National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for miles williston basin

  1. Little Knife field - US Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittstrom, M.D.; Lindsay, R.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Little Knife field is a combination structural and stratigraphic trap located near the structural center of the Williston basin, North Dakota. The field is approximately 12 mi (19.3 km) long and 2.5 to 5.5 mi (4 to 8.9 km) wide. Little Knife was discovered by Gulf Oil in 1976 as part of a regional exploration play involving a transition from impermeable to porous carbonate rocks. In 1987, ultimate recovery from the Mission Canyon (Mississippian) reservoir was estimated to be 97.5 MMBO. This included 57.5 MMBO primary, 27 MMBO secondary, and 13 MMBO tertiary (CO{sub 2}) oil. At present the field is still under primary recovery, since utilization efforts have not been successful. Approximately one-third of Little Knife's 130 ft (39.6 m) oil column is trapped by structural closure beneath a regional anhydrite seal in a north-south-trending anticline. The remaining two-thirds of the oil column is trapped where the reservoir beds change facies from porous dolostones and dolomitic limestones to nonporous limestones. Structural entrapment accounts for approximately 50% (127 MMBO) of the OOIP, but covers only 30% of the producing area. Production is from the upper portions of the Mission Canyon Formation, a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate-anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. The Mission Canyon in the Little Knife area is divided into six zones that record predominantly cyclic, subtidal deposition. These are overlain by prograding lagoonal, tidal flat, and sabkha beds. The source of Mission Canyon oil is thought to be the Bakken Formation, an organic-rich shale at the base of the Mississippian.

  2. Williston basin oil exploration: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, A.H.

    1991-06-01

    Past: In 1951, modern oil exploration came to the Williston basin with the discovery of Paleozoic oil on the large Nesson anticline. This was quickly followed by similar discoveries on Cedar Creek and Poplar anticlines. To the north, the Canadians, lacking large structures, concentrated on Paleozoic stratigraphic traps and were highly successful. US explorationists quickly followed, finding similar traps on the basin's northeastern flank and center. The 1960s saw multiple Devonian salt dissolution structures produce on the western flank. To the northwest, shallow Mississippian and deeper Ordovician pays were found on small structural closures. These later were combined with pays in the Devonian and Silurian to give multiple pay potential. In the basin center large buried structures, visible only to seismic, were located. The 1970s revealed an Ordovician subcrop trap on the southeast flank. Centrally, a Jurassic astrobleme with Mississippian oil caused a flurry of leasing and deep drilling. The 1982 collapse of oil prices essentially halted exploration. 1987 saw a revival when horizontal drilling for the Mississippian Bakken fractured shale promised viable economics. Present: Today, emphasis is on Bakken horizontal drilling in the deeper portion of the basin. Next in importance is shallow drilling such as on the northeastern flank. Future: An estimated on billion barrels of new oil awaits discovery in the Williston basin. Additional exploration in already established production trends will find some of this oil. Most of this oil, however, will almost certainly be found by following up the numerous geological leads hinted at by past drilling.

  3. Thermal history of Bakken shale in Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosnold, W.D. Jr.; Lefever, R.D.; Crashell, J.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Stratigraphic and thermal conductivity data were combined to analyze the thermostratigraphy of the Williston basin. The present thermostratigraphy is characterized by geothermal gradients of the order of 60 mK/m in the Cenozoic and Mesozoic units, and 30 mK/m in the Paleozoic units. The differences in geothermal gradients are due to differences in thermal conductivities between the shale-dominated Mesozoic and Cenozoic units and the carbonate-dominated Paleozoic units. Subsidence and compaction rates were calculated for the basin and were used to determine models for time vs. depth and time vs. thermal conductivity relationships for the basin. The time/depth and time/conductivity relationships include factors accounting for thermal conductivity changes due to compaction, cementation, and temperature. The thermal history of the Bakken shale, a primary oil source rock in the Williston basin, was determined using four different models, and values for Lopatin's time-temperature index (TTI) were calculated for each model. The first model uses a geothermal gradient calculated from bottom-hole temperature data, the second uses present-day thermostratigraphy, the third uses the thermostratigraphic relationship determined in this analysis, and the fourth modifies the third by including assumed variations in continental heat flow. The thermal histories and the calculated TTI values differ markedly among the models with TTI values differing by a factor of about two between some models.

  4. Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin ... Coalbed Methane Fields, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  5. Sulfur isotope ratios in petroleum research and exploration: Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thode, H.G.

    1981-09-01

    The three major types of crude oil in the Williston basin - the type I oils of the Winnipeg-Red River system, the type II oils of the Bakken-Madison system, and the type III oils of the Tyler-Pennsylvanian system - can be distinguished by their sulfur isotope compositions. They have characteristic delta/sup 34/S values of 5.8 +- 1.2 parts per thousand (ppt), 2.8 +- 0.8 ppt, and -4.0 +- 0.7 ppt respectively. Highly mature oils have less typical values. Type II oils which have migrated over a distance of some 150 km beyond the region of generation have maintained their characteristic delta/sup 34/S values even though sulfur may have been lost. This indicates little or no interaction with reservoir sulfates under normal circumstances. On the periphery of the basin, type II oils altered by water washing and biodegradation have altered delta/sup 34/S values which increase from +2.9 to +9.4 ppt with the increasing degree of crude oil degradation. The Bakken shales, source of the type II oils, have delta/sup 34/S distribution patterns in the reduced sulfur typical of marine sediments. The delta/sup 34/S values for the type II oils match most closely the delta/sup 34/S value of organic sulfur in the black bituminous shales of the lower Bakken.

  6. Thermal modeling of Bakken Formation of Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.

    1986-08-01

    Organic geochemical analyses provide a quantitative basis on which conceptual models of thermal maturation may be built. Contour maps of maturation indices of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin show anomalous patterns that are not dependent on burial depth. One such area is on the western side of the Nesson anticline. One-dimensional modeling incorporating a uniform, constant heat flow, lithology-dependent thermal conductivities, and decompaction factors indicates that these areas are less mature than surrounding regions. This is due primarily to decreasing burial depth and thinning of low-thermal-conductivity Tertiary and Cretaceous shales. Additional heat transfer to these regions may be due in part to heat transfer by fluid movement through aquifers or vertical fractures. The influence of these fluid systems is simulated through the use of a two-dimensional finite difference program. Basic assumptions are made concerning heat flow, thermal properties, and ground-water flow rates through time. Modeling of the time-temperature history is simplified by restricting the study to the time of greatest maturation, the post-Jurassic.

  7. Horizontal drilling the Bakken Formation, Williston basin: A new approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefever, J.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Horizontal drilling is an attractive new approach to exploration and development of the Mississippian/Devonian Bakken Formation in the southwestern part of North Dakota. This drilling technique increases the probability of success, the profit potential, the effective drainage area maximizing recoverable reserves, and the productivity by encountering more natural occurring fractures. The target formation, the Mississippian/Devonian Bakken, consists of three members in an overlapping relationship, a lower organic-rich black shale, a middle siltstone/limestone, and an upper organic-rich black shale. It attains a maximum thickness of 145 ft and thins to a feather edge along its depositional limit. Considered to be a major source rock for the Williston basin, the Bakken is usually overpressured where productive. Overpressuring is attributed to intense hydrocarbon generation. Reservoir properties are poor with core fluid porosities being generally 5% or less and permeabilities ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 md. The presence of natural fractures in the shale are necessary for production. Two types of fractures are associated with Bakken reservoirs: large vertical fractures (of tectonic origin) and microfractures (probably related to hydrocarbon generation). An economic comparison between horizontal and vertical wells show that well completion costs are approximately two times higher (average costs; $1,500,000 for a horizontal to $850,000 for a vertical) with average payout for horizontal wells projected to occur in half the time (1.5 yr instead of 3.4 yr). Projected production and reserves are considered to be 2 to 4 times greater from a horizontal well.

  8. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, and methods for improved completion efficiency. The investigations and demonstrations were focussed on Red River and Ratcliffe reservoirs in the Williston Basin within portions of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Both of these formations have been successfully explored with conventional 2-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) seismic was investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterizations were integrated with geological and engineering studies. The project tested lateral completion techniques, including high-pressure jetting lance technology and short-radius lateral drilling to enhance completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary oil where low permeability is a problem and higher-density drilling of vertical infill wells is limited by drilling cost. New vertical wells were drilled to test bypassed oil in ares that were identified by 3D seismic. These new wells are expected to recover as much or greater oil than was produced by nearby old wells. The project tested water injection through vertical and horizontal wells in reservoirs where application of waterflooding has been limited. A horizontal well was drilled for testing water injection. Injection rates were tested at three times that of a vertical well. This demonstration well shows that water injection with horizontal completions can improve injection rates for economic waterflooding. This report is divided into two sections, part 1 covers the Red River and part 2 covers the Ratcliffe. Each part summarizes integrated reservoir characterizations and outlines methods for targeting by-passed oil reserves in the respective formation and locality.

  9. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Results of seismic surveys are presented.

  10. A two-dimensional regional basin model of Williston basin hydrocarbon systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrus, J.; Wolf, S.; Doligez, B.

    1996-02-01

    Institut Francais du Petrole`s two-dimensional model, TEMISPACK, is used to discuss the functioning of petroleum systems in the Williston basin along a 330-km-long section, focusing on four regional source intervals: Ordovician Yeoman formation, Lower Devonian Winnipegosis Formation, Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, and Mississippian Lodgepole formation. Thermal history calibration against present temperature and source rock maturity profiles suggests that the Williston basin can be divided into a region of constant heat flow of about 55 mW/m{sup 2} away from the Nesson anticline, and a region of higher heat flow and enhanced thermal maturity in the vicinity of the Nesson anticline. Original kinetic parameters used in the calibration were derived for each of the four source rocks from Rock-Eval yield curves. Bakken overpressures are entirely due to oil generation, not compaction disequilibrium. Very low Bakken vertical permeabilities range from 0.01 to 0.001 and are matched against observed overpressures, whereas Bakken porosities based on the model and confirmed by measurements are inferred to be also unusually low, around 3%.

  11. Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-09-01

    The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Developing an oil generation model for resource assessment of Bakken formation, Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charpentier, R.R.; Krystinik, K.B.

    1984-04-01

    A model was developed for oil generation in the Devonian and Mississippian Bakken Formation, which has been proposed as the main hydrocarbon source rock within the Williston basin. The data consisted of formation temperatures and of density, neutron-porosity, resistivity, and gamma-ray logs from more than 250 wells in North Dakota and Montana. The upper and the lower shale members of the Bakken Formation were studied. Regression analysis, analysis of residuals, and cluster, discriminant, and factor analyses were used in an attempt to separate depositional effects--especially variations in organic content-from maturity. Regression and analysis of residuals indicate differences both areally and between the upper and lower members. In the upper member, and less strongly in the lower member, the center of the basin differs from the basin margins in that it has extreme residuals--either high or low. Clustering and residual analyses show roughly the same areal patterns. Inverse relationships, similar to those suggested by other workers, were found between formation temperature and organic content and between density logs and organic content. Also found, though, was that the addition of other factors, such as neutron porosity, helps to indicate organic content. Preliminary results show that it may be possible to model oil generation by using statistical techniques on well-log data. In particular, the model has the potential to refine estimates of the amount of hydrocarbons generated by the Bakken Formation in the Williston basin.

  13. Fracture-enhanced porosity and permeability trends in Bakken Formation, Williston basin, western North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freisatz, W.B.

    1988-07-01

    Fractures play a critical role in oil production from the Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. The Bakken Formation in the study area is known for its low matrix porosity and permeability, high organic content, thermal maturity, and relative lateral homogeneity. Core analysis has shown the effective porosity and permeability development within the Bakken Formation to be related primarily to fracturing. In theory, lineaments mapped on the surface reflect the geometry of basement blocks and the zones of fracturing propagated upward from them. Fracturing in the Williston basin is thought to have occurred along reactivated basement-block boundaries in response to varying tectonic stresses and crustal flexure throughout the Phanerozoic. Landsat-derived lineament maps were examined for the area between 47/degrees/ and 48/degrees/ north lat. and 103/degrees/ and 104/degrees/ west long. (northern Billings and Golden Valley Counties, and western McKenzie County, North Dakota) in an attempt to identify large-scale fracture trends. In the absence of major tectonic deformation in the craton, a subtle pattern of fracturing has propagated upward through the sedimentary cover and emerged as linear topographic features visible on these large-scale, remote-sensed images.

  14. Stratigraphy and diagenesis of the Mississippian Lodgepole Limestone, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, P.W. )

    1996-01-01

    Stratigraphic correlation of the Lodgepole Limestone (Bottineau Interval) indicates a sequence of three clinoform-shaped wedges that filled in the early Williston Basin. To date four productive 100m thick mounds have been discovered in the Lodgepole Limestone at Dickinson Field. The mounds seem to have nucleated at the toe of slope of the first highstand system tract and were subsequently buried by the second highstand systems tract. By isopaching each of the systems tracts one can predict were other mounds might have nucleated. Burial depth of the Bakken Shale-Lodgepole Limestone contact grade from 0.6 km at the edge of the Williston Basin to 3.4 km in the center. With increased depth the basal Lodgepole Limestone shows three phases of dolomitization, which are: small clear early dolomite; later iron rich fracture filling saddle dolomite and a later iron rich dolomite that seems to follow stylolites. Pre-oil migration mineralization of the overlying limestone include minor amounts of: anhydrite, pyrite, iron poor sphalerite, late iron rich sphalerite, chalcopyrite and celestite.

  15. Stratigraphy and diagenesis of the Mississippian Lodgepole Limestone, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, P.W.

    1996-12-31

    Stratigraphic correlation of the Lodgepole Limestone (Bottineau Interval) indicates a sequence of three clinoform-shaped wedges that filled in the early Williston Basin. To date four productive 100m thick mounds have been discovered in the Lodgepole Limestone at Dickinson Field. The mounds seem to have nucleated at the toe of slope of the first highstand system tract and were subsequently buried by the second highstand systems tract. By isopaching each of the systems tracts one can predict were other mounds might have nucleated. Burial depth of the Bakken Shale-Lodgepole Limestone contact grade from 0.6 km at the edge of the Williston Basin to 3.4 km in the center. With increased depth the basal Lodgepole Limestone shows three phases of dolomitization, which are: small clear early dolomite; later iron rich fracture filling saddle dolomite and a later iron rich dolomite that seems to follow stylolites. Pre-oil migration mineralization of the overlying limestone include minor amounts of: anhydrite, pyrite, iron poor sphalerite, late iron rich sphalerite, chalcopyrite and celestite.

  16. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1994--June 9, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.; Zinke, S.; Magruder, G.; Eby, D.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  17. Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  18. Recognition of hydrocarbon expulsion using well logs: Bakken Formation, Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, R.; Zelt, F.B.; Morgan, S.R.; Passey, Q.R. ); Snavely, P.D. III; Webster, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Upper Mississippian-Lower Devonian Bakken Formation forms a source/carrier/reservoir system in the Williston basin. Hydrocarbon expulsion within the Bakken has been identified by overlaying sonic and resistivity logs. Typically, these curves track in organically lean, water-saturated mudrocks because both respond mainly to porosity; however, in thermally mature organic-rich rocks and hydrocarbon reservoirs or carrier beds, the curves separate due to the anomalously high resistivity associated with replacement of pore water by hydrocarbons. Sonic/resistivity-log overlays for wells throughout the Montana and North Dakota parts of the Williston basin reveal significant increases and maximum in-curve separation within the middle siltstone member of the Bakken at subsurface temperatures of about 170 and 200{degree}F, respectively. Sequence-stratigraphic characteristics of the Bakken define the framework within which the expulsion process operates. The organic-rich upper and lower shale members represent the transgressive and early highstand systems tracts of two adjacent depositional sequences. A sequence boundary within the intervening middle siltstone member separates nearshore siltstone and sandstone of the late highstand systems tract in the lower sequence from cross-bedded subtidal to intertidal sandstones of the lowstand systems tract in the upper sequence. Reservoir properties vary across this sequence boundary. The authors attribute the log separation in the siltstone member to hydrocarbons expelled from the adjacent shales. Abrupt shifts in several geochemical properties of the shale members, indicative of hydrocarbon generation occur over the same subsurface temperature range as the rapid increase in log separation in the middle siltstone, thus indicating the contemporaneity of generation and expulsion.

  19. Macrofossils of Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian), Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrasher, L.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Results of this study of the macrofossils of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota have reinforced the suggestion, based on previous paleontological work in Saskatchewan, that the Bakken is of both Devonian and Mississippian age, rather than being entirely of Lower Mississippian age as originally considered. Increased drilling and coring activity in the North Dakota part of the Williston Basin has provided the opportunity for acquiring a larger fauna that was previously available. Based on lithologic character, the Bakken has been divided into three informal members. These consist of a calcareous siltstone unit between two lithologically similar units of carbonaceous shale. These black shales contain similar faunas distinct from that of the middle member. The black shales contain inarticulate brachiopods, conchostracans, and rare cephalopods and fish remains as well as more abundant conodonts, ostracods, and palynomorphs. The middle siltstone unit contains a more abundant and diverse fauna consisting of inarticulate and articulate brachiopods together with corals, gastropods, cephalopods, ostracods, echinoderm remains, and trace fossils. This is the first report of cephalopods, conchostracans, ostracods, corals, trace fossils, and some of the brachiopods in the Bakken, although all, except the gastropods, have been reported from stratigraphic equivalents (Exshaw Formation of south-central Montana, the Leatham Formation of northeastern Utah, and the middle member of the Pilot Shale in western Utah and eastern Nevada).

  20. A chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation from the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J.J.; Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K. ); Gosnold, W.D. )

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin. The modeling incorporates kinetic methods to simulate chemical reactions and 1-dimensional conductive heat flow models to simulate thermal histories of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation source rock. We developed thermal histories of the source rock for 53 wells in the basin using stratigraphic and heat flow data obtained by the University of North Dakota. Chemical kinetics for hydrocarbon generation, determined from Pyromat pyrolysis, were, then used with the diennal histories to calculate the present day value of the Rock-Eval T[sub max] for each well. The calculated Rock-Eval T[sub max] values agreed with measured values within amounts attributable to uncertainties in the chemical kinetics and the heat flow. These optimized thermal histories were then used with a more detailed chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion, modified from a model developed for the Cretaceous La Luna shale, to simulate pore pressure development and detailed aspects of the hydrocarbon chemistry. When compared to values estimated from sonic logs, the pore pressure calculation underestimates the role of hydrocarbon generation and overestimates the role of compaction disequilibrium, but it matches well the general areal extent of pore pressures of 0.7 times lithostatic and higher. The simulated chemistry agrees very well with measured values of HI, PI, H/C atomic ratio of the kerogen, and Rock-Eval S1. The model is not as successful in simulating the amount of extracted bitumen and its saturate content, suggesting that detailed hydrous pyrolysis experiments will probably be needed to further refine the chemical model.

  1. Organic carbon in Bakken Formation, United States portion of Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoker, J.W.; Hester, T.C.

    1983-12-01

    The upper and lower members of the Mississippian and Devonian Bakken Formation in the United States portion of the Williston basin are black shales that are extremely rich in organic matter and are the source of much of the oil found in the basin. Organic-carbon values are calculated from formationdensity logs using the equation: TOC = (154.497//rho/) -57.261, where TOC is organic-carbon content (wt. %) and /rho/ is formation density (g/cm/sup 3/). Test calculations comparing this equation to laboratory organic-carbon analyses from 39 wells in North Dakota show an average absolute difference of 1.1% in organic-carbon content. Organic-carbon content, calculated at 159 locations in North Dakota and 107 in Montana, averages 12.1% for the upper member of the Bakken Formation and 11.5% for the lower member. There is a regional depletion of organic carbon, paralleling present-day isotherms, that reflects the conversion of organic matter to oil and subsequent expulsion of the oil from the formation. The mass of organic carbon in the Bakken Formation is approximately evenly divided between the upper and lower members, and it totals about 126 X 10/sup 12/ kg in the study area, of which 102 X 10/sup 12/ kg are in the thermally mature region. The assumption that 167 mg HC/g TOC have migrated out of the mature Bakken shales leads to a tentative estimate that hydrocarbons equivalent to 132 billion bbl of 43/sup 0/ (API gravity) oil have been expelled from the United States portion of the upper and lower members of the Bakken Formation.

  2. A chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation from the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J.J.; Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.; Gosnold, W.D.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin. The modeling incorporates kinetic methods to simulate chemical reactions and 1-dimensional conductive heat flow models to simulate thermal histories of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation source rock. We developed thermal histories of the source rock for 53 wells in the basin using stratigraphic and heat flow data obtained by the University of North Dakota. Chemical kinetics for hydrocarbon generation, determined from Pyromat pyrolysis, were, then used with the diennal histories to calculate the present day value of the Rock-Eval T{sub max} for each well. The calculated Rock-Eval T{sub max} values agreed with measured values within amounts attributable to uncertainties in the chemical kinetics and the heat flow. These optimized thermal histories were then used with a more detailed chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion, modified from a model developed for the Cretaceous La Luna shale, to simulate pore pressure development and detailed aspects of the hydrocarbon chemistry. When compared to values estimated from sonic logs, the pore pressure calculation underestimates the role of hydrocarbon generation and overestimates the role of compaction disequilibrium, but it matches well the general areal extent of pore pressures of 0.7 times lithostatic and higher. The simulated chemistry agrees very well with measured values of HI, PI, H/C atomic ratio of the kerogen, and Rock-Eval S1. The model is not as successful in simulating the amount of extracted bitumen and its saturate content, suggesting that detailed hydrous pyrolysis experiments will probably be needed to further refine the chemical model.

  3. Conodonts of Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian), Williston basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, M.D.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    The Bakken Formation is a thin (maximum 145 ft, 45 m), clastic unit in the subsurface of Williston basin in the United States and Canada. The Bakken is similar in lithologic character and stratigraphic position to other black shale units deposited on the North American craton during the Late Devonian and Early Mississippian. The Bakken was initially considered entirely Mississippian in age. Paleontologic study of regional physical equivalents and analysis of the macrofauna in Saskatchewan has suggested that the Bakken is actually both Devonian and Mississippian. Conodonts were obtained from cores of the Bakken in an effort to determine the age of the formation in North Dakota and to assess the oil generation potential. Nearly 700 conodonts have been recovered, but are unevenly distributed within the Bakken Formation. A majority was obtained from thin (approximately 0.5 cm), fossil-rich beds within the upper shale. Conodonts from the top of the upper shale reveal a Mississippian (Kinderhookian) age and are here assigned to the Lower Siphonodella crenulata Zone. Only rare, fragmentary conodonts have been found in the middle member. Conodont evidence from the middle of the lower shale suggests a late Devonian (Famennian) age (Upper Polygnathus styriacus Zone) for this member. Conodont color has been established as a geothermometer in carbonate rocks. Color alteration indices of conodonts from the Bakken range from 1.5 to approximately 2.5 and indicate a pattern of increasing temperature with depth. These results suggest possible hydrocarbon generation from shallower depths than has been reported previously for the Bakken. The lack of agreement in interpreted hydrocarbon generation depths may be due to, among other things, the clastic nature of the Bakken Formation.

  4. Comparison of explosive and vibroseis source energy penetration during COCORP deep seismic reflection profiling in the Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steer, D.N.; Brown, L.D.; Knapp, J.H.; Baird, D.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of high-fold (50) vibroseis recordings with coincident low-fold (6) explosive source data from deep reflection surveys in the Williston Basin indicates that while vibroseis generated energy decays to ambient noise levels at 7--9 s two-way traveltime (twtt) (20--30 km depth), energy from explosive sources remains above ambient levels to 35--60 s twtt (105--180 km depth). Moreover, single, moderately sized (30 kg) and well-placed charges proved to be as effective as larger (90 kg) sources at penetrating to mantle traveltimes in this area. However, the explosive source energy proved highly variable, with source-to-ground coupling being a major limiting factor in shot efficacy. Stacked results from the vibroseis sources provide superior imagery of shallow and moderate crustal levels by virtue of greater redundancy and shot-to-shot uniformity; shot statics, low fold, and ray-path distortion across the relatively large (24--30 km aperture) spreads used during the explosive recording have proven to be especially problematic in producing conventional seismic sections. In spite of these complications, the explosive source recording served its primary purpose in confirming Moho truncation and the presence of a dipping reflection fabric in the upper mantle along the western flank of the Trans-Hudson orogen buried beneath the Williston Basin.

  5. A comparison of the rates of hydrocarbon generation from Lodgepole, False Bakken, and Bakken formation petroleum source rocks, Williston Basin, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvie, D.M.; Elsinger, R.J.; Inden, R.F.; Palacas, J.G.

    1996-06-01

    Recent successes in the Lodgepole Waulsortian Mound play have resulted in the reevaluation of the Williston Basin petroleum systems. It has been postulated that hydrocarbons were generated from organic-rich Bakken Formation source rocks in the Williston Basin. However, Canadian geoscientists have indicated that the Lodgepole Formation is responsible for oil entrapped in Lodgepole Formation and other Madison traps in portions of the Canadian Williston Basin. Furthermore, geoscientists in the U.S. have recently shown oils from mid-Madison conventional reservoirs in the U.S. Williston Basin were not derived from Bakken Formation source rocks. Kinetic data showing the rate of hydrocarbon formation from petroleum source rocks were measured on source rocks from the Lodgepole, False Bakken, and Bakken Formations. These results show a wide range of values in the rate of hydrocarbon generation. Oil prone facies within the Lodgepole Formation tend to generate hydrocarbons earlier than the oil prone facies in the Bakken Formation and mixed oil/gas prone and gas prone facies in the Lodgepole Formation. A comparison of these source rocks using a geological model of hydrocarbon generation reveals differences in the timing of generation and the required level of maturity to generate significant amounts of hydrocarbons.

  6. Developing an oil generation model for resource assessment of the Bakken Formation, US portion of the Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krystinik, K.B.; Charpentier, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the Bakken Formation, the proposed source rock for much of the hydrocarbons generated in the Williston basin, was done using well-log data. Principal components analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis were used on bulk density, neutron porosity, and resistivity logs, and formation temperatures. These analyses indicate that the present-day distribution of organic matter controls much of the variability in the log values. The pattern of present-day total organic carbon (TOC) is high in the central part of the basin near northeastern Montana and along the east edge of the basin. Low values of TOC occur in the area of the Nesson anticline and along the southwest edge of the basin. Using the regression of density on temperature and the analysis of residuals from this regression, it is possible to separate maturity effects from those of original deposition. These analyses reveal that original concentrations of organic matter were low near the shoreline and increased offshore to a high in northeast Montana. The pre-maturation and present-day TOC distributions derived using statistical analyses and well-log data can easily be explained by the depositional pattern and thermal history that would be expected in this basin, and by geochemical analyses. 9 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Statistical model for source rock maturity and organic richness using well-log data, Bakken Formation, Williston basin, United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krystinik, K.B.; Charpentier, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    A study of the Bakken Formation, the proposed source rock for much of the hydrocarbons generated in the Williston basin, was done using bulk density, neutron porosity, and resistivity logs, and formation temperatures. Principal components, cluster, and discriminant analyses indicate that the present-day distribution of organic matter controls much of the variability in the log values. Present-day total organic carbon values are high in the central part of the basin near northeastern Montana and along the east edge of the basin, and low in the area of the Nesson anticline and along the southwest edge of the basin. Using a regression of density on temperature and the analysis of residuals from this regression, hydrocarbon maturity effects were partially separated from depositional effects. These analyses suggest that original concentrations of organic matter were low near the limits of the Bakken and increased to a high in northeastern Montana. The pre-maturation distribution of total organic carbon and the present-day total organic carbon distribution, as determined by statistical analyses of well-log data, agree with the results of geochemical analyses. The distributions can be explained by a relatively simple depositional pattern and thermal history for the Bakken. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  8. File:EIA-Williston-NE-Gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    pdf) Description Williston Basin, Northeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  9. File:EIA-Williston-S-Gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    pdf) Description Williston Basin, South Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  10. File:EIA-Williston-NW-Gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    pdf) Description Williston Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  11. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  12. Natural CO2 accumulations in the western Williston Basin: A mineralogical analog for CO2 injection at the Weyburn site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Lake, John; Whittaker, Steven; Johnson, James W.

    2013-01-17

    The Devonian carbonates of the Duperow Formation on the western flank of the Williston Basin in southwest Saskatchewan contain natural accumulations of CO2, and may have done so for as long as 50 million years. These carbonate sediments are characterized by a succession of carbonate cycles capped by anhydrite-rich evaporites that are thought to act as seals to fluid migration. The Weyburn CO2 injection site lies 400 km to the east in a series of Mississippian carbonates that were deposited in a similar depositional environment. That long-term isolation of natural CO2 can be accomplished within carbonate strata has motivated themore » investigation of the Duperow rocks as a potential natural analog for storage of anthropogenic CO2 in carbonate lithologies. For the Duperow strata to represent a legitimate analog for Midale injection and storage, the similarity in lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineral compositions and porosity with the Midale Beds must be established. Here we compare lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineralogy and mineral compositions from both locales. The major mineral phases at both locales are calcite, dolomite and anhydrite. In addition, accessory pyrite, fluorite, quartz and celestine (strontium sulfate) are also observed. Dawsonite, a potential CO2-trapping mineral, is not observed within the CO2-bearing horizons of the Duperow Formation, however. The distribution of porosity in the Midale Vuggy units is similar to that of the Duperow Formation, but the Marly units of the Midale have significantly higher porosity. The Duperow Formation is topped by the Dinesmore evaporite that is rich in anhydrite, and often contains authigenic K-feldspar. The chemistry of dolomite and calcite from the two localities also overlaps. Silicate minerals are in low abundance (<3%) within the analyzed Duperow samples, with quartz and K-feldspar the only silicates observed petrographically or in X-ray diffraction patterns. The Midale Beds contain

  13. A resource evaluation of the Bakken Formation (Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian) continuous oil accumulation, Williston Basin, North Dakota and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoker, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation in the United States portion of the Williston Basin is both the source and the reservoir for a continuous oil accumulation -- in effect a single very large field -- underlying approximately 17,800 mi{sup 2} (46,100 km{sup 2}) of North Dakota and Montana. Within this area, the Bakken Formation continuous oil accumulation is not significantly influenced by the water column and cannot be analyzed in terms of conventional, discrete fields. Rather, the continuous accumulation can be envisioned as a collection of oil-charged cells, virtually all of which are capable of producing some oil, but which vary significantly in their production characteristics. Better well-performance statistics are linked regionally to higher levels of thermal maturity and to lower levels of reservoir heterogeneity. Although portions of the Bakken Formation continuous oil accumulation have reached a mature stage of development, the accumulation as a whole is far from depleted.

  14. Bakken and other Devonian-Mississippian petroleum source rocks, northern Rocky Mtns.-Williston basin: Depositional and burial history and maturity estimations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    The three-member Devonian-Mississippian Bakken-Exshaw organic-rich shaly facies is widely distributed in the northern U.S. and southern Canadian Cordillera. Equivalent facies are also present as far south as Utah and Nevada. Paleogeographically, these rocks thin markedly or pinchout to the west approximately along the Devonian-Mississippian carbonate reef-mound belt of the Cordilleran shelf margin. Although these rocks reach maximum organic richness approximately at the Devonian-Carboniferous transition, similar but somewhat less organic-rich Bakken-like beds are also present in underlying Upper Devonian and overlying Lower Carboniferous carbonate depositional cycles. At least ten cycles are identified in the underlying Duperow and Jefferson Formations, characterized by basal organic-rich Bakken-like shale or shaly carbonate that grades upward into carbonate mound or reefal beds, overlain by evaporite or solution breccia. Cycles in the overlying Lodgepole and Mission Canyon Formations, as many as 10-12 in number, are similar except that the carbonates are composed of algal-oolith, crinoid, or mixed skeletal beds, and end-cycle evaporitic units are less prevalent in the lower cycles. These dark shaly beds are the most important source of hydrocarbon reserves in Montana and the Williston basin. Maximum net thickness of the Devonian-Mississippian organic-rich facies is in the Williston basin. However, variable thicknesses of these potential source rocks is present in parts of Montana as far west as the thrust belt. Burial history studies suggest that in some areas these rocks are probably thermally immature. However, in much of the area original burial depths are sufficient for them to reach the thermally mature stage, and therefore are of importance to further exploration efforts in the Devonian-Mississippian Madison-Duperow-Jefferson Formations.

  15. Effects of outcropping groundwater from the F- and H-Area seepage basins on the distribution of fish in Four Mile Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H.; Storey, C.

    1990-10-01

    Four Mile Creek was electrofished during June 26--July 2, 1990 to assess the impacts of outcropping ground water form the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins on fish abundance and distribution. Number of fish species and total catch were comparable at sample stations upstream from and downstream from the outcropping zone in Four Mile Creek. Species number and composition downstream from the outcropping zone in Four Mile Creek were similar to species number and composition in unimpacted portions of Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Meyers Branch. These findings indicate that seepage basin outcropping was not adversely affecting the Four Mile Creek fish community. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Williston, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    congressional district. 1 2 Registered Energy Companies in Williston, Vermont Phillips BioFuel Supply Co References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  17. EA-1896: Williston to Stateline Transmission Line Project, Mountrail Williams Electric Cooperative, Williston, North Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Stateline I transmission line, in Williston, North Dakota, to Western’s transmission system.

  18. Miles Hall

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Miles Hall - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  19. Miles Hand Grenade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrington, John J.; Buttz, James H.; Maish, Alex B.; Page, Ray R.; Metcalf, Herbert E.

    2005-11-15

    A simulated grenade for MILES-type simulations generates a unique RF signal and a unique audio signal. A detector utilizes the time between receipt of the RF signal and the slower-traveling audio signal to determine the distance between the detector and the simulated grenade.

  20. miles-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical Velocity Statistics as Derived from 94-GHz Radar Measurements N. L. Miles, D. M. Babb, and J. Verlinde The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Profiles of millimeter-wavelength radar Doppler spectra contain information about both the mean vertical velocities and cloud microphysics. In order to obtain this information, it is necessary to remove the effects of turbulence. Stratocumulus clouds often contain various species of ice and liquid, including

  1. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin ... Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  2. Chapter 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled Chapter 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled Vehicle-miles traveled--the number of miles that residential vehicles are driven--is probably the most important...

  3. Valley Co. McCone Co. Roosevelt Co. Richland Co. Sheridan Co...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class Montana North Dakota South Dakota Wyoming INDEX MAP 0 10 20 5 15 Miles Williston Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Liquids Reserve Class No 2004 Liquids ...

  4. Valley Co. McCone Co. Roosevelt Co. Richland Co. Sheridan Co...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class Montana North Dakota South Dakota Wyoming INDEX MAP 0 10 20 5 15 Miles Williston Basin Oil & Gas Field Boundaries 2004 BOE Reserve Class No 2004 reserves 0.1 - ...

  5. Valley Co. McCone Co. Roosevelt Co. Richland Co. Sheridan Co...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class Montana North Dakota South Dakota Wyoming INDEX MAP 0 10 20 5 15 Miles Williston Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Gas Reserve Class No 2004 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 ...

  6. The Three Mile Island crisis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houts, P.S.; Cleary, P.D.; Hu, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    Since the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant, many studies have assessed its impacts. Compiled and summarized in this book are the results of five related surveys, all aimed at the scientific assessment of the psycho-socio-economic behavior of the residents around the TMI facility. These studies are based on a randomly selected, large sample of the population (with telephones) around TMI.

  7. Williston Basin. Gulf's CO/sub 2/ mini-test at Little Knife being evaluated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, T.

    1981-10-01

    The Gulf Oil Exploration and Production Co. nonproducing CO/sub 2/ mini-test at Little Knife field is complete and under evaluation. Although Gulf and the Department of Energy, cosponsors of the $5.62-million project in Billings County, North Dakota, say it is premature to draw conclusions, it appears field test results mirror those achieved in laboratory tests. CO/sub 2/ and tracers have shown up in the observation wells. The objective was to show that CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement is potentially a commercial method of recovering crude oil from high-saturation carbonate reservoirs that have not been extensively waterflooded. The mini-test site, 3-144N-98W in Little Knife field, was appropriate because it was representative of the field.

  8. Miles Electric Vehicles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Name: Miles Electric Vehicles Place: Santa Monica, California Zip: 90405 Sector: Vehicles Product: California-based developer of...

  9. Mile High: Order (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Mile High Equipment, LLC to pay a $17,525 civil penalty after finding Mile High had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. approximately 109 units of lce-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW, a noncompliant product.

  10. Identifying Oil Exploration Leads using Intergrated Remote Sensing and Seismic Data Analysis, Lake Sakakawea, Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, Willistion Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott R. Reeves; Randal L. Billingsley

    2004-02-26

    The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, inhabited by the Arikara, Mandan and Hidatsa Tribes (now united to form the Three Affiliated Tribes) covers a total area of 1530 mi{sup 2} (980,000 acres). The Reservation is located approximately 15 miles east of the depocenter of the Williston basin, and to the southeast of a major structural feature and petroleum producing province, the Nesson anticline. Several published studies document the widespread existence of mature source rocks, favorable reservoir/caprock combinations, and production throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas indicating high potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. This technical assessment was performed to better define the oil exploration opportunity, and stimulate exploration and development activities for the benefit of the Tribes. The need for this assessment is underscored by the fact that, despite its considerable potential, there is currently no meaningful production on the Reservation, and only 2% of it is currently leased. Of particular interest (and the focus of this study) is the area under the Lake Sakakawea (formed as result of the Garrison Dam). This 'reservoir taking' area, which has never been drilled, encompasses an area of 150,000 acres, and represents the largest contiguous acreage block under control of the Tribes. Furthermore, these lands are Tribal (non-allotted), hence leasing requirements are relatively simple. The opportunity for exploration success insofar as identifying potential leads under the lake is high. According to the Bureau of Land Management, there have been 591 tests for oil and gas on or immediately adjacent to the Reservation, resulting in a total of 392 producing wells and 179 plugged and abandoned wells, for a success ratio of 69%. Based on statistical probability alone, the opportunity for success is high.

  11. Mile High: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Mile High Equipment, LLC manufactured and distributed noncompliant Ice-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW in the U.S.

  12. Mile High: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Mile High Equipment, LLC finding that Ice-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole...

  14. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  15. March 28, 1979: Three Mile Island | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 1979: Three Mile Island March 28, 1979: Three Mile Island March 28, 1979: Three Mile Island March 28, 1979 A partial meltdown of the core occurs at one of the two reactors at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Highways Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways on Delicious Rank

  17. Modeling overpressures in sedimentary basins: Consequences for permeability and rheology of shales, and petroleum expulsion efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrus, J.; Schneider, F.; Wolf, S. )

    1994-07-01

    The prediction of overpressures using Institut Francais du Petrole's 2-D numerical model TEMISPACK is applied to several provinces of the world. In the Paris basin, France, normally pressured Liassic shales are shown to have permeabilities around a microdarcy, independently confirmed by laboratory measurements. In contrast, in the Norway section of the North Sea, Williston Basin, Canada, Gulf Coast, and in the Mahakam delta, observed overpressures of 10-50 MPa are consistently modeled with shale permeabilities around 1-10 nanodarcys. This theoretical value fits well with the lowest permeability measured in compacted shales. For these basins, compaction disequilibrium was found to explain most (>85%) of the overpressures. The only exception was the Williston basin in which overpressures observed in the organic-rich Bakken shales are entirely due to hydrocarbon generation. In Mahakam delta, the rheology of shales is nonlinear, i.e., the strength of shales increases rapidly with death. Consequently, shale compaction cannot be described by the linear behavior often assumed in hydrology. In the absence of fault barriers, numerical simulations and geological evidence suggest that overpressured source rocks have low or very low expulsion efficiency, irrespective of their organic content. However, shales with a permeability on the order of a microdarcy do not hinder petroleum migration.

  18. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,805,"6,634",94.1,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,805,"6,634",94.1

  19. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau...

  20. Focus Series: Denver Energy Advisor Program Helps Homeowners Go the Extra Mile in Mile-High City

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Focus Series: Denver Energy Advisor Program Helps Homeowners Go the Extra Mile in Mile-High City, a publication of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Program.

  1. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were

  2. Seven Mile Hill Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.wsgs.uwyo.eduTopicsEnergyResourceswind.aspx http:renewableenergydev.comredwind-power-seven-mile-hill-wind-energy-project Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

  4. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excel file and dataset for Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of ... Move in Opposition - Dataset 2012 Data File 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report Data

  5. Title list publicly available documents: Three Mile Island Unit...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS THREE MILE ISLAND-2 REACTOR; BIBLIOGRAPHIES; REACTOR LICENSING; DC - 78 - Light Water Reactor Technology Word Cloud More ...

  6. Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay

  7. Valley Co. McCone Co. Roosevelt Co. Richland Co. Sheridan Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class Montana North Dakota South Dakota Wyoming INDEX MAP ± 0 10 20 5 15 Miles Williston Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Liquids Reserve Class No 2004 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl > 10,000 Mbbl

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Vehicle Mile

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Traveled (eVMT): On-road Results and Analysis | Department of Energy Electric Vehicle Mile Traveled (eVMT): On-road Results and Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Vehicle Mile Traveled (eVMT): On-road Results and Analysis Presentation given by Idaho National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting about Electric Vehicle Mile Traveled (eVMT): on-road results and

  9. "Table 11. Fuel Economy, Selected Survey Years (Miles Per Gallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy, Selected Survey Years (Miles Per Gallon)" ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",15.1,16.1,18.3,19.3,19.8,20.2 "Household Characteristics" "Census...

  10. China has 6,000-mile pipeline system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ming, S.

    1983-08-01

    A dramatic change has taken place in China's oil transport system, with pipelines replacing tank-cars as the most important means of transport for crude oil and petroleum products. According to Petroleum Ministry officials, the volume of crude oil carried by China's pipeline system increased from 23.2 percent in 1971 to 65.6 percent in 1981, while the volume delivered by tank-cars declined from 61.11 percent to 8.4 percent. The remainder was transported by tankers. China's 9,700 km (6,000-mile) pipeline network includes 5,600 km (3,500 miles) designed to carry crude oil and more than 600 km (375 miles) for petroleum products, plus 3,400 km (2,100 miles), mostly in Sichuan province, for natural gas.

  11. Seven Mile, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Seven Mile is a village in Butler County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 8th congressional district.12 References ...

  12. Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  13. Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  14. Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  15. Microsoft Word - 10_Million_Loaded_Miles.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Trucks Surpass 10 Million Loaded Miles CARLSBAD, N.M., April 19, 2010 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office said drivers, who haul defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, surpassed 10 million safe, loaded miles. The first of more than 8,400 shipments to WIPP arrived 11 years ago from Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico. "There's no doubt, some of the best drivers in the transportation industry work for

  16. Subsurface cross section of lower Paleozoic rocks, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macke, D.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Powder River basin is one of the most actively explored Rocky Mountain basins for hydrocarbons, yet the lower Paleozoic (Cambrian through Mississippian) rocks of this interval remain little studied. As a part of a program studying the evolution of sedimentary basins, approximately 3200 km of cross section, based on more than 50 combined geophysical and lithologic logs, have been constructed covering an area of about 200,000 km/sup 2/. The present-day basin is a Cenozoic structural feature located between the stable interior of the North American craton and the Cordilleran orogenic belt. At various times during the early Paleozoic, the basin area was not distinguishable from either the stable craton, the Williston basin, the Central Montana trough, or the Cordilleran miogeocline. Both deposition and preservation in the basin have been greatly influenced by the relative uplift of the Transcontinental arch. Shows of oil and dead oil in well cuttings confirm that hydrocarbons have migrated through at least parts of the basin's lower Paleozoic carbonate section. These rocks may have been conduits for long-distance migration of hydrocarbons as early as Late Cretaceous, based on (1) the probable timing of thermal maturation of hydrocarbon-source rocks within the basin area and to the west, (2) the timing of Laramide structural events, (3) the discontinuous nature of the reservoirs in the overlying, highly productive Pennsylvanian-Permian Minnelusa Formation, and (4) the under-pressuring observed in some Minnelusa oil fields. Vertical migration into the overlying reservoirs could have been through deep fractures within the basin, represented by major lineament systems. Moreover, the lower Paleozoic rocks themselves may also be hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  17. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,630,"5,294",95.9,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  18. Early dismantlement of Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, J.; Heisey, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear station ceased commercial operation following the March 1979 accident. Following completion of an extensive cleanup effort that included removal and shipment of the damaged core, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a possession-only license (POL) amendment on September 14, 1993. Postdefueling monitored storage (PDMS) technical specifications were issued on December 28, 1993. Entry into PDMS required that the licensee demonstrate that the plant was in a safe and stable condition and posed no risk to public health and safety.

  19. Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs Yimin Zhu, PD/PI OneD Material, LLC (former Nanosys Energy Storage) Palo Alto, California June 16 ~20, 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies AMR 2014 ES130_zhu_2014_p This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information TM * Barriers addressed - Performance: Low Wh/kg & Wh/L - Life: Poor deep discharge cycles - Cost: High $/kWh * Targets Anode: >700 mAh/g 1,600 mAh/g >800 cycles

  20. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert.

  1. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  2. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  3. Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles When a household has more than one vehicle, the secondary vehicles travel fewer miles than the primary vehicle. In a two-vehicle household, the second vehicle travels less than half of the miles that the primary vehicle travels in a day. In a six-vehicle household, the sixth vehicle travels fewer than five miles a day. Daily Vehicle

  4. Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State | Department of Energy 2: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week In the United States, the U.S. Department of Transportation classifies 3.9 million miles of roadway as rural and 1.2 million miles of roadway as urban. Each state has a different travel pattern affecting the proportion of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) on rural versus urban roads.

  5. Fact #938: August 15, 2016 Median All-Electric Vehicle Range Grew from 73 Miles in Model Year 2011 to 83.5 Miles in Model Year 2016- Dataset

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Excel file and dataset for Median All-Electric Vehicle Range Grew from 73 Miles in Model Year 2011 to 83.5 Miles in Model Year 2016

  6. Valley Entrepreneurial Network monthly meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class Montana North Dakota South Dakota Wyoming INDEX MAP ± 0 10 20 5 15 Miles Williston Basin Oil & Gas Field Boundaries 2004 BOE Reserve Class No 2004 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE >100,000 MBOE

    Gas Reserve Class Montana North Dakota South Dakota Wyoming INDEX MAP ± 0 10 20 5 15 Miles Williston Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Gas Reserve Class No 2004 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1

  7. Valley Co. McCone Co. Roosevelt Co. Richland Co. Sheridan Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class Montana North Dakota South Dakota Wyoming INDEX MAP ± 0 10 20 5 15 Miles Williston Basin Oil & Gas Field Boundaries 2004 BOE Reserve Class No 2004 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE >100,000 MBOE

  8. Valley Co. McCone Co. Roosevelt Co. Richland Co. Sheridan Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class Montana North Dakota South Dakota Wyoming INDEX MAP ± 0 10 20 5 15 Miles Williston Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Gas Reserve Class No 2004 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF

  9. Columbia basin project, Washington: Adams, Douglas, Franklin, Grant, Lincoln, and Walla Walla Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Columbia Basin Project is a multipurpose development utilizing a portion of the resources of the Columbia River in the central part of the State of Washington. The key structure, Grand Coulee Dam, is on the main stem of the Columbia River about 90 miles west of Spokane, Wash. The extensive irrigation works extend southward on the Columbia Plateau 125 miles to the vicinity of Pasco, Wash., where the Snake and Columbia Rivers join.

  10. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  11. Regional geologic characteristics relevant to horizontal drilling, Woodford Shale, Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hester, T.C.; Schmoker, J.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Horizontal drilling in the Late Devonian-Early Mississippian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin has spurred new interest in other black shales as primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. The Late Devonian-Early Mississippian Woodford Shale, which is similar in some respects to the Bakken Formation, is a major source of oil and gas in the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma and could prove to be a significant reservoir rock as well. The three regional geologic characteristics of the Woodford discussed here are of likely importance to horizontal drilling programs, although direct relations to drilling strategy cannot be developed until empirical data from horizontal tests become available. First, the Woodford Shale is composed of three distinct depositional units (the upper, middle, and lower informal members) with different physical and geochemical properties. Second, a paleotopographic high that was rising before and during Woodford deposition divided the Woodford Shale into northeast and southwest depocenters. Third, Woodford depositional patterns are overprinted by thermal-maturity trends shaped primarily by differential burial of the Woodford during Pennsylvanian and Permian time. The Woodford Shale northeast of the forebulge is generally immature to marginally mature, whereas its thermal maturity southwest of the forebulge ranges from mature to postmature with respect to oil generation. A formation resistivity of about 35 ohm-m approximates the updip limit of oil-saturated Woodford Shale from which free oil might be produced from fracture systems.

  12. DC Fast Charge Effects on Battery Life and Performance Study - 50,000 Mile Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 L2 4582 L2 2183 DCFC 2078 DCFC 0-10k Miles (Oct-Jan) 28.6 28.6 32.7 32.5 10-20k Miles (Jan-Mar) 22.7 22.5 27.6 27.3 20-30k Miles (Apr-Jul) 35.7 36.0 39.8 39.5 30-40k Miles (Jul-Oct) 38.2 38.4 40.8 40.6 40-50k Miles (Oct-Mar) 23.2 23.6 27.3 26.8 1. Capacity and Peak Power tests based on tests from USABC Electric Vehicle Battery Test Procedures Manual Revision 2. Electric Vehicle Power Characterization test adapted from the Hybrid Pulse Power Characterization Test from the FreedomCAR Battery

  13. MASK basin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MASK basin - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  14. Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dataset | Department of Energy 3: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 - Dataset Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 fotw#903_web.xlsx (17.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation: S&K Holding Company - 2004 Project 2015 GTO Peer Review Fact #926: May 23, 2016 Petroleum

  15. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Price of Gasoline - Dataset | Department of Energy 0 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline fotw#860_web.xlsx (30.54 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #906: January 4, 2016 VMT and the Price of Gasoline Typically Move in Opposition -

  16. Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State - Dataset | Department of Energy 2: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State - Dataset Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State fotw#902_web.xlsx (177.48 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 - Dataset Fact #906: January 4, 2016 VMT

  17. Fact #552: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region Fact #552: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region Total vehicle miles of travel (VMT) in the U.S. have declined from 2007 to 2008. The latest data available, September 2008, shows a 4.4% decline in travel that varies by region. Comparing September 2007 to September 2008, the South Atlantic and South Gulf regions experienced VMT declines of more than 5%. Total U.S. cumulative VMT for 2008 (January-September) is 3.5%

  18. Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 6: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose In 2009, getting to and from work accounted for about 27% of household vehicle-miles of travel (VMT). Work-related business was 8.4% of VMT in 2001, but declined to 6.7% in 2009, possibly due to advancements in computing technology making it possible for more business to be handled electronically. VMT for shopping was almost

  19. EIS-0433-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    would transport crude oil from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin and the Williston Basin to existing pipeline facilities near Steele City, Nebraska, for onward transport to ...

  20. 51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

  1. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware 26.24 - W...

  2. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware 28.49 - W...

  3. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    43 0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida 0.0161 W W W W 0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin...

  4. Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 43 Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994...

  5. Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 fotw903web.xlsx (17.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead ...

  6. Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The average trip length (one-way) is 9.7 miles according to the 2009 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey. Trip lengths vary by the purpose of the trip. Shopping and family/personal business...

  7. Bureaucracy in crisis: Three Mile Island, the shuttle Challenger, and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casamayou, M.H.

    1995-07-01

    This book is a study in organizational theory about how technological bureaucracies perceive, communicate about, and respond to potential risks to public safety, using Three mile island and the Challenger accident as examples.

  8. Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vehicle travel in the U.S. varies by month. There are many reasons for this, including the fact that some months are shorter than others. The vehicle miles of travel (VMT) recorded in February is...

  9. Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 (Continued) 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor:...

  10. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The prices of gasoline and diesel fuel affect the transportation sector in many ways. For example, fuel prices can impact the number of miles driven and affect the choices consumers make when...

  11. Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of Commercial Trucking; A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel ...

  12. No Recordable Accidents in 17,000 Waste Shipments Across 3.4 Million Miles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – No U.S. Department of Transportation recordable accidents resulted from DOE’s nearly 17,000 radioactive, hazardous material and waste shipments across 3.4 million miles in fiscal 2015.

  13. 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) Presentation given at DEER 2006, ...

  14. John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie

    2009-07-15

    Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

  15. Toward 300 Miles on a Single Charge? | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Toward 300 Miles on a Single Charge? News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.27.13 Toward 300 Miles on a Single Charge? Berkeley Lab scientists design a high-performance, long cycle-life

  16. Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es130_zhu_2012_p.pdf (1.04 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs U.S. Battery R&D Progress and Plans

  17. Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 3 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es130_zhu_2013_p.pdf (1.37 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced High-Performance Batteries for Electric Vehicle (EV) Applications

  18. 1982 worldwide pipeline construction will top 21,900 miles, $9. 5 billion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.

    1982-07-01

    Reports that pipeline construction slowed slightly in 1982 because of lowered economic activity worldwide, with an upturn forecast for 1983. Explains that need for new pipelines to transport increasing amounts of oil and gas energy now being discovered, plus use of pipelines to transport other commodities in increasing amounts, has created a backlog of demand for facilities. Indicates that commodities suited for pipeline transport and getting consideration include crude oil; refined products; natural gas liquids; LPG; coal slurries; carbon dioxide (used for enhanced oil recovery); chemicals such as ammonia, ethane, ethylene, and similar petrochemical feedstocks; industrial gases such as oxygen, nitrogen; and solids slurries such as ores, wood chips, and other non-soluble minerals, even items such as wood chips and wood pulp for paper-making. Reveals that there are 10,396 miles of coal slurry pipeline planned for the US and 500 miles in Canada. Major US projects underway in the gas pipeline field include the 797-mile, 36-in. Trailblazer system in Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. Products/ LPG/NGL pipelines underway include 105 miles of dual 4 and 6-in. line in Kansas. Crude pipeline activity includes 100 miles of 12-in. in California and 80 miles of 4 thru 40-in. in Alaska on the North Slope. Updates plans in Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Ireland, France, the Middle East, Australia, Southeast Asia, Mexico, South America and the USSR.

  19. Peru onshore-deepwater basins should have large potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuniga-Rivero, F.; Keeling, J.A.; Hay-Roe, H.

    1998-10-19

    Perupetro`s recent announcement that 13 offshore exploration blocks of nearly 1 million acres each will be offered for bids in the fourth quarter of 1998 has reawakened interest in this extensive, largely unexplored area. The new government policy, combined with the results of modern, deep-probing seismic surveys, has already led to a stepped-up search for oil and gas that will probably escalate. Most of Peru`s ten coastal basins are entirely offshore, but at both ends of the 1,500-mile coastline the sedimentary basins stretch from onshore across the continental shelf and down the continental slope. Two of these basin areas, both in the north, have commercial production. The third, straddling the country`s southern border, has never been drilled either on land or offshore. The Peruvian sectors of these three basins total roughly 50,000 sq miles in area, 75% offshore. All have major oil and gas potential. They are described individually in this article, an update in the ongoing studies last reported at the 1998 Offshore Technology Conference and in the first article of this series.

  20. Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FOURTH QUARTER 20 08 REPORT Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison F F Prepared by: M A R C H 2 0 0 9 FOURTH QUARTER 2008 REPORT OPERATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING WITHIN A THREE-MILE RADIUS OF PROJECT RULISON Prepared for: Noble Energy Inc. EnCana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. Williams Production RMT Inc. Prepared by: URS Corporation 8181 East Tufts Avenue Denver, CO 80237 March 26, 2009 Rulison Fourth Quarter 2008 Report March 2009 i TABLE OF

  1. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultralow-Sulfur Fuel | Department of Energy Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultralow-Sulfur Fuel Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in

  2. To Pluto and Beyond: Powering New Horizons' 3-Billion-Mile Journey |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy To Pluto and Beyond: Powering New Horizons' 3-Billion-Mile Journey To Pluto and Beyond: Powering New Horizons' 3-Billion-Mile Journey July 15, 2015 - 11:23am Addthis This image of Pluto, taken by New Horizons after a 9 1/2-year journey, is our highest-resolution photo of the dwarf planet since its discovery by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930. | Photo courtesy of NASA. This image of Pluto, taken by New Horizons after a 9 1/2-year journey, is our highest-resolution photo of the

  3. 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 00,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_barnitt.pdf (575.91 KB) More Documents & Publications Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel Impact

  4. Structural evolution of Val Verde basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, D.E.; Petersen, N.

    1984-04-01

    The Val Verde basin is a northwest-southeast trending foreland basin contained within the southern portion of the Permian basin. The Val Verde basin has several large fields, e.g., Brown Bassett and JM, which have a combined ultimate recovery of over 1 tcf of gas. Structurally, the major fields are complexly faulted features related to differential uplift of basement blocks. Middle and Upper Permian strata are not present in the central and southern Val Verde basin. Appreciable amounts of Permian sediment were eroded prior to deposition of Cretaceous strata, thus, Cretaceous rocks unconformably overlie Wolfcamp sediments. Restored estimates for vitrinite reflectance data indicate a minimum of 8000-10,000 ft (2400-3000 m) of Permian rocks have been eroded. Therefore, in the central and southern portions of the basin, Paleozoic rocks are inferred to have occupied depths several miles deeper than present. Vitrinite reflectance values for Ellenburger (Ordovician) rocks at Brown Bassett are approximately 1.8 to 2.0% R/sub o/. Ellenburger reflectance values increase to the south and southeast to values greater than 4.5% R/sub o/. The most southerly wells also have reflectance depth trends which show a break in gradient within Wolfcamp sediments (9000-10,000 ft, 2700-3000 m). The change in gradient suggests a thermal event contemporaneous with the basin's rapid downwarping and Wolfcamp deposition. Any exploration in the basin, therefore, must recognize the unique relationships between structural timing, structural position, depth of burial, thermal pulses, and hydrocarbon mobility for a large portion of Val Verde basin.

  5. Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

  6. Crisis contained, The Department of Energy at Three Mile Island: a history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantelon, P L; Williams, R C

    1980-12-01

    An account is given of the response of US DOE to the Three Mile Island-2 accident on March 28, 1979. The accident is treated as though it was a military battle. A synoptic chronologgy of the accident events and of DOE and other responses is included. (DLC)

  7. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.0323 0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida 0.0146 W W W W 0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian...

  8. Robin Miles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Experiments Fast Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star How ICF Works Discovery ...

  9. Reactor engineering support of operations at Three Mile Island nuclear station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tropasso, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to detail the activities in which plant nuclear engineering personnel provide direct support to plant operations. The specific activities include steady-state, transient, and shutdown/refueling operation support as well as special project involvement. The paper is intended to describe the experiences at Three Mile Island (TMI) in which significant benefit to the success of the activity is achieved through the support of the nuclear engineers.

  10. Summary Report of Commercial reactor Criticality Data for Three Mile Island Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry B. Wimmer

    2001-08-29

    The objective of the ''Summary Report of Commercial Reactor Criticality Data for Three Mile Island Unit I'' is to present the CRC data for the TMI-1 reactor. Results from the CRC evaluations will support the development and validation of the neutronics models used for criticality analyses involving commercial spent nuclear fuel. These models and their validation are discussed in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000).

  11. Nondestructive techniques for assaying fuel debris in piping at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinjamuri, K.; McIsaac, C.V.; Beller, L.S.; Isaacson, L.; Mandler, J.W.; Hobbins, R.R. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Four major categories of nondestructive techniques - ultrasonic, passive gamma ray, infrared detection, and remote video examination - have been determined to be feasible for assaying fuel debris in the primary coolant system of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Reactor. Passive gamma ray detection is the most suitable technique for the TMI-2 piping; however, further development of this technique is needed for specific application to TMI-2.

  12. Italy to open exclusive Po basin area in 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigo, F.

    1991-05-27

    Under new regulations of the European Community, no oil and gas state monopoly is allowed in the member countries. As a consequence, by 1992 Italy will open for application by international oil companies all lands not covered by exploitation concessions in the ENI exclusive area. This monopoly area covers the prolific Po basin, the cradle of the Italian state oil company AGIP SpA, Milan. Due to profits derived from numerous gas discoveries of the 1950s in this basin, AGIP, a relatively small enterprise at that time, could eventually afford to expand in Italy and abroad and through successful exploration achieve status of a major international oil company. The ENI exclusive area covers the Po and Veneto plains and adjacent 15 km of territorial waters, for a total surface of more than 23,000 sq miles. The area to become available for exploration will be regulated by the Italian petroleum law, for one of the most favorable in the world.

  13. Electricity Generation from Geothermal Resources on the Fort Peck Reservation in Northeast Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Garry J.; Birkby, Jeff

    2015-05-12

    Tribal lands owned by Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, located in Northeastern Montana, overlie large volumes of deep, hot, saline water. Our study area included all the Fort Peck Reservation occupying roughly 1,456 sq miles. The geothermal water present in the Fort Peck Reservation is located in the western part of the Williston Basin in the Madison Group complex ranging in depths of 5500 to 7500 feet. Although no surface hot springs exist on the Reservation, water temperatures within oil wells that intercept these geothermal resources in the Madison Formation range from 150 to 278 degrees F.

  14. Texas' lightly drilled Dalhart basin getting more oil exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-06-24

    The Dalhart basin of the northwestern Texas Panhandle, the state's least drilled prospective area, is showing signs of another round of exploratory drilling. Horizon Oil and Gas Co., Dallas, opened ERT (Granite Wash) field in Potter County at 102 Bivins Ranch 9 miles north of Amarillo in early June. The discovery well pumped 105 b/d of 37.7{degrees} gravity oil and 48 b/d of water with gas too small to measure from perforations at 5,820-5,913 ft. Total depth is 7,516 ft in granite. In Hartley County, McKinney Operating Co., Amarillo, is pumped testing a second well in a field it discovered in 1990 that opened the first commercial Permian oil production in the Dalhart basin. The discovery well, McKinney's 1 Proctor, in section 63, block 22, CSL Survey, 19 miles west of Channing, pumped 12 b/d of oil and 15 b/d of water from Wolfcamp perforations at 4,038-50 ft. The well, which opened Proctor Ranch field, is producing about 35 b/d of oil.

  15. Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

  16. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    10.68 12.03 13.69 14.71 16.11 19.72 20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 6.74 8.16 W 8.10 W W...

  17. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11.34 12.43 13.69 14.25 15.17 18.16 18.85 6.5 3.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 7.43 8.85 W 8.37 W W...

  18. Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveBasin&oldid596392" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  19. Sequence stratigraphic framework and exploration potential of lower Permian (Wolfcampian) gravity-flow deposits, eastern Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.A.; Clopine, W.W. ); Kokkoros, G.F.; Wiley, B.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Eight major Wolfcampian sequences (W1-W8) have been identified on seismic data and well logs in a 1500 square mile study area along the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. These sequences compose two lower frequency sequences (W1-W5 W6-W8) which are separated by a major erosional surface associated with a sea-level fall near the time of the early-middle Wolfcampian boundary. Sea-level falls associated with sequences W5 and W6 resulted in significant erosion of platform-margin deposits, incision of a submarine canyon several miles into the Eastern Shelf, and deposition of carbonate gravity flows in the Midland Basin. Gravity flows entered the basin via the submarine canyon and fed basin-floor fan systems which extend up to 25 miles basinward of the toe-of-slope. Within the study area, production from carbonate gravity-flow deposits is mostly from three submarine fan systems within sequences W5 and W6 - the Credo (10 MMBOER) fan (oldest) , the Triple M (5 MMBOER)-Howard Glasscock (7 MMBOER) fan, and the Hutto (5 MMBOER) fan (youngest). The maximum gross thickness of the fans ranges from 100 to 200 feet. Regional isolith and seismic amplitude data were used to high-grade a 70 square mile area in the vicinity of Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields. Model-based velocity inversions, constrained by sonic and density data from 52 wells, were performed utilizing a grid of 2-D seismic data and a 3-D survey. Both Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields are clearly defined by high-velocity anomalies within the productive basin-floor fan interval of sequence W6. An untested high-velocity anomaly with a velocity signature and stratal geometry similar to the two fields, and estimated reserves of 5 MMBOER, is scheduled to be drilled in 1995.

  20. Sequence stratigraphic framework and exploration potential of lower Permian (Wolfcampian) gravity-flow deposits, eastern Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.A.; Clopine, W.W.; Kokkoros, G.F.; Wiley, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    Eight major Wolfcampian sequences (W1-W8) have been identified on seismic data and well logs in a 1500 square mile study area along the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. These sequences compose two lower frequency sequences (W1-W5 & W6-W8) which are separated by a major erosional surface associated with a sea-level fall near the time of the early-middle Wolfcampian boundary. Sea-level falls associated with sequences W5 and W6 resulted in significant erosion of platform-margin deposits, incision of a submarine canyon several miles into the Eastern Shelf, and deposition of carbonate gravity flows in the Midland Basin. Gravity flows entered the basin via the submarine canyon and fed basin-floor fan systems which extend up to 25 miles basinward of the toe-of-slope. Within the study area, production from carbonate gravity-flow deposits is mostly from three submarine fan systems within sequences W5 and W6 - the Credo (10 MMBOER) fan (oldest) , the Triple M (5 MMBOER)-Howard Glasscock (7 MMBOER) fan, and the Hutto (5 MMBOER) fan (youngest). The maximum gross thickness of the fans ranges from 100 to 200 feet. Regional isolith and seismic amplitude data were used to high-grade a 70 square mile area in the vicinity of Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields. Model-based velocity inversions, constrained by sonic and density data from 52 wells, were performed utilizing a grid of 2-D seismic data and a 3-D survey. Both Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields are clearly defined by high-velocity anomalies within the productive basin-floor fan interval of sequence W6. An untested high-velocity anomaly with a velocity signature and stratal geometry similar to the two fields, and estimated reserves of 5 MMBOER, is scheduled to be drilled in 1995.

  1. Examination of claims of Miles et al. in Pons-Fleischmann-type cold fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, S.E.; Hansen, L.D.

    1995-05-04

    In cold fusion experiments conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory in China Lake, M. H. Miles and co-workers claim to have produced excess heat correlated with helium-4 production, X-rays, and Geiger-counter excitation. However, scrutiny of the claims shows that unreliable calorimetric and nuclear-product detection methods were used. Moreover, inconsistencies and errors are found in the data and data analysis. The juxtaposition of several poor techniques and inconsistent data does not make a compelling case for cold fusion. We conclude that the evidence for cold fusion from these efforts is far from compelling. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. 18 MILES NORTH OF PHlLADEl.PHlA HATBORO, PA. August

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 MILES NORTH OF PHlLADEl.PHlA HATBORO, PA. August 27, 1948 ! ! Frank Giaccio' Commission / I This follows my letter of August ZOth, in which I promised to advise you of our thoughts concerning beryllium, after I had completed a series of con- tacts with both.Government and private,grou?s and had an opportunity to evaluate the possibilities of using our process from the point of view of industrial research. By this, I meanthe possibility of the research leading into substantial production of

  3. Compilation of Earthquakes from 1850-2007 within 200 miles of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Seth Carpenter

    2010-07-01

    An updated earthquake compilation was created for the years 1850 through 2007 within 200 miles of the Idaho National Laboratory. To generate this compilation, earthquake catalogs were collected from several contributing sources and searched for redundant events using the search criteria established for this effort. For all sets of duplicate events, a preferred event was selected, largely based on epicenter-network proximity. All unique magnitude information for each event was added to the preferred event records and these records were used to create the compilation referred to as “INL1850-2007”.

  4. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  5. EIS-0025: Miles City-New Underwood 230-kV Electrical Transmission Line, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposed action to construct a 3.28-mile, 230-kV transmission line between Miles City and Baker, Montana, Hettinger, North Dakota, and New Underwood, South Dakota, in Custer and Fallon Counties in Montana, Adams, Bowman, and Slope Counties in North Dakota and Meade, Pennington, and Perkins Counties in South Dakota.

  6. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

    2008-12-30

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by

  7. Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-08-01

    Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

  8. Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

    2012-07-01

    Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japan’s Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

  9. Reserves in western basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  10. the Central Basin Platform,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... As a result. it is believed that most of the structures formed within the context of an ... order to facilitate flexure modeling of the CBP and adjacent Delaware and Midland basins. ...

  11. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  12. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  13. Permian basin gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeberle, F.R.

    1995-06-01

    Of the 242 major gas fields in the Permian basin, 67 are on the Central Basin Platform, 59 are in the Delaware basin, 44 are in the Midland basin, 28 are in the Val Verde basin, 24 are on the Eastern Shelf, 12 are in the Horshoe Atoll and eight are on the Northwest Shelf. Eleven fields have produced over one trillion cubic feet of gas, 61 have produced between 100 billion and one trillion cubic feet of gas and 170 have produced less than 100 billion cubic feet. Highlights of the study show 11% of the gas comes from reservoirs with temperatures over 300 degrees F. and 11% comes from depths between 19,000 and 20,000 feet. Twenty percent of the gas comes from reservoirs with pressures between 1000 and 2000 psi, 22% comes from reservoirs with 20-24% water saturation and 24% comes from reservoirs between 125 and 150 feet thick. Fifty-three reservoirs in the Ellenburger formation have produced 30% of the gas, 33% comes from 88 reservoirs in the Delaware basin and 33% comes from reservoirs with porosities of less than five percent. Forty percent is solution gas and 46% comes from combination traps. Over 50% of the production comes from reservoirs with five millidarcys or less permeability, and 60% of the gas comes from reservoirs in which dolomite is the dominant lithology. Over 50% of the gas production comes from fields discovered before 1957 although 50% of the producing fields were not discovered until 1958.

  14. Results of the radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York (TNY002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Uziel, M.S.

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in November 1991 and May 1996. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been transported into the creek. The survey included a surface gamma scan in accessible areas near the creek and the collection of soil, sediment, and core samples for radionuclide analyses. Survey results indicate that no significant material originating at the Linde plant is presently in the creek. Three of the 1991 soil sample locations on the creek bank and one near the lake contained slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U with radionuclide distributions similar to that found in materials resulting from former processing activities at the Linde site.

  15. CURRENT APPLICATIONS OF THREE MILE ISLAND-2 CORE AND DEBRIS HANDLING AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmack, William Jonathan; Braase, Lori Ann

    2015-09-01

    Fuel recovery from severe accidents requires careful planning and execution. The Idaho National Laboratory played a key role in the Three Mile Island (TMI) fuel and core recovery. This involved technology development to locate and handle the damaged fuel; characterization of fuel and debris; analysis of fuel interaction with structural components and materials; development of fuel drying technology for long-term storage. However, one of the critical activities from the TMI project was the extensive effort document all the activities and archive the reports and photos. A historical review of the TMI project at the INL leads to the identification of current applications and considerations for facility designs, fuel handling, robotic applications, material characterization, etc.

  16. Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin...

  17. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres

  18. Cancer incidence among residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1982-1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Youk, Ada O.; Sasser, Howell; Talbott, Evelyn O.

    2011-11-15

    Background: The Pennsylvania Department of Health established a registry of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident in 1979. Over 93% of the population present on the day of the accident within a 5-mile radius was enrolled and interviewed. We used the registry to investigate the potential cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure among the TMI population. Methods: Cancer incidence data among the TMI cohort were available from 1982 to 1995. Because more than 97% of the population were white and few cancer cases were reported for those younger than 18 years of age, we included whites of age 18 years and older (10,446 men and 11,048 women) for further analyses. Cox regression models were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) per 0.1 m Sv and 95% confident interval (CI) of cancer by radiation-related exposures. The cancers of interest were all malignant neoplasms, cancer of bronchus, trachea, and lung, cancer of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues, leukemia, and female breast. Results: Among men and women, there was no evidence of an increased risk for all malignant neoplasms among the TMI cohort exposed to higher maximum and likely {gamma} radiation (RR=1.00, 95% CI=0.97, 1.01 and RR=0.99, 95% CI=0.94, 1.03, respectively) after adjusting for age, gender, education, smoking, and background radiation. Elevation in risk was noted for cancer of the bronchus, trachea, and lung in relation to higher background radiation exposure (RR=1.45, 95% CI=1.02-2.05 at 8.0-8.8 {mu}R/h compared to 5.2-7.2 {mu}R/h). An increased risk of leukemia was found among men exposed to higher maximum and likely {gamma} radiation related to TMI exposure during the ten days following the accident (RR=1.15, 95% CI=1.04, 1.29 and RR=1.36, 95% CI=1.08, 1.71, respectively). This relationship was not found in women. Conclusion: Increased cancer risks from low-level radiation exposure within the TMI cohort were small and mostly statistically non-significant. However, additional

  19. Fact #913: February 22, 2016 The Most Common Warranty for Plug-In Vehicle Batteries is 8 Years/100,000 Miles- Dataset

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Excel file and dataset for The Most Common Warranty for Plug-In Vehicle Batteries is 8 Years/100,000 Miles

  20. Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles

  1. Fact #848: November 24, 2014 Nearly Three-Fourths of New Cars have Fuel Economy above 25 Miles per Gallon- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #848: November 24, 2014 Nearly Three-Fourths of New Cars have Fuel Economy above 25 Miles per Gallon

  2. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fsh Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, R. Todd

    2001-12-31

    The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla River Basin Watershed Assessment assisted the project in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Habitat enhancement projects continued to be maintained on 44 private properties, four riparian easements and one in-stream enhancement agreement were secured, two new projects implemented and two existing projects improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities in the Umatilla River Basin. New project locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River and Buckaroo Creek. Improvements were implemented at existing project sites on the upper Umatilla River and Wildhorse Creek. A stream bank stabilization project was implemented at approximately River Mile 37.4 Umatilla River to stabilize 760 feet of eroding stream bank and improve in-stream habitat diversity. Habitat enhancements at this site included construction of six rock barbs with one large conifer root wad incorporated into each barb, stinging approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings, planting 195 tubling willows and 1,800 basin wildrye grass plugs, and seeding 40 pounds of native grass seed. Staff time to assist in development of a subcontract and fence materials were provided to establish eight spring sites for off-stream watering and to protect wetlands within the Buckaroo Creek Watershed. A gravel bar was moved and incorporated into an adjacent point bar to reduce stream energy and stream channel confinement within the existing project area at River Mile 85 Umatilla River. Approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings were stung and trenched into the stream channel margins and stream banks, and 360

  3. Analysis of soil and water at the Four Mile Creek seepline near the F- and H-Areas of SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, J.S.

    2000-05-24

    Several soil and water samples were collected along the Four Mile Creek (FMC) seepline at the F and H Areas of the Savannah River Site. The samples were analyzed for concentrations of metals, radionuclides, and inorganic constituents. The results of the analyses are summarized for the soil and water samples.

  4. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24 nautical miles offshore of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to fund Virginia Electric and Power Company's Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP). The proposed VOWTAP project consists of design, construction and operation of a 12 megawatt offshore wind facility located approximately 24 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA on the Outer Continental Shelf.

  5. Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, D.; Adams, J. W.

    1983-08-01

    Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation.

  6. Lessons learned from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Advisory Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lach, D.; Bolton, P.; Durbin, N.; Harty, R.

    1994-08-01

    In response to public concern about the cleanup of the Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2) facility after an accident on March 28, 1979 involving a loss of reactor coolant and subsequent damage to the reactor fuel, twelve citizens were asked to serve on an independent Advisory Panel to consult with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the decontamination and cleanup of the facility. The panel met 78 times over a period of thirteen years, holding public meetings in the vicinity of TMI-2 and meeting regularly with NRC Commissioners in Washington, DC. This report describes the results of a project designed to identify and describe the lessons learned from the Advisory Panel and place those lessons in the context of what we generally know about citizen advisory groups. A summary of the empirical literature on citizen advisory panels is followed by a brief history of the TMI-2 Advisory Panel. The body of the report contains the analysis of the lessons learned, preliminary conclusions about the effectiveness of the Panel, and implications for the NRC in the use of advisory panels. Data for the report include meeting transcripts and interviews with past and present Panel participants.

  7. Historical summary of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris transportation campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Tyacke, M.J.; Quinn, G.J.

    1993-03-01

    Transport of the damaged core materials from the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for examination and storage presented many technical and institutional challenges, including assessing the ability to transport the damaged core; removing and packaging core debris in ways suitable for transport; developing a transport package that could both meet Federal regulations and interface with the facilities at TMI-2 and the INEL; and developing a transport plan, support logistics, and public communications channels suited to the task. This report is a historical summary of how the US Department of Energy addressed those challenges and transported, received, and stored the TMI-2 core debris at the INEL. Subjects discussed include preparations for transport, loading at TMI-2, institutional issues, transport operations, receipt and storage at the INEL, governmental inquiries/investigations, and lessons learned. Because of public attention focused on the TMI-2 Core Debris Transport Program, the exchange of information between the program and public was extensive. This exchange is a focus for parts of this report to explain why various operations were conducted as they were and why certain technical approaches were employed. And, because of that exchange, the program may have contributed to a better public understanding of such actions and may contribute to planning and execution of similar future actions.

  8. the Central Basin Platform,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Bolden, G.P., 1984, Wrench Faulting in Selected Areas of the Permian Basin, &: Moore, G. ... I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I Henry, C.A. and Price, J.G., 1985, Summary of ...

  9. Pumping test and fluid sampling report, Mansfield No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin: Report of the Geologic Project Manager, Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Mansfield No. 1 well in Oldham County about 10 miles north of Vega, Texas. The well site was selected by TBEG and is located along the northern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution with the Permian salt sections. The objectives of the pumping test and fluid sampling program were to collect data to determine the hydrologic characteristics (formation pressure and permeability) of deep water bearing formations, and to obtain formation fluid samples for analyses (gas and fluid chemistry) in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Analysis of the Three Mile Island submerged demineralizer system vessel burial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasen, W.G.; Amir, S.J.

    1989-09-01

    The Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) was used during the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor cleanup to remove cesium and strontium from contaminated water. The SDS vessels are 2-ft-in diameter and 4-ft tall stainless steel cylinders containing up to 60 kCi of radioactive cesium and strontium loaded on damp zeolite. The water in the damp zeolite absorbs some of the ionizing radiation and decomposes to hydrogen and oxygen by a process called radiolysis. Gas generation rates approaching 1 L/h (Quinn et al. 1984) have been calculated and measured for some of these loaded vessels. Each of the SDS vessels contains a catalyst bed to recombine the available hydrogen and oxygen back to water. Tests have proven this hydrogen control method to be highly effective, even under very wet (but unsubmerged) conditions. Nineteen SDS vessels, packaged one at a time in a shielded and licensed shipping cask, were shipped to Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell). Collectively, these vessels contain approximately 7,500 kCi of radioactive material. Sixteen vessels were transloaded into concrete overpacks and buried at the Hanford Site. The contents of the other three vessels were vitrified at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Subsequent to placement of the SDS vessels in the burial grounds, DOE Order 5820.2A (DOE 1988) was issued in September 1988. This order requires wastes to be evaluated against 10 CFR 61.55 for radioactivity above greater-than-class C(GTCC) limits. Fourteen of the sixteen vessels buried at the Hanford Site have been determined to be GTCC waste. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Suzanne M.; Kern, J. Chris; Carmichael, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    This is the second year report of a multi-year project that monitors the outmigration and survival of hatchery and naturally-produced juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project supplements and complements ongoing or completed fisheries projects in the Umatilla River basin. Knowledge gained on outmigration and survival will assist researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts for natural and restored fish populations. The authors also report on tasks related to evaluating juvenile salmonid passage at Three Mile Falls Dam and West Extension Canal.

  12. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Gregory Graham

    2002-02-01

    This report presents the results of the 2001 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the two predominant radiation exposure pathways, potential airborne radioactivity releases and direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  13. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Gregory Graham

    2001-02-01

    This report presents the results of the 2000 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the two predominant radiation exposure pathways, potential airborne radioactivity releases and direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  14. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Three Mile Island - Unit 2 Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory G. Hall

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the results of the 2002 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the two predominant radiation exposure pathways, potential airborne radioactivity releases and direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  15. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Gregory Graham

    2001-02-01

    This report presents the results of the 2000 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the two predominant radiation exposure pathways, potential airborne radioactivity releases and direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  16. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. G. Hall

    2000-02-01

    This report presents the results of the 1999 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the two predominant radiation exposure pathways, potential airborne radioactivity releases and direct radiation exposure, indicate facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  17. San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern

  18. Are We Forgetting the Lessons From the Accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2, March 1979: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christie, Bob; Johnson, David H.

    2002-07-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 in March 1979 resulted in major changes to the way emergency procedures were written and operators were trained at nuclear commercial electric generating units. These changes had a major impact on the public health risk of nuclear electric generating units. The record over the last 20 years has been excellent. For approximately 2000 reactor years of operation since 1979, there have been no accidents equivalent to TMI Unit 2 in the USA. Other factors have had an influence on this excellent record but it is clear that more efficient emergency procedures and better operator training had a significant impact on the excellent record achieved over the last 20 plus years. Abnormal events still occur at the nuclear commercial electric generating units in the USA and these events have the potential for causing damage to the reactor core. In some cases, the emergency procedures used in abnormal events and the training received by the operators of the nuclear units have not been based on the lessons learned from the accident at Three Mile Island. The following paper describes one such case. It is clear to the authors of this paper that further changes should be made to make sure that the lessons learned from the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 in 1979 are implemented and not forgotten. (authors)

  19. Oil-spill risk analysis: Navarin Basin (Proposed Lease Sale 107) Outer Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluszkiewicz, T.; Marshall, C.; Anderson, C.; Lear, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis (OSRA) conducted for the proposed Navarin Basin OCS Lease Sale 107. The objective of the analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production from proposed leasing alternatives for the proposed lease sale. The analysis will be considered in the environmental impact statement (EIS) prepared for the lease area by the Minerals Management Service (MMS). The proposed action (Alternative I) is to offer for lease OCS lands in the Navarin Basin. The leasing proposal consists of nearly 5,036 blocks (11.4 million hectares) located in the Bering Sea approximately 30 to 225 miles (48 to 360 km) off St. Matthew Island. The area lies in waters that are from 70 to 2,400 meters deep. The 41 hypothetical spill locations, which are used to represent platform and transportation risks for the risk analysis.

  20. Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Denver Basin Map Abstract This webpage contains a map of the Denver Basin. Published Colorado...

  1. Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sediment Basin Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sediment Basin Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility...

  2. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Basin Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Basin Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  3. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wild winter steelhead in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project is funded by through the Bonneville Power...

  4. Review of Destructive Assay Methods for Nuclear Materials Characterization from the Three Mile Island (TMI) Fuel Debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla J. Miller

    2013-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the literature review that was performed and based on previous work performed at the Idaho National Laboratory studying the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear reactor accident, specifically the melted fuel debris. The purpose of the literature review was to document prior published work that supports the feasibility of the analytical techniques that were developed to provide quantitative results of the make-up of the fuel and reactor component debris located inside and outside the containment. The quantitative analysis provides a technique to perform nuclear fuel accountancy measurements

  5. Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Jesse D.M.; Contor, Craig C.; Hoverson, Eric

    2005-10-01

    developed with the efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha) coho salmon and (O. kisutch) and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three-Mile Falls Dam (3MD) and other irrigation projects that dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore the historical fisheries in the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Produce almost 48,000 adult returns to Three-Mile Falls Dam. The goals were reviewed in 1999 and were changed to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead returns (Table 2). We conduct core long-term monitoring activities each year as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004), and habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998). Our project goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. This is the only project that monitors the restoration of naturally producing salmon and steelhead in the basin.

  6. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

    1988-06-01

    This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

  7. Disposal demonstration of a high integrity container (HIC) containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Tyacke, M.J.; Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.

    1985-02-01

    A high integrity container (HIC) was developed, tested, and certified for use in disposing of unusual low-level radioactive waste from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The work was coordinated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and funded by the US Department of Energy. A disposal demonstration using an HIC containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from TMI-2 was completed at the commercial disposal facility in the State of Washington. A Certification of Compliance was issued by the Department of Social and Health Services of the State of Washington to use the HIC in disposing of up to 50 EPICOR-II prefilters. That Certification of Compliance was issued after rigorous review of the HIC design and test program by the State and by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and disposing of the demonstration HIC and briefly describes the design, testing, and approval effort leading up to the demonstration.

  8. Transporting TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) core debris to INEL: Public safety and public response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.; Young, W.R.; Hamric, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure that public safety is maintained during transport of core debris from the Unit-2 reactor at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID. It provides up-to-date information about public response to the transport action and discusses DOE's position on several institutional issues. The authors advise that planners of future transport operations be prepared for a multitude of comments from all levels of federal, state, and local governments, special interest groups, and private citizens. They also advise planners to keep meticulous records concerning all informational transactions.

  9. Transformer failure and common-mode loss of instrument power at Nine Mile Point Unit 2 on August 13, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    On August 13, 1991, at Nine Mile Point Unit 2 nuclear power plant, located near Scriba, New York, on Lake Ontario, the main transformer experienced an internal failure that resulted in degraded voltage which caused the simultaneous loss of five uninterruptible power supplies, which in turn caused the loss of several nonsafety systems, including reactor control rod position indication, some reactor power and water indication, control room annunciators, the plant communications system, the plant process computer, and lighting at some locations. The reactor was subsequently brought to a safe shutdown. Following this event, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission dispatched an Incident Investigation Team to the site to determine what happened, to identify the probable causes, and to make appropriate findings and conclusions. This report describes the incident, the methodology used by the team in its investigation, and presents and the team's findings and conclusions. 59 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. A reevaluation of cancer incidence near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: The collision of evidence and assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wing, S.; Richardson, D.; Armstrong, D.; Crawford-Brown, D.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies concluded that there was no evidence that the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) affected cancer incidence in the surrounding area; however, there were logical and methodological problems in earlier reports that led us to reconsider data previously collected. A 10-mile area around TMI was divided into 69 study tracts, which were assigned radiation dose estimates based on radiation readings and models of atmospheric dispersion. Incident cancers from 1975 to 1985 were ascertained from hospital records and assigned to study tracts. Associations between accident doses and incidence rates of leukemia, lung cancer, and all cancer were assessed using relative dose estimates calculated by the earlier investigators. Adjustments were made for age, sex, socioeconomic characteristics, and preaccident variation in incidence. Considering a 2-year latency, the estimated percent increase per dose unit {plus_minus} standard error was 0.020 {plus_minus} 0.012 for all cancer, 0.082 {plus_minus} 0.032 for lung cancer, and 0.116 {plus_minus} 0.067 for leukemia. Adjustment for socioeconomic variables increased the estimates to 0.034 {plus_minus} 0.013, 0.103 {plus_minus} 0.035, and 0.139 {plus_minus} 0.073 for all cancer, lung cancer, and leukemia, respectively. Associations were generally larger considering a 5-year latency, but were based on smaller numbers of cases. Results support the hypothesis that radiation doses are related to increased cancer incidence around TMI. The analysis avoids medical detection bias, but suffers from inaccurate dose classification; therefore, results may underestimate the magnitude of the association between radiation and cancer incidence. These associations would not be expected, based on previous estimates of near-background levels of radiation exposure following the accident. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Stormwater detention basin sediment removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    In the past, stormwater runoff from landfills has been treated mainly by focusing on reducing the peak storm discharge rates so as not to hydraulically impact downstream subsheds. However, with the advent of stricter water quality regulations based on the Federal Clean Water Act, and the related NPDES and SPDES programs, landfill owners and operators are now legally responsible for the water quality of the runoff once it leaves the landfill site. At the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City, the world`s largest covering over 2000 acres, landfilling activities have been underway since 1945. With the main objective at all older landfill sites having focused on maximizing the available landfill footprint in order to obtain the most possible airspace volume, consideration was not given for the future siting of stormwater basin structures. Therefore, when SCS Engineers began developing the first comprehensive stormwater management plan for the site, the primary task was to locate potential sites for all the stormwater basins in order to comply with state regulations for peak stormwater runoff control. The basins were mostly constructed where space allowed, and were sized to be as large as possible given siting and subshed area constraints. Seventeen stormwater basins have now been designed and are being constructed to control the peak stormwater runoff for the 25-year, 24-hour storm as required by New York State. As an additional factor of safety, the basins were also designed for controlled discharge of the 100-year, 24 hour storm.

  12. The development of the ''Sleeping Giant'' deep basin natural gas, Alberta Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    During the past seven years attention has been focused on ''mega'' projects and the frontier areas for continental energy self sufficiency. However, a giant conventional resource project has been developing without fanfare. This project has potential impact on the well being of Canada and the North American energy scene. This ''Sleeping Giant'', which delivered its initial sales gas on November 1, 1979 is the Alberta (Elmworth) Deep Basin. The project area covers 67,400 square km (26,000 square miles) and contains potentially hydrocarbon bearing sediments over a thickness of 4,572 meters (15,000 feet). This basin is best equated in terms of size and reserves to the famous San Juan Basin. Since its discovery in 1976 approximately 1,000 multi-zoned gas wells have been drilled and reserves in the order of 140,000 10/sup 6/m/sup 3/ (5 trillion cubic feet) have been recognized by gas purchasers. Ten gas plants have been constructed with capacity of roughly 28,174 10/sup 3/m/sup 3/ (1 billion cubic feet) per day. This paper documents the development of these reserves and the stages in the construction of field facilities.

  13. Permian {open_quotes}Wolfcamp{close_quotes} limestone reservoirs: Powell Ranch field, Eastern Midland Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    Deep-water carbonate channel reservoirs form important oil reservoirs along the toe of the Eastern Shelf of the Permian basin in west Texas. In northwestern Glasscock County, these `Wolfcamp` reservoirs are Leonardian (Early Permian) in age and define high-energy channels incised into surrounding carbonate detritus and basinal shale. Porous grain-flow material filling these channels, along with encasing detritus, was derived from the shallow shelf located six miles to the east. Reservoirs are in packstone and grainstone facies and have significant interparticle and moldic porosity. Relevant exploration began in the 1960s, but expanded slowly thereafter due to lack of success caused by complex patterns of channel occurrence. Results of a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey conducted in 1990 have greatly enhanced the identification and mapping of productive channels in the Powell Ranch field complex. Wells in this complex are capable of flowing 400-1200 bbl of oil per day, and have reserves ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 MBO. The new 3-D data have improved the relevant geologic model and dramatically increased rates of drilling success. Application of such data to this setting offers a potential model for other parts of the Permian basin.

  14. Publications | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... PDF-2.55MB May, 2009: NETL R&D Tackles Technical Challenges of the Williston Basin's Bakken Formation PDF-2.3MB arrowsmdrkorange.gif Program Fact Sheets Natural Gas & Oil ...

  15. Table 2. U.S. tight oil plays: production and proved reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Basin","Play","State(s)","Production","Reserves" "Williston","Bakken","ND, MT, SD",270,4844,387,5972,1128 "Western Gulf","Eagle Ford","TX",351,4177,497,5172,995 "Permian","Bo...

  16. EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative (2.8 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-64-A

  17. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty

    2009-06-10

    salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

  18. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  19. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  20. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheeler, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

  1. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public out reach was emphasized during this first year of the project. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and off-stream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements were signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Two landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and one chose OWEB as a funding source. Two landowners implemented there own enhancement measures protecting 3 miles of stream. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin. We provided input to the John Day Summary prepared for the NWPPC by ODFW. The Tribe worked with the Umatilla National Forest on the Clear Creek Dredgetailings Rehabilitation project and coordinated regularly with USFS Fisheries, Hydrology and Range staff.

  2. Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Houston, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NETL R&D Tackles Technological Challenges of the Williston Basin's Bakken Formation Recent development of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota and eastern Montana is a good example of persistent analysis of geologic data and adaptation of new completion technologies overcoming the challenges posed by unconventional reservoirs. However, as with most unconventional plays, as Bakken development continues, questions regarding exactly how to refine newly applied

  3. Energy Department Receives Award for First-of-its-Kind Geothermal Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Receives Award for First-of-its-Kind Geothermal Project Energy Department Receives Award for First-of-its-Kind Geothermal Project June 7, 2016 - 10:25am Addthis The geothermal facility in the Williston Basin in North Dakota. | Photo by Kirby Baier of Continental Resources The geothermal facility in the Williston Basin in North Dakota. | Photo by Kirby Baier of Continental Resources Erin Tulley Communications Lead, Geothermal Technologies Office Timothy Patrick Reinhardt

  4. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for July, August, and September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2006-12-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during July, August, and September 2006. Conditions remain very similar to those reported in the previous quarterly report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of basin water to the ground. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified in the coming quarters as a consequence of remedial action at KE Basin, i.e., removal of sludge and basin demolition.

  5. Percolation Cooling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Lower Head by Way of Thermal Cracking and Gap Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomsen, K.L.

    2002-01-15

    Two partial models have been developed to elucidate the Three Mile Island Unit 2 lower head coolability by water percolation from above into the thermally cracking debris bed and into a gap between the debris and the wall. The bulk permeability of the cracked top crust is estimated based on simple fracture mechanics and application of Poiseuille's law to the fractures. The gap is considered as an abstraction representing an initially rugged interface, which probably expanded by thermal deformation and cracking in connection with the water ingress. The coupled flow and heat conduction problem for the top crust is solved in slab geometry based on the two-phase Darcy equations together with quasi-steady mass and energy conservation equations. The resulting water penetration depth is in good agreement with the depth of the so-called loose debris bed. The lower-head and bottom-crust problem is treated analogously by a two-dimensional axisymmetric model. The notion of a gap is maintained as a useful concept in the flow analysis. Simulations show that a central hot spot with a peak wall temperature of 1075 to 1100 deg. C can be obtained, but the quenching rates are not satisfactory. It is concluded that a three-dimensional model with an additional mechanism to explain the sudden water ingress to the hot spot center would be more appropriate.

  6. The Nuclear Accident at Three Mile Island a Practical Lesson in the Fundamental Importance of Effective Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVine Jr, J.C.

    2008-07-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident in March 1979 had a profound effect on the course of commercial nuclear generation in the United States and around the world. And while the central elements of the accident were matters of nuclear engineering, design and operations, its consequences were compounded, and in some respects superseded, by extraordinarily ineffective communications by all parties at all levels. Communications failures during the accident and its aftermath caused misunderstanding, distrust, and incorrect emergency response - and seeded or reinforced public opposition to nuclear power that persists to this day. There are communications lessons from TMI that have not yet been fully learned, and some that once were learned but are now gradually being forgotten. The more glaring TMI communications problems were in the arena of external interactions and communications among the plant owner, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the media, and the public. Confusing, fragmented, and contradictory public statements early in the accident, regardless of cause, undermined all possibility for reasonable discourse thereafter. And because the TMI accident was playing out on a world stage, the breakdown in public trust had long term and widespread implications. At the plant site, both TMI-2 cleanup and restart of the undamaged TMI-1 unit met with years of public and political criticism, and attendant regulatory pressure. Across the nation, public trust in nuclear power and those who operate it plummeted, unquestionably contributing to the 25+ year hiatus in new plant orders. There were other, less visible but equally important, consequences of ineffective communications at TMI. The unplanned 'precautionary' evacuation urged by the governor two days after the accident - a life changing, traumatic event for thousands of residents - was prompted primarily by misunderstandings and miscommunications regarding the condition of the plant. And today, nearly 30

  7. Lower head creep rupture failure analysis associated with alternative accident sequences of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sang Lung, Chan

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this lower head creep rupture analysis is to assess the current version of MELCOR 1.8.5-RG against SCDAP/RELAP5 MOD 3.3kz. The purpose of this assessment is to investigate the current MELCOR in-vessel core damage progression phenomena including the model for the formation of a molten pool. The model for stratified molten pool natural heat transfer will be included in the next MELCOR release. Presently, MELCOR excludes the gap heat-transfer model for the cooling associated with the narrow gap between the debris and the lower head vessel wall. All these phenomenological models are already treated in SCDAP/RELAP5 using the COUPLE code to model the heat transfer of the relocated debris with the lower head based on a two-dimensional finite-element-method. The assessment should determine if current MELCOR capabilities adequately cover core degradation phenomena appropriate for the consolidated MELCOR code. Inclusion of these features should bring MELCOR much closer to a state of parity with SCDAP/RELAP5 and is a currently underway element in the MELCOR code consolidation effort. This assessment deals with the following analysis of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) alternative accident sequences. The TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-1 includes the continuation of the base case of the TMI-2 accident with the Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP) tripped, and the High Pressure Injection System (HPIS) throttled after approximately 6000 s accident time, while in the TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-2, the reactor coolant pumps is tripped after 6000 s and the HPIS is activated after 12,012 s. The lower head temperature distributions calculated with SCDAP/RELAP5 are visualized and animated with open source visualization freeware 'OpenDX'. (author)

  8. Revisiting Insights from Three Mile Island Unit 2 Postaccident Examinations and Evaluations in View of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Corradini; Larry Ott; Randall Gauntt; Dana Powers

    2012-11-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979, led industry and regulators to enhance strategies to protect against severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants. Investigations in the years after the accident concluded that at least 45% of the core had melted and that nearly 19 tonnes of the core material had relocated to the lower head. Postaccident examinations indicate that about half of that material formed a solid layer near the lower head and above it was a layer of fragmented rubble. As discussed in this paper, numerous insights related to pressurized water reactor accident progression were gained from postaccident evaluations of debris, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) specimens, and nozzles taken from the RPV. In addition, information gleaned from TMI-2 specimen evaluations and available data from plant instrumentation were used to improve severe accident simulation models that form the technical basis for reactor safety evaluations. Finally, the TMI-2 accident led the nuclear community to dedicate considerable effort toward understanding severe accident phenomenology as well as the potential for containment failure. Because available data suggest that significant amounts of fuel heated to temperatures near melting, the events at Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 offer an unexpected opportunity to gain similar understanding about boiling water reactor accident progression. To increase the international benefit from such an endeavor, we recommend that an international effort be initiated to (a) prioritize data needs; (b) identify techniques, samples, and sample evaluations needed to address each information need; and (c) help finance acquisition of the required data and conduct of the analyses.

  9. Review of the state of criticality of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core and reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratton, W.R. )

    1987-04-15

    The events during the early hours of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident on March 28, 1979 caused the fuel in the reactor core to crumble or disintegrate, and then subside into a rubble structure more compact that its normal configuration. The present height of the core is about seven feet, five feet less than its normal configuration of 12 feet. With the same boron content and some or all of the control rod and burnable poison rod material as the normal core configuration, the collapsed structure is calculated to be more reactive. However, the reactor is assuredly subcritical at present because of the extraordinarily high boron concentration maintained in the coolant water. Four additional and different physical models are discussed briefly in the report to illustrate the margin of subcriticality, to provide a better estimate of the neutron multiplication factor, and to provide some understanding of the criticality effects of the important parameters. Two different finite, cylindrical models of a collapsed core are also presented in this report. The conclusion of this review is that the reactor is now very far subcritical with a boron concentration of 4350 ppM or more, and no conceivable rearrangement of fuel can create a critical state. Careful administrative control to maintain the boron concentration of the reactor coolant close to 5000 ppM, and controls to rigorously exclude addition of unborated water to the primary system, provide additional assurance that subcriticality will be maintained. The immediate corollary is that the defueling of the reactor vessel can proceed as planned, with complete confidence that such operations will remain subcritical. 20 refs.

  10. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  11. Tectonic mechanisms for formation of the Central Basin platform and adjacent basinal areas, Permian basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kennming; Dorobek, S.L. )

    1992-04-01

    Formation of the Central Basin platform (CBP), with the Delaware basin to its west and the Midland basin to its east, has been attributed to the crustal deformation in the foreland area of the Marathon Orogen during the late Paleozoic. Because of complexities in the areal distribution and magnitudes of uplift along the length of the CBP, its formative mechanisms are still controversial. Previous interpretations about the mechanisms for uplift of the CBP are based on the characteristics of the boundary faults between the CBP and adjacent basinal areas. Here, an integrated tectonic model is proposed for formation of the uplift and adjacent basins based on studies of the structure of sedimentary layers overlying Precambrian basement rocks of the uplift and restoration of the lower Paleozoic strata in the Delaware basin.

  12. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  13. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for January, February, and March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater monitoring near the K Basins for the period January, February, and March 2007.

  14. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G.

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  15. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-04-01

    In 2001, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled six properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Since 1997, approximately 7 miles of critical salmonid habitat has been secured for restoration and protection under this project. Major accomplishments to date include the following: Secured approximately $250,000 in cost share; Secured 7 easements; Planted 30,000+ native plants; Installed 50,000+ cuttings; and Seeded 18 acres to native grass. Pre and post-project monitoring efforts were included for all projects, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan. Basin-wide monitoring also included the deployment of 6 thermographs to collect summer stream temperatures.

  16. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1987 through 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmsen, S.C.; Bufe, C.G.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1987, the southern Great basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 820 earthquakes in the southern Great Basin (SGB). Local magnitudes ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 (December 30, 1987, 22:50:42 UTC at Hot Creek Valley). Five earthquakes epicenters in 1987 within the detection threshold of the seismic network are at Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository. The maximum magnitude of those five earthquakes is 1.1, and their estimated depths of focus ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 km below sea level. For the calendar year 1988, about 1280 SGB earthquakes were catalogued, with maximum magnitude-4.4 for an Owens Valley, California, earthquake on July 5, 1988. Eight earthquake epicenters in 1988 are at Yucca Mountain, with depths ranging from three to 12 km below sea level, and maximum magnitude 2.1. For the calendar year 1989, about 1190 SGB earthquakes were located and catalogued, with maximum magnitude equal to 3.5 for earthquake about ten miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, on January 9. No Yucca Mountain earthquakes were recorded in 1989. An earthquake having a well-constrained depth of about 30 km below sea level was observed on August 21, 1989, in eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  17. Geothermal Resources Of California Sedimentary Basins | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Resources Of California Sedimentary Basins Abstract The 2004 Department of Energy...

  18. Late Paleozoic structural evolution of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, T.E.

    1984-04-01

    The southern Permian basin is underlain by the NNW-trending Central Basin disturbed belt of Wolfcamp age (Lower Permian), the deep Delaware basin to its west, and the shallower Midland basin to its eat. The disturbed belt is highly segmented with zones of left-lateral offset. Major segments from south to north are: the Puckett-Grey Ranch zone; the Fort Stockton uplift; the Monahans transverse zone; the Andector ridges and the Eunice ridge; the Hobbs transverse zone; and the Tatum ridges, which abut the broad Roosevelt uplift to the north. The disturbed belt may have originated along rift zones of either Precambrian or Cambrian age. The extent of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian deformation is unclear; much of the Val Verde basin-Ozona arch structure may have formed then. The main Wolfcamp deformation over thrust the West Texas crustal block against the Delaware block, with local denudation of the uplifted edge and eastward-directed backthrusting into the Midland basin. Latter in the Permian, the area was the center of a subcontinental bowl of subsidence - the Permian basin proper. The disturbed belt formed a pedestal for the carbonate accumulations which created the Central Basin platform. The major pre-Permian reservoirs of the Permian basin lie in large structural and unconformity-bounded traps on uplift ridges and domes. Further work on the regional structural style may help to predict fracture trends, to assess the timing of oil migration, and to evaluate intrareservoir variations in the overlying Permian giant oil fields.

  19. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-09-28

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. EPA requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard and must consider inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  20. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for October, November, and December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-03-22

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during October, November, and December 2006. Conditions remained very similar to those reported in the previous quarterly report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of basin water to the ground. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified in the coming months as a consequence of new wells having been installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and new wells installed between the KE Basin and the river to augment long-term monitoring in that area.

  1. Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (51) Power Plants (10)...

  2. Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman Wellfield Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman...

  3. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section ...

  4. PP-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Basin Electric Power Cooperative to construct, operate, and maintain transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PDF icon PP-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative More ...

  5. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range...

  6. Judith Basin County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Judith Basin County, Montana Hobson, Montana Stanford, Montana Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleJudithBasinCounty,...

  7. Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to 2099 Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to...

  8. L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers...

  9. EIS-0478: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    78: Record of Decision EIS-0478: Record of Decision Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota DOE's Western Area Power Administration issued a record of decision to grant Basin Electric Power Cooperative's request to interconnect the Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project to Western's Williston Substation and Williston to Charlie Creek transmission line. EIS-0478-ROD-2014.pdf (195.66 KB)

  10. conventional_gas.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Uinta Basin Paradox Basin Arkoma Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin Palo ... Miles Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from HPDI, IN Geological ...

  11. Delaware basin/Central basin platform margin: The development of a subthrust deep-gas province in the Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purves, W.J. ); Ting, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    A deep-gas-prone province was identified along the Delaware basin/Central Basin platform margin, a margin conventionally interpreted to be bounded by high-angle normal or high-angle reverse structures. Redefinition of the tectonic style between the Delaware basin and the adjacent platform resulted in the identification of this Delaware basin/Central Basin platform subthrust province and a giant prospect within it. Definition of a giant-sized gas prospect in northern Pecos County, Texas, revealed that portions of this margin may be characterized by shingled, low-angle, eastward-dipping, basement involved thrust faults. Interpretations suggest that hidden, subthrust footwall structures may trend discontinuously for greater than 100 mi along this structural margin. Subthrust footwall structures formed as basinal buttress points for the Central Basin platform to climb over the Delaware basin. In this area, structural relief of over 19,000 ft over a 10-mi width is believed due to stacking of low-angle thrust sheets. Seismic resolution of this subthrust margin has been complexed by allochtonous hanging-wall gravity-glide blocks and folds and by velocity changes in overlying syn- and posttectonic sediments associated with basin-to-shelf lithofacies changes. Statistical studies indicate that this deep-gas province has a play potential of greater than 10 tcf of gas, with individual prospect sizes exceeding 1 tcfg. The prospects defined along this trend are deep (approximately 20,000 ft) subthrust structural traps that are indigenously sourced and reservoired by dual-matrix porosity. Vitrinite supported maturation modeling suggests that these subthrust structures formed prior to catagenic conversion of the oldest source rocks to oil and later to gas. Tectonically fractured Ordovician Ellenburger and Devonian sediments are considered the principal reservoirs. Shales overlying reservoir intervals form vertical seals.

  12. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  13. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  14. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-21

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  15. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    1999-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  16. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-09-28

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  17. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  18. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Tara

    2007-02-01

    This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9

  19. K Basins isolation barriers summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, G.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    The 105-K East and 105-K West fuel storage basins (105-K Basins) were designed and constructed in the early 1950`s for interim storage of irradiated fuel following its discharge from the reactors. The 105-K- East and 105-K West reactor buildings were constructed first, and the associated storage basins were added about a year later. The construction joint between each reactor building structure and the basin structure included a flexible membrane waterstop to prevent leakage. Water in the storage basins provided both radiation shielding and cooling to remove decay heat from stored fuel until its transfer to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility for chemical processing. The 105-K West Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1970; the 105-K East Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1971. Except for a few loose pieces, fuel stored in the basins at that time was shipped to the PUREX Facility for processing. The basins were then left idle but were kept filled with water. The PUREX Facility was shut down and placed on wet standby in 1972 while N Reactor continued to operate. When the N Reactor fuel storage basin began to approach storage capacity, the decision was made to modify the fuel storage basins at 105-K East and 105-K West to provide additional storage capacity. Both basins were subsequently modified (105-K East in 1975 and 105-K West in 1981) to provide for the interim handling and storage of irradiated N Reactor fuel. The PUREX Facility was restarted in November 1983 to provide 1698 additional weapons-grade plutonium for the United States defense mission. The facility was shut down and deactivated in December 1992 when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the plant was no longer needed to support weapons-grade plutonium production. When the PUREX Facility was shut down, approximately 2.1 x 1 06 kg (2,100 metric tons) of irradiated fuel aged 7 to 23 years was left in storage in the 105-K Basins pending a decision on

  20. Rate of deformation in the Pasco Basin during the Miocene as determined by distribution of Columbia River basalt flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Ledgerwood, R.K.; Myers, C.W.; Jones, M.G.; Landon, R.D.

    1980-03-01

    Detailed mapping of over 8000 square kilometers and logs from 20 core holes were used to determine the distribution and thickness of basalt flows and interbeds in the Pasco Basin. The data indicate the high-MgO Grande Ronde Basalt and Wanapum Basalt thicken from the northeast to the southwest. Deformation began in late Frenchman Springs time in the Saddle Mountains along a northwest-southeast trend and in Roza time along an east-west trend. By late Wanapum time, basalt flows were more restricted on the east side. Saddle Mountains Basalt flows spread out in the basin from narrow channels to the east. The Umatilla Member entered from the southeast and is confined to the south-central basin, while the Wilbur Creek, Asotin, Esquatzel, Pomona, and Elephant Mountain Members entered from the east and northeast. The distribution of these members is controlled by flow volume, boundaries of other flows, and developing ridges. The Wilbur Creek, Asotin, and Esquatzel flows exited from the basin in a channel along the northern margin of the Umatilla flow, while the Pomona and Elephant Mountain flows exited between Umtanum Ridge and Wallula Gap. The thickness of sedimentary interbeds and basalt flows indicated subsidence and/or uplift began in post-Grande Ronde time (14.5 million years before present) and continued through Saddle Mountains time (10.5 million years before present). Maximum subsidence occurred 40 kilometers (24 miles) north of Richland, Washington with an approximate rate of 25 meters (81 feet) per million years during the eruption of the basalt. Maximum uplift along the developing ridges was 70 meters (230 feet) per million years.

  1. File:EIA-Williston-S-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  2. File:EIA-Williston-NE-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  3. File:EIA-Williston-NW-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  4. File:EIA-Williston-NW-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  5. File:EIA-Williston-NE-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  6. File:EIA-Williston-S-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  7. EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -A Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-64

  8. K Basins Sludge Treatment Process | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Process (27.17 MB) Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process (185.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide

  9. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for April, May, and June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-08-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring near the K Basins during April, May, and June 2007. Conditions remained similar to those reported in the previous quarters report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of shielding water from either basin to the ground. During the current quarter, the first results from two new wells installed between KE Basin and the river became available. Groundwater conditions at each new well are reasonably consistent with adjacent wells and expectations, with the exception of anomalously high chromium concentrations at one of the new wells. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified for FY 2008 to take advantage of new wells recently installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and also the new wells recently installed between the KE Basin and the river, which augment long-term monitoring capability in that area.

  10. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This goal was addressed under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703 (c) (1) - Action Item 4.2. Construction of fish habitat structures was completed on ...