Spiral Rainbands in a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation and quasi-periodic behavior of outer spiral rainbands in a tropical cyclone simulated in the cloud-resolving tropical cyclone model version 4 (TCM4) are analyzed. The outer spiral rainbands in the simulation are preferably initiated ...

Qingqing Li; Yuqing Wang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers Related Campaigns Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) 2011.04.22, Jensen, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers 2011.04.22 - 2011.06.06 Lead Scientist : Christopher Williams For data sets, see below. Description The scientific focus was to study the vertical structure of precipitation in a vertical column over the SGP Central Facility. These multi-frequency profiler observations enabled directly measuring the vertical air motion and retrieving the raindrop size distributions from near the surface to just under the freezing level. These profilers were deployed during MC3E

153

BNL | Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a

154

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jason Tomlinson; Mike Jensen

155

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Mike Jensen

156

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

SciTech Connect

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jason Tomlinson; Mike Jensen

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

SciTech Connect

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Mike Jensen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

Bargar, John R

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Electric Utility Terrain Vehicle Demonstration in a Military Base Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility terrain vehicles (UTVs), also called all terrain vehicles (ATVs), are used for a variety of purposes ranging from transporting people and materials to recreation. Examples of uses include transportation at military bases, for beach patrols, at ports, agricultural locations, industrial sites, and local/municipal applications such as at parks and schools. As of August 30, 2012 the Federal Highway Administration estimated that annual fuel usage of All-terrain vehicles to be approximately 173 ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

A liquid over-feeding military air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A 3-ton military air conditioning unit has been experimentally studied for baseline and liquid over-feeding operation (LOF). The test results indicate that LOF outperforms the baseline case over a wide ambient temperature range in terms of cooling capacity, power consumption, and system coefficient of performance (COP). At 95 F test point, the COP improvement for LOF is 19.8% over that of the baseline case. However, optimal refrigerant charge is essential for LOF to work properly.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bolton, C. [Army CECOM Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Fort Belvoir, VA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Resolved Outer Population of NGC6822 with WFPC2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present F336W (U), F439W (B), F555W (V), and F675W (R) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) photometry of two outer regions of the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC6822. The NE region is ~13 arcmin from the galaxy centre, while the W region lies 10 arcmin out, and within the wispy low surface brightness outer regions of the galaxy. The fields are not crowded and contain few NGC 6822 stars. We discuss errors and uncertainties and find that the W region contains a main sequence that extends to stars of about 2 solar masses, with an age of about 200 Myr. The NE region has no main sequence or stars younger than 1 Gyr, but does contain some luminous red stars that are not matched in the W field. These stars are not clumped in the field. The results suggest that the W region may be a trace of a tidal event that triggered the current star-formation in this isolated galaxy.

J. B. Hutchings; B. Cavanagh; L. Bianchi

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Outer zone electron precipitation produced by a VLF transmitter  

SciTech Connect

By means of high-resolution pitch angle measurements made by a magnetic-focusing electron spectrometer on the S3-3 satellite while in the drift loss cone region of the magnetosphere, characteristics of fluxes of 108- to 654-keV electron precipitated in the inner zone, in the slot region, and in the outer zone of the magnetosphere are all shown to be consistent with the precipitation's having been produced by the same ground-based VLF transmitter, UMS. Pitch angle measurements are used to locate the longitude of precipitation. The temporal pattern of transmitter operation obtained from synoptic data from a ground-based VLF receiver is used along with drift rate calculations to predict the electron energies as a function of L shell which should be observable by the S3-3 instrument. The predicted energy response is then compared with the in situ observations, getting complete agreement. Finally, wave-particle resonance calculations are made for each of the three regions. The study indicates that ground-based VLF transmitters, which have previously been shown to produce precipitation in the inner zone and slot regions, are almost certainly instrumental in precipitating electrons in the outer zone also. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

Vampola, A.L.; Adams, C.D.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Photoionization of the outer electrons in noble gas endohedral atoms  

SciTech Connect

We suggest a prominent modification of the outer shell photoionization cross section in noble gas (NG) endohedral atoms NG-C{sub n} under the action of the electron shell of fullerene C{sub n}. This shell leads to two important effects: a strong enhancement of the cross section due to fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and to prominent oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of a photoelectron from the NG by the fullerene shell. Both factors lead to powerful maxima in the outer shell ionization cross sections of NG-C{sub n}, which we call giant endohedral resonances. The oscillator strength reaches a very large value in the atomic scale, 25. We consider atoms of all noble gases except He. The polarization of the fullerene shell is expressed in terms of the total photoabsorption cross section of the fullerene. The photoelectron reflection is taken into account in the framework of the so-called bubble potential, which is a spherical {delta}-type potential. It is assumed in the derivations that the NG is centrally located in the fullerene. It is also assumed, in accordance with the existing experimental data, that the fullerene radius R{sub C} is much larger than the atomic radius r{sub A} and the thickness {delta}{sub C} of the fullerene shell. As was demonstrated recently, these assumptions allow us to represent the NG-C{sub n} photoionization cross section as a product of the NG cross section and two well-defined calculated factors.

Amusia, M. Ya. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)], E-mail: amusia@vms.huji.ac.il; Baltenkov, A. S. [Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Uzbekistan, Arifov Institute of Electronics (Uzbekistan); Chernysheva, L. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hostile energetic particle radiation environments in earth's outer magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect

Many spacecraft operational problems in Earth's outer magnetosphere appear to be due to intense, transient radiation phenomena. Three types of naturally-occurring, and highly variable, hostile particle radiation environments are encountered at, or near, the geostationary orbit: (1) High-energy protons due to solar flares; (2) Energetic ions and electrons produced by magnetospheric substorms; and (3) very high energy electrons of uncertain origin. Present particle sensor systems provide energetic particle detection and assessment capabilities during these kinds of high-energy radiation events. In this paper, particular emphasis is given to highly relativistic electrons (3 approx. 10 MeV). Electron fluxes and energy spectra are shown which were measured by two high-energy electron sensor systems at 6.6 R/sub E/ from 1979 through 1984. Large, persistent increases in this population were found to be relatively infrequent and sporadic in 1979-81 around solar maximum. During the approach to solar minimum (1981 to present) it is observed that the highly relativistic electrons occur with a regular 27-day periodicity, and are well associated with the re-established solar wind stream structures. Through a superposed epoch analysis technique we show that an energetic electron enhancement typically rises on a 2- to 3-day time scale and decays on 3- to 4-day time scale at essentially all energies above approx.3 MeV. The present analysis suggests that the Jovian magnetosphere is a recurrent source of this significant electron population in the outer terrestrial magnetosphere and that these electrons have a very deleterious influence on spacecraft systems due to deep dielectric charging and low-dose susceptibility effects. 13 refs., 11 figs.

Baker, D.N.; Belian, R.D.; Higbie, P.R.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Blake, J.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Continental U.S. State Wind Resource Potential Tables (RDF Transformat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Continental U.S. State Wind Resource Potential Tables (RDF Transformation) Submitted by Woodjr on Fri, 02042011 - 14:19 A linked data (RDF) transformation of the...

166

EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, SC September 7, 2011 EA-1606: Draft Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah...

167

Behavioral representation of military tactics for single-vehicle autonomous rotorcraft via statecharts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past several years, aerospace companies have developed unmanned helicopters suitable for integration into military operations as reconnaissance platforms. These rotorcraft, however, require ground-based human ...

Hickie, Mark M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Unproven screening devices threaten the lives of police and military.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a world plagued with improvised explosive devices, drugs and dangerous people, the desire to field technology to protect our police and military is providing a fertile market for the proliferation of protection technologies that range from the unproven to the disproven. The market place is currently being flooded with detection equipment making inflated and inaccurate marketing claims of high reliably, high detection probabilities, and ease of operation - all while offering detection capabilities at safe distances. The manufacturers of these devices have found a willing global marketplace, which includes some of the most dangerous places in the world. Despite a wealth of contradictory performance and testing data available on the Internet, sales of these devices remain brisk and profitable. Rather than enhancing the security of police and military personnel, the reliance on these unproven and disproven devices is creating a sense of false security that is actually lowering the safety of front-line forces in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. This paper addresses the development and distribution history of some of these devices and describes the testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, and other reputable testing agencies that illustrate the real danger in using this kind of unproven technology.

Murray, Dale W.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phytoplankton abundance and species composition were examined over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during May 1992 and May 1993, as part of a phytoplankton diversity study funded by the Office of Naval Research. Phytoplankton distribution data were assessed in relation to the hydrography and physical processes on the shelf, which were studied as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX A). Phytoplankton group distributions from 1992 , which was an average flow year for the Mississippi River, were compared with observations from 1993, which was a record flow year. Water samples for phytoplankton determinations were examined at 22 locations on cross-shelf transacts from 90.5' to 94.0'W longitude. Samples were collected at the surface and the chlorophyll maximum from Niskin bottles attached to a Sea-Bird SBE911plus CTD, preserved in 1% glutaraldehyde, and analyzed using the Uterm6hl method and the inverted-microscope technique. Unique phytoplankton distributions and regionspecific hydrography and physical processes were found on the inner, middle, and outer shelf during both flow regimes. Some differences were found in May 1993 due to the record river discharge. In 1992 and 1993, the inner shelf was diatom dominated, and was characterized by the highest nutrient and lowest safety values. River discharge and associated nutrients were focused by the localized downcoast flow predominant on the inner shelf area during the month of May. Water column stability decreased moving from the eastern part of the shelf to the western part in May 1992. The opposite regime was present in May 1993. Inner shelf nutrient concentrations in May 1993 were approximately double those in May 1992. The increased river discharge in 1993 caused a dramatic shift in dominant diatom species to Skeletonema costatum (Grevifle) Grunow, which is found in a range of salinities, temperatures, and depths. Chain-forming diatom and others were predominant in both years. On the middle shelf, the presence of tychopelagic diatoms reflected the possibility of benthic regeneration of nutrients and resuspension into the upper water column. This flux from the benthos supported the phytoplankton community on the middle shelf, where a near-bottom chlorophyll maximum was found. Lower concentrations of phytoplankton were present on the middle shelf than the inner shelf during both years. The upper 30-70 m of the water column on the middle shelf were found to be oligotrophic, so smaller or more motile cers such as dinoflagenates, microflagellates, and coccolithophorids became more dominant. The outer shelf upper water column was nutrient-poor as well during both years, and dinoflageuates, microflagellates, and coccolithophorids were even more dominant than on the middle shelf. The diatom population decreased more moving from the middle to the outer shelf. Effects of a warm core Loop Current eddy were evident on the outer shelf area. Upwelling processes shallower than 100 m may provide a means of supporting the phytoplankton population at the chlorophyll maximum on the outer shelf. The location of the increased volume of river water across the shelf in May 1993 was identified based on the increase in overall phytoplankton abundance in May 1993.

Bontempi, Paula Susan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Exploring the Outer Solar System with the ESSENCE Supernova Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the discovery and orbital determination of 14 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the ESSENCE Supernova Survey difference imaging data set. Two additional objects discovered in a similar search of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey database were recovered in this effort. ESSENCE repeatedly observed fields far from the solar system ecliptic (-21{sup o} < {beta} < -5{sup o}), reaching limiting magnitudes per observation of I {approx} 23.1 and R {approx} 23.7. We examine several of the newly detected objects in detail, including 2003 UC{sub 414}, which orbits entirely between Uranus and Neptune and lies very close to a dynamical region that would make it stable for the lifetime of the solar system. 2003 SS{sub 422} and 2007 TA{sub 418} have high eccentricities and large perihelia, making them candidate members of an outer class of TNOs. We also report a new member of the 'extended' or 'detached' scattered disk, 2004 VN{sub 112}, and verify the stability of its orbit using numerical simulations. This object would have been visible to ESSENCE for only {approx}2% of its orbit, suggesting a vast number of similar objects across the sky. We emphasize that off-ecliptic surveys are optimal for uncovering the diversity of such objects, which in turn will constrain the history of gravitational influences that shaped our early solar system.

Becker, A.C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Arraki, K.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Kaib, N.A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Aguilera, C.; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Blackman, J.W.; /Australian Natl. U., Canberra; Blondin, S.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Challis, P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Clocchiatti, A.; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol.; Covarrubias, R.; /Kyushu Sangyo U.; Damke, G.; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Davis, T.M.; /Bohr Inst. /Queensland U.; Filippenko, A.V.; /UC, Berkeley; Foley, R.J.; /UC, Berkeley; Garg, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hicken, M.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Jha, S.; /Harvard U. /SLAC; Kirshner, R.P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Krisciunas, K.; /Notre Dame U. /Texas A-M; Leibundgut, B.; /Munich, Tech. U. /UC, Berkeley /NOAO, Tucson /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Fermilab /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /Chile U., Santiago /Ohio State U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Munich, Tech. U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Texas A-M /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

171

GRAIN SORTING IN COMETARY DUST FROM THE OUTER SOLAR NEBULA  

SciTech Connect

Most young stars are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. Close to the hot stars, amorphous dust grains from the parent molecular cloud are reprocessed into crystals that are then distributed throughout the accretion disk. In some disks, there is a reduction in crystalline grain size with heliocentric distance from the star. We investigated crystalline grain size distributions in chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) believed to be from small, icy bodies that accreted in outer regions of the solar nebula. The grains are Mg-rich silicates and Fe-rich sulfides, the two most abundant minerals in CP IDPs. We find that they are predominantly <0.25 {mu}m in radius with a mean grain size that varies from one CP IDP to another. We report a size-density relationship between the silicates and sulfides. A similar size-density relationship between much larger silicate and sulfide grains in meteorites from the asteroid belt is ascribed to aerodynamic sorting. Since the silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs are theoretically too small for aerodynamic sorting, their size-density relationship may be due to another process capable of sorting small grains.

Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Ishii, H. A. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Brownlee, D. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kearsley, A. T. [Department of Mineralogy, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, M. J.; Price, M. C., E-mail: P.Wozniakiewicz@kent.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from South Carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from in revised form 6 July 2004 Abstract The lithium concentration and isotopic composition of two saprolites the behavior of lithium isotopes during continental weathering. Both saprolites show a general trend

Rudnick, Roberta L.

173

The Breaking and Scattering of the Internal Tide on a Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong internal tide is generated in the Luzon Strait that radiates westward to impact the continental shelf of the South China Sea. Mooring data in 1500-m depth on the continental slope show a fortnightly averaged incoming tidal flux of 12 kW m?...

Jody M. Klymak; Matthew H. Alford; Robert Pinkel; Ren-Chieh Lien; Yung Jang Yang; Tswen-Yung Tang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Continental Divide El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Divide El Coop Inc Divide El Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Continental Divide El Coop Inc Place New Mexico Utility Id 4265 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL RATE - GENERAL SERVICE Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE ( UTILITY OWNED) Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE (CONSUMER OWNED) Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE (CONSUMER OWNED) Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE (UTILITY OWNED) Commercial Large Industrial Transmission Service Industrial

175

Determination of robot drop location for military path planning using GIS application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the uncertainties and higher risks of fatality in combat situations, Unmanned Ground Robots (UGR) may be proven to be a safer alternative for carrying out critical military missions, such as search and rescue, and reconnaissance operations. Among ... Keywords: military path planning, robot drop, unmanned ground robot

Min-Wook Kang; Manoj K. Jha; Gautham Karri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A novel adaptive proxy certificates management scheme in military grid environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proxy Certificates (PCs) is one of key mechanisms in Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI). Users need PCs to access grid service. But there is no effective mechanism to manage the PCs in GSI. In order to apply GSI in Military Grid, a novel adaptive Proxy ... Keywords: GSI, hash value, hierarchical oneway chains, military grid, proxy certificate

Ying Liu; Jingbo Xia; Jing Dai

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research continues to be the understanding of the complex processes of fossil fuel formation and migration. DOE funded research to date has focused on case histories'' of down-hole well profiles of light hydrocarbons, pyrograms, pyrolysis-GC and -GCMS parameters, and biomarker data from wells in the Louisiana and Texas Gulf Coasts the Alaskan North Slope. In the case of the Alaskan North Slope, geological data and one-dimensional maturation modeling have been integrated in order to better constrain possible source rocks, timing, and migration routes for oil and gas generation and expulsion processes.This period, biomarker analyses and organic petrographic analyses were completed for the Ikpikpuk well. In the case of the Gulf Coast, we have obtained a one-dimensional maturation model of the Cost B-1 well in E. Cameron field of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. The completed E. Cameron data set adds to the enigma of the Gulf Coast oils found on the continental shelf of Louisiana. If significant quantities of the oil are coming from relatively organic lean Tertiary rocks, then non-conventional'' expulsion and migration mechanisms, such as gas dissolved in oil must be invoked to explain the Gulf Coast oils reservoired on the Louisiana continental shelf. We are designing and starting to assemble a hydrous pyrolysis apparatus to follow, the laboratory, rates of generation and expulsion of sediment gases. Initiation of some new research to examine {delta}{sup 13}C of individual compounds from pyrolysis is also described. We are beginning to examine both the laboratory and field data from the Gulf Coast in the context of a Global Basin Research Network (GBRN). The purpose is to better understand subsurface fluid flow processes over geologic time in sedimentary basins and their relation to resource accumulation (i.e., petroleum and metal ores). 58 refs.

Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Eglinton, T.; Dickinson, P.; Johnson, C.; Buxton, L.; Tarafa, M.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order February 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis James Hawkins James Hawkins BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan - EM employee James Hawkins is currently serving the U.S. military in Afghanistan, where he is administering a $5.8 billion task order for the Army. A major in the U.S. Air Force Reserves, Hawkins is an administrative contracting officer for the Defense Contract Management Agency, a component of the Defense Department that directly contributes to the military readiness of the U.S. and its allies. Hawkins is an acquisition planning manager and procurement analyst in the Office of Procurement Planning in EM's Office of Acquisition and Project

179

An Interview with Chris Gunderson: Are Militaries Lagging Their Non-State Enemies in Use of Internet?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing number of cyber attacks on military networks and servers has raised the question of what the global defense community is doing to safeguard military systems and protect the larger global Internet. Ubiquity's editor interviewed Chris Gunderson, ...

Peter Denning

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The weight of an assassin's mace : vulnerabilities in the US military's satellite communications and China's information warfare threat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Believing that an information Revolution of Military Affairs has occurred, the US military is currently transforming to achieve dominance over the full spectrum of deployment scenarios with a lighter, more mobile, and more ...

Brooks, Benjamin M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere at Solar John D. Richardson and Chi Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere at Solar Maximum John D. Richardson and Chi Wang Center solar wind observations in the outer heliosphere, concentrating on the recent data near solar maximum. The speed and temperature tend to be lower at solar maximum, due to the lack of coronal holes. The near

Richardson, John

182

Dependence Balance Based Outer Bounds for Gaussian Networks With Cooperation and Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We obtain new outer bounds on the capacity regions of the two-user multiple access channel with generalized feedback (MAC-GF) and the two-user interference channel with generalized feedback (IC-GF). These outer bounds are based on the idea of dependence ...

R. Tandon; S. Ulukus

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Testing military grade magnetics (transformers, inductors and coils).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineers and designers are constantly searching for test methods to qualify or 'prove-in' new designs. In the High Reliability world of military parts, design test, qualification tests, in process tests and product characteristic tests, become even more important. The use of in process and function tests has been adopted as a way of demonstrating that parts will operate correctly and survive its 'use' environments. This paper discusses various types of tests to qualify the magnetic components - the current carrying capability of coils, a next assembly 'as used' test, a corona test and inductance at temperature test. Each of these tests addresses a different potential failure on a component. The entire process from design to implementation is described.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

STUDY OF REMOTE MILITARY POWER APPLICATIONS REPORT NO. 1. SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect

An economic evaluation of the construction and operation of 5 to 46 Mw(e) nuclear power plants at several military installations throughout the world is presented. After an evaluation of economic factors involved, 10 sites were chosen for which the cost of nuclear power is most nearly economically competitive with conventional power costs. The 10 sites include Okinawa, Guam, Thule, Asmara (Eritrea), Inchon, McMurdo Sound (Antarctica), a barge in the Atlantic Ocean, and three sites in the U. S. (NORAD, Super Sage, and Nike-Zeus). A comparison between the capital cost for the nuclear power plant and the conventional power plant is made for all sites. Operating, maintenance, labor, supply, and fuel-oil costs were calculated for an annual cost that could be applied over the assumed 20-year life of the plant. Descriptions and designs of each site are included. (C.J.G.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). This report provides information on the phase stability of Alloy 22, the current waste package outer barrier material. The goal of this model is to determine whether the single-phase solid solution is stable under repository conditions and, if not, how fast other phases may precipitate. The aging and phase stability model, which is based on fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic concepts and principles, will be used to provide predictive insight into the long-term metallurgical stability of Alloy 22 under relevant repository conditions. The results of this model are used by ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' as reference-only information. These phase stability studies are currently divided into three general areas: Tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) phase and carbide precipitation in the base metal; TCP and carbide precipitation in welded samples; and Long-range ordering reactions. TCP-phase and carbide precipitates that form in Alloy 22 are generally rich in chromium (Cr) and/or molybdenum (Mo) (Raghavan et al. 1984 [DIRS 154707]). Because these elements are responsible for the high corrosion resistance of Alloy 22, precipitation of TCP phases and carbides, especially at grain boundaries, can lead to an increased susceptibility to localized corrosion in the alloy. These phases are brittle and also tend to embrittle the alloy (Summers et al. 1999 [DIRS 146915]). They are known to form in Alloy 22 at temperatures greater than approximately 600 C. Whether these phases also form at the lower temperatures expected in the repository during the 10,000-year regulatory period must be determined. The kinetics of this precipitation will be determined for both the base metal and the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The TCP phases (P, {mu}, and {sigma}) are present in the weld metal in the as-welded condition. It may be possible to eliminate these phases through a solution anneal heat treatment, but that may not be possible for the closure weld because the spent nuclear fuel cladding cannot be heated to more than 350 C. The effects of any stress mitigation techniques (such as laser peening or solution heat treating) that may be used to reduce the tensile stresses on the closure welds must also be determined. Cold-work will cause an increase in dislocation density, and such an increase in dislocation density may cause an increase in diffusion rates that control precipitation kinetics (Porter et al. 1992 [DIRS 161265]; Tawancy et al. 1983 [DIRS 104991]). Long-range order (LRO) occurs in nickel (Ni)-Cr-Mo alloys (such as Alloy 22) at temperatures less than approximately 600 C. This ordering has been linked to an increased susceptibility of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement (Tawancy et al. 1983 [DIRS 104991]). These analyses provide information on the rate at which LRO may occur in Alloy 22 under repository conditions. Determination of the kinetics of transformations through experimental techniques requires that the transformations being investigated be accelerated due to the fact that the expected service life is at least 10,000 years. Phase transformations are typically accelerated through an increase in temperature. The rate of transformation is determined at the higher temperature and is extrapolated to the lower temperatures of interest.

F. Wong

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

A tool for military officers enchasing life long learning applied on the paradigm of risk preparedness and management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper model for managing the Job Rotation of personnel attached to specific military units is proposed. This model aims to maintain the level of the overall preparedness of the units against known risks, by maintaining the presence of skilled ... Keywords: grid architecture, job rotation, military applications, military units, risk preparedness, training sessions, web services

Nikolaos V. Karadimas; Nikolaos Doukas; Nikolaos P. Papastamatiou

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effect of military training on indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of soil disturbance on several key indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia. Military activities at Fort Benning that result in soil disturbance include infantry, artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training. Soil samples were collected along a disturbance gradient that included: (1) reference sites, (2) light military use, (3) moderate military use, (4) heavy military use, and (5) remediated sites. With the exception of surface soil bulk density, measured soil properties at reference and light use sites were similar. Relative to reference sites, greater surface soil bulk density, lower soil carbon concentrations, and less carbon and nitrogen in particulate organic matter (POM) were found at moderate use, heavy use, and remediated sites. Studies along a pine forest chronosequence indicated that carbon stocks in POM gradually increased with stand age. An analysis of soil C:N ratios, as well as soil carbon concentrations and stocks, indicated a recovery of soil quality at moderate military use and remediated sites relative to heavy military use sites. Measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen are ecological indicators that can be used by military land managers to identify changes in soil from training activities and to rank training areas on the basis of soil quality.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Special Audit Report on the Department of Energy's Arms and Military-type Equipment, IG-0385  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 1, 1996 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Special Audit Report on the Department of Energy's Arms and Military-Type Equipment" TO: The Secretary BACKGROUND: The Department of Energy is responsible for over 50 major facilities across the United States, many of which use and store nuclear and other sensitive materials. The Department maintains a large inventory of arms and military-type equipment to use in protecting its nuclear weapons, materials, facilities, and classified information against theft, sabotage, espionage, and terrorist activity. The Department's inventory of arms and military-type equipment included handguns, rifles, submachine guns, grenade

189

MAGNESIUM ALLOYS IN US MILITARY APPLICATIONS: PAST, CURRENT AND FUTURE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1940s Mg-alloys have been used for military applications, from aircraft components to ground vehicles. The drive for usage was primarily availability and lightweighting of military systems. But the promise of widespread military usage was not met largely based on corrosion and flammability concerns, poor mechanical behavior and inferior ballistic response. This review paper will cover historical, current and potential future applications with a focus on scientific, engineering and social barriers relevant to integration of Mg-alloy. It will also present mechanical and physical property improvements solutions which are currently being developed to address these issues.

Mathaudhu, Suveen N.; Nyberg, Eric A.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

190

Rates of tectonic and magmatic processes in the North Cascades continental magmatic arc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental magmatic arcs are among the most dynamic. geologic systems, and documentation of the magmatic, thermal, and tectonic evolution of arcs is essential for understanding the processes of magma generation, ascent ...

Matzel, Jennifer E. Piontek, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Circulation Induced by River Inflow in Well Mixed Water over a Sloping Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pressure field over a sloping continental shelf subject to freshwater runoff at the coast can be resolved into a nearly two-dimensional dynamic height field and a residual field, the latter arising from the interaction of baroclinity and ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Mean Along-Isobath Heat and Salt Balances over the Middle Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean heat and salt balances over the Middle Atlantic Bight continental shelf are investigated by testing the hypothesis that surface fluxes of heat or freshwater are balanced by along-isobath fluxes resulting from the mean, depth-averaged, ...

Steven J. Lentz

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Swell Transformation across the Continental Shelf. Part II: Validation of a Spectral Energy Balance Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art parameterizations of the interactions of waves with a sandy bottom are evaluated using extensive field observations of swell evolution across the North Carolina continental shelf and hindcasts performed with the spectral wave ...

Fabrice Ardhuin; T. H. C. Herbers; P. F. Jessen; W. C. O'Reilly

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Role of Entrainment in the Diurnal Cycle of Continental Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In continental convective environments, general circulation models typically produce a diurnal cycle of rainfall that peaks close to the noon maximum of insolation, hours earlier than the observed peak. One possible reason is insufficient ...

Anthony D. Del Genio; Jingbo Wu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Supertidal Frequency Internal Waves on the Continental Shelf South of New England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-amplitude internal waves of supertidal frequency are commonly observed on continental shelves during the stratified mason. We present a series of intensive observations of such waves at an anchor station south of New England using two CTD ...

Derek M. Burrage; Richard W. Garvine

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Mixing and the Evolution of Cloud Droplet Size Spectra in a Vigorous Continental Cumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements in a vigorous, highly turbulent continental cumulus show predominantly bimodal and multiple peaked cloud droplet spectral shapes. The data are 100 m (1 s) averages. Three factors involved in the development of the cloud ...

Ilga R. Paluch; Charles A. Knight

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Observations and a Model of the Mean Circulation over the Middle Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of current time series longer than 200 days from 33 sites over the Middle Atlantic Bight continental shelf reveal a consistent mean circulation pattern. The mean depth-averaged flow is equatorward, alongshelf, and increases with ...

Steven J. Lentz

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Quasi-Geostrophic Topographically Generated Mean Flow over the Continental Margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of oppositely directed, monthly mean alongshore currents and wind stress over the continental margin off the Pacific coast of North America motivate the theoretical examination of mean flow generation by topographic lee-wave drag. We ...

Roger M. Samelson; J. S. Allen

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Evolvement of tsunami waves on the continental shelves with gentle slope in the China Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential tsunami generated in the Okinawa Trench or the Manila Trench may attack the southeast coast of China. The continental shelves with extremely gentle slope in the China Seas affect the evolvement of tsunami waves. In this paper

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Modeling the Aerosol Extinction versus Backscatter Relationship for Lidar Applications: Maritime and Continental Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model to derive functional relationships linking extinction (?) and backscatter (?) of continental and maritime aerosol at 532 nm is presented and tested. These relationships are needed to solve the single-wavelength lidar equation, where both ...

Francesca Barnaba; Gian Paolo Gobbi

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hydro-Climatological Trends in the Continental United States, 1948-88  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial patterns in trends of four monthly variables: average temperature, precipitation, streamflow, and average of the daily temperature range were examined for the continental United States for the period 194888. The data used are a subset of ...

Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Eric F. Wood; James R. Wallis

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Effects of In-Cloud Sulfate Production on Light-Scattering Properties of Continental Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model calculations am presented for continental scenarios that demonstrate that the heterogeneity in the chemistry of different size cloud drops can have a significant impact on the amount of sulfate produced in cloud, its size distribution, and ...

Po-Fat Yuen; Dean A. Hegg; Timothy V. Larson

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Polarimetric Radar Analysis of Raindrop Size Variability in Maritime and Continental Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Queensland Cloud Seeding Research Program, the CP2 polarimetric radar parameter differential radar reflectivity Zdr was used to examine the raindrop size evolution in both maritime and continental clouds. The focus of this paper is to ...

James W. Wilson; Charles A. Knight; Sarah A. Tessendorf; Courtney Weeks

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Advancing Global-and Continental-Scale Hydrometeorology: Contributions of GEWEX Hydrometeorology Panel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 9 years, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), has coordinated the activities of the Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) and other related research ...

R. G. Lawford; R. Stewart; J. Roads; H-J. Isemer; M. Manton; J. Marengo; T. Yasunari; S. Benedict; T. Koike; S. Williams

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Air, Sea, and Land Interactions of the Continental U.S. Hydroclimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multidecadal simulations over the continental United States by an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to an ocean general circulation model is compared with that forced by observed sea surface temperature (SST). The differences in the ...

Vasubandhu Misra; P. A. Dirmeyer

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified for small tidal excursion over a near-critical continental slope. A theoretical framework for low-wavenumber energy transfer is derived from flat bottom vertical modes ...

Samuel M. Kelly; Jonathan D. Nash; Kim I. Martini; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Aspects of the Tidal Variability Observed on the Southern California Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the current and temperature field from the southern California continental shelf are analyzed in a frequency band (0.66 cpd) dominated by tidal fluctuations. The seasonal variability of the temperature and horizontal velocity ...

A. Bratkovich

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Toward the Improvement of Aircraft-Icing Forecasts for the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated procedure is developed for detecting and forecasting atmospheric conditions conductive to aircraft icing over the continental United States. The procedure uses gridded output from the Nested-Grid Model, and is based on the manual ...

Paul Schultz; Marcia K. Politovich

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Turbulence Structure in a Continental Stratocumulus Cloud from Millimeter-Wavelength Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The turbulent-scale vertical velocity structure in a continental stratocumulus cloud is studied using a 3-mm wavelength Doppler radar operating in a vertically pointing mode. The radar observations provided 30-m sampling in the vertical with 2-s ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce Albrecht

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Bottom Stress Estimates from Vertical Dissipation Rate Profiles on the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the near-bottom distribution of the turbulent dissipation rate on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island are used to calculate bottom stress. A free-failing vertical profiler with microstructure shear probes was used to ...

Richard K. Dewey; William R. Crawford

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Scale Dependence of the Predictability of Precipitation from Continental Radar Images. Part II: Probability Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eulerian and Lagrangian persistence of precipitation patterns derived from continental-scale radar composite images are used as a measure of predictability and for nowcasting [the McGill algorithm for precipitation nowcasting by Lagrangian ...

Urs Germann; Isztar Zawadzki

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Laboratory Models of Bay-Type Continental Shelves in the Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory experiment consisting of a shallow sea of constant depth bounded by a deep ocean through a uniformly sloping continental rise was conducted. The experiment is cooled from above, and there is a region that exhibits sinking convection ...

Takashige Sugimoto; John A. Whitehead

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Long-Term Coastal Upwelling over a Continental ShelfSlope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term coastal upwelling over a continental shelf-slope with emphasis on the planetary dispersion of Rossby waves is studied with numerical models. The ocean is forced by a wind stress with a limited longshore extent. The thermocline ...

Nobuo Suginohara; Yoshiteru Kitamura

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Upwelling Circulation on the Oregon Continental Shelf. Part II: Simulations and Comparisons with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixty-day simulations of flow on the Oregon continental shelf are performed using the Blumberg and Mellor sigma coordinate, primitive equation model. The model is two-dimensional (an across-shelf section) with high spatial resolution and ...

J. Federiuk; J. S. Allen

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Pan-continental droughts in North America over the last millennium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional droughts are common in North America, but pan-continental droughts extending across multiple regions, including 2012, are rare relative to single region events. We use the tree-ring derived North American Drought Atlas to investigate ...

Benjamin I. Cook; Jason E. Smerdon; Richard Seager; Edward R. Cook

216

Thermal Fronts Generated by Internal Waves Propagating Obliquely along the Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid temperature falls occurring at semidiurnal periods are observed close to the bottom above the continental slope in the Bay of Biscay. Simultaneous current measurements reveal that the abrupt temperature decrease O(0.5 K) within one minute ...

Johannes R. Gemmrich; Hans van Haren

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Statistical Evaluation of Combined Daily Gauge Observations and Rainfall Satellite Estimates over Continental South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a comprehensive assessment of a new high-resolution, gaugesatellite-based analysis of daily precipitation over continental South America during 2004. This methodology is based on a combination of additive and multiplicative ...

Daniel A. Vila; Luis Gustavo G. de Goncalves; David L. Toll; Jose Roberto Rozante

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A statistical method for improving continental shelf and near-shore marine climate predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially and temporally homogeneous measurements of ocean temperature variability at high resolution on the continental shelf are scarce. Daily estimates of large-scale ocean properties are readily available from global ocean reanalysis products. ...

Eric C. J. Oliver; Neil J. Holbrook

219

Combined Effects of Wind-Driven Upwelling and Internal Tide on the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal tides on the continental shelf can be intermittent as a result of changing hydrographic conditions associated with wind-driven upwelling. In turn, the internal tide can affect transports associated with upwelling. To study these ...

A. L. Kurapov; J. S. Allen; G. D. Egbert

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Influence of Buoyancy Flux from Estuaries on Continental Shelf Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of freshwater from a midlatitude estuary to the continental shelf is modeled numerically as a Rossby adjustment problem using a primitive equation model. As the initial salinity front is relaxed, a first baroclinic-mode Kelvin wave ...

Andrew J. Weaver; William W. Hsieh

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Modeling Study on the Early Electrical Development of Tropical Convection: Continental and Oceanic (Monsoon) Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical modeling studies of continental tropical and maritime tropical convection were conducted using the two-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, cloud electrification model developed at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The model ...

Scot C. Randell; Steven A. Rutledge; Richard D. Farley; John H. Helsdon Jr.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Solid oxide fuel cells for stationary, mobile, and military applications.  

SciTech Connect

Among all designs of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), the most progress has been achieved with the tubular design. However, the electrical resistance of tubular SOFCs is high, and specific power output (W/cm2) and volumetric power density (W/cm3) are low. These low power densities make tubular SOFCs suitable only for stationary power generation and not very attractive for mobile applications. Planar SOFCs, in contrast, are capable of achieving very high power densities. Additionally, sizeable cost reductions are possible through a concept called''mass customization'' that is being pursued in the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA). This concept involves the development a 3-10 kW size core planar SOFC module that can be mass produced and then combined for different size applications in stationary power generation, transportation, and military market sectors, thus eliminating the need to produce custom-designed and inherently more expensive fuel cell stacks to meet a specific power rating. This paper discusses the recent work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the design and development of low-cost modular SOFC systems using lower temperature, anode-supported SOFCs.

Singhal, Subhash C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy efficiency in military housing: Monitoring to support revitalization guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working with the US Army, the US Air Force, and the US Department of Energy to develop a guidebook to be used by architectural and engineering firms in the design phases of military family housing revitalization projects. The purpose of the guidebook is to ensure that energy efficiency is properly addressed in revitalization projects. Monitoring space-heating and cooling energy used in houses both before and after they are revitalized is necessary in order to assess the amount of energy saved by the revitalization process. Three different methods of conducting monitoring experiments are discussed, as well as the methods of data analysis to be used. Houses will be monitored individually using standard gas and electric meters to obtain heating and cooling data for the houses. The authors recommend conducting monitoring programs at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, and Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, because of their project schedules and potential for savings. They do not recommend doing any monitoring at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, because of the relatively small savings that they expect revitalization to accomplish there. They do not recommend seeking out alternative sites for monitoring because of the time required to become familiar with the installation and also because revitalization schedules at alternative sites may be no better than those at the sites they inspected.

Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

An augmented reality system for military operations in urban terrain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many future military operations are expected to occur in urban environments. These complex, 3D battlefields introduce many challenges to the dismounted warfighter. Better situational awareness is required for effective operation in urban environments. However, delivering this information to the dismounted warfighter is extremely difficult. For example, maps draw a user's attention away from the environment and cannot directly represent the three-dimensional nature of the terrain. To overcome these difficulties, we are developing the Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS). The system consists of a wearable computer, a wireless network system, and a tracked see-through head-mounted display (HMD). The computer generates graphics that, from the user's perspective, appear to be aligned with the actual environment. For example, a building could be augmented to show its name, a plan of its interior, icons to represent reported sniper locations, and the names of adjacent streets. This paper surveys the current state of development of BARS and describes ongoing research efforts. We describe four major research areas. The first is the development of an effective, efficient user interface for displaying data and processing user inputs. The second is the capability for collaboration between multiple BARS users and other systems. Third, we describe the current hardware for both a mobile and indoor prototype system. Finally, we

Mark A. Livingston; Mark A. Livingston; Lawrence J. Rosenblum; Simon J. Julier; Dennis Brown; Yohan Baillot; J. Edward; Swan Ii; Joseph L. Gabbard; Deborah Hix

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A liquid over-feeding military air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A 3.3-ton military air conditioning unit has been studied experimentally in both baseline (as received) and as modified for liquid over-feeding (LOF) operation. Tne baseline test, using a proper refrigerant charge, showed the measured cooling capacity to be less than 1% off the rated capacity at 95{degrees}F ambient temperature. The test results indicate that LOF operation outperforms the baseline case over a wide ambient temperature range in terms of cooling capacity, power consumption, and system coefficient of performance (COP). At a 95{degrees}F test point, LOF operation has a cooling capacity of 51,100 BTU per hour, which is a 28.9% improvement over the baseline operation capacity of 39,600 BTU per hour. The COP for LOF at 95{degrees}F is 2.62, which is 29% better than the baseline COP of 2.03. However, an optimal refrigerant charge is essential for LOF to work properly.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

GRR/Section 13-FD-b - Military Land Evaluation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Military Land Evaluation b - Military Land Evaluation < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-FD-b - Military Land Evaluation 13FDBMilitaryLandEvaluationProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Department of Defense Fish and Wildlife Service Regulations & Policies Sikes Act 10 USC 2684a - Agreements to limit encroachments and other constraints on military training, testing and operations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13FDBMilitaryLandEvaluationProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

228

EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military 06: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, South Carolina EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, South Carolina Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security to use the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina, for military training purposes. For more information, contact: Mr. Andrew R. Grainger NEPA Compliance Officer U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office Building 730-1B, Room 3150 Aiken, SC 29808 Telephone: 803-952-8001 Fax/telephone: 1-800-881-7292 Electronic mail: nepa@srs.gov Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download

229

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2008, DoD and DOE defined a joint initiative to address military energy use by identifying specific actions to reduce energy demand and increase use of renewable energy on DoD installations.

230

17.953 U.S. Military Budget and Force Planning, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States is spending about $400 billion this year on national defense, some $40 billion on homeland security, and $85 billion on military operations and nation-building in Iraq and Afghanistan. This course is for ...

Williams, Cindy

231

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recessn.html), and crude oil price histories are from thea long history of estimates of the military costs of oil usehistory: Received 7 May 2007 Accepted 3 March 2008 Available online 21 April 2008 Keywords: Oil

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Optimization-based routing and scheduling of IED-detection assets in contemporary military operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvised Explosive Devices, or IEDs, have become a familiar and lethal part of contemporary military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, producing more casualties than any other weapons system. One reason for their success ...

Marks, Christopher E. (Christopher Edward)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Regime legitimacy and military resilience : lessons from World War II and Yugoslavia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis argues that regime legitimacy creates military resilience. A regime is legitimate when its constituents believe-whether because of ideological solidarity, patriotism, nationalism, or good governance-that a ...

Russell, Jacob Hale

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Essays using military-induced variation to study social interactions, human capital development, and labor markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of four empirical studies, each using military-induced variation to examine various aspects of human capital production and the U.S. labor market. The first two chapters study the effects of ...

Lyle, David S. (David Stephen), 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Negative mood endures after completion of high-altitude military training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of High-Altitude Military Training Wayne A. Bardwell, Ph.D.mood effects strenuous training would have on Marines, whatdays after completion of training, and how mood scores would

Bardwell, Wayne A; Ensign, Wayne Y; Mills, Paul J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Politicized armies, militarized politics : civil-military relations in Turkey and Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite their common Ottoman heritage, Greece and Turkey have diverged widely in their modem history of civil-military relations. The armed forces have a long record of intervention in both countries, but there is a crucial ...

Liaras, Evangelos

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of rapidly deployable structures for military applications : a system based approach to command post facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today's battlespace is the most dynamic in recorded history. Accompanying other military improvements, Command and Control (C2) technology has also been modernized. In spite of advances in technology, it currently takes ...

Hopping, Jakob A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Turbine airfoil with dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure. The compliant structure may be configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand without limitation by the inner layer. The compliant structure may be formed from a plurality of pedestals positioned generally parallel with each other. The pedestals may include a first foot attached to a first end of the pedestal and extending in a first direction aligned with the outer layer, and may include a second foot attached to a second end of the pedestal and extending in a second direction aligned with the inner layer.

Campbell; Christian X. (Oviedo, FL), Morrison; Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

239

Turbulence Structure of the Hurricane Boundary Layer between the Outer Rainbands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Coupled Boundary Layers AirSea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane program, flights were conducted to directly measure turbulent fluxes and turbulence properties in the high-wind boundary layer of hurricanes between the outer rainbands. ...

Jun A. Zhang; William M. Drennan; Peter G. Black; Jeffrey R. French

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Miniature Supercells in an Offshore Outer Rainband of Hurricane Ivan (2004)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne Doppler radar observations are used to document the structure of three miniature supercells embedded in an outer rainband of Hurricane Ivan on 15 September 2004. The cells were located more than 100 km offshore, beyond the Doppler range ...

Matthew D. Eastin; M. Christopher Link

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

How Do Outer Spiral Rainbands Affect Tropical Cyclone Structure and Intensity?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-standing issue on how outer spiral rainbands affect the structure and intensity of tropical cyclones is studied through a series of numerical experiments using the cloud-resolving tropical cyclone model TCM4. Because diabatic heating due ...

Yuqing Wang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Multiscale Processes Leading to Supercells in the Landfalling Outer Rainbands of Hurricane Katrina (2005)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow supercells are frequently observed within the outer rainbandsboth onshore and offshoreof landfalling tropical cyclones (TCs). Such supercells can produce tornadoes along the coast even when the center of the parent TC is hundreds of ...

Benjamin W. Green; Fuqing Zhang; Paul Markowski

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005 (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

H.R. 4837, The Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005 [19], was signed into law on October 13, 2004. The Act provides for construction to support the operations of the U.S. Armed Forces and for military family housing. It also provides funds to help citizens in Florida and elsewhere in the aftermath of multiple hurricanes and other natural disasters. In addition, it authorizes construction of an Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism  

SciTech Connect

Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Comprehensive Program for Measurement of Military Aircraft Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions of gases and particulate matter by military aircraft were characterized inplume by 'extractive' and 'optical remote-sensing (ORS)' technologies. Non-volatile particle size distribution, number and mass concentrations were measured with good precision and reproducibly. Time-integrated particulate filter samples were collected and analyzed for smoke number, elemental composition, carbon contents, and sulfate. Observed at EEP the geometric mean diameter (as measured by the mobility diameter) generally increased as the engine power setting increased, which is consistent with downstream observations. The modal diameters at the downstream locations are larger than that at EEP at the same engine power level. The results indicate that engine particles were processed by condensation, for example, leading to particle growth in-plume. Elemental analysis indicated little metals were present in the exhaust, while most of the exhaust materials in the particulate phase were carbon and sulfate (in the JP-8 fuel). CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, HCHO, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, and alkanes were measured. The last five species were most noticeable under engine idle condition. The levels of hydrocarbons emitted at high engine power level were generally below the detection limits. ORS techniques yielded real-time gaseous measurement, but the same techniques could not be extended directly to ultrafine particles found in all engine exhausts. The results validated sampling methodology and measurement techniques used for non-volatile particulate aircraft emissions, which also highlighted the needs for further research on sampling and measurement for volatile particulate matter and semi-volatile species in the engine exhaust especially at the low engine power setting.

Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

SciTech Connect

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earths energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical parameterizations that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the AprilMay 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed perpendicular to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Outer Bounds for Multiple-Access Channels With Feedback Using Dependence Balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the idea of dependence balance to obtain a new outer bound for the capacity region of the discrete memoryless multiple-access channel with noiseless feedback (MAC-FB). We consider a binary additive noisy MAC-FB whose feedback capacity is not known. The binary additive noisy MAC considered in this paper can be viewed as the discrete counterpart of the Gaussian MAC-FB. Ozarow established that the capacity region of the two-user Gaussian MAC-FB is given by the cut-set bound. Our result shows that for the discrete version of the channel considered by Ozarow, this is not the case. Direct evaluation of our outer bound is intractable due to an involved auxiliary random variable whose large cardinality prohibits an exhaustive search. We overcome this difficulty by using a composite function and its properties to explicitly evaluate our outer bound. Our outer bound is strictly less than the cut-set bound at all points on the capacity region where feedback increases capacity. In addition, we explicitly evaluate the CoverLeung achievable rate region for the binary additive noisy MAC-FB in consideration. Furthermore, using the tools developed for the evaluation of our outer bound, we also explicitly characterize the boundary of the feedback capacity region of the binary erasure MAC, for which the CoverLeung achievable rate region is known to be tight. This last result confirms that the feedback strategies developed by Kramer for the binary erasure MAC are capacity achieving.

Ravi Tandon; Sennur Ulukus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Dependence Balance Based Outer Bounds for Gaussian Networks with Cooperation and Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain new outer bounds on the capacity regions of the two-user multiple access channel with generalized feedback (MAC-GF) and the two-user interference channel with generalized feedback (IC-GF). These outer bounds are based on the idea of dependence balance which was proposed by Hekstra and Willems [1]. To illustrate the usefulness of our outer bounds, we investigate three different channel models. We first consider a Gaussian MAC with noisy feedback (MAC-NF), where transmitter $k$, $k=1,2$, receives a feedback $Y_{F_{k}}$, which is the channel output $Y$ corrupted with additive white Gaussian noise $Z_{k}$. As the feedback noise variances become large, one would expect the feedback to become useless, which is not reflected by the cut-set bound. We demonstrate that our outer bound improves upon the cut-set bound for all non-zero values of the feedback noise variances. Moreover, in the limit as $\\sigma_{Z_{k}}^{2}\\to \\infty$, $k=1,2$, our outer bound collapses to the capacity region of the Gaussian MAC wit...

Tandon, Ravi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Simulations of Design Modifications in Military Health Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Military Health System (MHS) is a worldwide network of healthcare facilities and personnel. The healthcare facility inventory is aging and requires extensive facility management, renovations and replacement construction to maintain the environment of a high quality of care. Recent developments in sustainability and evidence-based design (EBD) have created additional requirements for the design and construction of facilities. These areas of design emphasis, sustainability and EBD, are developing best practices according to the respective theory. Existing facilities in the MHS have been directed to undergo restoration and modernization by Department of Defense (DoD) civilian leadership. Governmental directives have mandated that these restorations and new construction complies with current building codes and that EBD design features be included in healthcare facility planning. The hospital building type has changed over history due to innovations in building technology, such as HVAC and steel frame construction, as well as healthcare initiatives, such as treatment of tuberculosis and the mentally ill. The design concepts of environmental sustainability and EBD are currently altering the hospital typology. Building professionals have found significant differences in facilities that are categorized as evidence-based and those noted as sustainable. The future of successful healthcare designs relies on a balance of these concepts. The hospital building type has one of the highest energy intensities out of all commercial building types. Hospitals have become more energy intense due to the evolution of the deep-plan hospital. The design of the building envelope is the most lasting feature affecting the energy use of a hospital, due to its service-life typically equaling the life of the facility. The building envelope design consists of the shape of the building, material selection, as well as its orientation. This research demonstrates the relationship between incorporating positive building occupant features, such as increased day lighting and views of nature, and efficient energy design choices. The use of energy simulation software and early design collaboration between multiple professional disciplines is recognized as critical to optimal design solutions.

Kiss, Christopher William

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Francis H. Smith: architect of antebellum southern military schools and educational reform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the historical significance of the Virginia Military Instituteâ??s (VMI) first superintendent, Francis Henney Smith, and his influence not only at his home institution but also on his broader social, educational, and political importance. Historiography neglects to credit or identify Smithâ??s contributions to the notable expansion of military education in the antebellum South and his influence beyond VMI. Not only did he play a key role in the developing of Southern military education, but overwhelming evidence indicates that the growth of these schools in the South would not have happened without Smith acting as an influential father figure. He provided the structure, ideology and pedagogical models of these institutions and advised, guided and inspired nearly every other Southern military school in the two decades preceding the Civil War. Moreover, his innovations spread far beyond those of military schools as he promoted a new vision for Virginia and the South, one in which independence could be established through intellectual solidarity by creating a society centered on education. As a West Point graduate, Smith structured VMI on the Sylvanus Thayer educational model and sought to promote this system throughout every school in Virginia and the South, both in military and non-military institutions. He also created a network of like-minded academics, mostly with alumni from the U.S. Military Academy who launched a movement to encourage a more practical education in the South, focusing on mathematics, engineering and the sciences. VMI graduates would also spread Smithâ??s academic gospel throughout the state and region as he encouraged them to serve their republic as teachers rather than soldiers. In spite of the popularity of his reforms and ideologies, Smith contended with the challenges of the volatile nature of antebellum Virginia politics as well as the social constructs of his native South, particularly in the forms of honor and masculinity demonstrated by his cadets. The outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 temporarily destroyed his dreams improving VMI on the model of the most advanced scientific institutions in Europe as the Institute converted to an exclusively military mission to serve the Confederacy.

Wineman, Bradford Alexander

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

U.S. military action in Panama: justifying OPERATION JUST CAUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project of this thesis is a moral evaluation of OPERATION JUST CAUSE, the United States' use of military force in Panama in 1989. I begin by arguing that just war theory, both in its classic and contemporary forms, needs to be revised. Present just war positions do not adequately take into account the complex, nontraditional missions that military forces are increasingly called to perform in today's ever-changing international arena. From humanitarian relief efforts in Somalia to peacekeeping missions in Kosovo, militaries today and those of the United States in particular, are serving in roles that are a sharp tactical departure from those they prepared for in the Cold War era. OPERATION JUST CAUSE is one such example of these types of nonstandard missions. I survey classic and contemporary just war theories, select and modify appropriate criteria, and restate a modified composite theory that I argue for as optimal for evaluating these new types of military actions. I then put my composite theory to the test by examining in detail U.S. motives and actions in Panama in 1989, and subsequently evaluating them against my revised criteria. Finally, given the judgment methodology that I state, I conclude that OPERATION JUST CAUSE was a justified use of military force by the United States.

Reich, Theodore Herman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Implementation of an Outer Can Welding System for Savannah River Site FB-Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper details three phases of testing to confirm use of a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) system for closure welding the 3013 outer container used for stabilization/storage of plutonium metals and oxides. The outer container/lid closure joint was originally designed for laser welding, but for this application, the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process has been adapted. The testing progressed in three phases: (1) system checkout to evaluate system components for operational readiness, (2) troubleshooting to evaluate high weld failure rates and develop corrective techniques, and (3) pre-installation acceptance testing.

Howard, S.R.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

Preliminary engineering studies for the support shell of the outer tracker of the SDC detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) detector is in the conceptual design phase. ORNL is currently working with various sub-groups on the design of the outer tracker portion of the SDC detector. A major focus in the outer tracker design is the structure that mounts and supports the tracking elements. This structure must meet extreme requirements of alignment and stability while containing a minimum of material. This report describes the requirements, evaluations, and analyses that have been performed on the two options being explored; a cylindrical support shell and a modular support shell.

Vandergriff, D.H.; Mayhall, J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California Abstract The Coso Geothermal Field, located in east central California, hosts a world-class power-generating project that has been in continuous operation for the past 15 years. The project is located on the test and evaluation ranges of the Naval Air Weapons Station, China Lake-the Navy's premier research and development (R&D) facility for air-to-air and air-to-ground ordnance. Fully financed by private investment, the Coso geothermal power

256

ARPA-E and the Military Team Up on New Technologies and Summit Partnerships  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and the Military Team Up on New Technologies and Summit and the Military Team Up on New Technologies and Summit Partnerships ARPA-E and the Military Team Up on New Technologies and Summit Partnerships January 31, 2013 - 1:06pm Addthis Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus speaks to attendees at the 2011 Energy Innovation Summit in Washington, DC. | Energy Department photo. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus speaks to attendees at the 2011 Energy Innovation Summit in Washington, DC. | Energy Department photo. Alexa McClanahan Communications Support Contractor to ARPA-E What are the key facts? ARPA-E and the Navy are funding development of HVAC technology that could achieve 20-50% better fuel efficiency for soldiers in extreme conditions. Learn more about Defense Department and ARPA-E collaborations at the 2013 Energy Innovation Summit, held Feb. 25-27 outside Washington, DC.

257

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Zero Energy Military Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning Samuel Booth, John Barnett, Kari Burman, Josh Hambrick and Robert Westby Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-48876 August 2010 Technical Report Net Zero Energy Military NREL/TP-7A2-48876 Installations: A Guide to August 2010 Assessment and Planning Samuel Booth, John Barnett, Kari Burman, Josh Hambrick and Robert Westby Prepared under Task No. IDOD.1010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

258

Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified briefings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. military officer gets classified briefings U.S. military officer gets classified briefings Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified briefings Winnefield was at Los Alamos to receive a wide variety of classified briefings that covered the broad spectrum of national security science at the Lab. November 17, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

259

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) recognizes the strategic importance of energy to its mission, and is working to reduce energy consumption and enhance energy self-sufficiency by drawing on local clean energy sources. A joint initiative formed between DoD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to address military energy use led to a task force to examine the potential for net zero energy military installations, which would produce as much energy on site as they consume in buildings, facilities, and fleet vehicles. This report presents an assessment and planning process to examine military installations for net zero energy potential. Net Zero Energy Installation Assessment (NZEIA) presents a systematic framework to analyze energy projects at installations while balancing other site priorities such as mission, cost, and security.

Booth, S.; Barnett, J.; Burman, K.; Hambrick, J.; Westby, R.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modular photonic power and VCSEL-based data links for aerospace and military applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

If photonic data and power transfer links are constructed in a modular fashion, they can be easily adapted into various forms to meet a wide range of needs for aerospace and military applications. The performance specifications associated with these needs can vary widely according to application. Alignment tolerance needs also tend to vary greatly, as can requirements on power consumption. An example of a modular photonic data and/or power transfer link that can be applied to military and aerospace needs is presented. In this approach, a link is designed for low (<10 kb/s) data rates, ultra-low electrical power consumption, large alignment tolerance, and power transfer to provide complete electrical shielding in a remote module that might be found in a military or aerospace application.

Carson, R.F.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

SciTech Connect

Sustainable municipal solid waste management at military solutions necessitates a combined approach that includes waste reduction, alternative disposal techniques, and increased recycling. Military installations are unique because they often represent large employers in the region in which they are located, thereby making any practices they employ impact overall waste management strategies of the region. Solutions for waste sustainability will be dependent on operational directives and base location, availability of resources such as water and energy, and size of population. Presented in this paper are descriptions of available waste strategies that can be used to support sustainable waste management. Results presented indicate source reduction and recycling to be the most sustainable solutions. However, new waste-to-energy plants and composting have potential to improve on these well proven techniques and allow military installations to achieve sustainable waste management.

Borglin, S.; Shore, J.; Worden, H.; Jain, R.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fourth generation nuclear weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects, Report ISRI-05-03  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped-charge jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Andre Gsponer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Avoid painting walls with a hammer: a methodology for leveraging COTS/GOTS games for military training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today' military faces an increasingly arduous commitment to maintain readiness for a multitude of taskings including full-scale conflicts, reconstruction and stability operations and humanitarian efforts. On a unit level, commanders often face this challenge ... Keywords: COTS, GOTS, games, military training, selection methodology

Major Joseph M. Nolan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fort Campbell, Kentucky A Forester position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Forest Management Plan. · Integrate military training support with habitat management, sustainable timber · Experience in the design and execution of forest inventories · Experience in forest inventory data analysis for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is located at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. ORGANIZATION

265

Deep Flow along the Western Boundary South of the Blake Bahama Outer Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In JuneJuly 1990, hydrographic, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), and velocity observations were taken along the western boundary of the North Atlantic south of the Blake Bahama Outer Ridge from 30 to 24N between the northern Bahamas and 71W. The ...

Elizabeth Johns; Rana A. Fine; Robert L. Molinari

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Outer Bounds for Multiple Access Channels with Feedback using Dependence Balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the idea of dependence balance to obtain a new outer bound for the capacity region of the discrete memoryless multiple access channel with noiseless feedback (MAC-FB). We consider a binary additive noisy MAC-FB whose feedback capacity is not known. The binary additive noisy MAC considered in this paper can be viewed as the discrete counterpart of the Gaussian MAC-FB. Ozarow established that the capacity region of the two-user Gaussian MAC-FB is given by the cut-set bound. Our result shows that for the discrete version of the channel considered by Ozarow, this is not the case. Direct evaluation of our outer bound is intractable due to an involved auxiliary random variable whose large cardinality prohibits an exhaustive search. We overcome this difficulty by using functional analysis to explicitly evaluate our outer bound. Our outer bound is strictly less than the cut-set bound at all points on the capacity region where feedback increases capacity. In addition, we explicitly evaluate the Cover-Leung achi...

Tandon, Ravi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Outer bounds for multiple-access channels with feedback using dependence balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use the idea of dependence balance to obtain a new outer bound for the capacity region of the discrete memoryless multiple-access channel with noiseless feedback (MAC-FB). We consider a binary additive noisy MAC-FB whose feedback capacity is not known. ... Keywords: cut-set bound, dependence balance, multiple-access channel with feedback (MAC-FB)

Ravi Tandon; Sennur Ulukus

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

FilMINT: An Outer Approximation-Based Solver for Convex Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a new solver for convex mixed-integer nonlinear programs (MINLPs) that implements a linearization-based algorithm. The solver is based on an algorithm of Quesada and Grossmann [Quesada, I., I. E. Grossmann. 1992. An LP/NLP based branch-and-bound ... Keywords: LP/NLP-based branch and bound, mixed-integer nonlinear programming, outer approximation

Kumar Abhishek; Sven Leyffer; Jeff Linderoth

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

An integrated approach to modelling land-use change on continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use and land-cover change are important drivers of global environmental change, affecting the state of biodiversity, the global carbon cycle, and other aspects of the earth system. In this article we describe the development of the land-use model ... Keywords: Continental and global scale land-use change modelling, Human-environment interaction, Land-use systems, Model framework

Rdiger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Jennifer Koch; Christina Klking; David M. Lapola; Jan Schngel; Jrg A. Priess

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hydrographic and Current Observations on the Continental Slope and Shelf of the Western Equatorial Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic and current-profiling data from December 1980 and current-meter data obtained between September 1980 and November 1981 from the continental slope and shelf of the western equatorial Atlantic between 2 and 7N are used to describe ...

Charles N. Flagg; R. Lee Gordon; Scott McDowell

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Model of Gulf Stream Frontal Instabilities, Meanders and Eddies along the Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a simplified model of the Gulf Stream front along a vertical-walled continental slope of a constant-depth ocean basin, the dynamics governing frontal instabilities, meanders, and eddies depend primarily on (i) L0/ R0, the ratio of the cross-...

Lie-Yauw Oey

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The K1 Tide on the Continental Shelf from Nova Scotia to Cape Hatteras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description is given of the K1 tide over the northeast continental shelf off North America from Nova Scotia to Cape Hatteras. Analyzed pressure data obtained from W. Brown and J. Irish (University of New Hampshire) have been used to draw up the ...

Peter R. Daifuku; Robert C. Beardsley

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Stability and charging characteristics of the comma head region of continental winter cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents analyses of the fine-scale structure of convection in the comma head of two continental winter cyclones and a 16-storm climatology analyzing the distribution of lightning within the comma head. A case study of a deep cyclone is ...

Robert M. Rauber; Joseph Wegman; David M. Plummer; Andrew A. Rosenow; Melissa Peterson; Greg M. McFarquhar; Brian F. Jewett; David Leon; Patrick S. Market; Kevin R. Knupp; Jason M. Keeler; Steven M. Battaglia

275

A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental. It is in this spirit that we advocate establishing a hydrologic remote sensing observatory (RSO) to advance sensing al. (2006), A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling

Katul, Gabriel

276

SimClast: An aggregated forward stratigraphic model of continental shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new basin-scale, 2DH model of continental shelves with a focus on generating clastic stratigraphy. The model, SimClast, is capable of simulating fluvial channel network dynamics, plume deposition, wave-induced cross-shore and longshore ... Keywords: Coupling, Fluvio-deltaic, Numerical model, Sedimentary, Stratigraphy, Waves

Rory A. F. Dalman; Gert Jan Weltje

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a April 2008 Accepted 5 June 2008 Editor: B. Bourdon Keywords: Lithium Isotope fractionation Deep. Lithium concentrations of granulite xenoliths also vary widely (0.5 to 21 ppm) and are, on average, lower

Mcdonough, William F.

278

Influences of Continental Monsoons and AirSea Coupling on the Climate of the Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airsealand coupled model of intermediate complexity was used to reveal the important roles of airsea coupling and adjacent continental monsoons (i.e., American monsoons and AsianAustralian monsoons) on the annual cycle and mean state of ...

Xiouhua Fu; Bin Wang

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental during opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Unlike the Atlantic margins, where Wilson cycles were first recognized, breakup in the Gulf of Mexico did not initially focus within the orogen, but was instead

Huerta, Audrey D.

280

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892, United States b School of Mathematical Sciences, Building 28 May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above

Manga, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A virtual tall tower network for understanding continental sources and sinks of CO2  

SciTech Connect

Our understanding of the North American terrestrial carbon cycle is limited by both a lack of continental atmospheric CO2 data, and by a need for methods to interpret these and other continental data with confidence. In response to this challenge a rapid expansion of the N. American carbon cycle observational network is underway. This expansion includes a network of continuous, continental CO2 mixing ratio observations being collected at a subset of AmeriFlux towers. Progress in developing this resource includes instrument development, site installation, calibration and intercalibration efforts, and initiation of a uniform data product. Progess in applying these data include proposed methods for interpreting surface layer measurements in atmospheric inversions (the virtual tall towers approach), examination of coherence patterns in continental mixing ratios in response to weather and climate, and application of these mixing ratio measurements in formal atmospheric inversions. Future work will merge these methods with interpretation of flux towers observations of terrestrial carbon fluxes in an effort to create a single coherent diagnosis of North American terrestrial carbon fluxes over a multi-year period.

Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Modified Halocline Water over the Laptev Sea Continental Margin: Historical Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical hydrographic data (1940s2010) show a distinct cross-slope difference of the lower halocline water (LHW) over the Laptev Sea continental margins. Over the slope, the LHW is on average warmer and saltier by 0.2C and 0.5 psu, ...

Igor A. Dmitrenko; Sergey A. Kirillov; Vladimir V. Ivanov; Bert Rudels; Nuno Serra; Nikolay V. Koldunov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Current Meter Observations on the Continental Slope at Two Sites in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current-meter observations obtained at two sites on the continental slope of the eastern Gulf of Mexico, at nominal positions of 29N, 88W (the Mobile site) and 27.5N, 85.5W (the Tampa site) are presented. Data were collected at three levels ...

Robert L. Molinari; Dennis A. Mayer

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

FallWinter Current Reversals on the TexasLouisiana Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fallwinter recurrence of current reversal from westward to eastward is identified on the TexasLouisiana continental shelf using the current-meter [TexasLouisiana Shelf Physical Oceanography Program (LATEX-A)] and near-surface drifting buoy [...

Peter P. Chu; Leonid M. Ivanov; Oleg V. Melnichenko

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Cooperation and Collaboration among the Nation's Meteorology, Oceanography, and Satellite Operational Processing Centers: An Evolving Era in U.S. Civilian-Military Partnerships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States has several meteorological, oceanographic, and satellite operational processing centers (OPCS) in the military and civilian sectors. Separate cooperative and complementary military and civilian OPCs provide sufficient redundancy ...

Robert J. Dumont; Cynthia A. Nelson; Donald G. Caviness; Carl D. Thormeyer; David L. Martin; John J. Pereira

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles Mark A. Delucchi 2008 Keywords: Oil importing cost Motor fuel social cost Energy security cost a b s t r a c t Analyses of the full social cost of motor vehicle use in the US often estimate an ``oil import premium'' that includes

Murphy, James J.

287

The Optimizing-Simulator: An Illustration Using the Military Airlift Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and WARREN B. POWELL Princeton University and ALAN WHISMAN Air Mobility Command Retired There have been two, optimizing-simulator ACM Reference Format: Wu, T. T., Powell, W. B., and Whisman, A. 2009. The optimizing-simulator: An illustration using the military airlift problem. ACM Trans. Model. Comput. Simul., 19, 3, Article 14 (June 2009

Powell, Warren B.

288

The future of components for high reliability military and space applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Military specified, ceramic packaged and radiation hardened components will disappear before the end of the century. The only long-term sustainable alternative may well be to use plastic packaged Commercial Components. The material in this report comes from the Defense Logistics Agency sponsored Plastic Package Availability Program and from an AT and T field reliability study. It summarizes Case Studies from companies which have been building and fielding highly reliable commercial and DOD military systems using plastic commercial components. Findings are, that when properly selected commercial components are operated within the true limitations of their design and packaging, they are as reliable as today`s Mil Spec components. Further, they offer cost, space and weight savings, shared manufacturing and field test experience with industry, and access to the most modern technology. Also reported are potential problems that may be encountered when using commercial components, their long term storage and use reliability characteristics, recommended design processes and supplier selection practices, commercial best business practices, and a semiconductor manufacturer`s view of the military`s switch to commercial plastic microcircuits.

Hanlon, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Component Information and Management Dept.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Applying advanced user models and input technologies to augment military simulation-based training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the current state of requirement specification for an initiative based tactics virtual training environment. The methodology for collecting requirements followed three concurrent processes of task analysis, simulated firearms specification, ... Keywords: agent-based combat modeling, exercises, military operations, requirements, simulation and modeling for acquisition, simulation/exercise integration, simulations in training, training, training (SMART), virtual training environment

Bruno Emond; Hlne Fournier; Jean-Franois Lapointe

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Puritan Military Justice: American War Crimes and the Global War on Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring Puritanical cultural habits in the 21st century American military, the following study focuses on U.S. Army courts-martial in the Global War on Terrorism. The study uses Emile Durkheim's original sociological interpretation of crime and deviance. That interpretation is linked with responsibility as described by Durkheim's follower Paul Fauconnet in Responsibility: A Study in Sociology ([1928] 1978) and with a new cultural reading of Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism ([1905] 1976). The study is an inductive, descriptive examination of the Puritanical aspects of American military culture based on its treatment of acts labeled as deviant and criminal in the Global War on Terrorism. Four sets of war crimes are included in the study: Abu Ghraib (which occurred in Iraq in 2004), Operation Iron Triangle (which occurred in Iraq in 2006), the Baghdad canal killings (which occurred in Iraq in 2007), and the Maywand District killings (which occurred in Afghanistan in 2010). My data include primary data collected through participation and observation as a consultant for courts-martial related to all the cases except Abu Ghraib. Records of trial, investigation reports, charge sheets, sworn statements, and other documentation are also included in the study as secondary data sources. The study illuminates how unconscious, Puritan cultural habits color and shape both military actions and their perceptions. I explore Puritanism and its influence on military law, responsibility, revenge, "magic" (in its sociological sense), and narcissism. The study concludes with observations and recommendations for changes in U.S. military law.

Lorenzo, Ronald

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Stabilized by Diabetes Drugs The rise in obesity in the United States parallels a dramatic increase in obesity-associated diseases, most notably type-2 diabetes. This disease is predicted to reach epidemic proportions in the next several decades (Zimmet et al 2001, Urek et al 2007). Thus, understanding the biochemical processes underlying type-2 diabetes and identifying new targets for therapeutic intervention are critical for national and world health. A drug of choice to treat type-II diabetes is pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) derivative originally thought to exert its effect through activation of the nuclear transcription factor PPARg. Recently, a novel protein target for pioglitazone was discovered and was called mitoNEET (Colca et al 2004). This protein is anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) (Wiley et al 2007). Contrary to predictions that this was a zinc-finger transcription factor we discovered that mitoNEET is a novel 2Fe-2S protein.

293

Incorporating Peptides in the Outer Coordination Sphere of Bio-inspired Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four new cyclic 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands have been prepared and used to synthesize [Ni(PPh2NR2)2]2+ complexes in which R is a mono- or dipeptide. These complexes represent a first step in developing an outer coordination sphere for this class of complexes that can mimic the outer coordination sphere of the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. Importantly, these complexes retain the electrocatalytic activity of the parent [Ni(PPh2NPh2)2]2+ complex in acetonitrile solution with turnover frequencies (TOF) for hydrogen production ranging from 14 to 25 s-1 in the presence of p-cyanoanilinium trifluoromethanesulphonic acid and 135-1000 s-1 in the presence of triflic acid salt of protonated dimethylformamide, with moderately low overpotentials, ~0.3 V. The addition of small amounts of water result in rate increases of 5-7 times. Unlike the parent complex, these complexes demonstrate dynamic structural transformations in solution whereby the dipeptide tail interacts with the nickel center. These results establish a building block from which larger peptide scaffolding can be added to allow the [Ni(PR2NR2)2]2+ molecular catalytic core to begin to mimic the multifunctional outer coordination sphere of enzymes. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Jain, Avijita; Lense, Sheri; Linehan, John C.; Raugei, Simone; Cho, Herman M.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

DETECTING THE RAPIDLY EXPANDING OUTER SHELL OF THE CRAB NEBULA: WHERE TO LOOK  

SciTech Connect

We present a range of steady-state photoionization simulations, corresponding to different assumed shell geometries and compositions, of the unseen postulated rapidly expanding outer shell to the Crab Nebula. The properties of the shell are constrained by the mass that must lie within it, and by limits to the intensities of hydrogen recombination lines. In all cases the photoionization models predict very strong emissions from high ionization lines that will not be emitted by the Crab's filaments, alleviating problems with detecting these lines in the presence of light scattered from brighter parts of the Crab. The near-NIR [Ne VI] {lambda}7.652 {mu}m line is a particularly good case; it should be dramatically brighter than the optical lines commonly used in searches. The C IV {lambda}1549 doublet is predicted to be the strongest absorption line from the shell, which is in agreement with Hubble Space Telescope observations. We show that the cooling timescale for the outer shell is much longer than the age of the Crab, due to the low density. This means that the temperature of the shell will actually ''remember'' its initial conditions. However, the recombination time is much shorter than the age of the Crab, so the predicted level of ionization should approximate the real ionization. In any case, it is clear that IR observations present the best opportunity to detect the outer shell and so guide future models that will constrain early events in the original explosion.

Wang Xiang; Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Baldwin, J. A.; Loh, E. D.; Richardson, C. T., E-mail: xiang.wang@uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Study of the B-Meson Lifetime and the Performance of the Outer Tracker at LHCb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research in the dissertation addresses two issues: the overall performance of the LHCb Outer Tracker (OT) detectors as shown during quality checks and beam tests; the study of the lifetimes of B+ and B0 mesons at LHCb. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva requires high performance detectors. One of the four major LHC experiments is the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment (LHCb). It is a dedicated B-physics experiment for precision measurements of CP violation in the B-meson system and for studying rare B decays. In order to efficiently reconstruct the trajectories of charged particles, LHCb is equipped with Outer Tracker (OT), consisting of gaseous straw tube detectors. The OT system comprises three stations each consisting of multiple layers of wires in vertical and non-vertical orientation. Basic unit of the stations is the OT module - a self-contained gas-detector unit filled with a counting gas mixture. The outer tracker module production was carefully monitored by variety of...

Vankov, P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figure 11. Petroleum Production and Consumption them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figure 11. Petroleum Production and Consumption Duquesne (now the site of Pittsburgh) set fire to an oil-slicked creek as part of a religious ceremony. As settlement by Europeans proceeded, oil' was discovered in many places in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York-to tile frequent dismay of the well-owners, who were drilling for salt brine./ >' Cons umption/ In the mid-1800s expanding uses for oil extracted from coal and shale began to hint at the value of rock oil and encouraged the search for readily accessible A Production supplies. This impetus launched the modem petroleum age, which began on a t 10 - Sunday afternoon in August 1859 at Oil Creek, near Titusville in northwestern-\

297

REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION, PRATT & WHITNEY MILITARY ENGINES, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION, PRATT & UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION, PRATT & WHITNEY MILITARY ENGINES, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FORE IGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER UT-BATTELLE, LLC SUBCONTRACT NO. 40001Q288 UNDER PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-000R22725; DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (D OE) WAIVER DOCKET W(A)201 0-051 [OR0-800] Uniteo Technolog ies , Pratt & Whitney Military Eng ines (Petitioner) has made a timely request for an advance wa iver to worldwide rights in Su bject Inventions made in the course of or under UT -Battelle , LLC Subcontract No. 400010288 entitled , and "Bulk Amorphous Alum inum Program" unde r UT -Battelle Prime Contract No . DE-AC05-000R22725 . The scope of work involves the production of eng ine components using a conventional powder metallurgy

298

Military Base Off-Taker Opportunities for Tribal Renewable Energy Projects  

SciTech Connect

This white paper surveys DOD installations that could have an increased potential interest in the purchase of energy from renewable energy projects on tribal lands. Identification of likely purchasers of renewable energy is a first step in the energy project development process, and this paper aims to identify likely electricity customers that tribal commercial-scale projects could serve. This white paper builds on a geospatial analysis completed in November 2012 identifying 53 reservations within 10 miles of military bases (DOE 2012). This analysis builds on those findings by further refining the list of potential opportunity sites to 15 reservations (Table ES-1), based on five additional factors: 1) The potential renewable resources required to meet the installation energy loads; 2) Proximity to transmission lines; 3) Military installation energy demand; 4) State electricity prices; 5) Local policy and regulatory environment.

Nangle, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The United States Military Assistance Advisory Group in French Indochina, 1950-1956  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the American Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG) sent to French Indochina, from 1950 to 1956, when the United States provided major monetary and material aid to the French in their war against the communist Viet Minh. MAAG observed French units in the field and monitored the flow of American materiel into the region. Relying upon primary research in the National Archives, the thesis departs from previous interpretations by showing that MAAG held generally positive assessments of France?s performance in Indochina. The thesis also argues that MAAG personnel were more interested in getting material support to the French, than in how that material was used, to the point of making unrealistic assessments of French combat abilities. By connecting primary research with the greater history of Cold War American military assistance, the thesis contributes to the scholarship on American involvement in Vietnam.

Weber, Nathaniel R.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lessons Learned from Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations Michael Callahan, Kate Anderson, Sam Booth, Jessica Katz, and Tim Tetreault Technical Report NREL/TP-7A40-51598 Revised September 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations Michael Callahan, Kate Anderson, Sam Booth, Jessica Katz, and Tim Tetreault

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Similarity of Deep Continental Cumulus Convection as Revealed by a Three-Dimensional Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud-resolving simulation of midlatitude continental convection during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program summer 1997 intensive observation period (IOP) is used to study the similarity of several second and ...

Marat F. Khairoutdinov; David A. Randall

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

On Intermediate Models for Barotropic Continental Shelf and Slope Flow Fields. Part I: Formulation and Comparison of Exact Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by the general objective of pursuing oceanographic process and data assimilation studies of the complex, nonlinear eddy and jet current fields observed over the continental shelf and slope off the west coast of the United States, we ...

J. S. Allen; J. A. Barth; P. A. Newberger

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Estimation of Climate Change Impact on Mean Annual Runoff across Continental Australia Using Budyko and Fu Equations and Hydrological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the climate change impact on mean annual runoff across continental Australia estimated using the Budyko and Fu equations informed by projections from 15 global climate models and compares the estimates with those from extensive ...

J. Teng; F. H. S. Chiew; J. Vaze; S. Marvanek; D. G. C. Kirono

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Horizontal Scales of Variability over the Middle Atlantic Bight Shelf Break and Continental Rise from Finescale Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations with fine horizontal resolution are used to identify the horizontal scales of variability over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf break and continental rise. Spray gliders collected observations along two alongshelf transects over ...

Robert E. Todd; Glen G. Gawarkiewicz; W. Brechner Owens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Influence of Time-Dependent Melting on the Dynamics and Precipitation Production in Maritime and Continental Storm Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of one maritime and four continental observed cases of deep convection are performed with the Hebrew University Cloud Model that has spectral bin microphysics. The maritime case is from observations made on 18 September 1974 during ...

Vaughan T. J. Phillips; Andrei Pokrovsky; Alexander Khain

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Structure and Generation of Turbulence at Interfaces Strained by Internal Solitary Waves Propagating Shoreward over the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed observations of the structure within internal solitary waves propagating shoreward over Oregon's continental shelf reveal the evolving nature of interfaces as they become unstable and break, creating turbulent flow. A persistent feature ...

J. N. Moum; D. M. Farmer; W. D. Smyth; L. Armi; S. Vagle

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Coastal Upwelling: OnshoreOffshore Circulation, Equatorward Coastal Jet and Poleward Undercurrent over a Continental Shelf-Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The onshore-offshore circulation, equatorward coastal jet and poleward undercurrent associated with coastal upwelling are studied with numerical models. The model ocean has a continental shelf-slope uniform in the longshort direction and is ...

Nobuo Suginohara

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Scale-Dependence of the Predictability of Precipitation from Continental Radar Images. Part I: Description of the Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lifetime of precipitation patterns in Eulerian and Lagrangian space derived from continental-scale radar images is used as a measure of predictability. A three-step procedure is proposed. First, the motion field of precipitation is determined ...

Urs Germann; Isztar Zawadzki

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Prediction of continental shelf sediment transport using a theoretical model of the wave-current boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an application of the Grant-Madsen-Glenn bottom boundary layer model (Grant and Madsen, 1979; Glenn and Grant, 1987) to predictions of sediment transport on the continental shelf. The analysis is a ...

Goud, Margaret R

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Influence of Ocean Surface Temperature Gradient and Continentality on the Walker Circulation. Part I: Prescribed Tropical Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coarse-mesh, global climate model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) has been used to assess the influence of ocean surface temperature (OST) gradient and continentality on the Walker circulation. The basic model ...

Robert M. Chervin; Leonard M. Druyan

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cross-shelf circulation and momentum and heat balances over the inner continental shelf near Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water circulation and evolution of water temperature over the inner continental shelf are investigated using observations of water velocity, temperature, density, and bottom pressure; surface gravity waves; wind stress; ...

Fewings, Melanie Rinn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Influence of an Offshore Shift in the Gulf Stream on Waters of the South Carolina Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 4.3-month-long dataset from moorings on the continental shelf off South Carolina during 1986 showed unusual midrecord shifts in bottom pressure, temperature, stratification, and alongshelf currents. The Gulf Stream moved farther offshore during ...

Dana K. Savidge; Jackson O. Blanton; Thomas N. Lee; Robert H. Evans

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Bayesian Inference and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling to Reconstruct a Contaminant Source on a Continental Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology combining Bayesian inference with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling is applied to a real accidental radioactive release that occurred on a continental scale at the end of May 1998 near Algeciras, Spain. The source parameters (...

Luca Delle Monache; Julie K. Lundquist; Branko Kosovi?; Gardar Johannesson; Kathleen M. Dyer; Roger D. Aines; Fotini K. Chow; Rich D. Belles; William G. Hanley; Shawn C. Larsen; Gwen A. Loosmore; John J. Nitao; Gayle A. Sugiyama; Philip J. Vogt

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Identifying and estimating the distributional effects of unionization and the long-term consequences of military service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the economic consequences for individuals of two important U.S. labor market institutions: unionization and the military draft. The first chapter develops an econometric procedure for estimating ...

Frandsen, Brigham R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Unit Social Cohesion in the Israeli Military as a Case Study of Dont Ask, Dont Tell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an Israeli military unit. Oxford, UK: Berghahn Books.group cohesion in U.S. Army units. Basic and Applied Socialand war in Israeli combat units. New York: Haworth Press.

Kaplan, Danny; Rosenmann, Amir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Partners in Freedom: Contributions of the Langley Research Center to U.S. Military Aircraft of the 1990''s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Established in 1917 as the nation''s first civil aeronautics research laboratory under the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), Langley was a small laboratory that solved the problems of flight for military and civil aviation. Throughout ...

Chambers Joseph R.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

On the application of IAEA safeguards to plutonium and highly enriched uranium from military inventories  

SciTech Connect

Progress toward the reduction of nuclear arsenals may render surplus hundreds of tonnes of plutonium and highly enriched uranium by the end of the century. None of the acknowledged nuclear weapon states (NWS) is under a specific obligation to submit surplus military inventories to international control. However, inviting the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to apply safeguards to the plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) released from military use could contribute to building confidence as part of the reductions currently envisaged and could encourage further steps within the states currently planning reductions or by other NWS. If invited, specific arrangements for the application of IAEA safeguards to plutonium and highly enriched uranium from military inventories would be determined by: the institutional provisions adopted; the specified verification requirements; the amounts and forms of plutonium and HEU and the types of facilities to be safeguarded; facility-specific features for the control and accounting of the plutonium and HEU; and the number of facilities where safeguards will be applied. These considerations would be used to establish the most appropriate verificiation arrangements, including the technology to be employed and inspection scheduling arrangements, to provide effective and efficient safeguards. If an invitation is made, the IAEA Board of Governors must approve of the obligations and commitments of the states involved and of the financial arrangements that will ensure the safeguards can be implemented as agreed. 2 tabs.

Shea, T.E. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse, Vienna (Austria))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A versatile simulation tool for the design and verification of military vehicle power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of the electric platform in military vehicles requires the ability to determine the best combination of power system components that support the desired operational abilities, while minimizing the size, weight, cost, and impact of the overall power system. Because prototypes are both time consuming, rigid, and costly, they have become inadequate for verifying system performance. By using simulations, engineers can best plan for and observe the associations between missions (including modes of operation and system scenarios) and system performance in a dynamic, realistic environment. This thesis proposes a new tool to analyze and design military vehicle platforms: the Advanced Mobile Integrated Power System (AMPS). This tool is useful for design and design verification of military vehicles due to its unique incorporation of mission-specific functionality. It allows the user ease of design with the ability to customize the vehicle power system architecture and components, while permitting full control over source and load input parameters. Simulation of programmed mission sequences allows the user to ensure that the chosen vehicle architecture can provide all of the electrical power and energy needed to support the mission, thus providing adequate design verification. The present thesis includes an introduction to vehicle power systems and an outline of the need for simulation, a description of the AMPS project and vehicle specifications, analytical and numerical models of the simulated vehicle, explanation of the power management system, description of the graphical user interface, and a simulation performed with the AMPS tool.

Lipscomb, Melissa Anne

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Legal-Military Dilemma in the Response to International Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, the US appears to have responded inconsistently to similar acts of terrorism in two different ways, using either a law enforcement or military response. These legal and military responses can be either unilateral or multilateral. This study attempts to determine when each type of response is preferred by decisionmakers, both political leaders and their citizens. The hypotheses suggesting that a response is preferred depending upon terrorist attack success, location, and the terrorists' sociocultural similarities are tested in three experiments and examined in a case study. These three variables are believed, as suggested by the Cognitive Calculus concept, to cause an emotional reaction amongst the respondents resulting in them having a higher preference for the military and unilateral options. Whether or not the respondents were experiencing an emotional reaction was studied in each experiment as well as being tested in the third experiment by examining the respondents? selection of options based upon their success rates. The case study examined US government responses to the First World Trade Center bombing, the Bojinka Plot, the Khobar Towers bombing, and the September 11, 2001 attacks. The results of the experiments and case study suggest a calm and deliberative response by the respondents to acts of terrorism, with a greater preference for legal and multilateral responses to terrorism.

Allan, Matthew W.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Role of military scientists and engineers in space (1980-2000)  

SciTech Connect

The Space Transportation System provides military scientists and engineers exciting new capabilities to conduct a variety of pioneering experiments on orbit, taking unique advantage of the space environment itself or observing the planet firsthand from the vantage point of space. The reusable Shuttle/Spacelab configuration permits a more effective use of the human and material resources being committed to the space program in the next decade, and ensures the presence of man in space on a routine basis. However, full-scale exploitation of space for national defense will depend to a great extent on the skillful and successful utilization of the military payload specialists, who will fly and operate various Shuttle-based DoD experiments. This paper explores the doctrine, role, function, and training requirements for DoD payload specialists. The unique advantage of man-in-the-loop activities and the orbiting military scientist conducting experiments in situ is addressed in light of previous US manned space flight experience and the projected capabilities of the Shuttle. 4 figures.

Angelo, J.A. Jr

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Acting alone: U.S. unilateral uses of force, military revolutions, and hegemonic stability theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The premise of this dissertation is straight-forward the U.S., as hegemon, acts unilaterally given the power disparity between it and the rest of the world. In solving the puzzle of why presidents make the wrong decision to act alone, I organize international conflict literature along traditional lines international and domestic explanations and use Gilpins (1981) hegemonic stability theory to test a theory of unilateral use of force decision making. In order to overcome a lack of scientific study on unilateralism, I devise a definition and coding rules for unilateral use of force, develop a sequential model of presidential use of force decision making, and construct a new, alternative measure of military power, a Composite Indicator of Military Revolutions (CIMR). I then use three methods a statistical test with a heckman probit model, an experiment, and case studies to test U.S. crisis behavior since 1937. I find that presidents are realists and make an expected utility calculation to act unilaterally or multilaterally after their decision to use force. The unilateral decision, in particular, positively correlates with a wide military gap vis--vis an opponent, an opponent located in the Western hemisphere, and a national security threat.

Podliska, Bradley Florian

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Acculturation and Transformation among Female Immigrant Military Spouses in an ESL Learning Program at a Community College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was designed to explore the acculturation experiences of military-related immigrant wives enrolled in an ESL program in a selected community college. More specifically, the purpose of the study was to understand the personal and structural forces that facilitated or hindered their acculturation process into their community of residence and whether their participation and retention in ESL classes contributed to their acculturation. Using a qualitative design with the basic interpretive paradigm, data collection consisted of face-to-face interviews with 14 immigrant military wives from 10 differing countries who were either enrolled or had been enrolled in a community college ESL program. The site chosen served a multicultural population of military spouses who enrolled in educational programs that offered English language development. The nearest ESL program, located at a community college near the military base, became an information-rich site for the study. The findings from the study highlighted the role of English language as an essential element to adjustment into the society of the United States for military immigrant wives, leading to acculturation and subsequently personal transformation. The data revealed both external and internal forces that influenced the acculturation process. External (structural) forces included community, workforce, the military, and an educational institution. The secondary forces included racial discrimination, cultural differences, and social networks within the community. Internal forces included love and care and self-efficacy. Self-efficacy was manifested through their persistence, patience, and resilience.

Darnell, Patricia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Apparatus and methods for installing, removing and adjusting an inner turbine shell section relative to an outer turbine shell section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine includes upper and lower inner shell sections mounting the nozzles and shrouds and which inner shell is supported by pins secured to a surrounding outer shell. To disassemble the turbine for access to the inner shell sections and rotor, an alignment fixture is secured to the lower outer shell section and has pins engaging the inner shell section. To disassemble the turbine, the inner shell weight is transferred to the lower outer shell section via the alignment fixture and cradle pins. Roller assemblies are inserted through access openings vacated by support pins to permit rotation of the lower inner shell section out of and into the lower outer shell section during disassembly and assembly. The alignment fixture includes adjusting rods for adjusting the inner shell axially, vertically, laterally and about a lateral axis. A roller over-cage is provided to rotate the inner shell and a dummy shell to facilitate assembly and disassembly in the field.

Leach, David (Niskayuna, NY); Bergendahl, Peter Allen (Scotia, NY); Waldo, Stuart Forrest (Salem, NC); Smith, Robert Leroy (Milford, OH); Phelps, Robert Kim (Milford, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The use of stellar occultations to study the figures and atmospheres of small bodies in the outer solar system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The methods of analyzing stellar occultations by small bodies in the outer solar system are discussed with examples from Triton, Pluto, and Charon. Simulations were performed characterizing the analysis of multi-chord ...

Person, Michael James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

Radioisotope electric propulsion of sciencecraft to the outer solar system and near-interstellar space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent results are presented in the study of radioisotope electric propulsion as a near-term technology for sending small robotic sciencecraft to the outer Solar System and near-interstellar space. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. Powerplant specific masses are expected to be in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW of thrust power. Planetary rendezvous missions to Pluto, fast missions to the heliopause (100 AU) with the capability to decelerate an orbiter for an extended science program and prestellar missions to the first gravitational lens focus of the Sun (550 AU) are investigated.

Noble, R.J.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS. II. PREDICTIONS FOR OUTER EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

We develop an idealized dynamical model to predict the typical properties of outer extrasolar planetary systems, at radii comparable to the Jupiter-to-Neptune region of the solar system. The model is based upon the hypothesis that dynamical evolution in outer planetary systems is controlled by a combination of planet-planet scattering and planetary interactions with an exterior disk of small bodies ('planetesimals'). Our results are based on 5000 long duration N-body simulations that follow the evolution of three planets from a few to 10 AU, together with a planetesimal disk containing 50 M{sub +} from 10 to 20 AU. For large planet masses (M {approx}> M{sub Sat}), the model recovers the observed eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. For lower-mass planets, the range of outcomes in models with disks is far greater than that which is seen in isolated planet-planet scattering. Common outcomes include strong scattering among massive planets, sudden jumps in eccentricity due to resonance crossings driven by divergent migration, and re-circularization of scattered low-mass planets in the outer disk. We present the distributions of the eccentricity and inclination that result, and discuss how they vary with planet mass and initial system architecture. In agreement with other studies, we find that the currently observed eccentricity distribution (derived primarily from planets at a {approx}< 3 AU) is consistent with isolated planet-planet scattering. We explain the observed mass dependence-which is in the opposite sense from that predicted by the simplest scattering models-as a consequence of strong correlations between planet masses in the same system. At somewhat larger radii, initial planetary mass correlations and disk effects can yield similar modest changes to the eccentricity distribution. Nonetheless, strong damping of eccentricity for low-mass planets at large radii appears to be a secure signature of the dynamical influence of disks. Radial velocity measurements capable of detecting planets with K {approx} 5 m s{sup -1} and periods in excess of 10 years will provide constraints on this regime. Finally, we present an analysis of the predicted separation of planets in two-planet systems, and of the population of planets in mean-motion resonances (MMRs). We show that, if there are systems with {approx} Jupiter-mass planets that avoid close encounters, the planetesimal disk acts as a damping mechanism and populates MMRs at a very high rate (50%-80%). In many cases, resonant chains (in particular the 4:2:1 Laplace resonance) are set up among all three planets. We expect such resonant chains to be common among massive planets in outer planetary systems.

Raymond, Sean N. [Universite de Bordeaux, Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l'Univers, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France); Armitage, Philip J. [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Gorelick, Noel, E-mail: pja@jilau1.colorado.ed [Google, Inc., 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Segmentation of the Outer Contact on P-Type Coaxial Germanium Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Germanium detector arrays are needed for low-level counting facilities. The practical applications of such user facilities include characterization of low-level radioactive samples. In addition, the same detector arrays can also perform important fundamental physics measurements including the search for rare events like neutrino-less double-beta decay. Coaxial germanium detectors having segmented outer contacts will provide the next level of sensitivity improvement in low background measurements. The segmented outer detector contact allows performance of advanced pulse shape analysis measurements that provide additional background reduction. Currently, n-type (reverse electrode) germanium coaxial detectors are used whenever a segmented coaxial detector is needed because the outer boron (electron barrier) contact is thin and can be segmented. Coaxial detectors fabricated from p-type germanium cost less, have better resolution, and are larger than n-type coaxial detectors. However, it is difficult to reliably segment p-type coaxial detectors because thick (~1 mm) lithium-diffused (hole barrier) contacts are the standard outside contact for p-type coaxial detectors. During this Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) we have researched the possibility of using amorphous germanium contacts as a thin outer contact of p-type coaxial detectors that can be segmented. We have developed amorphous germanium contacts that provide a very high hole barrier on small planar detectors. These easily segmented amorphous germanium contacts have been demonstrated to withstand several thousand volts/cm electric fields with no measurable leakage current (<1 pA) from charge injection over the hole barrier. We have also demonstrated that the contact can be sputter deposited around and over the curved outside surface of a small p-type coaxial detector. The amorphous contact has shown good rectification properties on the outside of a small p-type coaxial detector. These encouraging results are the first fundamental steps toward demonstrating the viability of the amorphous germanium contacts for much larger segmented p-type coaxial detectors. Large segmented p-type coaxial detectors based on this technology could serve as the gamma-ray spectrometers on instruments such as the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA). These detectors will provide a more sensitive, lower background measurement than currently available unsegmented p-type coaxial detectors.

Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Evolving Magnetic Scales of the Outer Solar Atmosphere and Their Potential Impact on Heliospheric Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of turbulent phenomena in the outer solar atmosphere is a given. However, because we are reduced to remotely sensing the atmosphere of a star with instruments of limited spatial and/or spectral resolution, we can only infer the physical progression from macroscopic to microscopic phenomena. Even so, we know that many, if not all, of the turbulent phenomena that pervade interplanetary space have physical origins at the Sun and so in this brief article we consider some recent measurements which point to sustained potential source(s) of heliospheric turbulence in the magnetic and thermal domains. In particular, we look at the scales of magnetism that are imprinted on the outer solar atmosphere by the relentless magneto-convection of the solar interior and combine state-of-the-art observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) which are beginning to hint at the origins of the wave/plasma interplay prevalent closer to the Earth. While linking th...

McIntosh, Scott W; Threlfall, James; De Moortel, Ineke; Leamon, Robert J; Tian, Hui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

INSTABILITY-DRIVEN DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL OF A PRIMORDIALLY FIVE-PLANET OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Over the last decade, evidence has mounted that the solar system's observed state can be favorably reproduced in the context of an instability-driven dynamical evolution model, such as the 'Nice' model. To date, all successful realizations of instability models have concentrated on evolving the four giant planets onto their current orbits from a more compact configuration. Simultaneously, the possibility of forming and ejecting additional planets has been discussed, but never successfully implemented. Here we show that a large array of five-planet (two gas giants + three ice giants) multi-resonant initial states can lead to an adequate formation of the outer solar system, featuring an ejection of an ice giant during a phase of instability. Particularly, our simulations demonstrate that the eigenmodes that characterize the outer solar system's secular dynamics can be closely matched with a five-planet model. Furthermore, provided that the ejection timescale of the extra planet is short, orbital excitation of a primordial cold classical Kuiper Belt can also be avoided in this scenario. Thus, the solar system is one of many possible outcomes of dynamical relaxation and can originate from a wide variety of initial states. This deems the construction of a unique model of solar system's early dynamical evolution impossible.

Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Betts, Hayden, E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu [Polytechnic School, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Roles of Outer Membrane Cytochromes of Shewanella and Geobacter in Extracellular Electron Transfer  

SciTech Connect

As key components of the electron transfer (ET) pathways used for dissimilatory reduction of solid iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(IV)] (hydr)oxides, outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and OmcE and OmcS of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediate ET reactions extracellularly. Cell surface-exposed MtrC and OmcA can transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. S. oneidensis MR-1 cells also secrete flavins that can facilitate ET to the oxides. The secreted flavins are thought to serve either as chelators that form soluble Fe(III)/Mn(IV)-flavin complexes or as electron shuttles that ferry the electrons from cell-associated ET proteins to the metal oxides. Cell-surface localization may also permit MtrC and OmcA to transfer electrons extracellularly to either flavin-chelated Fe(III)/Mn(IV) or oxidized flavins. OmcE and OmcS are proposed to be located on the Geobacter cell surface where they are believed to function as the intermediates to relay electrons to type IV pili, which are then hypothesized to transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. Thus, cell surface-localization positions these outer membrane cytochromes to transfer electrons to Fe(III)/Mn(IV) oxides external to the bacterial cells either directly, indirectly, or both, demonstrating a common strategy shared by Shewanella and Geobacter for extracellular reduction of the oxides.

Shi, Liang; Richardson, David; Wang, Zheming; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Outer-zone electron precipitation produced by a vlf transmitter. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

Using high-resolution pitch-angle measurements made by a magnetic-focusing electron spectrometer on the S3-3 satellite while in the drift-loss-cone region of the magnetosphere, characteristics of fluxes of 108 to 654-keV electrons precipitated in the inner zone, in the slot region, and in the outer zone of the magnetosphere are all shown to be consistent with the precipitation having been produced by the same ground-based VLF transmitter, UMS. Pitch angle measurements are used to locate the longitude of precipitation. The temporal pattern of transmitter operation obtained from synoptic data from a ground-based VLF receiver is used along with drift-rate calculations to predict the electron energies as a function of L-shell which should be observable by the S3-3 instrument. The predicted energy response is then compared with the in-situ observations, getting complete agreement. Finally, wave-particle resonance calculations are made for each of the three regions. The study indicates that ground-based VLF transmitters, which have previously been shown to produce precipitation in the inner zone and slot regions, are almost certainly instrumental in precipitating electrons in the outer zone also.

Vampola, A.L.; Adams, C.D.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

An outer gap model of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a refined calculation of high energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars based on the Outer Gap model of Cheng, Ho \\&~Ruderman (1986a,b). We have improved upon previous efforts to model the spectra from these pulsars (e. g. Cheng, et al. 1986b; Ho 1989) by following the variation in particle production and radiation properties with position in the outer gap. Curvature, synchrotron and inverse-Compton scattering fluxes vary significantly over the gap and their interactions {\\it via} photon-photon pair production build up the radiating charge populations at varying rates. We have also incorporated an approximate treatment of the transport of particle and photon fluxes between gap emission zones. These effects, along with improved computations of the particle and photon distributions, provide very important modifications of the model gamma-ray flux. In particular, we attempt to make specific predictions of pulse profile shapes and spectral variations as a function of pulse phase and suggest fu...

Chiang, J

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 3. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The Point is an area that supports a most productive pelagic fishery, including tuna, swordfish, marlin, and more. The objective of the study is to analyze video tapes from near the Point, in order to provide data on epibenthic, megafaunal invertebrates including species composition, relative abundances, and large scale (1 km) distribution. The Point is not a defined spot on a chart. Although fishermen do use the steep shelf break for location, they generally look for the west wall of the Gulf Stream. The Point and the oil lease site coincidentally occur where the Gulf Stream parts the continental slope, just north of the eastern-most tip of Cape Hatteras.

Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Military installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has reviewed the use of U.S. coal at DOD installations in West Germany. DOD reported that between April 1, 1988, and December 31, 1988, it had between 306,000 and 419,000 tons of U.S. coal stored in Germany. About two-thirds of that was anthracite coal. GAO visited six coal-handling locations that accounted for 72 to 79 percent of the total U.S. coal between April and December 1988. This report could not verify the official inventory records at five locations - two Air Force and three Army - for several reasons, including a lack of required physical inventories of coal for recent years. DOD's coal consumption data for fiscal year 1988 appeared to be accurate since it matched the data reported on source documents maintained at the installations and their commands. According to reported DOD coal inventory and consumption data, as of September 30, 1988, DOD had enough anthracite coal on hand to satisfy projected demands through at least fiscal year 1993, given that no additional heating plant conversions other than those already approved occur and no additional shipments of coal occur. DOD said that as of September 30, 1988, it facilities in Germany had enough anthracite coal on hand to last a minimum of five years.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

SUBJECT: Manual of Military Decorations and Awards: General Information, Medal of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. Manual. In accordance with the authority in DoD Directive 5124.02 (Reference (a)) and the guidance in DoD Instruction (DoDI) 1348.33 (Reference (b)), this Manual implements the DoD Military Awards Program policies and procedures. b. Volume. This Volume: (1) Provides procedures for preparation and submittal of: recommendations for the Medal of Honor (MOH) and Defense/Joint decorations and awards; out-of-Service requests for awards; lost award recommendations; posthumous awards; award replacement; and reconsideration of award recommendations. (2) Provides detailed information regarding DoD MOH criteria. (3) Provides detailed information regarding Defense/Joint decorations and awards,

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

STUDY OF REMOTE MILITARY POWER APPLICATIONS. REPORT NO. 12. EVALUATION AND SELECTION OF APPLICABLE REACTOR CONCEPTS  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the reactor concepts under consideration for remote military power plants is presented. The concepts include water-cooled and - moderated reactors, both direct and indirect cycle. organic-cooled and -moderated reactors, heavy-water-cooled and -moderated reactors. gas-cooled reactors, sodium- cooled graphite-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and fluid-fuel reactors. The limitations and advantages, technological status, economics, and future potential of each reactor are reviewed. From the reviews it is concluded that direct-cycle boiling-water and pressurized-water reactors are most suitable for applications requiring power before 1965. (C.J.G.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

NONE

1991-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Fighting For the Nation: Military Service, Popular Political Mobilization and the Creation of Modern Puerto Rican National Identities: 1868-1952.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project explores the military and political mobilization of rural and urban working sectors of Puerto Rican society as the Island transitioned from Spanish to (more)

Franqui, Harry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A probabilistic tornado wind hazard model for the continental United States  

SciTech Connect

A probabilistic tornado wind hazard model for the continental United States (CONUS) is described. The model incorporates both aleatory (random) and epistemic uncertainties associated with quantifying the tornado wind hazard parameters. The temporal occurrences of tornadoes within the continental United States (CONUS) is assumed to be a Poisson process. A spatial distribution of tornado touchdown locations is developed empirically based on the observed historical events within the CONUS. The hazard model is an aerial probability model that takes into consideration the size and orientation of the facility, the length and width of the tornado damage area (idealized as a rectangle and dependent on the tornado intensity scale), wind speed variation within the damage area, tornado intensity classification errors (i.e.,errors in assigning a Fujita intensity scale based on surveyed damage), and the tornado path direction. Epistemic uncertainties in describing the distributions of the aleatory variables are accounted for by using more than one distribution model to describe aleatory variations. The epistemic uncertainties are based on inputs from a panel of experts. A computer program, TORNADO, has been developed incorporating this model; features of this program are also presented.

Hossain, Q; Kimball, J; Mensing, R; Savy, J

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Non-binding conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a non-binding transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement and for moving without binding along corrugations of any slope less than vertical. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed parallel to the motion of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

General and Localized Corrosion of Outer Barrier of High-Level Waste Container in Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As described in the License Application Design Selection Report, the recommended waste, package design is Engineering Design Alternative II (CRWMS M&O 1999). This design includes a double-wall waste package (WP) underneath a protective drip shield (DS). purpose and scope of the process-level model described here is to account for both general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB), which assumed to be Alloy 22 (UNS N06022-21Cr-13Mo-4Fe-3W-2C-Ni) (ASTM 1997a). This model will include several sub-models, which will account for dry oxidation (DOX), humid air corrosion (HAC), general corrosion (GC) in the aqueous phase, and localized corrosion (LC) the aqueous phase. This model serves as a feed to the waste package degradation (WAPDEG) code for performance, assessment.

Farmer, J.; McCright, D.; Gdowski, G.; Wang, F.; Summers, T.; Bedrossian, P.; Horn, J.; Lian, T.; Estill, J.; Lingenfelter, A.; Halsey, W.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Using Cepheids to determine the galactic abundance gradient. III.First results for the outer disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a continuation of our previous work, which concerned the radial abundance distribution in the galactic disc over the distances 4-10 kpc this paper presents the first results on the metallicicty in the outer disc (RG > 10 kpc). Based on high-resolution spectra obtained for 19 distant Cepheids we sampled galactocentric distances from 10 to 12 kpc. Combined with the results of our previous work on the inner and middle parts of the galactic disc, the present data enable one to study the structure of the radial abundance distribution over a large baseline. In particular, we find indications of a discontinuity in the radial abundance distribution for iron as well as a number of the other elements. The discontinuity is seen at a galactocentric distance RG = 10 kpc. This finding supports the results reported earlier by Twarog et al. (1997).

S. M. Andrievsky; V. V. Kovtyukh; R. E. Luck; J. R. D. Lepine; W. J. Maciel; Yu. V. Beletsky

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

Preliminary assessment report for Florence Military Reservation, Installation 04080, Florence, Arizona. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Arizona Army National Guard property near Florence, Arizona. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. Florence Military Reservation is a 5,655-acre site located in the southern portion of Arizona, about 65 mi southeast of Phoenix, in the county of Pinal. Florence Military Reservation includes Unit Training Equipment Site (UTES) 1, an artillery firing range, and ammunition storage. The subject of this PA is the UTES. The environmentally significant operations associated with the UTES property are (1) vehicle maintenance and refueling, (2) supply/storage of materials, and (3) the vehicle washrack.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Emissions characteristics of Military Helicopter Engines Fueled with JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in aviation activities and more stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations have increased concerns regarding aircraft emissions, due to their harmful health and environmental impacts, especially in the vicinity of airports and military bases. In this study, the gaseous and particulate-matter emissions of two General Electric T701C engines and one T700 engine were evaluated. The T700 series engines power the U.S. Army's Black Hawk and Apache helicopters. The engines were fueled with standard military JP-8 fuel and were tested at three power settings. In addition, one of the T701C engines was operated on a natural-gas-derived Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene jet fuel. Test results show that the T701C engine emits significantly lower particulate-matter emissions than the T700 for all conditions tested. Particulate-matter mass emission indices ranged from 0.2-1.4 g/kg fuel for the T700 and 0.2-0.6 g/kg fuel for the T701C. Slightly higher NOx and lower CO emissions were observed for the T701C compared with the T700. Operation of the T701C with the Fischer-Tropsch fuel rendered dramatic reductions in soot emissions relative to operation on JP-8, due primarily to the lack of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuel. The Fischer-Tropsch fuel also produced smaller particles and slight reductions in CO emissions.

Corporan, E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; DeWitt, M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Klingshirn, Christopher D [ORNL; Striebich, Richard [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Use of non-petroleum fuels to reduce military energy vulnerabilities: self-sufficient bases and new weapon propulsion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US fossil synfuels program may not have significant impact on domestic fuel supplies until near the year 2000, resulting in a continuing mobility fuels vulnerability for the US military until then. But there are other mobility fuel options for both propulsion systems and stationary base-energy sources, for which the base technology is commercially available or at least demonstrated. For example, for surface propulsion systems, hydrogen-fuel-cell/battery-electric hybrids may be considered; for weapons systems these may offer some new flexibilities, standardization possibilities, and multiple military-controlled fuel-supply options. Hydrogen-fueled aircraft may provide interesting longer-term possibilities in terms of military energy self-sufficiency and multiple supply options, as well as performance specifications. These scenarios will be discussed, along with possibilities for demonstrations in the MX-system ground vehicles.

Freiwald, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Apparatus and methods for relieving thermally induced stresses in inner and outer bands of thermally cooled turbine nozzle stages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To control the temperature mismatch between the inner and outer bands and covers forming plenums with the inner and outer bands on sides thereof remote from the hot gas path, passages extend from the leading edge of the covers in communication with the hot gases of combustion to the trailing edge of the covers in communication with the hot gas flowpath. A mixing chamber is provided in each passage in communication with compressor discharge air for mixing the hot gases of combustion and compressor discharge air for flow through the passage, thereby heating the cover and minimizing the temperature differential between the inner and outer bands and their respective covers. The passages are particularly useful adjacent the welded or brazed joints between the covers and inner band portions.

Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Guilderland, NY); Itzel, Gary Michael (Clifton Park, NY); Correia, Victor H. S. (Milton Mills, NH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

Shaocheng Xie; Renata McCoy; Yunyan Zhang

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

Determinants of alternative fuel vehicle choice in the continental United States.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the ongoing investigation into the determinants of alternative fuel vehicle choice. A stated preference vehicle choice survey was conducted for the 47 of the continental U.S. states, excluding California. The national survey is based on and is an extension of previous studies on alternative fuel vehicle choice for the State of California conducted by the University of California's Institute of Transportation Studies (UC ITS). Researchers at UC ITS have used the stated-preference national survey to produce a series of estimates for new vehicle choice models. Three of these models are presented in this paper. The first two of the models were estimated using only the data from the national survey. The third model presented in this paper pools information from the national and California surveys to estimate a true national model for new vehicle choice.

Tompkins, M.

1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

Shaocheng Xie; Renata McCoy; Yunyan Zhang

353

Epibenthic invertebrates and fishes of the continental shelf of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from 34 epibenthic trawls were made on the continental shelf of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico between depths 13 and 400 meters. These took 6,468 individuals belonging to 251 species of demersal fishes and invertebrates, with a mean number of 287 individuals per hectare. The average biomass for all the assemblages was 294 mg/m2 (0.294 g/m2), and the average diversity (H') was 2.0. Hypoxic conditions were not found during the investigation. There was no correlation found between the number of species and depth. Biomass and diversity were not statistically significant between nearshore and offshore. A relatively high number of species were collected from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico compared with the northeastern Gulf; in addition, northwestern Gulf diversity lies between stable tropical shelves and those in temperate latitudes. Evaluation of the percentage similarity indices between stations showed low similarity among the assemblages.

Al-Jabr, Abdulrahman Mohammad

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Feasibility of Partial ZrO[subscript 2] Coatings on Outer Surface of Annular UO[subscript 2] Pellets to Control Gap Conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The viability of depositing a thin porous coating of zirconia on the outer surface of an annular UO[subscript 2] pellet

Feinroth, H.

355

The Formation and Maintenance of Density Fronts on the U.S. Southeastern Continental Shelf during Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density fronts on the U.S. southeastern continental shelf, during winter, am formed by (i) breakdown of the shelf-break front by Gulf Stream meanders or strong southward winds or both, (ii) shoreward intrusion of upper Gulf Stream warm water by ...

Lie-Yauw Oey

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Seabed Stresses in Combined Wave and Steady Flow Conditions on the Nova Scotia Continental Shelf: Field Measurements and Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tripod holding electromagnetic flowmeters at two heights within 1 m above the seabed has been deployed at two shallow sites (25 and 45 m depths) on the continental shelf off Nova Scotia, Canada. Wave flows are comparable with the small mean ...

D. A. Huntley; D. G. Hazen

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

North American Climate in CMIP5 Experiments. Part I: Evaluation of Historical Simulations of Continental and Regional Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first part of a three-part paper on North American climate in CMIP5 that evaluates the historical simulations of continental and regional climatology with a focus on a core set of seventeen models. We evaluate the models for a set of ...

Justin Sheffield; Andrew Barrett; Brian Colle; D. Nelun Fernando; Rong Fu; Kerrie L. Geil; Qi Hu; Jim Kinter; Sanjiv Kumar; Baird Langenbrunner; Kelly Lombardo; Lindsey N. Long; Eric Maloney; Annarita Mariotti; Joyce E. Meyerson; Kingtse C. Mo; J. David Neelin; Sumant Nigam; Zaitao Pan; Tong Ren; Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas; Yolande L. Serra; Anji Seth; Jeanne M. Thibeault; Julienne C. Stroeve; Ze Yang; Lei Yin

358

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations (Presentation), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations NDIA Joint Service Power Expo Mike Simpson Mike.Simpson@NREL.gov 5 May 2011 NREL/PR-5400-51519 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Agenda 2 1. NREL Transportation Research 2. Net Zero Energy Installations (NZEI) 3. Fort Carson as a Case Study - Vehicles On-Site - Utility Operations - Vehicle Charge Management 4. Full Fleet Simulation 5. Continuing Work NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY NREL is the only national laboratory solely dedicated to advancing renewable energy and energy efficiency. Our employees are committed to building a cleaner, sustainable world. Photo Credits: NREL 3 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY What is Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI)? 4 Cross Cutting Enablers Grid / Renewables

359

A shared data environment for the Military Traffic Management Command Directorate of International Traffic  

SciTech Connect

In September 1991, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed tasking to assist the Military Traffic Management Command Directorate of International Traffic (MTIT) in the analysis of a potential Shared Data Environment (SDE) for MTIT automated cargo traffic systems. This analysis was a preliminary effort with emphasis on documentation of requirements, examination of design alternatives, and identification of specific MTIT systems' data sharing problems. This report records the results of the ORNL analysis. The SDE envisioned by ORNL at this point in the analysis is not merely a repository of information; it is also a system that allows processing of distributed data. To provide high-level access to and control over international cargo processes, ORNL recommends a loosely coupled, replicated database design with high-speed communications among all sites.

Russell, D.L.; Wheeler, V.V. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Truett, L.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A shared data environment for the Military Traffic Management Command Directorate of International Traffic  

SciTech Connect

In September 1991, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed tasking to assist the Military Traffic Management Command Directorate of International Traffic (MTIT) in the analysis of a potential Shared Data Environment (SDE) for MTIT automated cargo traffic systems. This analysis was a preliminary effort with emphasis on documentation of requirements, examination of design alternatives, and identification of specific MTIT systems` data sharing problems. This report records the results of the ORNL analysis. The SDE envisioned by ORNL at this point in the analysis is not merely a repository of information; it is also a system that allows processing of distributed data. To provide high-level access to and control over international cargo processes, ORNL recommends a loosely coupled, replicated database design with high-speed communications among all sites.

Russell, D.L.; Wheeler, V.V. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Truett, L.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ANUDISflM-37 SMART BRIDGE: A TOOL FOR ESTIMATING THE MILITARY LOAD CLASSIFICATION OF BRIDGES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ANUDISflM-37 ANUDISflM-37 SMART BRIDGE: A TOOL FOR ESTIMATING THE MILITARY LOAD CLASSIFICATION OF BRIDGES USING VARYING LEVELS OF INFORMATION Decision and Information Sciences Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government, and operated by the University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memo is a product of Argonne's Decision and Information Sciences (DE) Division. For information on the division's scientific and engineering activities, contact: Director, Decision and Information

362

A multi-agent architecture for modelling and simulation of small military unit combat in asymmetric warfare  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's armed forces, which have a new perspective of combat, are trying to use high-end technologies to improve their capabilities especially in combat and asymmetric warfare. Complexity is the real word to define the future war environment, which will ... Keywords: Agent-based architecture, Asymmetric warfare, Complex adaptive system, Military decision making

Ibrahim Cil; Murat Mala

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Linear modeling and simulation of low-voltage electric system for single-point vulnerability assessment of military installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the formulation and development of a linear model to support the single-point vulnerability assessment of electric distribution systems at existing and future U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) military sites. The model uses flow sensitivity ...

Edgar C. Portante; Thomas N. Taxon; James A. Kavicky; Tarek Abdallah; Timothy K. Perkins

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Small magnetic loops connecting the quiet surface and the hot outer atmosphere of the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunspots are the most spectacular manifestation of solar magnetism, yet, 99% of the solar surface remains 'quiet' at any time of the solar cycle. The quiet sun is not void of magnetic fields, though; they are organized at smaller spatial scales and evolve relatively fast, which makes them difficult to detect. Thus, although extensive quiet Sun magnetism would be a natural driver to a uniform, steady heating of the outer solar atmosphere, it is not clear what the physical processes involved would be due to lack of observational evidence. We report the topology and dynamics of the magnetic field in very quiet regions of the Sun from spectropolarimetric observations of the Hinode satellite, showing a continuous injection of magnetic flux with a well organized topology of Omega-loop from below the solar surface into the upper layers. At first stages, when the loop travels across the photosphere, it has a flattened (staple-like) geometry and a mean velocity ascent of $\\sim3$ km/s. When the loop crosses the minimum...

Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Ramos, A Asensio; Rubio, L R Bellot

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energys Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

A New Giant Stellar Structure Near the Outer Halo of M31: Satellite or Stream?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has revealed an overdensity of stars ~3 degrees to the north-east of the Andromeda galaxy through a number excess of luminous red giant stars, which we have called Andromeda NE. With the data at hand, the distance to Andromeda NE is well enough determined to ascertain that these stars are bound within M31's dark matter halo, rather than a physically unrelated projection. Andromeda NE has a g-band absolute magnitude of ~ -11.6 and central surface brightness of ~29 mag/arcsec, making it nearly two orders of magnitude more diffuse than any known Local Group dwarf galaxy at that luminosity. Andromeda NE's red giant branch color is unlike that of M31's outer disk or the stellar stream reported by Ibata et al. (2001), arguing against a direct link between Andromeda NE and these structures. Depending on its exact distance, Andromeda NE may be undergoing tidal disruption, if indeed we have imaged the main body of the stellar feature.

Zucker, D B; Bell, E F; Martnez-Delgado, D; Grebel, E K; Rix, H W; Rockosi, C M; Holtzman, J A; Walterbos, R A M; Ivezic, Z; Brinkmann, J; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M J; Kleinman, S J; Krzesnski, J; Long, D; Newman, P R; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Zucker, Daniel B.; Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Bell, Eric F.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Grebel, Eva K.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brewington, Howard; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Newman, Peter R.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A New Giant Stellar Structure in the Outer Halo of M31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has revealed an overdensity of luminous red giant stars ~ 3 degrees (40 projected kpc) to the northeast of M31, which we have called Andromeda NE. The line-of-sight distance to Andromeda NE is within approximately 50 kpc of M31; Andromeda NE is not a physically unrelated projection. Andromeda NE has a g-band absolute magnitude of ~ -11.6 and central surface brightness of ~ 29 mag/sq.arcsec, making it nearly two orders of magnitude more diffuse than any known Local Group dwarf galaxy at that luminosity. Based on its distance and morphology, Andromeda NE is likely undergoing tidal disruption. Andromeda NE's red giant branch color is unlike that of M31's present-day outer disk or the stellar stream reported by Ibata et al. (2001), arguing against a direct link between Andromeda NE and these structures. However, Andromeda NE has a red giant branch color similar to that of the G1 clump; it is possible that these structures are both material torn off of M31's disk in the distant past, or that these are both part of one ancient stellar stream.

Daniel B. Zucker; Alexei Y. Kniazev; Eric F. Bell; David Martinez-Delgado; Eva K. Grebel; Hans-Walter Rix; Constance M. Rockosi; Jon A. Holtzman; Rene A. M. Walterbos; Zeljko Ivezic; J. Brinkmann; Howard Brewington; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Don Q. Lamb; Dan Long; Peter R. Newman; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden

2004-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

368

Molecular Clouds and Infrared Stellar Clusters in the Far-Outer Ronald L. Snell 1 , John M. Carpenter 2 , Mark H. Heyer 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Clouds and Infrared Stellar Clusters in the Far-Outer Galaxy Ronald L. Snell 1 , John M We present a study of the molecular cloud content and star formation ac- tivity in the far-0) and K 0 -band near-infrared imaging. This region contains 63 far-outer Galaxy molecular clouds; the most

Carpenter, John

369

Spitzer Observations of Star Formation in the Extreme Outer Disk of M83 (NGC5236)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spitzer IRAC observations of two fields in the XUV-disk of M83 have been recently obtained,3R_{HII} away from the center of the galaxy (R_{HII)=6.6 kpc).GALEX UV images have shown the two fields to host in-situ recent star formation.The IRAC images are used in conjunction with GALEX data and new HI imaging from THINGS to constrain stellar masses and ages of the UV clumps in the fields,and to relate the local recent star formation to the reservoir of available gas. multi wavelength photometry in the UV and mid-IR bands of 136 UV clumps(spatial resolution >220pc) identified in the two target fields, together with model fitting of the stellar UV-MIR SED,suggest that the clumps cover a range of ages between a few Myr and >1Gyr with a median value around ages,for which only a small fraction of the mass in stars appears to have formed in the past ~10Myr, agrees with the dearth of Ha emission observed in these outer fiel ds. At the location of our IRAC fields, the HI map shows localized enhancement and clumping of atomic gas. A comparison of the observed star formation with the gas reservoir shows that the UV clumps follow the Schmidt--Kennicutt scaling law of star formation,and that star formation is occurring in regions with gas dens ities at approximately (within a factor of a few) the critical density value de -rived according to the Toomre Q gravitational stability criterion. The signifi cant 8 micron excess in several of the clumps (16% of the total by number accou nting for ~67% of the 8 micron flux)) provides evidence for the existence of dust in these remote fields, in agreement with results for other galaxies. Furt hermore, we observe a relatively small excess of emission at 4.5 micron in the clumps...

Hui Dong; Daniela Calzetti; Michael Regan; David Thilker; Luciana Bianchi; Gerhardt R. Meurer; Fabian Walter

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

370

Distinguishing Realistic Military Blasts from Firecrackers in Mitigation Studies of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury  

SciTech Connect

In their Contributed Article, Nyein et al. (1,2) present numerical simulations of blast waves interacting with a helmeted head and conclude that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). A face shield may indeed be important for future military helmets, but the authors derive their conclusions from a much smaller explosion than typically experienced on the battlefield. The blast from the 3.16 gm TNT charge of (1) has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 10 atm, 0.25 ms, and 3.9 psi-ms at the front of the head (14 cm from charge), and 1.4 atm, 0.32 ms, and 1.7 psi-ms at the back of a typical 20 cm head (34 cm from charge). The peak pressure of the wave decreases by a factor of 7 as it traverses the head. The blast conditions are at the threshold for injury at the front of the head, but well below threshold at the back of the head (4). The blast traverses the head in 0.3 ms, roughly equal to the positive phase duration of the blast. Therefore, when the blast reaches the back of the head, near ambient conditions exist at the front. Because the headform is so close to the charge, it experiences a wave with significant curvature. By contrast, a realistic blast from a 2.2 kg TNT charge ({approx} an uncased 105 mm artillery round) is fatal at an overpressure of 10 atm (4). For an injury level (4) similar to (1), a 2.2 kg charge has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 2.1 atm, 2.3 ms, and 18 psi-ms at the front of the head (250 cm from charge), and 1.8 atm, 2.5 ms, and 16.8 psi-ms at the back of the head (270 cm from charge). The peak pressure decreases by only a factor of 1.2 as it traverses the head. Because the 0.36 ms traversal time is much smaller than the positive phase duration, pressures on the head become relatively uniform when the blast reaches the back of the head. The larger standoff implies that the headform locally experiences a nearly planar blast wave. Also, the positive phase durations and blast impulses are much larger than those of (1). Consequently, the blast model used in (1) is spatially and temporally very different from a military blast. It would be useful to repeat the calculations using military blast parameters. Finally, (1) overlooks a significant part of (5). On page 1 and on page 3, (1) states that (5) did not consider helmet pads. But pages pages 3 and 4 of (5) present simulations of blast wave propagation across an ACH helmeted head form with and without pads. (5) states that when the pads are present, the 'underwash' of air under the helmet is blocked when compared to the case without. (1) reaches this same conclusion, but reports it as a new result rather than a confirmation of that already found in (5).

Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

Workshop on core and sample curation for the National Continental Scientific Drilling Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Core and Sample Curation was held to discuss the best means of handling, distributing, and advertising samples and data collected during a Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) and to establish better communication between sample curators regarding common problems. It was geneerally agreed that CSDP samples should be handled, on a regional basis, by existing data systems and sample repositories judged to have adequate staff and support. Repository design, sample handling procedures, and sample accounting systems were discussed. Across North America, support for curation of geological samples was varied, but it was strongest within states or regions with well-established energy and mineral industries. A well-supported repository pays for itself through the circulation and preservation of samples and stratigraphic information. A national CSDP must have a well-established curatorial policy and system of regional repositories to circulate information and samples throughout the scientific community. Well-curated samples and data are a national resource with considerable benefits for industry and academia. Attendees agreed to form a Society of Geoscience Curators to maintain communication between curators from private, government, and university repositories and core research laboratories.

Goff, S.; Heiken, G. (eds.)

1981-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

372

Long-term Statistics of Continental Cumuli: Does Aerosol Trigger Cumulus Variability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols may control the formation, maintenance, and dissipation of cumuli by changing their microphysics. Recent observational and modeling results exist both in support and against strong potential impacts of aerosol [1-3]. Typically, the aerosol impact on water clouds has been investigated for regions with high aerosol loading and/or large atmospheric moisture [4]. Can we provide observational evidence of the aerosol-cloud relationship for a relatively dry continental region with low/moderate aerosol burden? To address this question, we revisit the aerosol-cloud relationship at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. In comparison with highly polluted regions, the SGP site is characterized by relatively small-to-moderate aerosol loading. Also, moisture content is small-to-moderate (compared to marine and coastal regions) for the SGP site. Because cumulus clouds have important impacts on climate forcing estimations [5] and are susceptible to aerosol effects [6], we focus on fair-weather cumuli (FWC) and their association with aerosol concentration and other potentially important factors. This association is investigated using a new 8-year aerosol and cloud climatology (2000-2007) developed with collocated and coincident surface and satellite observations.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Turner, David D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The effect of LNG on the relationship between UK and Continental European natural gas markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term relationship between the prices of natural gas in the United Kingdom and oil-indexed natural gas in the North West European market is the result of seasonal arbitrage. This paper empirically investigates this long-term relationship and offers two main contributions: (i) To the best knowledge of the author, this is the first study to take into account important UK spot gas market drivers such as seasonality, temperature and gas storage injection/withdrawal behaviour when examining the structural relationship between UK and Continental European markets. (ii) The effect of UK import capacity extensions since 2005, through both pipeline and LNG regasifcation capacity, on this longterm relationship will be analyzed. The results suggest that there is a signifcant structural break in 2006 when the two markets decouple and move from an old to a new, much weaker, long-term relationship. From the end of 2008 onwards, the time at which UK LNG imports started to increase, this long-term relationship appears to break down altogether.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Use of an ions thruster to dispose of type II long-lived fission products into outer space  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To dispose of long-lived fission products (LLFPs) into outer space, an ions thruster can be used instead of a static accelerator. The specifications of the ions thrusters which are presently studies for space propulsion are presented, and their usability discussed. Using of a rocket with an ions thruster for disposing of the LLFPs directly into the sun required a larger amount of energy than does the use of an accelerator.

Takahashi, H.; Yu, A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

Yong, David [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Carney, Bruce W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Friel, Eileen D., E-mail: yong@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu, E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

HIGH-ALBEDO C-COMPLEX ASTEROIDS IN THE OUTER MAIN BELT: THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

Primitive, outer-belt asteroids are generally of low albedo, reflecting carbonaceous compositions like those of CI and CM meteorites. However, a few outer-belt asteroids having high albedos are known, suggesting the presence of unusually reflective surface minerals or, conceivably, even exposed water ice. Here, we present near-infrared (1.1-2.5 {mu}m) spectra of four outer-belt C-complex asteroids with albedos {>=}0.1. We find no absorption features characteristic of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 {mu}m) in the objects. Intimate mixture models set limits to the water ice by weight {<=}2%. Asteroids (723) Hammonia and (936) Kunigunde are featureless and have (60%-95%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes that might explain the high albedos. Asteroid (1276) Ucclia also shows a featureless reflection spectrum with (50%-60%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes. Asteroid (1576) Fabiola shows a possible weak, broad absorption band (1.5-2.1 {mu}m). The feature can be reproduced by (80%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes or orthopyroxene (crystalline silicate), either of which is likely to cause its high albedo. We discuss the origin of high-albedo components in primitive asteroids.

Kasuga, Toshihiro [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kuroda, Daisuke, E-mail: toshi.kasuga@nao.ac.jp [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Parity restoration in the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach: application to the outer fission barrier of $^{240}$Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restoration of the parity symmetry has been performed in the framework of the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach suited to treat correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. To do so we have assumed axial symmetry and used a generalized Wick's theorem due to L\\"owdin in a projection-after-variation scheme. We have chosen the Skyrme SkM$^*$ energy-density functional for the particle-hole channel and a density-independent delta force for the residual interaction. We have applied this approach in the region of the outer fission barrier of the $^{240}$Pu nucleus. As a result, we have shown that the $K^{\\pi} = 0^+$ fission isomeric state is statically unstable against intrinsic-parity breaking modes, while the projection does not affect the energy at the top of the intrinsic outer fission barrier. Altogether, this leads to an increase of the height of the outer fission barrier--with respect to the fission isomeric state--by about 350 keV, affecting thus significantly th...

Hao, T V Nhan; Bonneau, L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Parity restoration in the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach: application to the outer fission barrier of $^{240}$Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restoration of the parity symmetry has been performed in the framework of the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach suited to treat correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. To do so we have assumed axial symmetry and used a generalized Wick's theorem due to L\\"owdin in a projection-after-variation scheme. We have chosen the Skyrme SkM$^*$ energy-density functional for the particle-hole channel and a density-independent delta force for the residual interaction. We have applied this approach in the region of the outer fission barrier of the $^{240}$Pu nucleus. As a result, we have shown that the $K^{\\pi} = 0^+$ fission isomeric state is statically unstable against intrinsic-parity breaking modes, while the projection does not affect the energy at the top of the intrinsic outer fission barrier. Altogether, this leads to an increase of the height of the outer fission barrier--with respect to the fission isomeric state--by about 350 keV, affecting thus significantly the fission-decay lifetime of the considered fission isomer.

T. V. Nhan Hao; P. Quentin; L. Bonneau

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Development of a Fluxless Flip Chip Bonding Process for Optical Military Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As military electronics tend to become lighter, smaller, thinner, and lower cost, the use of flip chip technology is becoming more common place to meet system requirements, yet survive environments. This paper explores the development of an optical flip chip application and details the selection/qualification of the substrate. The selected assembly consists of a procured 1x12 Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) die, having 80um diameter eutectic AuSn solder bumps at 250um pitch and flip chip bonded to a .006 thick 99.6% alumina substrate with .006 diameter thru holes and metallized with 500 WTi, under minimum 2.0-3.0?m (80-120?) thin film deposited Au. An 8 run, 3 factor, 2 level Full Factorial Design of Experiments (DOE) was completed on procured detector arrays and procured ceramic substrates using the Suss Microtec FC150. The optimum settings for the peak temperature, peak time and final die z-height were selected using the ANOVA results and interaction plots. Additional studies were completed to qualify in-house produced substrates. An epoxy glob-top encapsulant was selected to dissipate stress on the flip chip solder joints and to enhance thermal shock performance.

Girardi, Michael

2007-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

AB-Net Method of Protection from Projectiles (city, military base, battle-front, etc.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author suggests a low cost special AB-Net from artificial fiber, which may protect cities and important objects from rockets, artillery and mortar shells, projectiles, bullets, and strategic weapons. The idea is as follows: The offered AB-Net joins an incoming projectile to a small braking parachute and this incoming projectile loses speed by air braking after a drag distance of 50 - 150 meters. A following interception net after the first may serve to collect the slowed projectiles and their fragments or bomblets so that they do not reach the aimpoint. The author offers the design of AB-Net, a developed theory of snagging with a small braking parachute by AB-Net; and sample computations. These nets may be used for defense of a town, city, military base, battle-front line, road (from terrorists), or any important objects or installations (for example nuclear electric station, government buildings, etc.). Computed projects are: Net to counter small rockets (for example, from Qassam), net to counter artillery projectile (caliber 76 mm), net to counter bullets (caliber 7.6 mm). The offered method is cheaper by thousands of times than protection of a city by current anti-rocket systems. Discussion and results are at the end of the article. Key words: Protection from missile and projectile weapons, mortar, rocket, AB-Net, Qassam defense, incoming defense, armor.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

AB-Net Method of Protection from Projectiles (city, military base, battle-front, etc.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author suggests a low cost special AB-Net from artificial fiber, which may protect cities and important objects from rockets, artillery and mortar shells, projectiles, bullets, and strategic weapons. The idea is as follows: The offered AB-Net joins an incoming projectile to a small braking parachute and this incoming projectile loses speed by air braking after a drag distance of 50 - 150 meters. A following interception net after the first may serve to collect the slowed projectiles and their fragments or bomblets so that they do not reach the aimpoint. The author offers the design of AB-Net, a developed theory of snagging with a small braking parachute by AB-Net; and sample computations. These nets may be used for defense of a town, city, military base, battle-front line, road (from terrorists), or any important objects or installations (for example nuclear electric station, government buildings, etc.). Computed projects are: Net to counter small rockets (for example, from Qassam), net to counter artille...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Final report for LDRD project 11-0783 : directed robots for increased military manpower effectiveness.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this LDRD is to develop technology allowing warfighters to provide high-level commands to their unmanned assets, freeing them to command a group of them or commit the bulk of their attention elsewhere. To this end, a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) was developed, incorporating novel and uniquely capable feature creation and reinforcement learning algorithms. BECCA was demonstrated on both a mobile manipulator platform and on a seven degree of freedom serial link robot arm. Existing military ground robots are almost universally teleoperated and occupy the complete attention of an operator. They may remove a soldier from harm's way, but they do not necessarily reduce manpower requirements. Current research efforts to solve the problem of autonomous operation in an unstructured, dynamic environment fall short of the desired performance. In order to increase the effectiveness of unmanned vehicle (UV) operators, we proposed to develop robots that can be 'directed' rather than remote-controlled. They are instructed and trained by human operators, rather than driven. The technical approach is modeled closely on psychological and neuroscientific models of human learning. Two Sandia-developed models are utilized in this effort: the Sandia Cognitive Framework (SCF), a cognitive psychology-based model of human processes, and BECCA, a psychophysical-based model of learning, motor control, and conceptualization. Together, these models span the functional space from perceptuo-motor abilities, to high-level motivational and attentional processes.

Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Wagner, John S.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Morrow, James Dan

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Comparison of 700-hPa NCEP-R1 and AMIP-R2 Wind Patterns over the Continental United States Using Cluster Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clustering techniques are adapted to facilitate the comparison of gridded 700-hPa wind flow patterns spanning the continental United States. A recent decade (198594) of wind component data has been extracted from two widely used reanalysis ...

Ellen J. Cooter; Jenise Swall; Robert Gilliam

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation is presented of the impact on tropical climate of continental-scale perturbations given by different representations of land surface processes (LSP) in a general circulation model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One ...

Hsi-Yen Ma; C. Roberto Mechoso; Yongkang Xue; Heng Xiao; J. David Neelin; Xuan Ji

385

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part II: Uncertainties in River Routing Simulation Related to Flow Velocity and Groundwater Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the companion paper to this one (Part I), the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and AtmosphereTotal Runoff Integrating Pathways (ISBA-TRIP) continental hydrological system of the Centre National de Recherches Mtorologiques is evaluated ...

B. Decharme; R. Alkama; H. Douville; M. Becker; A. Cazenave

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A One-Dimensional Model of Continental Ice Volume Fluctuations through the Pleistocene: Implications for the Origin of the Mid-Pleistocene Climate Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new one-dimensional, zonally averaged high resolution spherical model of the accumulation and flow of continental ice sheets in response to variations in insolation forcing has been constructed. The model includes a detailed representation of ...

G. DeBlonde; W. R. Peltier

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

On Intermediate Models for Barotropic Continental Shelf and Slope Flow Fields. Part II: Comparison of Numerical Model Solutions in Doubly Periodic Domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a program to improve understanding of the dynamics of the complicated, vigorous eddy and jet flow fields recently observed over the continental shelf and slope, we investigate the potential of intermediate models for use in both ...

J. A. Barth; J. S. Allen; P. A. Newberger

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

On the Potential Change in Surface Water Vapor Deposition over the Continental United States due to Increases in Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of surface water vapor deposition (WVD) over the continental United States under the present climate and a future climate scenario reflecting the mid-twenty-first-century increased greenhouse gas concentrations were evaluated by ...

Zaitao Pan; Moti Segal; Charles Graves

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates and In Situ River Discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage, evapotranspiration, and freshwater runoff to the ocean has a major influence on the terrestrial water and energy budgets and thereby on ...

R. Alkama; B. Decharme; H. Douville; M. Becker; A. Cazenave; J. Sheffield; A. Voldoire; S. Tyteca; P. Le Moigne

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Microphysical Retrieval Scheme for Continental Low-Level Stratiform Clouds: Impacts of the Subadiabatic Character on Microphysical Properties and Radiation Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using measurements from the Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, a modified ground-based remote sensing technique is developed and evaluated to study the impacts of the subadiabatic character of continental low-level ...

Hung-Neng S. Chin; Daniel J. Rodriguez; Richard T. Cederwall; Catherine C. Chuang; Allen S. Grossman; John J. Yio; Qiang Fu; Mark A. Miller

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Deployment related mental health care seeking behaviors in the U.S. military and the use of telehealth to mitigate their impacts on access to care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interviewees report that groups of service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan often require substantial amounts of mental health care, causing surges in demand at military hospitals. These hospitals have difficulty ...

Hess, John (John Thomas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The impact of individual-, unit-, and enterprise-level factors on psychological health outcomes : a system dynamics study of the U.S. military  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychological health issues have emerged as a signature pathology of combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, the full continuum of care in the U.S. military for ...

Wang, Judy Y. H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22 (used for the waste package outer barrier) and Titanium Grade 7 (used for the drip shield) that are subjected to the effects of stress corrosion cracking. The use of laser peening or other residual stress mitigation techniques is considered as a means of mitigating stress corrosion cracking in the waste package final closure lid weld.

G. Gordon

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

Selected data fron continental scientific drilling core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents geochemical and isotopic data on rocks and water and wellbore geophysical data from the Continental Scientific Drilling Program core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico. These core holes were drilled as a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental questions about magma, water/rock interactions, ore deposits, and volcanology. The data in this report will assist the interpretation of the hydrothermal system in the Jemez Mountains and will stimulate further research in magmatic processes, hydrothermal alteration, ore deposits, hydrology, structural geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. 37 refs., 36 figs., 28 tabs.

Musgrave, J.A.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Luedemann, G.; Garcia, S.; Dennis, B.; Hulen, J.B.; Janik, C.; Tomei, F.A.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

The outer-coordination sphere: incorporating amino acids and peptides as ligands for homogeneous catalysts to mimic enzyme function  

SciTech Connect

Great progress has been achieved in the field of homogeneous transition metal-based catalysis, however, as a general rule these solution based catalysts are still easily outperformed, both in terms of rates and selectivity, by their analogous enzyme counterparts, including structural mimics of the active site. This observation suggests that the features of the enzyme beyond the active site, i.e. the outer-coordination sphere, are important for their exceptional function. Directly mimicking the outer-coordination sphere requires the incorporation of amino acids and peptides as ligands for homogeneous catalysts. This effort has been attempted for many homogeneous catalysts which span the manifold of catalytic reactions and often require careful thought regarding solvent type, pH and characterization to avoid unwanted side reactions or catalyst decomposition. This article reviews the current capability of synthesizing and characterizing this often difficult category of metal-based catalysts. This work was funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Shaw, Wendy J.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

Solar technical assistance provided to Forest City military communities in Hawaii for incorporation of 20-30 MW of solar energy generation to power family housing for US Navy personnel.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In May 2007, Forest City Military Communities won a US Department of Energy Solar America Showcase Award. As part of this award, executives and staff from Forest City Military Communities worked side-by-side with a DOE technical assistance team to overcome technical obstacles encountered by this large-scale real estate developer and manager. This paper describes the solar technical assistance that was provided and the key solar experiences acquired by Forest City Military Communities over an 18 month period.

Dominick, Jeff (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Merrigan, Tim (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Boudra, Will (Forest City Military Communities, Honolulu, HI); Miller, Ryan (CH2M Hill, Englewood, CO); Cisneros, Gabriela (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Rosenthal, Andrew L. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gupta, Vipin P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training activities on the Fort Hood Military Installation have imposed serious impacts to its grass-dominated landscape. Six decades of tracked vehicle impacts have caused soil compaction and vegetation reduction which has lead to severe surface erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted dairy manure may increase vegetation, while contour ripping may decrease discharge, both of which will lead to a decrease in erosion. Three small 0.30 ha watersheds were established on Fort Hood in January 2005. Each watershed had 0.46 m berms installed on all four sides with a 0.305 m H-flume and was equipped with automated storm sampling equipment. Soil samples were collected prior to any treatments, and twice after compost applications. Discharge and precipitation was collected continuously on each watershed. Stormwater samples were collected during storm events and analyzed for water quality parameters. Water quality samples, discharge and precipitation records were collected between January 2005 and July 2007. Three composted dairy manure application rates at 0, 28 and 57 m3 ha-1 were applied on watersheds C0, C1 and C2, respectively; watersheds were evaluated for effects on NO3 and soluble reactive phosphates (SRP) concentrations and loadings in storm events and on stormwater discharge. Twenty two months after the initial compost application, the two previously composted watersheds (C1 and C2) were treated with contour ripping and C2 received a second compost application. The compost application caused the spikes in NO3 and SRP concentrations and loads immediately after application. Both NO3 and SRP concentrations decreased as the number of days from application increased. Compost application did not appear to have an effect on the discharge from watersheds. Contour ripping had a significant effect on stormwater discharge. Contour ripping decreased discharge by 74 and 80% on C1 and C2, respectively when compared to the untreated control (C0).

Prcin, Lisa J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Peoples, Homelands, and Wars? Ethnicity, the Military, and Battle among British Imperial Forces in the War against Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tarak barkawi 26 Peter Gadsdon, An Amateur at War, unpublished ms., p. 29. 27 Bruce Lincoln, Discourse and the Construction of Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989), p. 88. 28 Rosen, Societies and Military Power. See also Alon Peled, A Question... of the class organization of the army was the reinforcement of ethnic difference. Peter Gadsdon, a wartime officer in 4/14th Punjab, new to the Indian Army, learned about the foibles of each class while his battalion trained for service in Burma: A Company...

Barkawi, Tarak

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force  

SciTech Connect

The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burress, R.V. [SEHO (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Atmospheric constraints for the CO2 partial pressure on terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, several potentially habitable, probably terrestrial exoplanets and exoplanet candidates have been discovered. The amount of CO2 in their atmosphere is of great importance for surface conditions and habitability. In the absence of detailed information on the geochemistry of the planet, this amount could be considered as a free parameter. Up to now, CO2 partial pressures for terrestrial planets have been obtained assuming an available volatile reservoir and outgassing scenarios. This study aims at calculating the allowed maximum CO2 pressure at the surface of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting near the outer boundary of the habitable zone by coupling the radiative effects of the CO2 and its condensation at the surface. These constraints might limit the permitted amount of atmospheric CO2, independent of the planetary reservoir. A 1D radiative-convective cloud-free atmospheric model was used. CO2 partial pressures are fixed according to surface temperature and vapor pressure curve. Considered scena...

von Paris, Philip; Hedelt, Pascal; Rauer, Heike; Selsis, Franck; Stracke, Barbara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Crystal Structures of the Outer Membrane Domain of Intimin and Invasin from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis  

SciTech Connect

Intimins and invasins are virulence factors produced by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. They contain C-terminal extracellular passenger domains that are involved in adhesion to host cells and N-terminal {beta} domains that are embedded in the outer membrane. Here, we identify the domain boundaries of an E. coli intimin {beta} domain and use this information to solve its structure and the {beta} domain structure of a Y. pseudotuberculosis invasin. Both {beta} domain structures crystallized as monomers and reveal that the previous range of residues assigned to the {beta} domain also includes a protease-resistant domain that is part of the passenger. Additionally, we identify 146 nonredundant representative members of the intimin/invasin family based on the boundaries of the highly conserved intimin and invasin {beta} domains. We then use this set of sequences along with our structural data to find and map the evolutionarily constrained residues within the {beta} domain.

Fairman, James W.; Dautin, Nathalie; Wojtowicz, Damian; Liu, Wei; Noinaj, Nicholas; Barnard, Travis J.; Udho, Eshwar; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Buchanan, Susan K. (CUA); (Einstein); (NIH); (Scripps)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

404

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

Mcdonough, William F.

405

Crop, forestry, and manure residue inventory, continental United States. Volume 3. West North-Central: including, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of eight similar data packages that make up a national residue inventory summarizing annual agricultural wastes generated in the nine census regions within the continental United States. The inventory is based upon data available through mid-1975 which are shown in Section II by region, state, and country, as well as by waste type, amount, and use.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

DOE, NREL Help DoD Enhance Energy Security (Fact Sheet), Integrated Deployment: Military, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Help DoD Enhance NREL Help DoD Enhance Energy Security The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the U.S. government, including the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), deploy large-scale energy efficiency measures and renewable energy technologies to reduce costs, increase energy security, and meet federal mandates. As the largest energy consumer within the U.S. federal government, DoD has long recognized the strategic impor- tance of energy to its mission and is particularly challenged to address energy security, reliability, and cost concerns. DoD has more than 500 military installations encompassing nearly 2 billion square feet of space, and had an annual installations energy bill of more than $4 billion in 2010.

407

RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7At 7At a z'/a tlYr'/ ORNL/RASA-85/ 42 RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR Accesr to thc inlormalion in thlt rcport is limitcd to tho!. indacatod on the di3tribution lilt and to oopartmont ot Encrgy lnd Oeplrtmcnt of Enorgy Contracton vd' This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U nited States Government. N€ither the U nited States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied' or assum€s any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness' or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not inf ringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

408

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the proposed disposal of Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point (MOTSU), North Carolina, sediments in the ocean. The report is divided into five sections. Section 1.0 is the introduction containing a brief overview of the study and the study objectives. Section 2.0 describes the methods and materials used for sample collection, processing, toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, physical/chemical analysis of sediments and tissues, data analysis, and quality assurance procedures. Section 3.0 presents the results of field collections, sediment chemistry, toxicological testing, and tissue chemistry resulting from bioaccumulation exposures. Section 4.0 presents a discussion of the results and summary conclusions concerning the acceptability of the Wilmington Harbor and MOTSU dredged material for ocean disposal. Section 5.0 lists the literature cited in support of this document. A series of appendixes contain detailed data listings.

Ward, J.A.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, M.E.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Texas Tech University Military & Veterans Programs My name is Josh Quigley. I'm originally from Lubbock, Texas and I'm a senior Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech University Military & Veterans Programs My name is Josh Quigley. I'm originally from Lubbock, Texas and I'm a senior Wildlife Management major here at Texas Tech. My name is Todd Truesdell. I am classified as a senior and I'm from Carrollton, Texas. My name is Alex Robles. I'm a junior here

Rock, Chris

410

Chemical evidence of kerogen formation in source rocks and oil shales via selective preservation of thin resistant outer walls of microalgae: Origin of ultralaminae  

SciTech Connect

New structures, termed ultralaminae, were recently observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy, usually in high amounts, in a number of kerogens from oil shales and source rocks. Morphological similarities were noted between ultralaminae and the thin (ca. 15 nm) resistant outer walls, composed of non-hydrolyzable macromolecules (algaenans), commonly occurring in extant Chlorophyceae, especially in the cosmopolitan genus Scenedesmus. Identification of the pyrolysis products of S. quadricauda algaenan showed (i) a highly aliphatic structure based on a macromolecular network of long (up to C{sub 32}) polymethylenic chains probably cross-linked by ether bridges, and (ii) a close correlation based on the formation of n-alkylnitriles, between this algaenan and two ultralaminar kerogens, the Rundle Oil Shale and the Green River Shale. These fossil ultralaminae, therefore, likely originated from the selective preservation of the thin, algaenan-containing, outer walls of Scenedesmus and/or of other Chlorophyceae containing outer walls of a similar morphology and composition. Previous evidence of kerogen formation via selective preservation of algaenans was restricted to rather uncommon kerogens; the present results, added to ultralamina common occurrence and abundance, point to a wide involvement and to a large contribution of the selective preservation of algaenan-containing thin outer walls of Chlorophyceae in the formation of kerogens in a number of lacustrine source rocks and oil shales.

Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.; Casadevall, E.; Berkaloff, C.; Rousseau, B. (Ecole Normale Superieure, Cedex (France))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE FROM CARBON SURFACES COATED WITH OXYGEN: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

We investigate via infrared spectroscopy the synthesis of CO{sub 2} by ultraviolet irradiation (6.41 eV) of amorphous carbon covered with solid O{sub 2} at 21 K. Oxidation occurs at the O{sub 2}-carbon interface promoted by photon excitation or dissociation of O{sub 2} molecules. The CO{sub 2} production is linear with photon fluence with a yield of 3.3 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} CO{sub 2} photon{sup -1}; the yield does not decrease at high fluences (at least up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} photons cm{sup -2}) since CO{sub 2} is not photodissociated at this photon energy. Replacing oxygen with water ice did not produce CO{sub 2} since H{sub 2}O does not dissociate at this photon energy. The CO{sub 2} synthesis process discussed in this Letter does not require H{sub 2}O or CO and may be important in cold astrophysical environments where O{sub 2} could be locally segregated on carbonaceous grains, such as in molecular clouds and icy objects in the outer solar system.

Fulvio, D.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A., E-mail: df6vz@virginia.edu, E-mail: ur5n@virginia.edu, E-mail: raul@virginia.edu [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, University of Virginia, Thornton Hall B-114, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2  

SciTech Connect

Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent with the inherent complexity associated with correct heme insertion and acylation of MtrC that occurs in the periplasm prior to its targeting to the outer membrane. These latter results suggest that MtrC protein trafficking to the outer membrane and its subsequent degradation are tightly regulated, which is consistent with cellular processing pathways that target MtrC to extracellular structures and their possible role in promoting electron transfer from Shewanella to extracellular acceptors.

Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

Limitations of ad hoc "SKA+VLBI" configurations & the need to extend SKA to trans-continental dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The angular resolution of the proposed Square Kilometre Array, SKA, must be extended towards the milliarcsecond scale if it is to resolve the distant starburst galaxies that are likely to dominate the radio source counts at micro and sub-microJy flux levels. This paper considers the best way of extending SKA's angular resolution towards the milliarcsecond scale. Two possible SKA-VLBI configurations have been investigated and simulated SKA and SKA-VLBI visibility data sets generated. The effects of non-uniform data weighting on the associated images are considered. The results suggest that the preferred option is for SKA to be extended to trans-continental dimensions. By retaining 50% of the array's collecting area within a region no larger than 50 km, the surface brightness sensitivity of the array at arcsec resolution is hardly compromised. In this configuration SKA's capabilities are impressive: in a single 12 hour run, between 100-1000 sources will be simultaneously detected and imaged with arcsecond, sub-arcsecond and milliarcsecond resolution.

M. A. Garrett

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

The impact of climate and CO{sub 2} changes on ecosystem dynamics of the continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The VEMAP study used three biogeochemical (BGC) models to investigate the impact of changes in climate and CO{sub 2} concentrations over the continental US. These models were Biome-BGC, CENTURY, and TEM. Differences among the BGC models and the climate scenarios (three different GCM-derived 2xCO{sub 2} climates were used) contributed equally to the variation in estimates of C dynamics under changing climate and CO,. The response of the individual biogeochemical models to increases in temperature and tp water stress are largely responsible for their behavior under climate change. All three models generally predict increases in C uptake when increases in temperature are not vastly greater than increases in precipitation, such as seen in the GFDL scenario. Differences in the biotic response to elevated CO{sub 2} determined the overall response of NPP and total system C storage due to differences on the manner in which plant C/N, transpiration, and photosynthesis are modified by the three different BGC models.

Ojima, D.S. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

416

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

417

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

418

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

419

Paul Becker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Service Office of Protected Resources, and NOAA's Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program for oil and gas exploration and ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Identification and Characterization of UndA-HRCR-6, an Outer Membrane Endecaheme c-Type Cytochrome of Shewanella sp. Strain HRCR-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyt) MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1(MR-1) play critical roles in extracellular reduction of iron [Fe(III)] oxides and uranium [ U(VI)]. To identify and characterize the outer membrane c-Cyts found in the metal-reducing Shewanella strains isolated from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 7 HRCR isolates were tested for the presence of mtrC, omcA and undA1 (a gene encoding a putative 11-heme c-Cyt) homologues in their genomes. All 7 tested strains possessed an mtrC homologue, while 3 strains had an omcA homologue and the remaining 4 strains contained an undA1 homologue. The coding region of an undA1 homologue from HRCR isolate 6 was cloned and sequenced. Because it was 93% identical to the UndA of S. baltica OS223, the protein product encoded by this sequenced gene was named as UndA-HRCR6. In MR-1, UndA-HRCR6 (i) restored an MR-1 mutants ability to reduce solid phase ferrihydrite at 40% of that for MR-1 wild type, (ii) increased extracellular formation of UO2 associated with the outer membrane and extracellular polymeric substances in a U(VI) reduction assay and (iii) was secreted to the extracellular environment by bacterial type II secretion system. UndA-HRCR6 was purified from the membrane fraction following its overexpression in MR-1 cells. Purified UndA-HRCR6 possessed 11 heme-Fe and reduced ferric complexes. Collectively, these results show that UndA-HRCR6 is an outer membrane endecaheme c-Cyt and can serve an extracellular metal reductase with functions similar to that of MR-1 MtrC and OmcA.

Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation of the computerized utilities energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Military Community at Goeppingen, Germany  

SciTech Connect

Under the provisions of an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is evaluating the Utilities and Energy Monitoring and Control System (UEMCS) installed at the US Military Community Activity at Goeppingen, Germany. This evaluation relies on examination of existing data and information to determine the effectiveness of the UEMCS. The Goeppingen UEMCS is an integral part of a combined UEMCS/district heating system which includes the UEMCS at Schwaebisch Gmuend, Germany. The system was installed during 1985 and 1986. The UEMCS at Goeppingen and Schwaebisch Gmuend are both well designed, implemented, and maintained. The UEMCS is operated in a supervisory mode with distributed intelligence in local controllers. At present, the UEMCS is operated in a supervisory mode with distributed intelligence in local controllers. At present, the UEMCS at Schwaebisch Gmuend does not have a central computer, but requires only a dedicated phone line to couple with the one at Goeppingen. Though the conversion to district heat has produced the majority of energy savings, the UEMCS day/night setback program also contributes substantially, with additional savings from start/stop programs, such as seasonal switchover, and various temperature control programs. Further opportunities for savings exist in increasing monitoring and control of water usage and connecting the community`s electrical network to the UEMCS, permitting demand limiting and increased power factor control.

Purucker, S.L.; Gettings, M.B.

1991-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on U.S. dependence on foreign oil: protecting againston U.S. dependence on foreign oil, that the cost of the 1991U.S. dependence on foreign oil is not to reduce military

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Development of a Geographic Information System Based Dust Dispersion Modeling System for Use in the Planning Implementation of Military Training Exercises  

SciTech Connect

As residential areas continue to develop near military sites, possible impacts from military traffic and exercises become of greater concern. Of particular concern is the effect of particulate matter and atmospheric dust dispersion on air quality caused by such maneuvers. To aid this problem, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory proposed a plan to develop, document, and test a modeling system in support of dust dispersion reduction and management near government sites. To accomplish this task a model interface was developed that would be user friendly yet sophisticated enough to accommodate the varying needs of the client. One such need was for the modeling system to be capable of providing data for diverse locations and varying sites. To accomplish this task, the dust dispersion modeling system needed to be integrated with a geographic information system (GIS). Through use of the GIS application, data maps contained within the application could be used to create new sites. The GIS application would also allow the user to enter the point, area, or line source required to run the dispersion modeling system. Incorporating the GIS with the model would allow the user to view plume rise and expansion over actual data maps of the desired site. By using historical, current, and user defined data, near real-time dust dispersion models will aid in estimating and managing the effects of military exercises on the environment and nonmilitary personnel.

Crandall, D.; Rutz, F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The distribution and optical response of particles on the continental shelf and their relationship to cross-isopycnal mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationships of optics, particles, and hydrography to shelf mixing processes were analyzed on a mid-continental shelf south of New England. The objectives were to characterize the types, sizes and sources of particles present in the water column and their effects on optics during conditions of strong stratification (late summer) and weak stratification (spring) and to determine how the particles and optics change over time in response to different forcing functions (wind, surface gravity waves, internal waves, solibors - large scale internal waves- and tides). An unexpected opportunity was presented by the passage of Hurricane Edouard close to the sampling site. Under both strong and weak stratification, surface oaters had high values of fluorescence, particulate organic carbon, and chlorophyll a. Mid-waters contained higher concentrations of particulate organic carbon than bottom oaters, but the optical characteristics of particles more closely resembled those of bottom waters (resuspended and adverted material). Strongly stratified conditions typically exhibited little mixing, with the exception of when extreme forcing events, such as the hurricane, passed through the sampling site. Most of the events sampled during the summer cruise were the result of addiction rather than mixing. Spring conditions included weakly stratified waders with frequent wind events (Nor'easters). Strong forcing events caused surface mixing initially, but solar heating stratified surface waders and gradually inhibited mixing. Particle size distribution changed with stratification. A dramatic increase was observed with the passage of the hurricane, and an initial increase in large particles followed by a substantial increase in smaller particles was observed during a spring phytoplankton bloom. Spring particle settling flux was 3 times higher in the bottom 40 meters than during the previous summer. Relationships between optics and discrete samples generally correlate better under mixed conditions than stratified conditions. During the stratified period, particle distributions were constrained by density layers, where as during weakly stratified periods, the waders were more mixed, leading to a more uniform distribution of particulate matter in the surface and the bottom waters.

Blakey, Joshua C.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fighting with Gender: Understanding the Contemporary Combat Experiences of Servicewomen and Servicemen in the United States Military  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the integration of women into the United States armed forces, servicemen have been expected to be the fighters while servicewomen largely occupied safe or nurturing support roles as dictated by American society at large. The ground combat exclusion policy, which officially barred women from all positions involving ground fighting, limited women to support units which, in theory, were strategically located in the rear and far removed from the dangers of the front lines. As we experienced in the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the differentiation of gender roles became irrelevant in asymmetrical wars with no established front lines. Female soldiers found themselves in a variety of combat situations of indirect and direct nature, as I learned through the qualitative interviews that I conducted at Fort Hood, Texas, and Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In this dissertation, I examined the narratives of female and male soldiers who experienced combat in Afghanistan and Iraq, to discern: 1) whether females and males discussed their scenarios differently; 2) whether experiencing combat affected soldiers ideas about their various gender roles; 3) whether perceptions on servicewomens combat participation differed by sex; and 4) whether soldiers opinions on womens inclusion in combat arms military occupation specialties differed by sex. What I found in my study was that: 1) female and male soldiers largely discussed their combat experiences in similar ways; 2) while familial gender roles were largely unchanged as a result of combat deployment, the majority of female and male soldiers perceived changes in their roles as women and men where women often discussed feeling stronger, empowered, and independent, and men often identified their changes in terms of maturity and personal growth; 3) that exposure to womens roles in combat deployments had a more positive effect on the perceptions of male soldiers than those of female soldiers; and 4) that both female and male participants largely disagreed with the ground combat exclusion policy for women.

Serrato, Margie

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Reiz Continental Hotel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:> To proffer solution to the energy problems in Africa by providing a forum for exchange of ideas by major stake holders.:> To address important aspects of the implementation of Renewable Energy Programmes in Africa.:> Explore emerging policy issues, regulations and implementation frameworks for the development of renewable energy and energy efficiency markets in Africa.:> Public awareness creation among poiicy makers, investors and the generai public on the potentials of renewable energy and energy efficiency in Africa SCOPE OF WORKSHOP:> State-of-the-art lectures to be delivered by seasoned experts in renewable energy in such areas as: Sea Water desalination Solar drying (food & cash crops,

University Nigeria; Sustalnable Economie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Chicago's Continental Divide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by highway, railroad, air and water. Its strategic location at the south end of Lake Michigan has been largely responsible. Among other unique advantages, it has an inexhaustible...

428

Economic and legal aspects of the organization of planning and construction of structures on the Continental Shelf of Arctic Seas of Russia  

SciTech Connect

At the current stage of development of Russia`s economy the problem arises of refining the concept and working out a strategy of developing the oil gas resources of the continental shelf. The given concept determines the main strategic directions with respect to the disposition, volumes, and scope of works, creation and use of special equipment, structures, and floating equipment, determination of the extent and dynamics of investments, evaluation of the potential possibilities of various financial sources, etc. Strategy is based on the fairly long-term (15-20 years) cost effectiveness of exploration and development of offshore oil and gas reserves governed by the high geologic prospects and poor study of the continental shelf of Russia. The approach to the solution of this problem obviously, should provide for the follow stages: Planning an exploration program realized mainly by centralized budgetary funds. The second stage is a prediction of the results of the competition, i.e., prediction of the number of specific blocks being claimed. A special problem is the selection of the form of licensing agreement. The existing legislation, particularly the Russian Federation Mineral Resources Law, provides for forms of concession and production sharing in addition to the traditional leasing form. One of the problems is the absence of an official division of Russian water areas according to their status: territoral waters, 200-mile exclusive (economic) zone, and continental shelf. Legal problems begin with the presence of variant readings in the formulation of the concepts of three aforementioned zones. All these problems either directly or indirectly determine the economic conditions and successfulness of the converted and other enterprises and organizations developing offshore oil and gas resources.

Nikitin, B.A.; Perchik, A.I.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

West Florida Continental Shelf: a study of geothermal flows and other processes affecting radionuclides and trace metals. Progress report, October 1, 1979-July 1, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported for the period October 1979-July 1980. Physical and chemical investigations have been made of the single known geothermal discharge on the West Florida Continental Shelf. It was discovered the discharge phenomenon is of regional extent. The origin of the discharges is normal seawater which enters the substrate of the Floridian plateau. The discharges are enriched in Ra 226 and Rn 222, heavy metals (Pb, Ca), and calcium, and depleted in magnesium. The effects of these thermal discharges on the shelf environment were investigated. (ACR)

Fanning, K.A.; Byrne, R.H.; Betzer, P.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Environmental sampling and mud sampling program of CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) core hole VC-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental sampling and drilling mud sampling program was conducted during the drilling operations of Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) core hole VC-2B, Valles caldera, New Mexico. A suite of four springs and creeks in the Sulphur Springs area were monitored on a regular basis to ensure that the VC-2B drilling program was having no environmental impact on water quality. In addition, a regional survey of springs in and around the Jemez Mountains was conducted to provide background data for the environmental monitoring. A drilling mud monitoring program was conducted during the operations to help identify major fluid entries in the core hole. 32 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

Meeker, K.; Goff, F.; Gardner, J.N.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

SPACEWAR WIRE MILITARY SPACE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arrest officer from Azerbaijan over brutal murder NATO chief hopes Putin will attend bloc's June summit

432

Optical Military Systems Adaptive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence in ground-based telescopes or to improve the spatial mode and power of lasers. More recently, Sandia has led the innovation of using adaptive elements, such as...

433

CCG Participating Military Organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... are available to consumers at reasonable prices. ... Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, the home of the ... RMS value (which represents the heating value of ...

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

434

Evaluation of Suitability of Selected Set of Department of Defense Military Bases and Department of Energy Facilities for Siting a Small Modular Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the approach that ORNL developed for screening a sample set of US Department of Defense (DOD) military base sites and DOE sites for possible powering with an SMR; the methodology employed, including spatial modeling; and initial results for several sample sites. The objective in conducting this type of siting evaluation is demonstrate the capability to characterize specific DOD and DOE sites to identify any particular issues associated with powering the sites with an SMR using OR-SAGE; it is not intended to be a definitive assessment per se as to the absolute suitability of any particular site.

Poore III, Willis P [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The responses of net primary production (NPP) and total carbon storage for the continental United States to changes in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate, and vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We extrapolated 3 biogeochemistry models (BIOME-BGC, CENTURY, and TEM) across the continental US with the vegetation distributions of 3 biogeography models (BIOME2, DOLY, and MAPSS) for contemporary climate at 355 ppmv CO{sub 2} and each of 3 GCM climate scenarios at 710 ppmv. For contemporary conditions, continental NPP ranges from 3132 to 3854 TgC/yr and total carbon storage ranges from 109 to 125 PgC. The responses of NPP range from no response (BIOME-BGC with DOLY or MAPSS vegetations for UKMO climate) to increases of 53% and 56% (TEM with BIOME2 vegetations for GFDL and OSU climates). The responses of total carbon storage vary from a decrease of 39% (BIOME-BGC with MAPSS vegetation for UKMO climate) to increases of 52% and 56% (TEM with BIOME2 vegetations for OSU and GFDL climates). The UKMO responses of BIOME-BGC with MAPSS vegetation are caused by both decreased forest area (from 44% to 38%) and photosynthetic water stress. The OSU and GFDL responses of TEM with BIOME2 vegetations are caused by forest expansion (from 46% to 67% for OSU and to 75% for GFDL) and increased nitrogen cycling.

McGuire, D.A. [Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Final Step in Phage Lysis: The Role of the Rz-Rz1 Spanin Complex in the Disruption of the Outer Membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the work described in this dissertation is to better understand the role of Rz and Rz1 function with respect to phage lysis. We determined using both a genetic and biochemical approach that the Rz protein is an inner membrane protein containing a single N-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) with an Nin/Cout topology. Consistent with previous work on Rz1, the Rz1 lipoprotein was found to be localized to the outer membrane (OM). Following localization, both Rz and Rz1 form homodimers in vivo due to intermolecular disulfide formation. Despite being localized to apposing membranes, the two proteins form a complex. A small number of phages encode a potential single protein equivalent of Rz-Rz1. This protein, termed a spanin, is predicted to tether the inner and outer membranes by a single polypeptide chain. Based on complementation, it was concluded that gp11 from the phage T1 is a functional equivalent of Rz-Rz1. Gp11, and by analogy the Rz-Rz1 two-component spanin complex, threads the meshwork of the PG layer. The presence of an Rz-Rz1 complex, which forms in the presence of peptidoglycan (PG), is supported by in vivo results. The soluble periplasmic domains of Rz and Rz1, which are dimeric and monomeric respectively, were purified. Circular dichroism analysis indicates that Rz is structured, with significant ?-helical content, whereas Rz1, in which 10 out 39 residues are proline, is unstructured. Mixing the proteins results in the formation of a complex with significant new ?-helical content. Negative-stain images reveal ~ 25 nm x ~ 4 nm rod-shaped structures. Holin independent activity of Rz and Rz1 is found to disrupt whole cells. Furthermore, time lapse microscopy of ? and ?Rzam lysis allows us to conclude that Rz and Rz1 are essential for lysis. These results suggest a model for Rz-Rz1 function which begins with Rz and Rz1 forming a complex through direct interaction prior to holin and endolysin function. Holin-mediated hole formation allows the endolysin to degrade PG which sterically hinders Rz-Rz1 activity. Removal of PG by endolysin degradation thus triggers Rz-Rz1 OM disruption via fusion of the inner and outer membranes.

Berry, Joel Dallas

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the major outer surface protein, OSP-A from North American and European isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyme borreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in North America and Western Europe. As the major delayed immune response in humans, a better understanding of the major outer surface lipoproteins OspA and OspB are of much interest. These proteins have been shown to exhibit three distinct phylogenetic genotypes based on their DNA sequences. This paper describes the cloning of genomic DNA for each variant and amplification of PCR. DNA sequence data was used to derive computer driven phylogenetic analysis and deduced amino acid sequences. Overproduction of variant OspAs was carried out in E. coli using a T7-based expression system. Circular dichroism and fluorescence studies was carried out on the recombinant B31 PspA yielding evidence supporting a B31 protein containing 11% alpha-helix, 34% antiparallel beta-sheet, 12% parallel beta sheet.

McGrath, B.C.; Dunn, J.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); France, L.L. [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY (United States); Jaing, W.; Polin, D.; Gorgone, G.; Luft, B.; Dykhuizen, D. [SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 A , * = 90, * = 97.8, * = 90*. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 A .

Tomanicek, S. J.; Johs, Alexander; Sawhney, M. S.; Shi, Liang; Liang, L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

SciTech Connect

The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 {angstrom}, = 90, {beta} = 97.8, {gamma} = 90{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 {angstrom}.

Tomanicek, S.J.; Johs, A.; Sawhney, M.S.; Shi, L.; Liang, L. (PNNL); (ORNL)

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

THE OUTER DISKS OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES. II. SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS PROFILES OF UNBARRED GALAXIES AND TRENDS WITH HUBBLE TYPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present azimuthally averaged radial profiles of R-band surface brightness for a complete sample of 47 early-type, unbarred galaxies, as a complement to our previous study of early-type barred galaxies. Following very careful sky subtraction, the profiles can typically be determined down to brightness levels well below 27 mag arcsec{sup -2} and in the best cases below 28 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We classified the profiles according to the scheme used previously for the barred sample: Type I profiles are single unbroken exponential radial declines in brightness; Type II profiles ('truncations') have an inner shallow slope (usually exponential) which changes at a well-defined break radius to a steeper exponential; and Type III profiles ('antitruncations') have an inner exponential that is steeper, giving way to a shallower outer (usually exponential) decline. By combining these profiles with previous studies, we can make the first clear statements about the trends of outer-disk-profile types along the Hubble sequence (including both barred and unbarred galaxies), and their global frequencies. We find that Type I profiles are most frequent in early-type disks, decreasing from one-third of all S0-Sa disks to barely 10% of the latest-type spirals. Conversely, Type II profiles (truncations) increase in frequency with Hubble type, from only {approx}25% of S0 galaxies to {approx}80% of Sd-Sm spirals. Overall, the fractions of Type I, II, and III profiles for all disk galaxies (Hubble types S0-Sm) are 21%, 50%, and 38%, respectively; this includes galaxies ({approx}8% of the total) with composite Type II+III profiles (counted twice). Finally, we note the presence of bars in 10 galaxies previously classified (optically) as 'unbarred'. This suggests that {approx}20% of optically unbarred galaxies are actually barred; the bars in such cases can be weak, obscured by dust, or so large as to be mistaken for the main disk of the galaxy.

Gutierrez, Leonel [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Astronomia, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Erwin, Peter [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aladro, Rebeca; Beckman, John E., E-mail: leonel@astrosen.unam.mx, E-mail: r.aladro@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: jeb@iac.es, E-mail: erwin@mpe.mpg.de [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "military outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Binding and Direct Electrochemistry of OmcA, an Outer-Membrane Cytochrome from an Iron Reducing Bacterium, with Oxide Electrodes: A Candidate Biofuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect

Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria transfer electrons to solid ferric respiratory electron acceptors. Outer-membrane cytochromes expressed by these organisms are of interest in both microbial fuel cells and biofuel cells. We use optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) to show that OmcA, an 85 kDa decaheme outer-membrane c-type cytochrome from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, adsorbs to isostructural Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in similar amounts. Adsorption is ionic-strength and pH dependent (peak adsorption at pH 6.57.0). The thickness of the OmcA layer on Al2O3 at pH 7.0 [5.8 1.1 (2r) nm] from OWLS is similar, within error, to that observed using atomic force microscopy (4.8 2 nm). The highest adsorption density observed was 334 ng cm 2 (2.4 1012 molecules cm 2), corresponding to a monolayer or 9.9 nm diameter spheres or submonolayer coverage by smaller molecules. Direct electrochemistry of OmcA on Fe2O3 electrodes was observed using cyclic voltammetry, with cathodic peak potentials of 380 to 320 mV versus Ag/AgCl. Variations in the cathodic peak positions are speculatively attributed to redox-linked conformation change or changes in molecular orientation. OmcA can exchange electrons with ITO electrodes at higher current densities than with Fe2O3. Overall, OmcA can bind to and exchange electrons with several oxides, and thus its utility in fuel cells is not restricted to Fe2O3.

Eggleston, Carrick M.; Voros, Janos; Shi, Liang; Lower, Brian H.; Droubay, Timothy; Colberg, Patricia J.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

SciTech Connect

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami U/NREL DoD/DLA Project) (presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miami University/NREL DoD/DLA Project Miami University/NREL DoD/DLA Project High throughput combinatorial screening of biomimetic metal-organic materials for military hydrogen-storage applications Philip Parilla - NREL Joe Zhou, Dan Zhao - Miami U, Ohio Jeff Blackburn, Kevin O'Neill, Lin Simpson, Mike Heben - NREL Outline * Miami/NREL Project - Synthesis (Miami) - High Throughput Characterization (NREL) - Other Characterization * Other High Throughput Activities (NREL) - Parallel Sieverts - Parallel Gravimetric * Final Comments Overview of Miami/NREL Project * Goals - Development of H 2 storage materials based on MOFs, targeting 15 kJ/mole binding energy and high density of H 2 sites - Development of optical-based detection of adsorbed H 2 allowing rapid screening of samples * Approach - Combinatorial MOFs synthesis involving 8

445

Curriculum connections: science, technology, ethics, Manhattan Project and the Cold War, military tactics and strategy, World War II and H-Bomb, radiation and its effects, terrorism, international arms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb (DVD) On Order The Manhattan Project and the Cold War, military tactics and strategy, World War II and H-Bomb, radiation16.E5 S3285 2008 J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic

Rose, Annkatrin

446

THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: THE COMPOSITIONAL CLASSES OF THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We present the first results of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. The purpose of this survey was to measure the surface properties of a large number of Kuiper Belt objects and attempt to infer compositional and dynamical correlations. We find that the Centaurs and the low-perihelion scattered disk and resonant objects exhibit virtually identical bifurcated optical color distributions and make up two well-defined groups of objects. Both groups have highly correlated optical and NIR colors that are well described by a pair of two-component mixture models that have different red components but share a common neutral component. The small, H{sub 606} {approx}> 5.6 high-perihelion excited objects are entirely consistent with being drawn from the two branches of the mixing model, suggesting that the color bifurcation of the Centaurs is apparent in all small excited objects. On the other hand, objects larger than H{sub 606} {approx} 5.6 are not consistent with the mixing model, suggesting some evolutionary process avoided by the smaller objects. The existence of a bifurcation amongst all excited populations argues that the two separate classes of object existed in the primordial disk before the excited Kuiper Belt was populated. The cold classical objects exhibit a different type of surface that has colors that are consistent with being drawn from the red branch of the mixing model, but with much higher albedos.

Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: fraserw@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers  

SciTech Connect

Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Trends for Outer Disk Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface-brightness profiles of galaxy disks fall into three main classes, based on whether they are simple exponentials (Type I), bend down at large radii (Type II, "truncations") or bend up at large radii (Type III, "antitruncations"). Here, we discuss how the frequency of these different profiles depends on Hubble type, environment, and the presence or absence of bars; these trends may herald important new tests for disk formation models.

Peter Erwin; Michael Pohlen; Leonel Gutierrez; John E. Beckman

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Outer planet magnetospheres: a tutorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar wind magnetic fields. This has long been postulated as the ultimate cause of the geomagnetic storm,

Russell, C T

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program)/thermal regimes core hole project at Valles Caldera, New Mexico (VC-1): Drilling report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a review and summary of the core drilling operations of the first Valles Caldera research borehole (VC-1) under the Thermal Regimes element of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). The project is a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental scientific questions about magma, rock/water interactions, and volcanology through shallow (<1-km) core holes at Long Valley, California; Salton Sea, California; and the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy of the core hole, core quality description, core rig specifications, and performance. It is intended to guide future research on the core and in the borehole, as well as have applications to other areas and scientific problems in the Valles Caldera. The primary objectives of this Valles Caldera coring effort were (1) to study the hydrogeochemistry of a subsurface geothermal outflow zone of the caldera near the source of convective upflow, (2) to obtain structural and stratigraphic information from intracaldera rock formations in the southern ring-fracture zone, and (3) to obtain continuous core samples through the youngest volcanic unit in Valles Caldera, the Banco Bonito rhyolite (approximately 0.1 Ma). All objectives were met. The high percentage of core recovery and the excellent quality of the samples are especially notable. New field sample (core) handling and documentation procedures were successfully utilized. The procedures were designed to provide consistent field handling of the samples and logs obtained through the national CSDP.

Rowley, J.; Hawkins, W.; Gardner, J. (comps.)

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams

452

Hydrothermal brecciation in the Jemez Fault zone, Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) corehole VC-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks intersected deep in Continental Scientific Drilling Program corehole VC-1, adjacent to the late Cenozoic Valles caldera complex, have been disrupted to form a spectacular breccia sequence. The breccias are of both tectonic and hydrothermal origin, and probably formed in the Jemez fault zone, a major regional structure with only normal displacement since mid-Miocene. Tectonic breccias are contorted, crushed, sheared, and granulated; slickensides are commmon. Hydrothermal breccias, by contrast, lack these frictional textures, but arej commonly characterized by fluidized matrix foliation and prominent clast rounding. Fluid inclusions in the hydrothermal breccias are dominantly two-phase, liquid-rich at room temperature, principally secondary, and form two distinctly different compositional groups. Older inclusions, unrelated to brecciation, are highly saline and homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range 189 to 246/sup 0/C. Younger inclusions, in part of interbreccia origin, are low-salinity and homogenize (also to liquid) in the range 230 to 283/sup 0/C. Vapor-rich inclusions locally trapped along with these dilute liquid-rich inclusions document periodic boiling. These fluid-inclusion data, together with alteration assemblages and textures as well as the local geologic history, have been combined to model hydrothermal brecciation at the VC-1 site.

Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Frequency variations of quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions: A possible new ground-based diagnostic of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic pulsations and quasi-periodic (QP) amplitude modulations of ELF-VLF waves at Pc 3-4 frequencies (15-50 mHz) are commonly observed simultaneously in cusp-latitude data. The naturally occurring ELF-VLF emissions are believed to be modulated within the magnetosphere by the compressional component of geomagnetic pulsations formed external to the magnetosphere. The authors have examined data from South Pole Station (L {approximately} 14) to determine the occurrence and characteristics of QP emissions. On the basis of 14 months of data during 1987 and 1988 they found that QP emissions typically appeared in both the 0.5-1 kHz and 1-2 kHz receiver channels at South Pole Station and ocassionally in the 2-4 kHz channel. The QP emission frequency appeared to depend on solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, and the months near fall equinox in both 1987 and 1988 showed a significant increase in the percentage of QP emissions only in the lowest-frequency channel. The authors present a model consistent with these variations in which high-latitude (nonequatorial) magnetic field minima near the magnetopause play a major role, because the field magnitude governs both the frequency of ELF-VLF emissions and the whistler mode propagation cutoffs. Because the field in these regions will be strongly influenced by solar wind and IMF parameters, variations in the frequency of such emissions may be useful in providing ground-based diagnostics of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere. 32 refs., 13 figs.

Alford, J.; Engebretson, M. [Ausburg College, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Arnoldy, R. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Inan, U. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Evaluation of the utility and energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Army, Europe, 409th Base Support Battalion, Military Community at Grafenwoehr, Germany  

SciTech Connect

Under the provisions of Interagency Agreement DOE 1938-B090-A1 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Army Europe (USAREUR), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., is providing technical assistance to USAREUR in the areas of computer science, information engineering, energy studies, and engineering and systems development. One of the initial projects authorized under this interagency agreement is the evaluation of utility and energy monitoring and control systems (UEMCSs) installed at selected US Army installations in Europe. This report is an evaluation of the overall energy-conservation effectiveness and use of the UEMCS at the 409th Base Support Battalion located in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The 409th Base Support Battalion is a large USAREUR military training facility that comprises a large training area, leased housing, the main post area, and the camp areas that include Camps Aachen, Algier, Normandy, Cheb, and Kasserine. All of these facilities are consumers of electrical and thermal energy. However, only buildings and facilities in the main post area and Camps Aachen, Algier, and Normandy are under the control of the UEMCS. The focus of this evaluation report is on these specific areas. Recommendations to further increase energy and cost savings and to improve operation of the UEMCS are proposed.

Broders, M.A.; Ruppel, F.R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Military Large-Scale Experiment (LSE-1): system design and support activities. Final report, November 23, 1976-November 30, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy System will include a concentrating solar collector field of several acres. During periods of direct insolation, a heat-transfer fluid will be circulated through the collector field and thus heated to 500 to 600/sup 0/F. Some of the fluid will be circulated through a steam generator to drive a turbine-generator set; additional fluid will be stored in insulated tanks for use when solar energy is not available. The electrical output will satisfy a portion of the electrical load at Fort Hood's 87,000 Troop Housing Complex. Heat extracted from the turbine exhaust in the form of hot water will be used for space heating, absorption air conditioning, and domestic water heating at the 87,000 Complex. Storage tanks for the hot water are also included. The systems analysis and program support activities include studies of solar availability and energy requirements at Fort Hood, investigation of interfacing LSE-1 with existing energy systems at the 87,000 Complex, and preliminary studies of environmental, health, and safety considerations. An extensive survey of available concentrating solar collectors and modifications to a computerized system simulation model for LSE-1 use are also reported. Important program support activities are military liaison and information dissemination. The engineering test program reported involved completion of the Solar Engineering Test Module (SETM) and extensive performance testing of a single module of the linear-focusing collector.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Roles of Advection and In Situ Growth in Determining the Dynamics of Continental Shelf Zooplankton: High Frequency Measurements of Zooplankton Biomass Coupled with Measurements of Secondary Productivity in the Middle Atlantic Bight  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation of the role of continental margins in planetary carbon cycles can be approached in various ways, with the extremes being knowledge generated either by large-scale studies of a few basic characteristics of the carbon cycle of shelves worldwide (comparative approach) or by temporally intensive studies of a few sites selected to typify contrasting processes. Mechanisms of cross-shelf transfer, for example, are presently of great interest and within the US there are at least four differing continental shelf environments in which cross-shelf processes are driven by storms (southern Bering Sea, northeastern US), by jets and eddies (northern California coast), by freshwater runoff (Bering Sea, Gulf of Mexico), and by frontal meanders and filaments of the Gulf Stream (southeastern US). Because the type and magnitude of the physical forcing, and its variability on an annual scale, are fundamental to the response of the carbon cycle, investigation of each of these shelves would offer insight useful to predictive global understanding of the carbon cycle on continental shelves.

Smith, Sharon L.

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

457

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis (GC 160/161) and Petronius (VK 786) fields is estimated to include 17%-28%, 31%-51%, 31%-49% bacterial methane, respectively. Geochemical assessment of the reservoir gas in the fields show that the gas may be the product of thermal cracking of Upper Jurassic crude oil before final migration to the reservoirs. The gas from three different fields is of similar thermal maturity levels. In contrast to oil in reservoirs in the fields, which shows biodegradation effects, the C1-C5 reservoir gas is unaltered by biodegradation. Late gas migration may have occurred at or near present burial depth and flushed the reservoir system of previously biodegraded hydrocarbon gas to include any previous bacterial methane. Molecular and isotopic properties of reservoir gas and oil suggest that bacterial methane mixed with thermogenic hydrocarbon gas before entering the reservoirs. Thus the source of the bacterial methane is logically deeper than the present depth (>~4 km) and temperatures of the reservoirs. High sedimentation rate and low geothermal gradient may offer conditions favorable for generation and preservation of bacterial methane in deep subsurface petroleum system of the Gulf slope. Bacterial methane dispersed across the large drainage areas of the deep subsurface petroleum system may have been swept by migrating fluids at >4 km, and then charged both vents (GC 185, GC 233 and GC 286) at the seafloor and reservoirs in the deep subsurface. The volume of bacterial methane from geologically significant depth in rapidly subsiding basins may be underestimated.

Ozgul, Ercin

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Bibliography and Literature Database, Ecology of the Southern California Bight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outer continental shelf; oil and gas exploration; Fischer;DC . Descriptors: oil and gas exploration; environmentalE&P, Inc. Exploration activities State oil and gas leases

Allen, L

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

U  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FR 9388; 2813). DOEEIS-0470 Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) off Massachusetts, in Nantucket...

460

Statement by Secretary W. Bodman on Senate Passage of S. 3711...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

will help strengthen our nation's energy security by expanding the development of crude oil and natural gas reserves along our Outer Continental Shelf. "Just by going to the...

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461

PHASE II CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE USNS BRIDGE (T AOE 10), MILITARY SEALIFT FLEET SUPPORT COMMAND, NAVAL STATION, NORFOLK, VIRGINIA DCN 5180-SR-01-0  

SciTech Connect

In March 2011, the USNS Bridge was deployed off northeastern Honshu, Japan with the carrier USS Ronald Reagan to assist with relief efforts after the 2011 T?hoku earthquake and tsunami. During that time, the Bridge was exposed to air-borne radioactive materials leaking from the damaged Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant. The proximity of the Bridge to the air-borne impacted area resulted in the contamination of the ships air-handling systems and the associated components, as well as potential contamination of other ship surfaces due to either direct intake/deposition or inadvertent spread from crew/operational activities. Preliminary surveys in the weeks after the event confirmed low-level contamination within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ductwork and systems, and engine and other auxiliary air intake systems. Some partial decontamination was performed at that time. In response to the airborne contamination event, Military Sealift Fleet Support Command (MSFSC) contracted Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under provisions of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to assess the radiological condition of the Bridge. Phase I identified contamination within the CPS filters, ventilation systems, miscellaneous equipment, and other suspect locations that could not accessed at that time (ORAU 2011b). Because the Bridge was underway during the characterization, all the potentially impacted systems/spaces could not be investigated. As a result, MSFSC contracted with ORAU to perform Phase II of the characterization, specifically to survey systems/spaces previously inaccessible. During Phase II of the characterization, the ship was in port to perform routine maintenance operations, allowing access to the prev