Sample records for mile maximum speed

  1. Structure of Turbulence in Katabatic Flows below and above the Wind-Speed Maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grachev, Andrey A; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Fernando, Harindra J S; Pardyjak, Eric R; Fairall, Christopher W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of small-scale turbulence made over the complex-terrain atmospheric boundary layer during the MATERHORN Program are used to describe the structure of turbulence in katabatic flows. Turbulent and mean meteorological data were continuously measured at multiple levels at four towers deployed along the East lower slope (2-4 deg) of Granite Mountain. The multi-level observations made during a 30-day long MATERHORN-Fall field campaign in September-October 2012 allowed studying of temporal and spatial structure of katabatic flows in detail, and herein we report turbulence and their variations in katabatic winds. Observed vertical profiles show steep gradients near the surface, but in the layer above the slope jet the vertical variability is smaller. It is found that the vertical (normal to the slope) momentum flux and horizontal (along the slope) heat flux in a slope-following coordinate system change their sign below and above the wind maximum of a katabatic flow. The vertical momentum flux is directed...

  2. Curriculum Vitae: Albie Felix Miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    pest management; biological control; food systems and sustainability; introduction to environmental science; nature and properties of soils; soil ecology; integrated soil fertility management; researchCurriculum Vitae: Albie Felix Miles Ph.D. Candidate Environmental Science, Policy and Management

  3. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  4. HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (Fabrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fahrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fabrikant,

  5. HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than 10 miles from the nuclear plant at any time during thewithin 10 miles of the nuclear plant is about 51 of thewithin 50 miles of the nuclear plant is less than 1% of the

  6. Mile High: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Mile High Equipment, LLC finding that Ice-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  7. Finance Division EXTRA MILE AWARD PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Finance Division EXTRA MILE AWARD PROGRAM Nomination Form Instructions Any fulltime or parttime permanent or temporary SPA employee within the Finance Division who works 20 or more provided. The seven major departments within the Finance Division to choose from are described below

  8. Estimating Vehicle Miles Traveled on Local Roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiayu

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents a new method to estimate the local road vehicle miles traveled (VMT) with the concept of betweenness centrality. Betweenness centrality is a measure of a node’s or link’s centrality on a network that has been applied popularly...

  9. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fact 860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Fact 860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the...

  10. Place Last Name First Name Gender Age Category Swim Lengths Swim Distance Bike Distance Run Distance Overall Distance 1 Happe Andy M 18-24 91.00 lengths 1.379 miles 16.200 miles 4.360 miles 21.939 miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Distance Overall Distance 1 Happe Andy M 18-24 91.00 lengths 1.379 miles 16.200 miles 4.360 miles 21.939 miles 2 Blazek Joseph M 18-24 72.00 lengths 1.091 miles 15.500 miles 3.760 miles 20.351 miles 3 Neuharth Jarrod M 18-24 48.00 lengths 0.727 miles 15.700 miles 3.150 miles 19.577 miles 4 Johnson Gabriel M 18

  11. Place Last Name First Name Gender Age Category Swim Lengths Swim Distance Bike Distance Run Distance Overall Distance 1 Guenter Jim M 40-49 92.00 lengths 1.394 miles 17.300 miles 4.360 miles 23.054 miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Distance Overall Distance 1 Guenter Jim M 40-49 92.00 lengths 1.394 miles 17.300 miles 4.360 miles 23 M 18-24 91.00 lengths 1.379 miles 16.200 miles 4.360 miles 21.939 miles 4 Gabrielsen Susanne F 25.00 lengths 0.894 miles 16.700 miles 3.770 miles 21.364 miles 6 Porter Paul M 50+ 53.00 lengths 0.803 miles 16

  12. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayPeachThree Mile

  13. Miles Electric Vehicles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickeyDelaware:Midwest, Wyoming:MilamMiles

  14. Three Mile Canyon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoulOaks,Mile Canyon Jump to:

  15. Renewable variable speed hybrid system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stott, Paul Anthony

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generator island grids, these generators will be running at a fraction of maximum output for most of the time. A new variable speed diesel generator allows for a reduction in fuel consumption at part load compared to constant speed operation. Combining...

  16. Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

  17. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  18. NASA Green Flight Challenge: Conceptual Design Approaches and Technologies to Enable 200 Passenger Miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Miles per Gallon Douglas P. Wells* NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 The Green 50 passenger-miles per gallon and this competition will push teams to greater than 200 passenger-miles per gallon. The aircraft must also fly at least 100 miles per hour for 200 miles. The total prize

  19. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline The prices of gasoline and diesel fuel affect the transportation sector in many...

  20. Odometer Versus Self-Reported Estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings described here compare odometer readings with self-reported estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) to investigate to what extent self-reported VMT is a reliable surrogate for odometer-based VMT.

  1. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with...

  2. Dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Handman, D. [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)] [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  3. Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LIGHT!! #12;Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c' C = 3 x 108 m/s Or 190,000 miles/second!! Light could travel around the world about 8 times in one second #12;What is light?? Light is a "wave packet" A photon is a "light particle" #12;Electromagnetic Radiation and You Light is sometimes

  4. MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris, Quirino

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator of the Generaland Douglas Miller, Maximum Entropy Econometrics, Wiley andCalifornia Davis MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators by

  5. Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood Methods Comparisons and Bootstrap Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood Methods Comparisons and Bootstrap Tests Character Likelihood Methods Comparisons and Bootstrap Tests Character Reconstruction PHYLIP and T-REX Exercises Outline 1 Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood 2 Methods Comparisons and Bootstrap Tests 3 Character

  6. Maximum Entropy Correlated Equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Luis E.

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study maximum entropy correlated equilibria in (multi-player)games and provide two gradient-based algorithms that are guaranteedto converge to such equilibria. Although we do not provideconvergence rates for these ...

  7. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  8. Wireless Network Interface Energy Conservation for Bottlenecked First Mile Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Surendar

    user using the limited upstream capacity of the home broad- band link. We analyze the behavior of two- posed by this behavior on a client side energy saving mechanism. We also describe techniques that allowWireless Network Interface Energy Conservation for Bottlenecked First Mile Networks Surendar

  9. Equity Evaluation of Vehicle Miles Traveled Fees in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Lisa Kay

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the infrastructure but the money needed to maintain and improve roadways is not being adequately generated. One proposed alternative to the gas tax is the creation of a vehicle miles traveled (VMT) fee; with equity being a crucial issue to consider. This research...

  10. Equity Evaluation of Vehicle Miles Traveled Fees in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Lisa Kay

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the infrastructure but the money needed to maintain and improve roadways is not being adequately generated. One proposed alternative to the gas tax is the creation of a vehicle miles traveled (VMT) fee; with equity being a crucial issue to consider. This research...

  11. Dynamic simulation of dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction generators have been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness, and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single- speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. The operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind-speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative to capture more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine will be investigated. One type of control algorithm for dual- speed operation is proposed. Results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works and how power, current and torque of the system vary as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  12. 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    00,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) Presentation given at DEER...

  13. Boise State University Automobile Use Mileage Log (Documentation for Business Miles)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Boise State University Automobile Use Mileage Log (Documentation for Business Miles) Rev. 03 University Automobile Use Mileage Log (Documentation for Business Miles) Rev. 03/10 PAGE ____ (IF YOU NEED

  14. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (MillionNine Mile Point Nuclear

  15. High-speed CARIBU and Other Behemoths

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Question: Why did the caribou cross the road, at 76 million miles per hour? Answer: To catch up with the chicken. Visitors to the Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory won’t actually encounter any hyper-speed fowl, but they will see a high-speed CARIBU, which recently started to chase other exotic beasts in the particle zoo. Argonne’s CARIBU – which stands for Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade – is designed to study the inner part of an atom known as its nucleus. A nucleus consists of a collection of two types of particles, the proton, with a positive charge, and the neutron, with no charge, just mass. Those particles themselves are made of even smaller particles called quarks. CARIBU creates extra-heavy (neutron-rich) nuclei, and then spits them out of a nozzle for acceleration.

  16. university-logo Maximum likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples REML and residual likelihood Peter McCullagh REML #12;university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples JAN: Some personal remarks... IC #12;university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples Outline 1 Maximum likelihood REML

  17. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert.

  18. Seven Mile, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScottsOklahoma: EnergySeoulSettlers HillMile, Ohio:

  19. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  20. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  1. Effectiveness of speed trailers on low-speed urban roadways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrillo, Kerry Victoria

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts are being made to use speed management methods to match operating speeds to posted speeds and to reduce the variability in vehicle speeds. The effectiveness of many different methods of speed management has not been documented. This thesis...

  2. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  3. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy analyzed uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  4. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up, and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy the authors analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  5. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  6. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  7. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  8. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  9. Accident at Three Mile Island: the human dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sills, D.L.; Wolf, C.P.; Shelanski, V.B. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 19 chapters, divided according to the following Parts: (1) Public Perceptions of Nuclear Energy; (2) Local Responses to Nuclear Plants; (3) Institutional Responsibilities for Nuclear Energy; (4) The Interaction of Social and Technical Systems; and (5) Implications for Public Policy. All of the abstracts will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); three will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). At the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (the Kemeny Commission), the Social Science Research Council commissioned social scientists to write a series of papers on the human dimensions of the event. This volume includes those papers, in revised and expanded form, and a comprehensive bibliography of published and unpublished social science research on the accident and its aftermath.

  10. Notices 20 Miles Northwest of Rapid City SD Rapid City SD 57702

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notices 20 Miles Northwest of Rapid City SD Rapid City SD 57702 Landholding Agency: Agriculture Property Number: 15201410016 Status: Excess Comments: off-site removal only; 55 sq....

  11. Evaluation of special safety issues associated with handling the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrie, J.O.; Appel, J.N.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of recent tests and analyses evaluating safety concerns relating to Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) core debris pyrophoricity, radiolytic hydrogen and oxygen, and the potential for steam generation in shipping canisters during a fire. Recommendations drawn from these results include the following: (1) hydrogen-oxygen recombiners should be installed in each core debris canister, (2) water should be removed from each canister by drip drying (no vacuum pumping is required), (3) the maximum weight of the loaded, dewatered canisters and the minimum volume of gas/vapor in each canister should be controlled and measured by weighting before and after dewatering, (4) a cover gas of approximately two atmospheres of argon should be added to each canister, (5) each canister should be weighed and pressure checked prior to shipping, (6) the shipping cask should be designed to limit the temperature of the canister contents after the standard hypothetical accident (fire) such that the design pressure of the canister/cask will not be exceeded, (7) provisions should be made for canister venting during long-term storage and for cask venting in the event of an overpressure condition resulting from an ''extended'' fire, and (8) some pyrophoricity testing of samples taken during defueling should be conducted to assure adequate safety-related information during canister opening.

  12. Achieve maximum application availability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Highlights Achieve maximum application availability and data protection using SQL Server AlwaysOn and other high availability features Reduce planned downtime significantly with SQL Server on Windows and management of high availability and disaster recovery using integrated tools Achieve maximum application

  13. EXTENSION OF THE MAXIMUM POWER REGION OF DOUBLY-SALIENT VARIABLE RELUCTANCE MOTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Salient Variable Reluctance Motors (DSVRM) has been investigated and developed for variable-speed drives during, variable-frequency generators, wind wheels, machine tools, etc.). In these applications, it is generally necessary to operate in a regime of a high speed ux-weakening (zone of maximum constant power), for a better

  14. Original article Restricted maximum likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Restricted maximum likelihood estimation of covariances in sparse linear models on the simplex algorithm of Nelder and Mead [40]. Kovac [29] made modifications that turned it into a stable

  15. Content Provider Speeds Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    protocols like SMPP for SMS and MM7 for MMS are industry standards, carriers typically layer their own APIs.0 standards," says Rose, "and we thought that would help speed development." The AT&T API Platform includesContent Provider Speeds Application Development AT&T API Platform cuts development time and costs

  16. Evaluation of alignment indices in estimating tangent speeds on rural two-lane highways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parma, Kelly Daniel

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design-speed concept has been used in attempting to ensure design and operating-speed consistency of roads in the United States, However, this concept has no effective controls on maximum speeds (e.g., tangents), which reduces its effectiveness...

  17. 51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

  18. Regulations for Gas Transmission Lines Less than Ten Miles Long (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any person who wishes to construct a gas transmission line that is less than ten miles long must file documents describing the construction plans and potential land use and environmental impacts of...

  19. Autonomous personal vehicle for the first- and last-mile transportation services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Z. J.

    This paper describes an autonomous vehicle testbed that aims at providing the first- and last- mile transportation services. The vehicle mainly operates in a crowded urban environment whose features can be extracted a ...

  20. EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Z d ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES, AND THOMAS WARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Z d ­ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES spaces was proposed by Boyle and Lind in terms of expansive behavior along lower­dimensional subspaces

  1. EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES, AND THOMAS WARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES spaces was proposed by Boyle and Lind in terms of expansive behavior along lower-dimensional subspaces

  2. Regulations for Electric Transmission and Fuel Gas Transmission Lines Ten or More Miles Long (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any person who wishes to construct an electric or gas transmission line that is more than ten miles long must file documents describing the construction plans and potential land use and...

  3. Balancing of high speed, flexible rotating shafts across critical speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Gary Paul

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this is equivalent to eliminating certain sen- sors. Once the influence coefficient matrix is square, the solution procedure is exactly that of the single speed case. The computed balance weights should now null the rotor vibration at the sensor ports which were... critical speed, The Sin- gle Speed and the Exact Point-Speed techniques were determined to be relatively ineffective over this speed range; however, the Least Squares procedure yields a dramatic decrease in rotor vibration over the entire speed range...

  4. Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption Mathew D. Penrose and Vadim;Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption M.D. Penrose, Department of the region. Keywords: cooperative sequential adsorption, space-time point pro- cess, maximum likelihood

  5. Estimating a mixed strategy employing maximum entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golan, Amos; Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIXED STRATEGY EMPLOYING MAXIMUM ENTROPY by Amos Golan LarryMixed Strategy Employing Maximum Entropy Amos Golan Larry S.Abstract Generalized maximum entropy may be used to estimate

  6. Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, April 2015 Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact...

  7. Pitch-controlled variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is a viable option to complement other types of pollution-free generation. In the early development of wind energy, the majority of wind turbines were operated at constant speed. Recently, the number of variable-speed wind turbines installed in wind farms has increased and more wind turbine manufacturers are making variable-speed wind turbines. This paper covers the operation of variable-speed wind turbines with pitch control. The system the authors considered is controlled to generate maximum energy while minimizing loads. The maximization of energy was only carried out on a static basis and only drive train loads were considered as a constraint. In medium wind speeds, the generator and power converter control the wind turbine to capture maximum energy from the wind. In the high wind speed region, the wind turbine is controlled to maintain the aerodynamic power produced by the wind turbine. Two methods to adjust the aerodynamic power were investigated: pitch control and generator load control, both of which are employed to control the operation of the wind turbine. The analysis and simulation shows that the wind turbine can be operated at its optimum energy capture while minimizing the load on the wind turbine for a wide range of wind speeds.

  8. High speed door assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  9. High speed door assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Carolyn (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  10. Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

  11. Two-speed transaxle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalns, Ilmars (Northville, MI)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  12. Balancing of high speed, flexible rotating shafts across critical speeds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Gary Paul

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BALANCING OF HIGH SPEED, FLEXIBLE ROTATING SHAFTS ACROSS CRITICAL SPEEDS A Thesis by Gary Paul White Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1977 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering Gary Paul White 1977 BALANCING OF HIGH SPEED, FLEXIBLE ROTATING SHAFTS ACROSS CRITICAL SPEEDS A Thesis by GARY PAUL WHITE Approved as to style and content by: Head of Department Member August...

  13. Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus for Breaking News: Is there a winner? Miles Osborne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Miles

    Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus for Breaking News: Is there a winner? Miles Osborne School Media have be- gun to carry news. Here we examine how Facebook, Google Plus and Twitter report Facebook or Google Plus. Face- book and Google Plus largely repost newswire stories and their main research

  14. Parallelising the dual revised simplex method Julian Hall1 Qi Huangfu2 Miles Lubin3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Parallelising the dual revised simplex method Julian Hall1 Qi Huangfu2 Miles Lubin3 1School Parallelising the dual revised simplex method: Overview Background Three approaches Multiple iteration Conclusions Julian Hall Parallelising the dual revised simplex method 2 / 42 Linear programming (LP) minimize

  15. TTrraavveell GGuuiiddee 1. Student Affairs REQUIRES overnight lodging when driving an Avis vehicle over 500 miles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    TTrraavveell GGuuiiddee 1. Student Affairs REQUIRES overnight lodging when driving an Avis vehicle over 500 miles. 2. Avis car rental (state contract) The vehicle is automatically covered under.) This will negate the contract and insurance coverage. You must use a compact car unless a different vehicle

  16. The Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is home to a two-mile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    -program laboratory for photon science, astrophysics, and accelerator and particle physics research. Six scientists promises to be just as extraordinary. #12;Accelerator Physics Particle accelerators are the working engines#12;The Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is home to a two-mile linear accelerator

  17. Crisis contained, The Department of Energy at Three Mile Island: a history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantelon, P L; Williams, R C

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An account is given of the response of US DOE to the Three Mile Island-2 accident on March 28, 1979. The accident is treated as though it was a military battle. A synoptic chronologgy of the accident events and of DOE and other responses is included. (DLC)

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Limited Speed Vehicle Access to Roadways A limited speed vehicle is defined as a vehicle that is capable of achieving a maximum speed of at least 25 miles per hour (mph) but no...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Low-Speed Vehicle Definition A low-speed vehicle is defined as a limited use automobile or truck that has a maximum speed greater than 20 miles per hour (mph) but not more than 25...

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Low-Speed Vehicle Access to Roadways A low-speed vehicle is defined as a four-wheeled electric vehicle that has a minimum speed capability of 20 miles per hour (mph) and a maximum...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Low-Speed Vehicle Access to Roadways A low-speed vehicle is defined as a four-wheeled vehicle with a maximum speed of 25 miles per hour (mph) that is manufactured in compliance...

  2. Elementary excitations and sound speed in liquid He at negative pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    Elementary excitations and sound speed in liquid 4 He at negative pressures Francesco Albergamoa of positive pressure values and from the sound speed. The maximum negative pressure realized, about -5.5 bar values as the density is decreased below the bulk value due to stretching of the liquid. The negative

  3. High speed flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrath, Stephen V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  4. Maximum Running Speed of Captive Bar-Headed Geese Is Unaffected by Severe Hypoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Graham

    of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 6 Department of Biology, McMaster University lower than bar-headed geese. In bar-headed geese, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in both Research Council (BBSRC) of the United Kingdom [Grant number BB/F015615/1] to CMB and PJB. The funders had

  5. Maximum CME speed as an indicator of solar and geomagnetic activities , V.B. Yurchyshyn1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Copernic, 06130 Grasse, France Abstract We investigate the relationship between the monthly averaged

  6. Maximum entropy principal for transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilich, F. [University of Brasilia (Brazil); Da Silva, R. [National Research Council (Brazil)

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

  7. High speed transient sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing. 17 figs.

  8. High speed transient sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing.

  9. Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odam, Kofi

    Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise tracking (MPPT) algorithms for photovoltaic systems, including how noise affects both tracking speed-performance photovoltaic sys- tems. An intelligent controller adjusts the voltage, current, or impedance seen by a solar

  10. Control strategy for variable-speed, stall-regulated wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable-speed, constant-pitch wind turbine was investigated to evaluate the feasibility of constraining its rotor speed and power output without the benefit of active aerodynamic control devices. A strategy was postulated to control rotational speed by specifying the demanded generator torque. By controlling rotor speed in relation to wind speed, the aerodynamic power extracted by the blades from the wind was manipulated. Specifically, the blades were caused to stall in high winds. In low and moderate winds, the demanded generator torque and the resulting rotor speed were controlled to cause the wind turbine to operate near maximum efficiency. A computational model was developed, and simulations were conducted of operation in high turbulent winds. Results indicated that rotor speed and power output were well regulated. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Robin Miles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources Resources About1KennamerRobertV. O'NeillRobin

  12. The determination of settling velocities for sewage sludge disposed at 106-Mile Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Daniel Saul

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DBTERMZNATZON OF SETTLING VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSED AT 106-MILE SITE A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THB DETERMZNATZON OF SBTTLZNG VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSBD AT 106-MZLE SZTB A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Approved as to style and content by: James S. Bonner '(Chair...

  13. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Frio sandstones, Nine Mile Point Field, Aransas County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Raina Rae

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Ma) or Suh) ect: Geology DEPOSZTZONAL ENVIRCNMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOCY OF THE FRIO SANDSTONES ~ NINE MILE POI?f FIELD y ARANSAS CXIPIY ~ TEXAS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ttee) ead... of Department (M August 1976 Depositional Environment and Reservoir Norphology of the Frio Sandstones, N1ne Nile Point Field, Aransas County~ Texas (August 1975) ~ Rains Rae Powell~ B, S? ~ Stephen F Austin State University Ch~ of Advisory Caamitteee Dr...

  14. Modal shifts in short-haul passenger travel and the consequent energy impacts. [Intercity travel under 500 miles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to evaluate the impacts of strategies to effect modal shifts in short-haul passenger travel (defined herein as intercity travel under 500 miles) from energy-intensive modes to those modes that are less energy-intensive. A series of individual strategies, ranging from incentives to the less energy-intensive modes (bus, rail) to penalties to the more energy-intensive modes (auto, air) was examined to determine energy saved and policy implications relative to strategy implementation. The most effective of the individual strategies were then combined in all permutations, and the analysis was repeated. As part of the analytical process, effects of factors other than energy (user cost and time, emissions, government subsidy, and travel fatailities) were examined in a benefit/cost analysis. Finally, energy savings, benefit/cost impacts, implementation considerations, and policy implications were evaluated to arrive at conclusions as to the effectiveness of the more-influential strategies and to the overall effectiveness of induced modal shifts. The principal conclusion of the study is that the maximum 1980 energy saving that might be realized by modal shifts, discounting the concurrent effects of demand suppression and improvement of mode efficiency, is approximately 83 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (46,500 bbl gasoline per day), 3.8% of the total projected 1980 energy consumption in the short-haul transportation sector and 0.23% of the total US petroleum use. It was also concluded that strategies to achieve these small savings by modal shifts would result in significant economic, social, and business disruptions.

  15. Optimization Online - Efficient Heuristic Algorithms for Maximum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. G. J. Myklebust

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 19, 2012 ... Efficient Heuristic Algorithms for Maximum Utility Product Pricing Problems. T. G. J. Myklebust(tmyklebu ***at*** csclub.uwaterloo.ca)

  16. Scheduling for Speed Bounded Processors Nikhil Bansal 1 , HoLeung Chan 2 , TakWah Lam 3 , and LapKei Lee 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Tak-Wah

    . Most modern processors use dynamic speed scaling to manage their energy usage. This leads maximum speed T . The processor uses energy at rate s # when run at speed s, where # > 1 is a constant to the problem of designing execution strategies that are both energy efficient, and yet have almost optimum

  17. EIS-0025: Miles City-New Underwood 230-kV Electrical Transmission Line, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposed action to construct a 3.28-mile, 230-kV transmission line between Miles City and Baker, Montana , Hettinger, North Dakota , and New Underwood , South Dakota , in Custer and Fallon Counties in Montana, Adams , Bowman , and Slope Counties in North Dakota and Meade, Pennington, and Perkins Counties in South Dakota.

  18. Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

  19. Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, Lynn R. (Los Alamos, NM); Forman, Peter R. (Los Alamos, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

  20. Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

  1. Compilation of Earthquakes from 1850-2007 within 200 miles of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Seth Carpenter

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An updated earthquake compilation was created for the years 1850 through 2007 within 200 miles of the Idaho National Laboratory. To generate this compilation, earthquake catalogs were collected from several contributing sources and searched for redundant events using the search criteria established for this effort. For all sets of duplicate events, a preferred event was selected, largely based on epicenter-network proximity. All unique magnitude information for each event was added to the preferred event records and these records were used to create the compilation referred to as “INL1850-2007”.

  2. Numerical wind speed simulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

  3. Maximum entropy segmentation of broadcast news 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Heidi; Kolluru, BalaKrishna; Gotoh, Yoshihiko; Renals, Steve

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    speech recognizer and subsequently segmenting the text into utterances and topics. A maximum entropy approach is used to build statistical models for both utterance and topic segmentation. The experimental work addresses the effect on performance...

  4. System and method that suppresses intensity fluctuations for free space high-speed optical communication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Bishop, Alan R. (Los Alamos, NM); Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Santa Fe, NM); Gorshkov, Vacheslav N. (Kiev, UA)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-speed (Gbps), free space optical communication system is based on spectral encoding of radiation from a wide band light source, such as a laser. By using partially coherent laser beams in combination with a relatively slow photosensor, scintillations can be suppressed by orders of magnitude for distances of more than 10 km. To suppress the intensity fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, a source with partial transverse coherence in combination with slow response time photodetector is used. Information is encoded in the spectral domain of a wideband optical source by modulation of spectral amplitudes. A non-coherent light source with wide spectrum (an LED, for example) may be used for high-speed communication over short (less than about a mile) distances.

  5. Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japan’s Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

  6. A conservative control strategy for variable-speed stall-regulated wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation models of a variable-speed, fixed-pitch wind turbine were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of constraining rotor speed and power output without the benefit of active aerodynamic control devices. A strategy was postulated to control rotational speed by specifying the demanded generator torque. By controlling rotor speed in relation to wind speed, the aerodynamic power extracted by the blades from the wind was manipulated. Specifically, the blades were caused to stall in high winds. In low and moderate winds, the demanded generator torque and the resulting rotor speed were controlled to cause the wind turbine to operate near maximum efficiency. Using the developed models, simulations were conducted of operation in turbulent winds. Results indicated that rotor speed and power output were well regulated. Preliminary investigations of system dynamics showed that, compared to fixed-speed operation, variable-speed operation caused cyclic loading amplitude to be reduced for the turbine blades and low-speed shaft and slightly increased for the tower loads. This result suggests a favorable impact on fatigue life from implementation of the proposed control strategy.

  7. Controlling proton source speeds catalyst | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    speeds catalyst Controlling proton source speeds catalyst Released: April 29, 2013 Nickel-based catalyst three times faster with adjustments to key acid Research showing that...

  8. Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont's Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Program was created by legislation in 2005 to promote renewable energy development. The SPEED program itself is not a renewable...

  9. Comment on "Measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation of free-fall absolute gravimeters"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper (Rothleitner et al. 2014 Metrologia 51, L9) reports on the measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation in absolute gravimeters. The conclusion that the perturbation reaches only 2/3 of the commonly accepted value violates the fundamental limitation on the maximum speed of information transfer. The conclusion was deluded by unaccounted parasitic perturbations, some of which are obvious from the report.

  10. Cell development obeys maximum Fisher information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Frieden; R. A. Gatenby

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10 micron and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6 micron. The NM contains about 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order delta I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order delta I = 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1-4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the approximate flux value F =10^16 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL approaches IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information approaches non-equilibrium, one condition for life.

  11. Results of the radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York (TNY002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Uziel, M.S.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in November 1991 and May 1996. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been transported into the creek. The survey included a surface gamma scan in accessible areas near the creek and the collection of soil, sediment, and core samples for radionuclide analyses. Survey results indicate that no significant material originating at the Linde plant is presently in the creek. Three of the 1991 soil sample locations on the creek bank and one near the lake contained slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U with radionuclide distributions similar to that found in materials resulting from former processing activities at the Linde site.

  12. Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles

  13. Fact #848: November 24, 2014 Nearly Three-Fourths of New Cars have Fuel Economy above 25 Miles per Gallon- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #848: November 24, 2014 Nearly Three-Fourths of New Cars have Fuel Economy above 25 Miles per Gallon

  14. Electric-field-induced flame speed modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcum, S.D. [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Ganguly, B.N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of pulsed and continuous DC electric fields on the reaction zones of premixed propane-air flames have been investigated using several types of experimental measurements. All observed effects on the flame are dependent on the applied voltage polarity, indicating that negatively charged flame species do not play a role in the perturbation of the reaction zone. Experiments designed to characterize the electric-field-induced modifications of the shape and size of the inner cone, and the concomitant changes in the temperature profiles of flames with equivalence ratios between 0.8 and 1.7, are also reported. High-speed two-dimensional imaging of the flame response to a pulsed DC voltage shows that the unperturbed conical flame front (laminar flow) is driven into a wrinkled laminar flamelet (cellular) geometry on a time scale of the order of 5 ms. Temperature distributions derived from thin filament pyrometry (TFP) measurements in flames perturbed by continuous DC fields show similar large changes in the reaction zone geometry, with no change in maximum flame temperature. All measurements are consistent with the observed flame perturbations being a fluid mechanical response to the applied field brought about by forcing positive flame ions counter to the flow. The resulting electric pressure decreases Lewis numbers of the ionic species and drives the effective flame Lewis number below unity. The observed increases in flame speed and the flame fronts trend toward turbulence can be described in terms of the flame front wrinkling and concomitant increase in reaction sheet area. This effect is a potentially attractive means of controlling flame fluid mechanical characteristics. The observed effects require minimal input electrical power (<1 W for a 1 kW burner) due to the much better electric field coupling achieved in the present experiments compared to the previous studies.

  15. Maximum Likelihood Haplotyping for General Pedigrees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Nir

    networks. The use of Bayesian networks enables efficient maximum likelihood haplotyping for more complex for the variables of the Bayesian network. The presented optimization algorithm also improves likelihood Analysis, Pedigree, superlink. Abstract Haplotype data is valuable in mapping disease-susceptibility genes

  16. Weak Scale From the Maximum Entropy Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuta Hamada; Hikaru Kawai; Kiyoharu Kawana

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the $S^{3}$ universe at the final stage $S_{rad}$ becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the Standard Model, we can check whether $S_{rad}$ actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard $S_{rad}$ at the final stage as a function of the weak scale ( the Higgs expectation value ) $v_{h}$, and show that it becomes maximum around $v_{h}={\\cal{O}}(300\\text{GeV})$ when the dimensionless couplings in the Standard Model, that is, the Higgs self coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by \\begin{equation} v_{h}\\sim\\frac{T_{BBN}^{2}}{M_{pl}y_{e}^{5}},\

  17. Weak Scale From the Maximum Entropy Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the $S^{3}$ universe at the final stage $S_{rad}$ becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the Standard Model, we can check whether $S_{rad}$ actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard $S_{rad}$ at the final stage as a function of the weak scale ( the Higgs expectation value ) $v_{h}$, and show that it becomes maximum around $v_{h}={\\cal{O}}(300\\text{GeV})$ when the dimensionless couplings in the Standard Model, that is, the Higgs self coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by \\begin{equation} v_{h}\\sim\\frac{T_{BBN}^{2}}{M_{pl}y_{e}^{5}},\

  18. Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

  19. Fast singular value decomposition combined maximum entropy method for plasma tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Junghee; Choe, W. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701(Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy method (MEM) is a widely used reconstruction algorithm in plasma physics. Drawbacks of the conventional MEM are its heavy time-consuming process and possible generation of noisy reconstruction results. In this article, a modified maximum entropy algorithm is described which speeds up the calculation and shows better noise handling capability. Similar to the rapid minimum Fisher information method, the modified maximum entropy algorithm uses simple matrix operations instead of treating a fully nonlinear problem. The preprocess for rapid tomographic calculation is based on the vector operations and the singular value decomposition (SVD). The initial guess of the sought-for emissivity is calculated by SVD and this helped reconstruction about ten times faster than the conventional MEM. Therefore, the developed fast MEM can be used for intershot tomographic analyses of fusion plasmas.

  20. Neutron Stars in a Varying Speed of Light Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Whinnett

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study neutron stars in a varying speed of light (VSL) theory of gravity in which the local speed of light depends upon the value of a scalar field $\\phi$. We find that the masses and radii of the stars are strongly dependent on the strength of the coupling between $\\phi$ and the matter field and that for certain choices of coupling parameters, the maximum neutron star mass can be arbitrarily small. We also discuss the phenomenon of cosmological evolution of VSL stars (analogous to the gravitational evolution in scalar-tensor theories) and we derive a relation showing how the fractional change in the energy of a star is related to the change in the cosmological value of the scalar field.

  1. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers UC Davis Water Management Research Group Aplication Efficiency: Dry Beans 2001 Developed as a cooperative project between University of California, Davis United States Geological Survey and California Department of Water Resources Map prepared

  2. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24 nautical miles offshore of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to fund Virginia Electric and Power Company's Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP). The proposed VOWTAP project consists of design, construction and operation of a 12 megawatt offshore wind facility located approximately 24 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA on the Outer Continental Shelf.

  3. QCD Level Density from Maximum Entropy Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinji Ejiri; Tetsuo Hatsuda

    2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to calculate the QCD level density directly from the thermodynamic quantities obtained by lattice QCD simulations with the use of the maximum entropy method (MEM). Understanding QCD thermodynamics from QCD spectral properties has its own importance. Also it has a close connection to phenomenological analyses of the lattice data as well as experimental data on the basis of hadronic resonances. Our feasibility study shows that the MEM can provide a useful tool to study QCD level density.

  4. Tissue Radiation Response with Maximum Tsallis Entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar [UNED, Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); UNED, Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, 28040 Madrid (Spain) and University of Havana, Catedra de Sistemas Complejos Henri Poincare, Havana 10400 (Cuba); University of Havana, Catedra de Sistemas Complejos Henri Poincare, Havana 10400 (Cuba)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is currently based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation, and conditions. Here, we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature.

  5. A global maximum power point tracking DC-DC converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Joseph, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design, and validation of a maximum power point tracking DC-DC converter capable of following the true global maximum power point in the presence of other local maximum. It does this without the ...

  6. South Dakota DOT 1) Rural PCCP -0.0 Band California Profilograph and incentive for less than 25" per mile max incentive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Profilograph - Bonus paid for less than 5" per mile. Max bonus is 103.5% for 2.9" PI or less and lift) - Bonus paid for 50 IRI or less, Max Bonus is $180 per 0.1 mile per lane for 35 or less IRI. 2

  7. SOLAR-CYCLE VARIATION OF SOUND SPEED NEAR THE SOLAR SURFACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabello-Soares, M. C., E-mail: cristina@sun.stanford.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that the sound-speed variation with solar activity has a two-layer configuration, similar to the one observed below an active region, which consists of a negative layer near the solar surface and a positive one in the layer immediately below the first one. Frequency differences between the activity minimum and maximum of solar cycle 23, obtained applying global helioseismology to the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, is used to determine the sound-speed variation from below the base of the convection zone to a few Mm below the solar surface. We find that the sound speed at solar maximum is smaller than at solar minimum at the limit of our determination (5.5 Mm). The min-to-max difference decreases in absolute values until {approx}7 Mm. At larger depths, the sound speed at solar maximum is larger than at solar minimum and the difference increases with depth until {approx}10 Mm. At this depth, the relative difference ({delta}c{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) is less than half of the value observed at the lowest depth determination. At deeper layers, it slowly decreases with depth until there is no difference between maximum and minimum activity.

  8. articulatorily constrained maximum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weight spanning forests. Amitabha Bagchi; Ankur Bhargava; Torsten Suel 2005-01-01 27 Maximum Entropy Correlated Equilibria MIT - DSpace Summary: We study maximum entropy...

  9. Petroleum production at Maximum Efficient Rate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an analysis of the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, which is continued operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. I (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) as authorized by Public law 94-258, the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Act). The document also provides a similar analysis of alternatives to the proposed action, which also involve continued operations, but under lower development scenarios and lower rates of production. NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.SA Inc. (CUSA) pursuant to a Unit Plan Contract that became effective in 1944; the government`s interest is approximately 78% and CUSA`s interest is approximately 22%. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The facility is approximately 17,409 acres (74 square miles), and it is located in Kern County, California, about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield and 100 miles north of Los Angeles in the south central portion of the state. The environmental analysis presented herein is a supplement to the NPR-1 Final Environmental Impact Statement of that was issued by DOE in 1979 (1979 EIS). As such, this document is a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS).

  10. Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, D.; Adams, J. W.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation.

  11. Characterization of solids in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, D. O.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the impact of poor water clarity on defueling operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station, a study was undertaken to characterize suspended particulates in the reactor defueling water. The examination included cascade filtration through Nuclepore filters of progressively smaller pore sizes, using three water samples obtained at different times and after varying degrees of clarification. The solids collected on the filters were examined with a scanning electron microscope and analyzed with energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence. A wide variety of solids was observed, and 26 elements were detected. These included all the materials expected from the reactor system (uranium, zirconium, silver, cadmium, indium, iron, chromium, and nickel), chemicals and zeolites used to decontaminate the water (aluminum, silicon, sodium), common impurities (potassium, chlorine, sulfur, magnesium, calcium, and others), as well as some unexpected metals (molybdenum, manganese, bromine, and lead). There was also evidence for the presence of organic material. A diverse assortment of particles with widely varying surface properties was found to be present.

  12. A critical essay: Ten mile emergency planning zones, pro or con

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDurmon, G.W.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NRC's current emergency planning regulations are based on source term data which has come into question. Indeed, many current models indicate that source terms can be calculated which are one or more orders of magnitude lower than those from WASH-1400. However, there remains a number of unresolved technical issues between the NRC and the Industry Downgraded Core Research Program (IDCOR) calculated source terms which presents a very large uncertainty for the determined values. In addition, there remains questions concerning the integrity of containment, and the emphasis which should be placed on operator intervention. These results have caused both the NRC and the APS to state that source terms cannot be lowered for all radionuclides and all nuclear power plants at this time. Data from NUREG-1150, along with the statements of other experts, do seem to demonstrate that evacuation, as a means of dose minimization, has been overemphasized under the current regulations. While an appropriate evacuation planning distance, specific to each plant, would vary according to a number of factors such as population density, available transportation, typical housing structures for shelter, type of plant containment, etc., current methods of emergency planning must also address these issues. In light of this and the dose estimates across the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ), it would seem that detailed emergency plans out to ten miles which place an emphasis on evacuation are unnecessary from a health physics perspective, and bear heavy socioeconomic costs. 14 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Heatup of the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to current perceptions of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, corium largely relocated into the reactor vessel lower head at {approximately}224 min into the accident. Defueling examinations have revealed that the corium relocated from the molten core region to the lower head predominantly by way of drainage through the core former region (CFR) located between the vertical baffle plates immediately surrounding the fuel assemblies and the core barrel. An analysis has been carried out to assess the heatup of the reactor vessel lower head during the core relocation event, particularly the potential for a melting attack on the lower head wall and the in-core instrument nozzle penetration weldments. The analysis employed the THIRMAL computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to predict the breakup and quenching or corium jets under film boiling conditions as well as the size distributions and quenching of the resultant molten droplets. The transient heatup and ablation of the vessel wall and penetration weldments due to impinging corium jets was calculated using the MISTI computer code.

  14. Historical summary of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris transportation campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Tyacke, M.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Quinn, G.J. [Wastren, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of the damaged core materials from the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for examination and storage presented many technical and institutional challenges, including assessing the ability to transport the damaged core; removing and packaging core debris in ways suitable for transport; developing a transport package that could both meet Federal regulations and interface with the facilities at TMI-2 and the INEL; and developing a transport plan, support logistics, and public communications channels suited to the task. This report is a historical summary of how the US Department of Energy addressed those challenges and transported, received, and stored the TMI-2 core debris at the INEL. Subjects discussed include preparations for transport, loading at TMI-2, institutional issues, transport operations, receipt and storage at the INEL, governmental inquiries/investigations, and lessons learned. Because of public attention focused on the TMI-2 Core Debris Transport Program, the exchange of information between the program and public was extensive. This exchange is a focus for parts of this report to explain why various operations were conducted as they were and why certain technical approaches were employed. And, because of that exchange, the program may have contributed to a better public understanding of such actions and may contribute to planning and execution of similar future actions.

  15. Performance of twist-coupled blades on variable speed rotors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.; Laino, D.J.

    1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The load mitigation and energy capture characteristics of twist-coupled HAWT blades that are mounted on a variable speed rotor are investigated in this paper. These blades are designed to twist toward feather as they bend with pretwist set to achieve a desirable twist distribution at rated power. For this investigation, the ADAMS-WT software has been modified to include blade models with bending-twist coupling. Using twist-coupled and uncoupled models, the ADAMS software is exercised for steady wind environments to generate C{sub p} curves at a number of operating speeds to compare the efficiencies of the two models. The ADAMS software is also used to generate the response of a twist-coupled variable speed rotor to a spectrum of stochastic wind time series. This spectrum contains time series with two mean wind speeds at two turbulence levels. Power control is achieved by imposing a reactive torque on the low speed shaft proportional to the RPM squared with the coefficient specified so that the rotor operates at peak efficiency in the linear aerodynamic range, and by limiting the maximum RPM to take advantage of the stall controlled nature of the rotor. Fatigue calculations are done for the generated load histories using a range of material exponents that represent materials from welded steel to aluminum to composites, and results are compared with the damage computed for the rotor without twist-coupling. Results indicate that significant reductions in damage are achieved across the spectrum of applied wind loading without any degradation in power production.

  16. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  17. Thermoacoustic tomography, variable sound speed Plamen Stefanov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanov, Plamen

    Thermoacoustic tomography, variable sound speed Plamen Stefanov Purdue University Based on a joint work with Gunther Uhlmann Plamen Stefanov (Purdue University ) Thermoacoustic tomography, variable sound speed 1 / 18 #12;Formulation Main Problem Thermoacoustic Tomography In thermoacoustic tomography

  18. High speed optical quantum random number generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    .3351 (2009). 6. I. Reidler, Y. Aviad, M. Rosenbluh, and I. Kanter, "Ultrahigh-speed random number generation

  19. Channel coding for high speed links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blitvic, Natasa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the benefit of channel coding for high-speed backplane or chip-to-chip interconnects, referred to as the high-speed links. Although both power-constrained and bandwidth-limited, the high-speed links ...

  20. Better haul roads speed operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern trucks and scrapers are manufactured to standards of increasingly larger size and degree of sophistication, and to get the greatest return in productivity it is necessary to have good haul roads. Good haul roads can reduce fuel consumption, increase vehicle speed, reduce wear and tear on machinery, and improve safety. The paper describes aspects of haul road maintenance, including levelling and repairing of the surface, reducing rolling resistance, super-elevating curves, eliminating reverse curves and controlling dust. The design of haul roads is also covered.

  1. Peer review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Vessel Investigation Project metallurgical examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohl, R.W.; Gaydos, R.G.; Vander Voort, G.F.; Diercks, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifteen samples recovered from the lower head of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel were subjected to detailed metallurgical examinations by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), with supporting work carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and several of the European participants. These examinations determined that a portion of the lower head, a so-called elliptical ``hot spot`` measuring {approx}0.8 {times} 1 m, reached temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C during the accident and cooled from these temperatures at {approx}10--100{degrees}C/min. The remainder of the lower head was found to have remained below the ferrite-toaustenite transformation temperature of 727{degrees}C during the accident. Because of the significance of these results and their importance to the overall analysis of the TMI accident, a panel of three outside peer reviewers, Dr. Robert W. Bohl, Mr. Richard G. Gaydos, and Mr. George F. Vander Voort, was formed to conduct an independent review of the metallurgical analyses. After a thorough review of the previous analyses and examination of photo-micrographs and actual lower head specimens, the panel determined that the conclusions resulting from the INEL study were fundamentally correct. In particular, the panel reaffirmed that four lower head samples attained temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C, and perhaps as high as 1150--1200{degrees}C in one case, during the accident. They concluded that these samples subsequently cooled at a rate of {approx}50--125{degrees}C/min in the temperature range of 600--400{degrees}C, in good agreement with the original analysis. The reviewers also agreed that the remainder of the lower head samples had not exceeded the ferrite-to-austenite transformation temperature during the accident and suggested several refinements and alternative procedures that could have been employed in the original analysis.

  2. Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

  3. Maximum screening fields of superconducting multilayer structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurevich, Alex

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a multilayer comprised of alternating thin superconducting and insulating layers on a thick substrate can fully screen the applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating fields $H_s$ of both the superconducting layers and the substrate, the maximum Meissner field is achieved at an optimum multilayer thickness. For instance, a dirty layer of thickness $\\sim 0.1\\; \\mu$m at the Nb surface could increase $H_s\\simeq 240$ mT of a clean Nb up to $H_s\\simeq 290$ mT. Optimized multilayers of Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, some of the iron pnictides, or alloyed Nb deposited onto the surface of the Nb resonator cavities could potentially double the rf breakdown field, pushing the peak accelerating electric fields above 100 MV/m while protecting the cavity from dendritic thermomagnetic avalanches caused by local penetration of vortices.

  4. Low pressure high speed Stirling air engine. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, M.A.

    1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to design, construct and test a simple, appropriate technology low pressure, high speed, wood-fired Stirling air engine of 100 W output. The final design was a concentric piston/displacer engine of 454 in. bore and 1 in. stroke with a rhombic drive mechanism. The project engine was ultimately completed and tested, using a propane burner for all tests as a matter of convenience. The 100 W aim was exceeded, at atmospheric pressure, over a wide range of engine speed with the maximum power being 112 W at 1150 rpm. A pressure can was constructed to permit pressurization; however the grant funds were running out, and the only pressurized power test attempted was unsuccessful due to seal difficulties. This was a disappointment because numerous tests on the 4 cubic inch engine suggested power would be more than doubled with pressurization at 25 psig. A manifold was designed and constructed to permit operation of the engine over a standard No. 40 pot bellied stove. The engine was run successfully, but at reduced speed and power, over this stove. The project engine started out being rather noisy in operation, but modifications ultimately resulted in a very quiet engine. Various other difficulties and their solutions also are discussed. (LCL)

  5. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as ``strobe kickout``. The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition. 16 figs.

  6. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as "strobe kickout". The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition.

  7. Maximum Entropy Method Approach to $?$ Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Imachi; Yasuhiko Shinno; Hiroshi Yoneyama

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In Monte Carlo simulations of lattice field theory with a $\\theta$ term, one confronts the complex weight problem, or the sign problem. This is circumvented by performing the Fourier transform of the topological charge distribution $P(Q)$. This procedure, however, causes flattening phenomenon of the free energy $f(\\theta)$, which makes study of the phase structure unfeasible. In order to treat this problem, we apply the maximum entropy method (MEM) to a Gaussian form of $P(Q)$, which serves as a good example to test whether the MEM can be applied effectively to the $\\theta$ term. We study the case with flattening as well as that without flattening. In the latter case, the results of the MEM agree with those obtained from the direct application of the Fourier transform. For the former, the MEM gives a smoother $f(\\theta)$ than that of the Fourier transform. Among various default models investigated, the images which yield the least error do not show flattening, although some others cannot be excluded given the uncertainty related to statistical error.

  8. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  9. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avery, Don E. (45-437 Akimala St., Honolulu, HI 96744)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  10. Maximum Throughput Power Control in CDMA Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Maximum Throughput Power Control in CDMA Wireless Networks Anastasios Giannoulis Department introduce cross­layer, distributed power control algorithms that guarantee maximum possible data throughput performing dynamic routing and scheduling together with power control. The cross­layer interaction consists

  11. Light Speed Invariance is a Remarkable Illusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan J. G. Gift

    2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Though many experiments appear to have confirmed the light speed invariance postulate of special relativity theory, this postulate is actually unverified. This paper resolves this issue by first showing the manner in which an illusion of light speed invariance occurs in two-way light speed measurement in the framework of a semi-classical absolute space theory. It then demonstrates a measurable variation of the one-way speed of light, which directly invalidates the invariance postulate and confirms the existence of the preferred reference frame of the absolute space theory.

  12. GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M estimate it using a simple yet flexible maximum entropy density. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed maximum entropy density is able to approximate various distributions extremely well. The two

  13. Effect of Tip-Speed Constraints on the Optimized Design of a Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Resor, B.; Platt, A.; Guo, Y.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Parsons, T.; Petch, D.; Veers, P.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the effect of tip-velocity constraints on system levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The results indicate that a change in maximum tip speed from 80 to 100~m/s could produce a 32% decrease in gearbox weight (a 33% reduction in cost) which would result in an overall reduction of 1%-9% in system LCOE depending on the design approach. Three 100~m/s design cases were considered including a low tip-speed ratio/high-solidity rotor design, a high tip-speed ratio/ low-solidity rotor design, and finally a flexible blade design in which a high tip-speed ratio was used along with removing the tip deflection constraint on the rotor design. In all three cases, the significant reduction in gearbox weight caused by the higher tip-speed and lower overall gear ratio was counterbalanced by increased weights for the rotor and/or other drivetrain components and the tower. As a result, the increased costs of either the rotor or drivetrain components offset the overall reduction in turbine costs from down-sizing the gearbox. Other system costs were not significantly affected, whereas energy production was slightly reduced in the 100~m/s case low tip-speed ratio case and increased in the high tip-speed ratio case. This resulted in system cost of energy reductions moving from the 80~m/s design to the 100~m/s designs of 1.2% for the low tip-speed ratio, 4.6% for the high tip-speed ratio, and 9.5% for the final flexible case (the latter result is optimistic because the impact of deflection of the flexible blade on power production was not modeled). Overall, the results demonstrate that there is a trade-off in system design between the maximum tip velocity and the overall wind plant cost of energy, and there are many trade-offs within the overall system in designing a turbine for a high maximum tip velocity.

  14. A review of "Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company" by Miles Ogborn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nechtman, Tillman W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2007. xiii + 318 pp. + 22 illus. $40.00. Review by TILLMAN W. NECHTMAN, SKIDMORE COLLEGE. The India Office Records... Company (EIC) and the English/British empire in South Asia. Miles Ogborn?s impressive new book, Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company, approaches this same archive from an important new direction. Rather than reading...

  15. Review of Destructive Assay Methods for Nuclear Materials Characterization from the Three Mile Island (TMI) Fuel Debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla J. Miller

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of the literature review that was performed and based on previous work performed at the Idaho National Laboratory studying the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear reactor accident, specifically the melted fuel debris. The purpose of the literature review was to document prior published work that supports the feasibility of the analytical techniques that were developed to provide quantitative results of the make-up of the fuel and reactor component debris located inside and outside the containment. The quantitative analysis provides a technique to perform nuclear fuel accountancy measurements

  16. Effect on Speed Distribution due to Intrusive and Non-Intrusive Portable Speed Measurement Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasrotia, Romika

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , placing traffic signs, and determining the effectiveness of the countermeasures. To evaluate the effectiveness on speed distribution due to the presence of various intrusive and non-intrusive portable speed measurement devices, automated traffic counters...

  17. Relationship between design speed and operating speed at horizontal curves on suburban arterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamburger, Carl Brian

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DESIGN SPEED AND OPERATING SPEED AT HORIZONTAL CURVES ON SUBURBAN ARTERIALS A Thesis by CARL BRIAN SHAMBURGER Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1995 Major Subject: Civil Engineering RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DESIGN SPEED AND OPERATING SPEED AT HORIZONTAL CURVES ON SUBURBAN ARTERIALS A Thesis by CARL BRIAN SHAMBURGER Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  18. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an application of variable speed pumping to level control of an industrial process. Topics include a comparison of the process using control valves with a variable speed system, an energy savings and cost...

  19. Processor Speed Control with Thermal Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almir Mutapcic

    2007-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 29, 2007 ... Processor Speed Control with Thermal Constraints ... and we model the dissipated power of a processor as a positive and strictly increasing ... speeds based on the measured temperatures in the system. ... Category 2: Applications -- Science and Engineering (Optimization of Systems modeled by PDEs ).

  20. Variable Speed Pumping for Level Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasel, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an application of variable speed pumping to level control of an industrial process. Topics include a comparison of the process using control valves with a variable speed system, an energy savings and cost...

  1. Speed-line for 3D animation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Won Chan

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    My thesis describes a tool which creates speed-lines automatically in 3D computer animations. Speed-lines are usually used in comic books to express fast motions in a still image. They are also used in 2D animations. ...

  2. An Econometric Analysis of the Elasticity of Vehicle Travel with Respect to Fuel Cost per Mile Using RTEC Survey Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Kahn, J.; Gibson, R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of econometric estimation of the ''rebound effect'' for household vehicle travel in the United States based on a comprehensive analysis of survey data collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) at approximately three-year intervals over a 15-year period. The rebound effect is defined as the percent change in vehicle travel for a percent change in fuel economy. It summarizes the tendency to ''take back'' potential energy savings due to fuel economy improvements in the form of increased vehicle travel. Separate vehicles use models were estimated for one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-vehicle households. The results are consistent with the consensus of recently published estimates based on national or state-level data, which show a long-run rebound effect of about +0.2 (a ten percent increase in fuel economy, all else equal, would produce roughly a two percent increase in vehicle travel and an eight percent reduction in fuel use). The hypothesis that vehicle travel responds equally to changes in fuel cost-per-mile whether caused by changes in fuel economy or fuel price per gallon could not be rejected. Recognizing the interdependency in survey data among miles of travel, fuel economy and price paid for fuel for a particular vehicle turns out to be crucial to obtaining meaningful results.

  3. A Near Maximum Likelihood Decoding Algorithm for MIMO Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Mobasher

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 3, 2005 ... A Near Maximum Likelihood Decoding Algorithm for MIMO Systems Based ... models are also used for soft output decoding in MIMO systems.

  4. Computing the Maximum Volume Inscribed Ellipsoid of a Polytopic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianzhe Zhen

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 23, 2015 ... Abstract: This paper introduces a method for computing the maximum volume inscribed ellipsoid and k-ball of a projected polytope. It is known ...

  5. Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling Problems Using Factored Masks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Burer

    2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 2, 2005 ... Abstract: We present a practical approach to Anstreicher and Lee's masked spectral bound for maximum-entropy sampling, and we describe ...

  6. A masked spectral bound for maximum-entropy sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Anstreicher

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 16, 2003 ... Abstract: We introduce a new masked spectral bound for the maximum-entropy sampling problem. This bound is a continuous generalization of ...

  7. Maximum entropy generation in open systems: the Fourth Law?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umberto Lucia

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops an analytical and rigorous formulation of the maximum entropy generation principle. The result is suggested as the Fourth Law of Thermodynamics.

  8. annual maximum extent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS2002) A Maximum Entropy Approach To Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites...

  9. analog fixed maximum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state for given entanglement which can be viewed as an analogue of the Jaynes maximum entropy principle. Pawel Horodecki; Ryszard Horodecki; Michal Horodecki 1998-05-22...

  10. IBM Research Report Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 28, 2005 ... Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling Problems Using. Factored Masks. Samuel Burer. Department of Management Sciences. University of Iowa.

  11. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for...

  12. Investigation of the flame speeds of propane/methanol gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foote, K.L.; Villareal, J.

    1985-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests was conducted in an acoustically tuned flame tube in order to determine the laminar burning velocities in air of various propane/methanol gas mixtures. The experimental method is explained in detail, along with the tabular results. A 90% propane, 10% methanol mixture is shown to have a maximum burning velocity of 40.8 cm/s. A 65% propane, 35% methanol mixture has a maximum velocity of 41.8 cm/s. These maximum flame speeds are shown to be about the same as that of pure propane by the same method. Gulder has found evidence that the presence of methanol in some hydrocarbon fuels may actually inhibit combustion, but we see no apparent modifications in the combustion of propane when mixed with methanol.

  13. Quantifying hurricane wind speed with undersea sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Joshua David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hurricanes, powerful storms with wind speeds that can exceed 80 m/s, are one of the most destructive natural disasters known to man. While current satellite technology has made it possible to effectively detect and track ...

  14. Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xinxin

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to support large-scale integration of wind power into current electric energy system, accurate wind speed forecasting is essential, because the high variation and limited predictability of wind pose profound challenges to the power system...

  15. Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xinxin

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to support large-scale integration of wind power into current electric energy system, accurate wind speed forecasting is essential, because the high variation and limited predictability of wind pose profound challenges to the power system...

  16. The invariance of the speed of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerrold Franklin

    2010-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the conclusion of a recent experiment [arXiv:0912.3934] that claims to have discovered that "the speed of light seems to depend on the motion of the observer" is wrong.

  17. Appendix 22 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 22 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily Load for Flathead Lake, Montana. #12;11/01/01 DRAFT i October 30, 2001 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily Load..............................................................................................................................2-11 SECTION 3.0 APPLICABLE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS

  18. FAST SPEAKER ADAPTION VIA MAXIMUM PENALIZED LIKELIHOOD KERNEL REGRESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

    of MLLR using non- linear regression. Specifically, kernel regression is applied with appropriate of Science and Technology Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong ABSTRACT Maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR) has], and transformation-based methods, most notably, maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR) adap- tation [3]. However

  19. Digital tomosynthesis mammography using a parallel maximum likelihood reconstruction method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meleis, Waleed

    Digital tomosynthesis mammography using a parallel maximum likelihood reconstruction method Tao Wu , a Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 b Dept. of Electrical and Computer on an iterative maximum likelihood (ML) algorithm, is developed to provide fast reconstruction for digital

  20. A Multivariate Analysis of Freeway Speed and Headway Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Yajie

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    key process is the generation of entry vehicle speeds and vehicle arrival times. It is helpful to find desirable mathematical distributions to model individual speed and headway values, because the individual vehicle speed and arrival time...

  1. Transformer failure and common-mode loss of instrument power at Nine Mile Point Unit 2 on August 13, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 13, 1991, at Nine Mile Point Unit 2 nuclear power plant, located near Scriba, New York, on Lake Ontario, the main transformer experienced an internal failure that resulted in degraded voltage which caused the simultaneous loss of five uninterruptible power supplies, which in turn caused the loss of several nonsafety systems, including reactor control rod position indication, some reactor power and water indication, control room annunciators, the plant communications system, the plant process computer, and lighting at some locations. The reactor was subsequently brought to a safe shutdown. Following this event, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission dispatched an Incident Investigation Team to the site to determine what happened, to identify the probable causes, and to make appropriate findings and conclusions. This report describes the incident, the methodology used by the team in its investigation, and presents and the team's findings and conclusions. 59 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. Residential Cold Climate Heat Pump with Variable-Speed Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cold Climate Heat Pump with Variable-Speed Technology Residential Cold Climate Heat Pump with Variable-Speed Technology Purdue prototype system Purdue prototype system Unico...

  3. Energy Department Announces $10 Million to Speed Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Speed Enhanced Geothermal Systems into the Market Energy Department Announces 10 Million to Speed Enhanced Geothermal Systems into the Market February 24, 2014 - 11:46am...

  4. Variable Speed Pumping: A Guide to Successful Applications -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Variable Speed Pumping: A Guide to Successful Applications - Executive Summary Variable Speed Pumping: A Guide to Successful Applications - Executive Summary This document...

  5. Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic continuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992). J. Skilling, in Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods,1989). S. F. Gull, in Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods,with the classical maximum entropy (CME) technique (MEAC-

  6. Improved constraints on transit time distributions from argon 39: A maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holzer, Mark; Primeau, Francois W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gull (1991), Bayesian maximum entropy image reconstruction,Atlantic venti- lated? Maximum entropy inversions of bottlefrom argon 39: A maximum entropy approach Mark Holzer 1,2

  7. Quantum Statistics Basis, Thermodynamic Analogies and the Degree of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soffer, Bernard H; Kikuchi, Ryoichi

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and EstimationApril 3, 1992) The Maximum Entropy method, using physicalare discussed. Maximum Entropy (ME) estimation has been

  8. Improved Algorithms Speed It Up for Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Huge computers, huge codes, complex problems to solve. The longer it takes to run a code, the more it costs. One way to speed things up and save time and money is through hardware improvements--faster processors, different system designs, bigger computers. But another side of supercomputing can reap savings in time and speed: software improvements to make codes--particularly the mathematical algorithms that form them--run faster and more efficiently. Speed up math? Is that really possible? According to Livermore physicist Eugene Brooks, the answer is a resounding yes. ''Sure, you get great speed-ups by improving hardware,'' says Brooks, the deputy leader for Computational Physics in N Division, which is part of Livermore's Physics and Advanced Technologies (PAT) Directorate. ''But the real bonus comes on the software side, where improvements in software can lead to orders of magnitude improvement in run times.'' Brooks knows whereof he speaks. Working with Laboratory physicist Abraham Szoeke and others, he has been instrumental in devising ways to shrink the running time of what has, historically, been a tough computational nut to crack: radiation transport codes based on the statistical or Monte Carlo method of calculation. And Brooks is not the only one. Others around the Laboratory, including physicists Andrew Williamson, Randolph Hood, and Jeff Grossman, have come up with innovative ways to speed up Monte Carlo calculations using pure mathematics.

  9. Directions to Virginia Tech Chemistry Department from Interstate 81 Follow I-81 to Exit 118-B. Follow US 460 West about 6 miles. Upon entering Blacksburg, do NOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Directions to Virginia Tech Chemistry Department from Interstate 81 Follow I-81 to Exit 118-B. Follow US 460 West about 6 miles. Upon entering Blacksburg, do NOT use "Business" US 460 which is also called Main Street. Bear left and stay on the freeway. The first traffic light on US 460 will be Virginia

  10. WORD PROBLEMS 1. Suppose your car gets 25 miles per gallon of gasoline and the price of gas is $3.50 per gallon. Write

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koban, Nic

    WORD PROBLEMS 1. Suppose your car gets 25 miles per gallon of gasoline and the price of gas is $3.50 per gallon. Write your monthly gasoline cost C in terms of the distance D that you travel each month

  11. UMore Park Update October 2013 UMore Park. The University of Minnesota Outreach, Research and Education (UMore) Park is a 5,000-acre site 25 miles southeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    UMore Park Update ­ October 2013 UMore Park. The University of Minnesota Outreach, Research and Education (UMore) Park is a 5,000-acre site 25 miles southeast of the Twin Cities at the suburban presentation set for October 11 The UMore Development LLC will provide an update on UMore Park activities

  12. Vehicle engine use when no longer in transit; exceptions -Vehicle idling gets zero miles per gallon; unnecessary idling wastes fuel and pollutes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Vehicle engine use when no longer in transit; exceptions - Vehicle idling gets zero miles per, no University vehicle or piece of equipment is to be idled in a non-emergency situation. The operator of the vehicle/equipment is to turn-off the unit and the keys are to be removed from the ignition. EXEMPTIONS

  13. Measure Guideline: Replacing Single-Speed Pool Pumps with Variable Speed Pumps for Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.; Easley, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report evaluates potential energy savings by replacing traditional single-speed pool pumps with variable speed pool pumps, and provide a basic cost comparison between continued uses of traditional pumps verses new pumps. A simple step-by-step process for inspecting the pool area and installing a new pool pump follows.

  14. Multichannel Blind Identification: From Subspace to Maximum Likelihood Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Lang

    Multichannel Blind Identification: From Subspace to Maximum Likelihood Methods LANG TONG, MEMBER, IEEE, AND SYLVIE PERREAU Invited Paper A review of recent blind channel estimation algorithms is pre-- Blind equalization, parameter estimation, system identification. I. INTRODUCTION A. What Is Blind

  15. Maximum containment : the most controversial labs in the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruzek, Alison K. (Allison Kim)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, following the September 11th attacks and the anthrax letters, the United States allocated money to build two maximum containment biology labs. Called Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) facilities, these labs were built to ...

  16. On the maximum pressure rise rate in boosted HCCI operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildman, Craig B.

    This paper explores the combined effects of boosting, intake air temperature, trapped residual gas fraction, and dilution on the Maximum Pressure Rise Rate (MPRR) in a boosted single cylinder gasoline HCCI engine with ...

  17. Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

  18. Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load Task Force Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, C. Allan; Wagner, Kevin; Di Giovanni, George; Hauck, Larry; Mott, Joanna; Rifai, Hanadi; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Ward, George; Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2006, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) charged a seven-person Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Task Force with: * examining approaches...

  19. Maximum Likelihood Decoding of Reed Solomon Codes Madhu Sudan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudan, Madhu

    Maximum Likelihood Decoding of Reed Solomon Codes Madhu Sudan Abstract We present a randomized and Welch [4] (see, for instance, Gem- mell and Sudan [9]). In this paper we present an algorithm which

  20. Multi-Class Classification with Maximum Margin Multiple Kernel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    (named OBSCURE and UFO-MKL, respectively) are used to optimize primal versions of equivalent problems), the OBSCURE and UFO-MKL algorithms are compared against MCMKL #12;Multi-Class Classification with Maximum

  1. Maximum entropy method and oscillations in the diffraction cone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Dumbrajs; J. Kontros; A. Lengyel

    2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy method has been applied to investigate the oscillating structure in the pbarp- and pp-elastic scattering differential cross-section at high energy and small momentum transfer. Oscillations satisfying quite realistic reliability criteria have been found.

  2. Filtering Additive Measurement Noise with Maximum Entropy in the Mean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henryk Gzyl; Enrique ter Horst

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this note is to show how the method of maximum entropy in the mean (MEM) may be used to improve parametric estimation when the measurements are corrupted by large level of noise. The method is developed in the context on a concrete example: that of estimation of the parameter in an exponential distribution. We compare the performance of our method with the bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches.

  3. The maximum entropy tecniques and the statistical description of systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Z. Belashev; M. K. Suleymanov

    2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy technique (MENT) is used to determine the distribution functions of physical values. MENT naturally combines required maximum entropy, the properties of a system and connection conditions in the form of restrictions imposed on the system. It can, therefore, be employed to statistically describe closed and open systems. Examples in which MENT is used to describe equilibrium and non-equilibrium states, as well as steady states that are far from being in thermodynamic equilibrium, are discussed.

  4. Pattern speed evolution and bar reformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Bars in spiral galaxies can weaken through gas inflow towards the center, and angular momentum transfer. Several bar episodes can follow one another in the life of the galaxy, if sufficient gas is accreted from the intergalactic medium to revive young disks. Pattern speeds of the successive bars are different, due to mass concentration, or increased velocity dispersion of the remaining stellar component. In the same time, the spiral galaxy evolves in morphological type. Numerical simulations are presented, trying to correlate type and bar pattern speeds.

  5. CRYOPUMP MEASUREMENTS RELATING TO SAFETY, PUMPING SPEED, AND RADIATION OUTGASSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, W.G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast Gas Pulse Typical Data for Dynamic Pumping Speed Measurements with Deuterium Plan View of Reactor

  6. PERCEIVED SPEED INCREASES AT LOW LUMINANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashkam, Maryam Vaziri

    PERCEIVED SPEED INCREASES AT LOW LUMINANCE Maryam Vaziri-Pashkam, Patrick Cavanagh Vision Sciences Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Harvard University Discussion Does changing the mean luminance is increased as the mean luminance of the grating decreases. Conclusion First Experiment: Stimuli were radial

  7. Detour : Los Angeles River Speed Cinema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Weifeng Victoria

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We live in the culture of speed; everything is on its way to become a faster version of itself tomorrow if it is not already there today. Automobile and cinema are two inventions at the turn of the 20th Century that brought ...

  8. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  9. Minimum Entangling Power is Close to Its Maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianxin Chen; Zhengfeng Ji; David W Kribs; Bei Zeng

    2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a quantum gate $U$ acting on a bipartite quantum system, its maximum (average, minimum) entangling power is the maximum (average, minimum) entanglement generation with respect to certain entanglement measure when the inputs are restricted to be product states. In this paper, we mainly focus on the 'weakest' one, i.e., the minimum entangling power, among all these entangling powers. We show that, by choosing von Neumann entropy of reduced density operator or Schmidt rank as entanglement measure, even the 'weakest' entangling power is generically very close to its maximal possible entanglement generation. In other words, maximum, average and minimum entangling powers are generically close. We then study minimum entangling power with respect to other Lipschitiz-continuous entanglement measures and generalize our results to multipartite quantum systems. As a straightforward application, a random quantum gate will almost surely be an intrinsically fault-tolerant entangling device that will always transform every low-entangled state to near-maximally entangled state.

  10. NGC2613, 3198, 6503, 7184: Case studies against `maximum' disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Decompositions of the rotation curves of NGC2613, 3198, 6505, and 7184 are analysed. For these galaxies the radial velocity dispersions of the stars have been measured and their morphology is clearly discernible. If the parameters of the decompositions are chosen according to the `maximum' disk hypothesis, the Toomre Q stability parameter is systematically less than one and the multiplicities of the spiral arms as expected from density wave theory are inconsitent with the observed morphologies of the galaxies. The apparent Q<1 instability, in particular, is a strong argument against the `maximum' disk hypothesis.

  11. When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods? Andrea K Barreiro1*, Eric T Shea-Brown1, Fred M Rieke2,3, Julijana Gjorgjieva4 From Nineteenth Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS*2010 San... Antonio, TX, USA. 24-30 July 2010 Recent experiments in retina and cortex have demon- strated that pairwise maximum entropy (PME) methods can approximate observed spiking patterns to a high degree of accuracy [1,2]. In this paper we examine...

  12. Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong Wang; Xurong Chen

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

  13. Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Rong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

  14. Assessing complexity by means of maximum entropy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chliamovitch, Gregor; Velasquez, Lino

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a characterization of complexity based on successive approximations of the probability density describing a system by means of maximum entropy methods, thereby quantifying the respective role played by different orders of interaction. This characterization is applied on simple cellular automata in order to put it in perspective with the usual notion of complexity for such systems based on Wolfram classes. The overlap is shown to be good, but not perfect. This suggests that complexity in the sense of Wolfram emerges as an intermediate regime of maximum entropy-based complexity, but also gives insights regarding the role of initial conditions in complexity-related issues.

  15. MASON LAB B-7 WIND TUNNEL OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS Our wind tunnel is a low speed tunnel with a test section 15"x24" It has a digital controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    MASON LAB B-7 WIND TUNNEL OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS Our wind tunnel is a low speed tunnel with a test up to a maximum velocity of about 39M/s (~130 feet/s , 88mph) We have a 2 axis force balance that can measure lift (~25 N) and drag (~8 N) PRECAUTIONS: ALL OBJECTS MUST BE SECURED BEFORE STARTING WIND TUNNEL

  16. Gas Model of Gravitons with Light Speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming Chen; Yong-Chang Huang

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We first review some aspects of gravitational wave and the thermodynamic expression of Einstein field equations, these achieved conclusions allow people to think of Einstein's gravitational wave as a kind of sound wave in ordinary gas which propagates as an adiabatic compression wave. In the following, using the properties of photon gas in "white wall box", we find an analogous relationship between ordinary gas and photon gas through sound velocity formula. At last, by taking the ordinary gas as an intermediary, we find that gravitational wave is analogous to photon gas, or equally, gravitons are analogous to photons although they are different in some ways such as spins and coupling strengths, and these different properties don't affect their propagation speeds. Utilizing this analogous relationship, we achieve the gas model of gravitons and this model naturally gives out the light speed of gravitons

  17. Thermodynamics in variable speed of light theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Racker; Pablo Sisterna; Hector Vucetich

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The perfect fluid in the context of a covariant variable speed of light theory proposed by J. Magueijo is studied. On the one hand the modified first law of thermodynamics together with a recipe to obtain equations of state are obtained. On the other hand the Newtonian limit is performed to obtain the nonrelativistic hydrostatic equilibrium equation for the theory. The results obtained are used to determine the time variation of the radius of Mercury induced by the variability of the speed of light ($c$), and the scalar contribution to the luminosity of white dwarfs. Using a bound for the change of that radius and combining it with an upper limit for the variation of the fine structure constant, a bound on the time variation of $c$ is set. An independent bound is obtained from luminosity estimates for Stein 2015B.

  18. Data Capture Technique for High Speed Signaling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrett, Wayne Melvin (Rochester, MN); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul William (Yorktwon Heights, NY); Gara, Alan Gene (Mount Kisco, NY); Jackson, Rory (Eastchester, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent (Yorktown Hieghts, NY); Nathanson, Ben Jesse (Teaneck, NY); Vranas, Paylos Michael (Bedford Hills, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Brewster, NY)

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A data capture technique for high speed signaling to allow for optimal sampling of an asynchronous data stream. This technique allows for extremely high data rates and does not require that a clock be sent with the data as is done in source synchronous systems. The present invention also provides a hardware mechanism for automatically adjusting transmission delays for optimal two-bit simultaneous bi-directional (SiBiDi) signaling.

  19. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halm, Leo W. (Blaine, MN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  20. Thermoacoustic tomography with variable sound speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanov, Plamen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mathematical model of thermoacoustic tomography in media with a variable speed for a fixed time interval, greater than the diameter of the domain. In case of measurements on the whole boundary, we give an explicit solution in terms of a Neumann series expansion. We give necessary and sufficient conditions for uniqueness and stability when the measurements are taken on a part of the boundary.

  1. Thermoacoustic tomography with variable sound speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen Stefanov; Gunther Uhlmann

    2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mathematical model of thermoacoustic tomography in media with a variable speed for a fixed time interval, greater than the diameter of the domain. In case of measurements on the whole boundary, we give an explicit solution in terms of a Neumann series expansion. We give necessary and sufficient conditions for uniqueness and stability when the measurements are taken on a part of the boundary.

  2. Energy Savings of Variable Speed Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishel, F. D.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pump) The input horsepower from the electrical system can be calculated using Equation (3). static head + frictional head + control valve Input HP = ::"\\;;=~..l... motor, conduit, and wire. Motors in the 25-350 HP range are best suited to VFD Systems. As the cost of energy increases and the relative cost savings of variable speed systems increase, the application of these systems should be more widespread. 281...

  3. Speed-line for 3D animation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Won Chan

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    point moved to a CV on the circle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 39 Ending point placed between the starting point and the goal object . 38 40 Speed-lines with another cartoon effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 ix FIGURE Page 41 Image sequences... from the result animation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION One of the earliest artists who tried to convey dynamic movement in a static image is Hokusai Katsushika, who is one of the best known Ukiyo-e1 artists. He is called...

  4. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halm, L.W.

    1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  5. Turbulent flame speeds in ducts and the deflagration/detonation transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is proposed for determining whether a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) might occur for flame propagation along a duct with baffles, closed at the ignition end. A flammable mixture can attain a maximum turbulent burning velocity. If this is sufficiently high, a strong shock is formed ahead of the flame. It is assumed that this maximum burning velocity is soon attained and on the basis of previous studies, this value can be obtained for the given conditions. The increase in temperature and pressure of the reactants, due to the shock, further increases the maximum turbulent burning velocity. The gas velocity ahead of the flame is linked to one-dimensional shock wave equations in a numerical analysis. The predicted duct flame speeds with the appropriate maximum turbulent burning velocities are in good agreement with those measured in the slow and fast flame regimes of a range of CH{sub 4}-air and H{sub 2}-air mixtures. DDTs are possible if autoignition of the reactants occurs in the time available, and if the projected flame speed approaches the Chapman-Jouguet velocity at the same temperature and pressure. Prediction of the first condition requires values of the autoignition delay time of the mixture at the shocked temperatures and pressures. Prediction of the second requires values of the laminar burning velocity and Markstein number. With the appropriate values of these parameters, it is shown numerically that there is no DDT with CH{sub 4}-air. With H{sub 2}-air, the onset of DDT occurs close to the values of equivalence ratio at which it has been observed experimentally. The effects of different duct sizes also are predicted, although details of the DDT cannot be predicted. Extension of the study to a wider range of fuels requires more data on their laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers at higher temperatures and pressures and on autoignition delay times at lower temperatures and pressures. (author)

  6. miles-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97 Upper TroposphericIVertical Velocity

  7. Lower head creep rupture failure analysis associated with alternative accident sequences of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sang Lung, Chan [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich and Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, Zurich, Switzerland, 8001 (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this lower head creep rupture analysis is to assess the current version of MELCOR 1.8.5-RG against SCDAP/RELAP5 MOD 3.3kz. The purpose of this assessment is to investigate the current MELCOR in-vessel core damage progression phenomena including the model for the formation of a molten pool. The model for stratified molten pool natural heat transfer will be included in the next MELCOR release. Presently, MELCOR excludes the gap heat-transfer model for the cooling associated with the narrow gap between the debris and the lower head vessel wall. All these phenomenological models are already treated in SCDAP/RELAP5 using the COUPLE code to model the heat transfer of the relocated debris with the lower head based on a two-dimensional finite-element-method. The assessment should determine if current MELCOR capabilities adequately cover core degradation phenomena appropriate for the consolidated MELCOR code. Inclusion of these features should bring MELCOR much closer to a state of parity with SCDAP/RELAP5 and is a currently underway element in the MELCOR code consolidation effort. This assessment deals with the following analysis of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) alternative accident sequences. The TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-1 includes the continuation of the base case of the TMI-2 accident with the Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP) tripped, and the High Pressure Injection System (HPIS) throttled after approximately 6000 s accident time, while in the TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-2, the reactor coolant pumps is tripped after 6000 s and the HPIS is activated after 12,012 s. The lower head temperature distributions calculated with SCDAP/RELAP5 are visualized and animated with open source visualization freeware 'OpenDX'. (author)

  8. Revisiting Insights from Three Mile Island Unit 2 Postaccident Examinations and Evaluations in View of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Corradini; Larry Ott; Randall Gauntt; Dana Powers

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979, led industry and regulators to enhance strategies to protect against severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants. Investigations in the years after the accident concluded that at least 45% of the core had melted and that nearly 19 tonnes of the core material had relocated to the lower head. Postaccident examinations indicate that about half of that material formed a solid layer near the lower head and above it was a layer of fragmented rubble. As discussed in this paper, numerous insights related to pressurized water reactor accident progression were gained from postaccident evaluations of debris, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) specimens, and nozzles taken from the RPV. In addition, information gleaned from TMI-2 specimen evaluations and available data from plant instrumentation were used to improve severe accident simulation models that form the technical basis for reactor safety evaluations. Finally, the TMI-2 accident led the nuclear community to dedicate considerable effort toward understanding severe accident phenomenology as well as the potential for containment failure. Because available data suggest that significant amounts of fuel heated to temperatures near melting, the events at Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 offer an unexpected opportunity to gain similar understanding about boiling water reactor accident progression. To increase the international benefit from such an endeavor, we recommend that an international effort be initiated to (a) prioritize data needs; (b) identify techniques, samples, and sample evaluations needed to address each information need; and (c) help finance acquisition of the required data and conduct of the analyses.

  9. Maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Maschberger; C. J. Clarke

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made a new compilation of observations of maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number from the literature, which we analyse for consistency with the predictions of a simple random drawing hypothesis for stellar mass selection in clusters. Previously, Weidner and Kroupa have suggested that the maximum stellar mass is lower, in low mass clusters, than would be expected on the basis of random drawing, and have pointed out that this could have important implications for steepening the integrated initial mass function of the Galaxy (the IGIMF) at high masses. Our compilation demonstrates how the observed distribution in the plane of maximum stellar mass versus membership number is affected by the method of target selection; in particular, rather low n clusters with large maximum stellar masses are abundant in observational datasets that specifically seek clusters in the environs of high mass stars. Although we do not consider our compilation to be either complete or unbiased, we discuss the method by which such data should be statistically analysed. Our very provisional conclusion is that the data is not indicating any striking deviation from the expectations of random drawing.

  10. Maximum likelihood estimation of the equity Efstathios Avdis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahana, Michael J.

    premium is usually estimated by taking the sample mean of stock returns and subtracting a measure the expected return on the aggregate stock market less the government bill rate, is of central importance an alternative esti- mator, based on maximum likelihood, that takes into account informa- tion contained

  11. STATE OF CALIFORNIA MAXIMUM RATED TOTAL COOLING CAPACITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-27-HERS Maximum Rated Total Cooling Capacity of the installed system (Btu/hr) 3b Sum of the ARI Rated Total Cooling Capacities of multiple systems installed Cooling Capacities of the installed cooling systems must be calculated and entered in row 3b. 4a MRTCC

  12. annual maximum water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annual maximum water First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ORIGINAL PAPER The distribution of...

  13. BRANCH-CUT-AND-PROPAGATE FOR THE MAXIMUM k ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    maximum k-colorable subgraph problem consists of selecting a k-color- able induced subgraph of ..... a symmetric subgroup Sp of Aut(G) acts on Vp for all p ? [s]. Let Vp = {vp. 1,...,vp qp. } ...... [9] J. Crawford, M. Ginsberg, E. Luks, and A. Roy.

  14. Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint Zhe Wang Electrical--In this paper, we develop efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal energy schedule for fading channel with energy harvesting. We assume that the side information of both the channel states and energy harvesting

  15. What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Andrew-Category 4· Category 4 Hurricane - Winds 131-155 mph. Wall failures in homes and complete roofHurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known

  16. Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for Thermoelectric Generator Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaltz, Erik

    of Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) systems a power converter is often inserted between the TEG system that the TEG system produces the maximum power. However, if the conditions, e.g. temperature, health, age, etc find the best compromise of all modules. In order to increase the power production of the TEG system

  17. Efficiency Improvement of an IPMSM using Maximum Efficiency Operating Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Efficiency Improvement of an IPMSM using Maximum Efficiency Operating Strategy Daniel Pohlenz. These are characterized by high efficiency and high torque as well as power density. The generation of reference currents that the MTPC method deviates considerably from the best efficiency under certain boundary conditions. The use

  18. MARTIN'S MAXIMUM AND TOWER FORCING SEAN COX AND MATTEO VIALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viale, Matteo

    MARTIN'S MAXIMUM AND TOWER FORCING SEAN COX AND MATTEO VIALE Abstract. There are several examples, the Reflection Princi- ple (RP) implies that if I is a tower of ideals which concentrates on the class GIC1 of 1 [16], shows that if PFA+ or MM holds and there is an inaccessible cardinal, then there is a tower

  19. Retrocommissioning Case Study - Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Irvine, L.; Frey, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RETROCOMMISSIONING CASE STUDY ?Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results? Larry Luskay, Tudi Haasl, Linda Irvine Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Portland, Oregon Donald Frey Architectural Energy Corporation Boulder.... The building was retrocommissioned by Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI), in conjunction with Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The building-specific goals were: 1) Obtain cost-effective energy savings from optimizing operation...

  20. Excitation and control of a high-speed induction generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englebretson, Steven Carl

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project investigates the use of a high speed, squirrel cage induction generator and power converter for producing DC electrical power onboard ships and submarines. Potential advantages of high speed induction generators ...

  1. Comparison of operating speeds at spiral transition and circular curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passetti, Karl Andrew

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzed, the presence of spiral transitions was not shown to produce any significant differences in operating speeds for passenger cars. Therefore, it is recommended that speed prediction models do not have to account for the presence of spiral transitions...

  2. High-speed cinematography of internal explosions for aviation security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settles, Gary S.

    High-speed cinematography of internal explosions for aviation security G.S. Settles1 , J.R. Benwood of a program to remedy this were shown. Having demonstrated high-speed schlieren shock wave cinematography

  3. Economical Aspects of Adjustable Speed Drives in Pumping Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovstadius, G.

    Speed variations of pumps have become increasingly popular as the technology to produce variable frequency drives has progressed. Variable speed drives have many advantages compared to throttle valves when it comes to regulation of flow. They offer...

  4. Wind speed PDF classification using Dirichlet mixtures Rudy CALIF1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wind speed PDF classification using Dirichlet mixtures Rudy CALIF1 , Richard EMILION2 , Ted'Orléans), UMR CNRS 6628 Université d'Orléans, France. Abstract: Wind energy production is very sensitive to instantaneous wind speed fluctuations. Thus rapid variation of wind speed due to changes in the local

  5. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    Research Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model a powered ankle­foot prosthesis and tested by an amputee walking at three speeds. The controller produced model; powered prosthesis; prosthesis control; speed adaptation 1. INTRODUCTION The human ankle

  6. Taiwan High Speed Rail Keeping passenger safety at the forefront

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benefits Increased safety and reliability of the Taiwan High Speed Rail network through conditionTaiwan High Speed Rail Keeping passenger safety at the forefront Overview The Need Taiwan High Speed Rail Corporation (THSRC) needed a highly reliable, cost- effective and proactive means

  7. Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

  8. Lorentz transformation directly from the invariance of the speed of light via the addition law of parallel speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Rothenstein

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that starting with the addition law of parallel speeds derived as a consequence of the invariance of the speed of light, the Lorentz transformations for the space-time coordinates can be derived.

  9. Low Speed Automation, a French Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sébastien Glaser; Maurice Cour; Lydie Nouveliere; Alain Lambert; Fawzi Nashashibi; Jean-christophe Popieul; Benjamin Mourllion

    MIPS, 2 rue des frères Lumière,68093 Mulhouse-FRANCE Nowadays, vehicle safety is constantly increasing thanks to the improvement of vehicle passive and active safety. However, on a daily usage of the car, traffic jams remains a problem. With limited space for road infrastructure, automation of the driving task on specific situation seems to be a possible solution. The French project ABV, which stands for low speed automation, tries to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to prove the benefits. In this article, we describe the scientific background of the project and expected outputs. "Keywords: vehicle automation, shared control, environment sensing, data fusion;" 1.

  10. Moving system with speeded-up evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. I. Shirokov

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the classical (non-quantum) relativity theory the course of the moving clock is dilated as compared to the course of the clock at rest (the Einstein dilation). Any unstable system may be regarded as a clock. The time evolution (e.g., the decay) of a uniformly moving physical system is considered using the relativistic quantum theory. The example of a moving system is given whose evolution turns out to be speeded-up instead of being dilated. A discussion of this paradoxical result is presented.

  11. Nuclear Speed-Dating | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecoveryNuclear Speed-Dating Nuclear

  12. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, Alexandre; da Silva, Roberto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  13. Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Alves; Alex G. Dias; Roberto da Silva

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

  14. Max '91: flare research at the next solar maximum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, B.; Canfield, R.; Bruner, M.; Emslie, G.; Hildner, E.; Hudson, H.; Hurford, G.; Lin, R.; Novick, R.; Tarbell, T.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address the central scientific questions surrounding solar flares, coordinated observations of electromagnetic radiation and energetic particles must be made from spacecraft, balloons, rockets, and ground-based observatories. A program to enhance capabilities in these areas in preparation for the next solar maximum in 1991 is recommended. The major scientific issues are described, and required observations and coordination of observations and analyses are detailed. A program plan and conceptual budgets are provided.

  15. Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy establishes the DOE policy on maximum entry and mandatory separation ages for primary or secondary positions covered under special statutory retirement provisions and for those employees whose primary duties are the protection of officials of the United States against threats to personal safety or the investigation, apprehension, and detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States. Admin Chg 1, dated 12-1-11, cancels DOE P 310.1.

  16. Maximum entropy method for reconstruction of the CMB images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Bajkova

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach for the accurate reconstruction of cosmic microwave background distributions from observations containing in addition to the primary fluctuations the radiation from unresolved extragalactic point sources and pixel noise. The approach uses some effective realizations of the well-known maximum entropy method and principally takes into account {\\it a priori} information about finiteness and spherical symmetry of the power spectrum of the CMB satisfying the Gaussian statistics.

  17. Maximum total organic carbon limit for DWPF melter feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    DWPF recently decided to control the potential flammability of melter off-gas by limiting the total carbon content in the melter feed and maintaining adequate conditions for combustion in the melter plenum. With this new strategy, all the LFL analyzers and associated interlocks and alarms were removed from both the primary and backup melter off-gas systems. Subsequently, D. Iverson of DWPF- T{ampersand}E requested that SRTC determine the maximum allowable total organic carbon (TOC) content in the melter feed which can be implemented as part of the Process Requirements for melter feed preparation (PR-S04). The maximum TOC limit thus determined in this study was about 24,000 ppm on an aqueous slurry basis. At the TOC levels below this, the peak concentration of combustible components in the quenched off-gas will not exceed 60 percent of the LFL during off-gas surges of magnitudes up to three times nominal, provided that the melter plenum temperature and the air purge rate to the BUFC are monitored and controlled above 650 degrees C and 220 lb/hr, respectively. Appropriate interlocks should discontinue the feeding when one or both of these conditions are not met. Both the magnitude and duration of an off-gas surge have a major impact on the maximum TOC limit, since they directly affect the melter plenum temperature and combustion. Although the data obtained during recent DWPF melter startup tests showed that the peak magnitude of a surge can be greater than three times nominal, the observed duration was considerably shorter, on the order of several seconds. The long surge duration assumed in this study has a greater impact on the plenum temperature than the peak magnitude, thus making the maximum TOC estimate conservative. Two models were used to make the necessary calculations to determine the TOC limit.

  18. Occam's Razor Cuts Away the Maximum Entropy Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnicki, ?ukasz

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I show that the maximum entropy principle can be replaced by a more natural assumption, that there exists a phenomenological function of entropy consistent with the microscopic model. The requirement of existence provides then a unique construction of the related probability density. I conclude the letter with an axiomatic formulation of the notion of entropy, which is suitable for exploration of the non-equilibrium phenomena.

  19. PNNL: A Supervised Maximum Entropy Approach to Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tratz, Stephen C.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Posse, Christian; Whitney, Paul D.

    2007-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we described the PNNL Word Sense Disambiguation system as applied to the English All-Word task in Se-mEval 2007. We use a supervised learning approach, employing a large number of features and using Information Gain for dimension reduction. Our Maximum Entropy approach combined with a rich set of features produced results that are significantly better than baseline and are the highest F-score for the fined-grained English All-Words subtask.

  20. Some interesting consequences of the maximum entropy production principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martyushev, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Division (Russian Federation)], E-mail: mlm@ecko.uran.ru

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two nonequilibrium phase transitions (morphological and hydrodynamic) are analyzed by applying the maximum entropy production principle. Quantitative analysis is for the first time compared with experiment. Nonequilibrium crystallization of ice and laminar-turbulent flow transition in a circular pipe are examined as examples of morphological and hydrodynamic transitions, respectively. For the latter transition, a minimum critical Reynolds number of 1200 is predicted. A discussion of this important and interesting result is presented.

  1. Beyond Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Maximum entropy hyperensembles out-of-equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1957). J. Skilling, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,45–52. J. Skilling, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,e C. C. Rodriguez, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,

  2. Deriving the continuity of maximum-entropy basis functions via variational analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukumar, N.; Wets, R. J. -B.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and V. J. DellaPietra, A maximum entropy approach to naturalJ. and R. K. Bryan, Maximum entropy image reconstruction:Heidelberg, Continuity of maximum-entropy basis functions p

  3. Rental rate includes liability insurance (LDW), vehicle licensing fees, unlimited roundtrip mileage; $0.25/mile for one-way rentals and no drop fees for vehicles that are picked up and returned in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    ; $0.25/mile for one-way rentals and no drop fees for vehicles that are picked up and returned in setting up direct billing for your department, please click link below: http://www

  4. Funding for the food miles project was provided through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Advancing Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food (ACAAF) Program. In Nova Scotia the program is delivered by Agri-Futures Nova Scotia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    Funding for the food miles project was provided through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.................................................................... 7 Energy .................................................................................. 9 Self grown? With these two questions at the fore, combing through various statistics and reports

  5. The effect of rainfall on freeway travel speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdener, Douglas Joseph

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distribution of All 5-minute Rainfall Summaries. . . . . 43 13 Distribution of Daily Rainfall Summaries by Rainfall Gauge. . . . . . 44 14 Dis&bution of 5-minute Mean Speeds over Mid-day Period during Dry Conditions. 62 15 Mean Link One Speeds by Weekday.... . 65 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 16 Distribution of Link Speed Data over Peak Period. . . . . . . . . 17 Average Link Speeds by Weekday over Peak Period. . . . . Page 67 69 18 Link One Speeds during Evening Period. 75 19 Plot of Wet and Dry Travel...

  6. The Speed of Sound in Hadronic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castorina, P; Miller, D E; Satz, H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the speed of sound $c_s$ in an ideal gas of resonances whose mass spectrum is assumed to have the Hagedorn form $\\rho(m) \\sim m^{-a}\\exp{bm}$, which leads to singular behavior at the critical temperature $T_c = 1/b$. With $a = 4$ the pressure and the energy density remain finite at $T_c$, while the specific heat diverges there. As a function of the temperature the corresponding speed of sound initially increases similarly to that of an ideal pion gas until near $T_c$ where the resonance effects dominate causing $c_s$ to vanish as $(T_c - T)^{1/4}$. In order to compare this result to the physical resonance gas models, we introduce an upper cut-off M in the resonance mass integration. Although the truncated form still decreases somewhat in the region around $T_c$, the actual critical behavior in these models is no longer present.

  7. Planning study, resin and debris removal system. Three Mile Island nuclear station unit 2 make-up and purification demineralizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renkey, E.J.; Jenkins, W.W.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various methods were evaluated to remove the resin and debris from the makeup and purification demineralizers. There are two preferred concepts. The existing waste disposal system should be utilized if some contamination of currently clean lines is acceptable. A skid mounted, temporary, upflow/downflow system should be utilized if the demineralizers and associated piping are to be cleaned to the maximum extent practicable with minimum contamination of the existing system. Both methods provide for removal of complex organic compounds from the effluent and elution of cesium from the resin. The resin and debris will be diluted with concrete to be disposed of in accordance with 10CFR61 burial limits.

  8. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bin predictions. and 90th percentile wind speeds and higherWind speed mean, 90th percentile, standard deviation, andwind speed mean, 90th percentile, standard deviation, and

  9. Better Nonlinear Models from Noisy Data: Attractors with Maximum Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to nonlinear modelling is presented which, by incorporating the global behaviour of the model, lifts shortcomings of both least squares and total least squares parameter estimates. Although ubiquitous in practice, a least squares approach is fundamentally flawed in that it assumes independent, normally distributed (IND) forecast errors: nonlinear models will not yield IND errors even if the noise is IND. A new cost function is obtained via the maximum likelihood principle; superior results are illustrated both for small data sets and infinitely long data streams.

  10. Application of Maximum Entropy Method to Dynamical Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Clowser; Costas Strouthos

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maximum Entropy Method is applied to dynamical fermion simulations of the (2+1)-dimensional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. This model is particularly interesting because at T=0 it has a broken phase with a rich spectrum of mesonic bound states and a symmetric phase where there are resonances, and hence the simple pole assumption of traditional fitting procedures breaks down. We present results extracted from simulations on large lattices for the spectral functions of the elementary fermion, the pion, the sigma, the massive pseudoscalar meson and the symmetric phase resonances.

  11. Improving predictability of time series using maximum entropy methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor Chliamovitch; Alexandre Dupuis; Bastien Chopard; Anton Golub

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how maximum entropy methods may be applied to the reconstruction of Markov processes underlying empirical time series and compare this approach to usual frequency sampling. It is shown that, at least in low dimension, there exists a subset of the space of stochastic matrices for which the MaxEnt method is more efficient than sampling, in the sense that shorter historical samples have to be considered to reach the same accuracy. Considering short samples is of particular interest when modelling smoothly non-stationary processes, for then it provides, under some conditions, a powerful forecasting tool. The method is illustrated for a discretized empirical series of exchange rates.

  12. Reducing Degeneracy in Maximum Entropy Models of Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvát, Szabolcs; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on Jaynes's maximum entropy principle, exponential random graphs provide a family of principled models that allow the prediction of network properties as constrained by empirical data. However, their use is often hindered by the degeneracy problem characterized by spontaneous symmetry-breaking, where predictions simply fail. Here we show that degeneracy appears when the corresponding density of states function is not log-concave. We propose a solution to the degeneracy problem for a large class of models by exploiting the nonlinear relationships between the constrained measures to convexify the domain of the density of states. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method on examples, including on Zachary's karate club network data.

  13. Improving predictability of time series using maximum entropy methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chliamovitch, Gregor; Chopard, Bastien; Golub, Anton

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how maximum entropy methods may be applied to the reconstruction of Markov processes underlying empirical time series and compare this approach to usual frequency sampling. It is shown that, at least in low dimension, there exists a subset of the space of stochastic matrices for which the MaxEnt method is more efficient than sampling, in the sense that shorter historical samples have to be considered to reach the same accuracy. Considering short samples is of particular interest when modelling smoothly non-stationary processes, for then it provides, under some conditions, a powerful forecasting tool. The method is illustrated for a discretized empirical series of exchange rates.

  14. Excited nucleon spectrum from lattice QCD with maximum entropy method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Sasaki; S. Sasaki; T. Hatsuda; M. Asakawa

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study excited states of the nucleon in quenched lattice QCD with the spectral analysis using the maximum entropy method. Our simulations are performed on three lattice sizes $16^3\\times 32$, $24^3\\times 32$ and $32^3\\times 32$, at $\\beta=6.0$ to address the finite volume issue. We find a significant finite volume effect on the mass of the Roper resonance for light quark masses. After removing this systematic error, its mass becomes considerably reduced toward the direction to solve the level order puzzle between the Roper resonance $N'(1440)$ and the negative-parity nucleon $N^*(1535)$.

  15. High-speed electrical motor evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this task, MTI conducted a general review of state-of-the-art high-speed motors. The purpose of this review was to assess the operating parameters, limitations and performance of existing motor designs, and to establish commercial sources for a motor compatible with the requirements of the Brayton-cycle system. After the motor requirements were established, a list of motor types, manufacturers and designs capable of achieving the requisite performance was compiled. This list was based on an in-house evaluation of designs. Following the establishment of these options, a technical evaluation of the designs selected was conducted. In parallel with their evaluations, MTI focused on the establishment of commercial sources.

  16. Slow speed object detection for haul trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Caterpillar integrates radar technology with its current camera based system. Caterpillar has developed the Integrated Object Detection System, a slow speed object detection system for mining haul trucks. Object detection is a system that aids the truck operator's awareness of their surroundings. The system consists of a color touch screen display along with medium- and short-range radar as well as cameras, harnesses and mounting hardware. It is integrated into the truck's Work Area Vision System (WAVS). After field testing in 2007, system commercialization began in 2008. Prototype systems are in operation in Australia, Utah and Arizona and the Integrated Object Detection System will be available in the fourth quarter of 2009 and on production trucks 785C, 789C, 793D and 797B. The article is adapted from a presentation by Mark Richards of Caterpillar to the Haulage & Loading 2009 conference, May, held in Phoenix, AZ. 1 fig., 5 photos.

  17. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  18. Proposal for high-speed and high-fidelity electron-spin initialization in a negatively charged quantum dot coupled to a microcavity in a weak external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arka; Lin Ziliang; Faraon, Andrei; Vuckovic, Jelena [E. L. Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a proposal for fast electron-spin initialization in a negatively charged quantum dot coupled to a microcavity without the need for a strong magnetic field. We employ two-photon excitation to access trion states that are spin forbidden by one-photon excitation. Our simulation shows a maximum initialization speed of 1.3 GHz and maximum fidelity of 99.7% with realistic system parameters.

  19. Wave Speed in the Macroscopic Extended Model for Ultrarelativistic Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Borghero; F. Demontis; S. Pennisi

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact macroscopic extended model for ultrarelativistic gases, with an arbitrary number of moments, is present in the literature. Here we exploit equations determining wave speeds for that model. We find interesting results; for example, the whole system for their determination can be divided into independent subsystems and some, but not all, wave speeds are expressed by rational numbers. Moreover, the extraordinary property that these wave speeds for the macroscopic model are the same of those in the kinetic model, is proved.

  20. Effect of shrink fits on threshold speeds of rotordynamic instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir, MD. Mofazzal Hossain

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 CHAPTER IV TEST APPARATUS . . . . 13 CHAPTER V RESULTS AND DISCUSSION . . . 17 17 30 42 42 47 5. 1 Rap Test. . 5. 2 Running Test 5. 3 Modeling and the Prcdiction of Threshold Speed of Instability.... . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 5. 3. 1 Matching the Base Case. 5. 3. 2 Gunter's Prediction Using C, q 5. 3. 3 Modeling and Prediction of the Threshold Speed Using the XLTRC Code. . . . 51 5. 4 Prediction of the Onset Speed of Instability for a Tight Inteiference Fit...

  1. Variable current speed controller for eddy current motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerth, H.L.; Bailey, J.M.; Casstevens, J.M.; Dixon, J.H.; Griffith, B.O.; Igou, R.E.

    1982-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A speed control system for eddy current motors is provided in which the current to the motor from a constant frequency power source is varied by comparing the actual motor speed signal with a setpoint speed signal to control the motor speed according to the selected setpoint speed. A three-phase variable voltage autotransformer is provided for controlling the voltage from a three-phase power supply. A corresponding plurality of current control resistors is provided in series with each phase of the autotransformer output connected to inputs of a three-phase motor. Each resistor is connected in parallel with a set of normally closed contacts of plurality of relays which are operated by control logic. A logic circuit compares the selected speed with the actual motor speed obtained from a digital tachometer monitoring the motor spindle speed and operated the relays to add or substract resistance equally in each phase of the motor input to vary the motor current to control the motor at the selected speed.

  2. New process speeds conversion of biomass to fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion of Biomass to Fuels New process speeds conversion of biomass to fuels Scientists made a major step forward recently towards transforming biomass-derived molecules into...

  3. automatic speed control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INITIAL BUOYANCY TESTING modules for automatic control of freeboard and turbine operation are denoted Buoyancy' and Generators 12 Optimal Pitch, Speed and Fuel Control...

  4. adjustable speed ac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Input Voltage Sag and Unbalance on DC Link Inductor and Capacitor Stress in Adjustable Speed Drives Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 's transition into single-phase operation,...

  5. ac adjustable speed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Input Voltage Sag and Unbalance on DC Link Inductor and Capacitor Stress in Adjustable Speed Drives Renewable Energy Websites Summary: 's transition into single-phase operation,...

  6. Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump 2013...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pump 2013 Peer Review Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program...

  7. Nationwide: Slashing Red Tape To Speed Solar Deployment for Homes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Slashing Red Tape To Speed Solar Deployment for Homes and Businesses While solar panels, inverters and other hardware are more affordable than ever before (the average cost of...

  8. aircraft by speed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model of a commercial aircraft Fernandez, Thomas 5 Aircraft deconfliction with speed regulation: new models from mixed-integer optimization Computer Technologies and...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Speed Joining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013...

  10. Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

  11. Maximum Margin Clustering for State Decomposition of Metastable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When studying a metastable dynamical system, a prime concern is how to decompose the phase space into a set of metastable states. Unfortunately, the metastable state decomposition based on simulation or experimental data is still a challenge. The most popular and simplest approach is geometric clustering which is developed based on the classical clustering technique. However, the prerequisites of this approach are: (1) data are obtained from simulations or experiments which are in global equilibrium and (2) the coordinate system is appropriately selected. Recently, the kinetic clustering approach based on phase space discretization and transition probability estimation has drawn much attention due to its applicability to more general cases, but the choice of discretization policy is a difficult task. In this paper, a new decomposition method designated as maximum margin metastable clustering is proposed, which converts the problem of metastable state decomposition to a semi-supervised learning problem so that...

  12. Efficiency at maximum power of a chemical engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooyberghs, Hans; Salazar, Alberto; Indekeu, Joseph O; Broeck, Christian Van den

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclically operating chemical engine is considered that converts chemical energy into mechanical work. The working fluid is a gas of finite-sized spherical particles interacting through elastic hard collisions. For a generic transport law for particle uptake and release, the efficiency at maximum power $\\eta$ takes the form 1/2+c\\Delta \\mu + O(\\Delta \\mu^2), with 1/2 a universal constant and $\\Delta \\mu$ the chemical potential difference between the particle reservoirs. The linear coefficient c is zero for engines featuring a so-called left/right symmetry or particle fluxes that are antisymmetric in the applied chemical potential difference. Remarkably, the leading constant in $\\eta$ is non-universal with respect to an exceptional modification of the transport law. For a nonlinear transport model we obtain \\eta = 1/(\\theta +1), with \\theta >0 the power of $\\Delta \\mu$ in the transport equation

  13. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, George E. (West Chicago, IL); Dawson, John W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  14. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  15. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  16. Improved Maximum Entropy Analysis with an Extended Search Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Rothkopf

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) follows Bryan and deploys a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to limit the dimensionality of the underlying solution space apriori. Here we present arguments based on the shape of the SVD basis functions and numerical evidence from a mock data analysis, which show that the correct Bayesian solution is not in general recovered with this approach. As a remedy we propose to extend the search basis systematically, which will eventually recover the full solution space and the correct solution. In order to adequately approach problems where an exponentially damped kernel is used, we provide an open-source implementation, using the C/C++ language that utilizes high precision arithmetic adjustable at run-time. The LBFGS algorithm is included in the code in order to attack problems without the need to resort to a particular search space restriction.

  17. Quantum maximum entropy principle for a system of identical particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione and CNISM, Universita del Salento, Via Arnesano s/n, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By introducing a functional of the reduced density matrix, we generalize the definition of a quantum entropy which incorporates the indistinguishability principle of a system of identical particles. With the present definition, the principle of quantum maximum entropy permits us to solve the closure problem for a quantum hydrodynamic set of balance equations corresponding to an arbitrary number of moments in the framework of extended thermodynamics. The determination of the reduced Wigner function for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions is found to become possible only by assuming that the Lagrange multipliers can be expanded in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2}. Quantum contributions are expressed in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2} while classical results are recovered in the limit (Planck constant/2pi)->0.

  18. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fensom, Rod (Peterborough, GB); Kidder, David J. (Peterborough, GB)

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  19. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhl, James Eugene (Albuquerque, NM); Warpinski, Norman Raymond (Albuquerque, NM); Whetten, Ernest Blayne (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves.

  20. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhl, J.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Whetten, E.B.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves. 9 figs.

  1. Calibrating Speed-Density Functions for ff SMesoscopic Traffic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    . (1999), Tavana & Mahmassani (2000), Wang & Papageorgiou (2005), Antoniou et al. (2007) #12;Case Studies) supply #12;Case Studies (contd.) · DynaMIT speed-density function form · Performance measures ( )= - S i pointsdataofnumber speed)(count,simulated : : S iy #12;Case Studies (contd.) · Methodology ­ Large

  2. 0 Riso-R-434 Wind Speed and Direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    meteorological statistics for the area as it was considered a possible site for a nuclear power plant. \\ \\ Duringm I 0 Riso-R-434 t Wind Speed and Direction Changes due to Terrain Effects revealed-4000 Roskilde, Denmark May 1983 #12;RISÃ?-R-434 WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION CHANGES DUE TO TERRAIN EFFECTS

  3. An evaluation of inductance loop detectors for speed measurement accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Brian Patrick

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The lag time from the presence of a vehicle at an inductance loop to the actual detection of a vehicle varies. As the lag time varies so does the accuracy of speed measurement. Vehicle size, vehicle speed, detector type, detector sensitivity...

  4. RESEARCH ARTICLE Controlling speed and direction during interception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control models fail to explain two important aspects of locomotor interception: (1) how steering and speed. Turning rate was controlled using a steering wheel and speed was controlled using a foot pedal that is characteristic of visually guided interception. Like models of other visually guided actions, such as steering

  5. Multiprocessor Speed Scaling for Jobs with Arbitrary Sizes and Deadlines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Prudence W.H.

    or laptops with multi-core processors. A popular technology to reduce energy usage is dynamic speed scaling.H. Wong 1 Introduction Energy consumption has become an important concern in the design of modern energy, yet it takes longer to finish the job. The study of speed scaling was initiated by Yao et al. [6

  6. Towards Explaining the Speed of k-Means Bodo Manthey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Towards Explaining the Speed of k-Means Bodo Manthey University of Twente, Department of Applied Mathematics P. O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands b.manthey@utwente.nl The k-means method exponential worst-case running-time. To explain the speed of the k-means method, a smoothed analysis has been

  7. Structural vibration damping using lightweight, low-wave-speed media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdirame, Justin Matthew, 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of a low-density, low-wave-speed medium (LWSM) into a structure yields significant damping if the speed of wave propagation in the medium is low enough for standing waves to arise in it. In this thesis, we ...

  8. Probabilistic Wind Speed Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Adrian

    the chance of winds high enough to pose dangers for boats or aircraft. In situations calling for a cost/loss analysis, the probabilities of different outcomes need to be known. For wind speed, this issue often arisesProbabilistic Wind Speed Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging J. Mc

  9. High Speed Rail in America Thomas Ducharme, Matt Schena,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    to Washington D.C. · A renewed interest in High Speed Rail Due to increased congestion Desire for cheaper emissions by 2.8 million tons o High speed trains use 1/3 the energy of planes and 1/5 that of cars · Reduce Resulting in improvement to those lines o Reducing operating costs due to sharing rail · Increase in freight

  10. The Boyer Benchmark at Warp Speed HenryG. Baker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., Warren A.

    The Boyer Benchmark at Warp Speed HenryG. Baker Nimble Computer Corporation, 16231 Meadow Ridge Way, Encino, CA 91436 (818) 501-4956 (818) 986-1360 (FAX) We show how to speed up the Boyer Benchmark. INTRODUCTION The Boyer benchmark is one of the most durable benchmarks in the Lisp landscape. It was already

  11. Volunteers hope ORNL technology will speed Haiti's long quake recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    SCIENCE Volunteers hope ORNL technology will speed Haiti's long quake recovery The multi to speed Haiti's recovery from its devastating 2010 earthquake and improve the Haitian population's overall public health by allowing quick, in-the-field diagnoses of diseases. A team of Haiti volunteers

  12. Petroleum production at maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Draft Supplement to the 1979 Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed action involves the continued operation of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) through the year approximately 2025 in accordance with the requirements of the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-258). NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field comprising 74 square miles. MER production primarily includes continued operation and maintenance of existing facilities; a well drilling and abandonment program; construction and operation of future gas processing, gas compression, and steamflood, waterflood, cogeneration, and butane isomerization facilities; and continued implementation of a comprehensive environmental protection program. The basis for the draft environment impact statement (DSEIS) proposed action is the April 1989 NPR-1 Long Range Plan which describes a myriad of planned operational, maintenance, and development activities over the next 25--30 years. These activities include the continued operation of existing facilities; additional well drilling; expanded steamflood operations; expanded waterflood programs; expanded gas compression, gas lift, gas processing and gas injection; construction of a new cogeneration facility; construction of a new isobutane facility; and a comprehensive environmental program designed to minimize environmental impacts.

  13. Non-Gaussianities of primordial perturbations and tensor sound speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshifumi Noumi; Masahide Yamaguchi

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the relation between the non-Gaussianities of the primordial perturbations and the sound speed of the tensor perturbations, that is, the propagation speed of the gravitational waves. We find that the sound speed of the tensor perturbations is directly related not to the auto-bispectrum of the tensor perturbations but to the cross-bispectrum of the primordial perturbations, especially, the scalar-tensor-tensor bispectrum. This result is in sharp contrast with the case of the scalar (curvature) perturbations, where their reduced sound speed enhances their auto-bispectrum. Our findings indicate that the scalar-tensor-tensor bispectrum can be a powerful tool to probe the sound speed of the tensor perturbations.

  14. Hydropower at flood control reservoirs - the variable speed option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence, K.; Yale, J. [Stone & Webster Engineering Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of hydroelectric turbine-generators to flood control has been limited due to the inability of a single turbine to operate efficiently over the wide head and flow ranges encountered. Multiple and different unit combinations have been applied to this problem, but the cost of the additional unit(s), powerhouse, and supporting facilities typically causes the project to become unfeasible. Variable speed operation can increase the operating range of a single turbine, and significantly improve efficiency over single speed units. This can make hydroelectric generation at flood control projects feasible. This paper presents a comparison of the application of variable speed units, two speed units, and single speed units at the Blue River Dam Hydroelectric Project. The project consists of the addition of a powerhouse to an existing Army Corps of Engineers flood control project. Efficiency data for the different types of units are compared and historical flow and release data are used in a computer model to simulate plant operation.

  15. High-speed electrochemistry using ultramicroelectrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, M.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research investigates the use of ultramicroelectrodes in performing electrochemistry on microsecond and nanosecond time scales. One purpose of this research was to look at new ways to apply ultramicroelectrodes to high speed experiments. Some of the aspects that are discussed in this thesis are: (a) A novel technique was developed for measuring currents on short time scales that involves conversion of the current to light using a light emitting diode and measuring the light intensity as a function of time using time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC). Computer processing of the light intensity data can convert this data back to current. The technique is capable of measurements on nanosecond time scales, but TCSPC requires tens or hundreds of millions of experiments to obtain a complete set of data and this frequently results in severe electrode fouling problems. (b) Potential step experiments were used instead of potential sweep experiments. Potential step experiments enable the separation in time of the faradaic and charging currents for chemical systems in which the faradaic impedance is greater than the uncompensated solution resistance. (c) For systems in which the faradaic impedance and uncompensated resistance are of the same order of magnitude, a computer simulation was developed which accounts for the interaction of the faradaic and double layer charging processes. (d) Application of short time scale experiments to the study of surface processes. Some processes studied in this work are the oxidation of clean platinum surfaces, electrode reactions of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid adsorbed on mercury, reductive hydrogen adsorption on platinum and double layer charging. (e) A study of the smallest available time constants was performed, taking into account non-idealities in the electrode such as stray capacitance and resistance of the electrode itself.

  16. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models.

  17. Maximum gravitational-wave energy emissible in magnetar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; Benjamin J. Owen

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent searches of gravitational-wave (GW) data raise the question of what maximum GW energies could be emitted during gamma-ray flares of highly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars). The highest energies (\\sim 10^{49} erg) predicted so far come from a model [K. Ioka, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 327, 639 (2001)] in which the internal magnetic field of a magnetar experiences a global reconfiguration, changing the hydromagnetic equilibrium structure of the star and tapping the gravitational potential energy without changing the magnetic potential energy. The largest energies in this model assume very special conditions, including a large change in moment of inertia (which was observed in at most one flare), a very high internal magnetic field, and a very soft equation of state. Here we show that energies of 10^{48}-10^{49} erg are possible under more generic conditions by tapping the magnetic energy, and we note that similar energies may also be available through cracking of exotic solid cores. Current observational limits on gravitational waves from magnetar fundamental modes are just reaching these energies and will beat them in the era of advanced interferometers.

  18. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Augenstein

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  19. Maximum Entropy Analysis of the Spectral Functions in Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asakawa; T. Hatsuda; Y. Nakahara

    2001-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    First principle calculation of the QCD spectral functions (SPFs) based on the lattice QCD simulations is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the Bayesian inference theory and the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM), which is a useful tool to extract SPFs from the imaginary-time correlation functions numerically obtained by the Monte Carlo method. Three important aspects of MEM are (i) it does not require a priori assumptions or parametrizations of SPFs, (ii) for given data, a unique solution is obtained if it exists, and (iii) the statistical significance of the solution can be quantitatively analyzed. The ability of MEM is explicitly demonstrated by using mock data as well as lattice QCD data. When applied to lattice data, MEM correctly reproduces the low-energy resonances and shows the existence of high-energy continuum in hadronic correlation functions. This opens up various possibilities for studying hadronic properties in QCD beyond the conventional way of analyzing the lattice data. Future problems to be studied by MEM in lattice QCD are also summarized.

  20. Improved Maximum Entropy Method with an Extended Search Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Rothkopf

    2012-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on an improvement to the implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM). It amounts to departing from the search space obtained through a singular value decomposition (SVD) of the Kernel. Based on the shape of the SVD basis functions we argue that the MEM spectrum for given $N_\\tau$ data-points $D(\\tau)$ and prior information $m(\\omega)$ does not in general lie in this $N_\\tau$ dimensional singular subspace. Systematically extending the search basis will eventually recover the full search space and the correct extremum. We illustrate this idea through a mock data analysis inspired by actual lattice spectra, to show where our improvement becomes essential for the success of the MEM. To remedy the shortcomings of Bryan's SVD prescription we propose to use the real Fourier basis, which consists of trigonometric functions. Not only does our approach lead to more stable numerical behavior, as the SVD is not required for the determination of the basis functions, but also the resolution of the MEM becomes independent from the position of the reconstructed peaks.

  1. Maximum entropy detection of planets around active stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, P; Hébrard, E; Morin, J; Folsom, C P; Böhm, T; Boisse, I; Borgniet, S; Bouvier, J; Delfosse, X; Hussain, G; Jeffers, S V; Marsden, S C; Barnes, J R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (shortened for arXiv) We aim to progress towards more efficient exoplanet detection around active stars by optimizing the use of Doppler Imaging in radial velocity measurements. We propose a simple method to simultaneously extract a brightness map and a set of orbital parameters through a tomographic inversion technique derived from classical Doppler mapping. Based on the maximum entropy principle, the underlying idea is to determine the set of orbital parameters that minimizes the information content of the resulting Doppler map. We carry out a set of numerical simulations to perform a preliminary assessment of the robustness of our method, using an actual Doppler map of the very active star HR 1099 to produce a realistic synthetic data set for various sets of orbital parameters of a single planet in a circular orbit. Using a simulated time-series of 50 line profiles affected by a peak-to-peak activity jitter of 2.5 km/s, we are able in most cases to recover the radial velocity amplitude, orbital phase and o...

  2. Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro- Fuzzy "ANFIS energy demand. The mathematical modeling and simulation of the photovoltaic system is implemented) like ANFIS. This paper presents Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using

  3. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global Onshore Wind Speed Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power, a renewable energy source, can play an important role in electrical energy generation. Information regarding wind energy potential is important both for energy related modeling and for decision-making in the policy community. While wind speed datasets with high spatial and temporal resolution are often ultimately used for detailed planning, simpler assumptions are often used in analysis work. An accurate representation of the wind speed frequency distribution is needed in order to properly characterize wind energy potential. Using a power density method, this study estimated global variation in wind parameters as fitted to a Weibull density function using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis data. The estimated Weibull distribution performs well in fitting the time series wind speed data at the global level according to R2, root mean square error, and power density error. The spatial, decadal, and seasonal patterns of wind speed distribution were then evaluated. We also analyzed the potential error in wind power estimation when a commonly assumed Rayleigh distribution (Weibull k = 2) is used. We find that the assumption of the same Weibull parameter across large regions can result in substantial errors. While large-scale wind speed data is often presented in the form of average wind speeds, these results highlight the need to also provide information on the wind speed distribution.

  4. A Maximum Entropy Algorithm for Rhythmic Analysis of Genome-Wide Expression Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    A Maximum Entropy Algorithm for Rhythmic Analysis of Genome-Wide Expression Patterns Christopher James Langmead C. Robertson McClung Bruce Randall Donald ,,,§,¶ Abstract We introduce a maximum entropy-based spectral analysis, maximum entropy spectral reconstruction is well suited to signals of the type generated

  5. 1 A MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD FOR SUBNETWORK ORIGIN-DESTINATION 2 TRIP MATRIX ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    1 A MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD FOR SUBNETWORK ORIGIN-DESTINATION 2 TRIP MATRIX ESTIMATION 3 4 Chi Xie 5, maximum entropy, linearization 36 algorithm, column generation 37 #12;C. Xie, K.M. Kockelman and S is the trip matrix of the simplified network. This paper discusses a5 maximum entropy method

  6. Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches to the ratio problem Edward Z. Shen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches to the ratio problem Edward Z. Shen* Jeffrey M. Perloff** January 2001 Abstract Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches provide superior estimates of a ratio extra information in the supports for the underlying parameters for generalized maximum entropy (GME

  7. Comparison of Maximum Entropy and Higher-Order Entropy Estimators Amos Golan* and Jeffrey M. Perloff**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Comparison of Maximum Entropy and Higher-Order Entropy Estimators Amos Golan* and Jeffrey M. Perloff** ABSTRACT We show that the generalized maximum entropy (GME) is the only estimation method- classes of estimators may outperform the GME estimation rule. Keywords: generalized entropy, maximum

  8. A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin-destination trip matrix estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin- destination trip matrix estimation propose a combined maximum entropy-least squares (ME-LS) estimator, by which O- D flows are distributed-destination trip table; elastic demand; maximum entropy; least squares; subnetwork analysis; convex combination

  9. Engine control system having speed-based timing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willi, Martin L. (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott B. (Metamora, IL); Montgomery, David T. (Edelstein, IL); Gong, Weidong (Dunlap, IL)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the cylinder and an actuator associated with the engine valve. The control system also has a controller in communication with the actuator. The controller is configured to receive a signal indicative of engine speed and compare the engine speed signal with a desired engine speed. The controller is also configured to selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve to control an amount of air/fuel mixture delivered to the cylinder based on the comparison.

  10. Critical speed measurements in the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGraff, B.; Bossert, R.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high energy operations. Nominal operating range for these compressors is 43,000 to 85,000 rpm. Past foil bearing failures prompted investigation to determine if critical speeds for operating compressors fall within operating range. Data acquisition hardware and software settings will be discussed for measuring liftoff, first critical and second critical speeds. Several tests provided comparisons between an optical displacement probe and accelerometer measurements. Vibration data and analysis of the 20 Tevatron ring cold compressors will be presented.

  11. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakwani, R. M.; Winsor, R. E.; Ryan, III, T. W.; Schwalb, J. A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, Jr., R. P.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

  12. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  13. High Speed Flywheels for Integrated Energy Storage and Attitude Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher D.

    High Speed Flywheels for Integrated Energy Storage and Attitude Control Christopher D. Hall. Decomposition of the space of internal torques separates the attitude control functionfrom the energy storage simultaneously performing energy storage and extraction operations. 1 Introduction The power engineering

  14. Microsoft Word - idaho_wind_speed_summary.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ft. Hall, ID Sites Wheat Grass Ridge Average Wind Speeds Site 0001 (66 ft. (20m) tower, erected week of 11101, data started on 11201) N. 42 deg. 44.762', W. 112 deg. 41.011'...

  15. High speed imaging of transient non-Newtonian fluid phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallup, Benjamin H. (Benjamin Hodsdon), 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I investigate the utility of high speed imaging for gaining scientific insight into the nature of short-duration transient fluid phenomena, specifically applied to the Kaye effect. The Kaye effect, noted ...

  16. Effects of various inefficiencies in rowing on shell speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Stephen F., Jr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First order predictions were made in determining the effects of various sources of inefficiency in rowing on shell speed. These predictions were then tested using a MATLAB model of the rowing stroke. The model simulates ...

  17. automated speed enforcement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: of a partial automation since they act on the control part of the vehicle. This increasing automationABV- A Low Speed Automation Project to Study the...

  18. adjustable speed drives: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: of a partial automation since they act on the control part of the vehicle. This increasing automationABV- A Low Speed Automation Project to Study the...

  19. adjustable speed drive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: of a partial automation since they act on the control part of the vehicle. This increasing automationABV- A Low Speed Automation Project to Study the...

  20. High-Speed Network Enables Industrial Internet | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Unveils High-Speed Network Infrastructure to Connect Machines, Data and People at Light...

  1. A high-speed hysteresis motor spindle for machining applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayless, Jacob D. (Jacob Daniel)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of suitable drive technologies for use in a new high-speed machining spindle was performed to determine critical research areas. The focus is on a hysteresis motor topology using a solid, inherently-balanced ...

  2. Rotary-linear axes for high speed machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebman, Michael Kevin, 1974-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design, analysis, fabrication, and control of a rotary-linear axis; this axis is a key subsystem for high speed, 5-axis machine tools intended for fabricating centimeter-scale parts. The rotary-linear ...

  3. Microsoft Word - utah_wind_speed_summary.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    02 - 110502) 10.6 mph Overall Average (120101 - 110502) 7.8 mph Dean Davis Site Spanish Fork, Utah Average Wind Speeds Site 0009 (66 ft. (20m) tower, data started on 1101...

  4. air speed indicators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A; Rozelot, J P; 10.10880004-637X727144 2011-01-01 6 High speed air pneumatic wind shield wiping design MIT - DSpace Summary: In this creative design process a number of...

  5. A Machian Version of Einstein's Variable Speed of Light Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unzicker, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is little known that while developing general relativity, Einstein's very first idea was a variable speed of light theory. Indeed spacetime curvature can be mimicked by a speed of light $c(r)$ that depends on the distribution of masses. Einstein's 1911 theory was considerably improved by Robert Dicke in 1957, but only recently the equivalence of the variable speed of light approach to the conventional formalism has been demonstrated (Broekaert, 2008). Using Green's functions, we show that Einstein's 1911 idea can be expressed in an analytic form, similar to the Poisson equation. Using heuristic arguments, we derive then a simple formula that directly relates curvature $w$ to the local speed of light, $w= -c^2 \\Delta \\frac{1}{c^2}$. In contrast to the conventional formulation, this allows for a Machian interpretation of general relativity and the gravitational constant $G$. Gravity, though described by local equations, would have its origin in all other masses in the universe.

  6. A Machian Version of Einstein's Variable Speed of Light Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Unzicker; Jan Preuss

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    It is little known that while developing general relativity, Einstein's very first idea was a variable speed of light theory. Indeed spacetime curvature can be mimicked by a speed of light $c(r)$ that depends on the distribution of masses. Einstein's 1911 theory was considerably improved by Robert Dicke in 1957, but only recently the equivalence of the variable speed of light approach to the conventional formalism has been demonstrated (Broekaert, 2008). Using Green's functions, we show that Einstein's 1911 idea can be expressed in an analytic form, similar to the Poisson equation. Using heuristic arguments, we derive then a simple formula that directly relates curvature $w$ to the local speed of light, $w= -c^2 \\Delta \\frac{1}{c^2}$. In contrast to the conventional formulation, this allows for a Machian interpretation of general relativity and the gravitational constant $G$. Gravity, though described by local equations, would have its origin in all other masses in the universe.

  7. High speed air pneumatic wind shield wiping design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heyward, Moses A

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this creative design process a number of designs were constructed, implemented and tested in order to assess the feasibility of using high speed to create a curtain to repel the rain from the automobile windshield instead ...

  8. On advancement of high speed atomic force microscope technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SooHoo, Kimberly E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a developing process in which nanoscale objects, such as crystal structures or strands of DNA, can be imaged at rates fast enough to watch processes as they occur. Although current ...

  9. High-Speed Parameter Estimation Algorithms For Nonlinear Smart Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and ferroelastic materials is the estimation or identification of material alters the position of the cutting head. The nonlinear material behavior creates difficulty whenHigh-Speed Parameter Estimation Algorithms For Nonlinear Smart Materials Jon M. Ernstberger

  10. Time-dependent Hamiltonians with 100% evolution speed efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raam Uzdin; Uwe Guenther; Saar Rahav; Nimrod Moiseyev

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution speed in projective Hilbert space is considered for Hermitian Hamiltonians and for non-Hermitian (NH) ones. Based on the Hilbert-Schmidt norm and the spectral norm of a Hamiltonian, resource-related upper bounds on the evolution speed are constructed. These bounds are valid also for NH Hamiltonians and they are illustrated for an optical NH Hamiltonian and for a non-Hermitian $\\mathcal{PT}-$symmetric matrix Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the concept of quantum speed efficiency is introduced as measure of the system resources directly spent on the motion in the projective Hilbert space. A recipe for the construction of time-dependent Hamiltonians which ensure 100% speed efficiency is given. Generally these efficient Hamiltonians are NH but there is a Hermitian efficient Hamiltonian as well. Finally, the extremal case of a non-Hermitian non-diagonalizable Hamiltonian with vanishing energy difference is shown to produce a 100% efficient evolution with minimal resources consumption.

  11. A Study of Adjustable Speed Drive Applications for Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triezenberg, D. M.; Lakhavani, S. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF ADJUSTABLE SPEED DRIVE APPLICATIONS FOR PUMPS D. M. Triezenberg and S. T. Lakhavani Westinghouse R&D Center Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT We have undertaken a survey and analysis of potential ASD applications for pumps in U...

  12. Hydrodynamic evaluation of high-speed semi-SWATH vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guttenplan, Adam (Adam David)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed semi-displacement vessels have enjoyed rapid development and widespread use over the past 25 years. Concurrent with their growth as viable commercial and naval platforms, has been the advancement of three-dimensional ...

  13. A Unified View on Speeded Categorization Hongbin Gu 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Chuanshu

    A Unified View on Speeded Categorization Hongbin Gu 1 Chuanshu Ji 2 1 Introduction The research of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; hongbin

  14. The Speed of Light as a Dilaton Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Wyss

    1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Through dimensional analysis, eliminating the physical time, we identify the speed of light as a dilaton field. This leads to a restmass zero, spin zero gauge field which we call the speedon field. The complete Lagrangian for gravitational, electromagnetic and speedon field interactions with a charged scalar field, representing matter, is given. We then find solutions for the gravitational-electromagnetic-speedon field equations. This then gives an expression for the speed of light.

  15. Unwinding the Spin on Variable Speed Drive Air Compressors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C. E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unwinding the Spin on Variable Speed Drive Air Compressors By Chris E. Beals, President, Air System Management, Inc Over the past several years, the variable speed drive (VSD) compressor has become a frequent choice for new compressor... purchases. The VSD compressor’s popularity is partly due to rising energy prices and its efficiency as a trim compressor. Unfortunately, much of the VSD compressor’s popularity is a result of spin applied by the marketers. For example, sales...

  16. Design of high temperature high speed electromagnetic axial thrust bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad Waqar

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN OF HIGH TEMPERATURE HIGH SPEED ELECTROMAGNETIC AXIAL THRUST BEARING A Thesis by MOHAMMAD WAQAR MOHIUDDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2002 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESIGN OF HIGH TEMPERATURE HIGH SPEED ELECTROMAGNETIC AXIAL THRUST BEARING A Thesis by MOHAMMAD WAQAR MOHIUDDIN Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  17. Best Practices for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms Efficient HVAC Systems: Variable-Speed-Drive Chillers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Speed-Drive Chillers Tengfang Xu June 15, 2005 The project is funded by the California Energy Commission's Industrial Efficient Cleanrooms Efficient HVAC Water Systems: Variable-Speed-Drive Chillers Tengfang Xu Contents HVAC.............................................................................................. 2 Variable-Speed-Drive Chillers

  18. On-line implementation of an adaptive speed filter and its experimental demonstration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdul, Anis Mohamed

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    previously developed neural network speed filter is implemented for on-line induction motor speed estimation. The speed filter is constructed using a combination of five neural networks. A neural networks framework developed in this work is used to construct...

  19. On-line implementation of an adaptive speed filter and its experimental demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdul, Anis Mohamed

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    previously developed neural network speed filter is implemented for on-line induction motor speed estimation. The speed filter is constructed using a combination of five neural networks. A neural networks framework developed in this work is used to construct...

  20. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  1. Speed and Path Control for Conflict-Free Flight in High Air Traffic Demand in Terminal Airspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezaei, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    speed control in terminal airspace, AIAA Guidance,Separattomcompltant tn the terminal airspace, Part I: speedSeparattomcompltant tn the terminal airspace, Part II: speed

  2. Validation of a blowby model using experimental results in motoring condition with the change of compression ratio and engine speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aghdam, E. Abdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran); Kabir, M.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran); Department of Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Aliabad Katoul Branch, Golestan (Iran)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Blowby and gas flow through the cylinder-piston-ring crevices are phenomena that affect the engine performance and exhaust emissions. Also these phenomena influence the cylinder pressure and temperature and the charge amount during a cycle. The study and validation of a sub-model for these phenomena in the absence of engine combustion deducts all effects arisen from the combustion event. During the current study, blowby sub-model and gas flow through crevices under motoring conditions has been noticed using a volume-orifice theory and the experimental results measured from a research engine. Blowby geometric parameters, consisting of a few critical cross-section areas (orifice areas) and volumes (top land and inter-ring crevice volumes), were measured in ambient temperature and corrected for hot running conditions. The cylinder pressure during cycle was measured by a piezoelectric pressure transducer and the low pressure parts of the cycle were measured using a piezoresistive pressure transducer for referencing purposes. The obtained results show a very good agreement between experimentally measured pressure data and model output for three compression ratios of 7.6, 10.2, 12.4 and three engine speeds of 750, 1500 and 2000 rpm, so that the maximum deviation was almost 5%. The model predicted that the maximum mass loss increased with increase of compression ratio and decreased with increase of engine speed. Also the peak mass loss position happened within the range of 3-9 CA after top dead center. After occurrence of the maximum loss, a reverse flow from the top land crevice into the cylinder was predicted in the model. (author)

  3. Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Investigation of the Application of Medium-Voltage Variable-Speed Drive Technology to Improve the Cost of Energy from Low Wind Speed Turbines; Behnke, Erdman and Whitaker Engineering, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Behnke, Erdman & Whitaker Engineering, Inc. to test the feasibility of applying medium-voltage variable-speed drive technology to low wind speed turbines.

  4. MEASUREMENT OF WIND SPEED FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Cary Tuckfield, C; Malcolm Pendergast, M

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collected thermal imagery and ground truth data at two commercial power plant cooling lakes to investigate the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and wind speed, and statistics derived from thermal imagery. SRNL demonstrated in a previous paper [1] that a linear relationship exists between the standard deviation of image temperature and surface heat flux. In this paper, SRNL will show that the skewness of the temperature distribution derived from cooling lake thermal images correlates with instantaneous wind speed measured at the same location. SRNL collected thermal imagery, surface meteorology and water temperatures from helicopters and boats at the Comanche Peak and H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant cooling lakes. SRNL found that decreasing skewness correlated with increasing wind speed, as was the case for the laboratory experiments. Simple linear and orthogonal regression models both explained about 50% of the variance in the skewness - wind speed plots. A nonlinear (logistic) regression model produced a better fit to the data, apparently because the thermal convection and resulting skewness are related to wind speed in a highly nonlinear way in nearly calm and in windy conditions.

  5. Speed Control in Industrial Refrigeration: Theory, Application & Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, M. H.

    at reduced capacity. Screw compressors back off slide valves, evaporator coils utilize back-pressure regulators (BPRs) or liquid solenoids, and condensers cycle fans. Unfortunately, these control methods do not provide the maximum attainable reduction...

  6. Speed-up of combustion fronts in shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Francois

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of speed-up of reaction-diffusion-advection traveling fronts in infinite cylinders with periodic boundary conditions. The advection is a shear flow with a large amplitude and the reaction is nonnegative, with either positive or zero ignition temperature. The unique or minimal speeds of the traveling fronts are proved to be asymptotically linear in the flow amplitude as the latter goes to infinity, solving an open problem from \\cite{b}. The asymptotic growth rate is characterized explicitly as the unique or minimal speed of traveling fronts for a limiting degenerate problem, and the convergence of the regular traveling fronts to the degenerate ones is proved for positive ignition temperatures under an additional H{\\"{o}}rmander-type condition on the flow.

  7. Local non-Gaussianity from rapidly varying sound speeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, Jon; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Wands, David, E-mail: jon.emery@port.ac.uk, E-mail: gianmassimo.tasinato@port.ac.uk, E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of non-trivial sound speeds on local-type non-Gaussianity during multiple-field inflation. To this end, we consider a multiple-DBI model and use the ?N formalism to track the super-horizon evolution of perturbations. By adopting a sum separable Hubble parameter we derive analytic expressions for the relevant quantities in the two-field case, valid beyond slow variation. We find that non-trivial sound speeds can, in principle, curve the trajectory in such a way that significant local-type non-Gaussianity is produced. Deviations from slow variation, such as rapidly varying sound speeds, enhance this effect. To illustrate our results we consider two-field inflation in the tip regions of two warped throats and find large local-type non-Gaussianity produced towards the end of the inflationary process.

  8. Analysis of a teetered, variable-speed rotor: final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, T.L.; Wilson, R.E.; Walker, S.N. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering) [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HOOT) with four structural degrees of freedom has been derived and verified. The four degrees of freedom include flapwise motion of the blades, teeter motion, and variable rotor speed. Options for the variable rotor speed include synchronous, induction, and constant-tip speed generator models with either start, stop, or normal operations. Verification is made by comparison with analytical solutions and mean and cyclic ESI-80 data. The Veers full-field turbulence model is used as a wind input for a synchronous and induction generator test case during normal operation. As a result of the comparison, it is concluded that the computer model can be used to predict accurately mean and cyclic loads with a turbulent wind input. 47 refs., 19 figs.

  9. Constant power speed range extension of surface mounted PM motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawler, Jack Steward (Knoxville, TN); Bailey, John Milton (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A circuit and method for controlling a rotating machine (11) in the constant horsepower range above base speed uses an inverter (15) having SCR's (T1-T6) connected in series with the primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) to control turn off of the primary commutation switches and to protect the primary commutation switches from faults. The primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) are controlled by a controller (14), to fire in advance or after a time when the back emf equals the applied voltage, and then to turn off after a precise dwell time, such that suitable power is developed at speeds up to at least six times base speed.

  10. How occasional backstepping can speed up a processive motor protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bier; F. J. Cao

    2008-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fueled by the hydrolysis of ATP, the motor protein kinesin literally walks on two legs along the biopolymer microtubule. The number of accidental backsteps that kinesin takes appears to be much larger than what one would expect given the amount of free energy that ATP hydrolysis makes available. This is puzzling as more than a billion years of natural selection should have optimized the motor protein for its speed and efficiency. But more backstepping allows for the production of more entropy. Such entropy production will make free energy available. With this additional free energy, the catalytic cycle of the kinesin can be speeded up. We show how measured backstep percentages represent an optimum at which maximal net forward speed is achieved.

  11. Speed of sound in liquids at high pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P., Kielczynski; S, Piekarski

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a new general formula for the sound speed in adiabatic conditions ( S = const ) has been established. The sound speed depends on the mass density {\\rho} (p,T ) and the internal energy per unit mass E(p,T ), both expressed as functions of the pressure p and the temperature T . This formula has been compared with experimental data on the example of triolein over the pressure range up to 450 MPa. For experimental data, phenomenological approximate formulas have been proposed. Those formulas have two versions, depending on the 2 and 3 parameters. Both versions have been developed with the help of the new expression (Eq.8) for the sound speed. The explicit form of both approximate curves can be regarded as the result of purely phenomenological modeling. However, in this paper, these new analytical expressions have been obtained by applying the heuristic procedure described in Appendix.

  12. Systematic Controller Design Methodology for Variable-Speed Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.; Balas, M. J.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three operational regions. This paper provides a guide for controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship between the two opposing metrics is easily visualized.

  13. Getting the Lorentz transformations without requiring an invariant speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Pelissetto; M. Testa

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the Lorentz transformations follows purely from the absence of privileged inertial reference frames and the group structure (closure under composition) of the transformations---two assumptions that are simple and physically necessary. The existence of an invariant speed is \\textit{not} a necessary assumption, and in fact is a consequence of the principle of relativity (though the finite value of this speed must, of course, be obtained from experiment). Von Ignatowsky derived this result in 1911, but it is still not widely known and is absent from most textbooks. Here we present a completely elementary proof of the result, suitable for use in an introductory course in special relativity.

  14. Secondary Containment Design for a High Speed Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, K.W.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary containment for high speed rotating machinery, such as a centrifuge, is extremely important for operating personnel safety. Containment techniques can be very costly, ungainly and time consuming to construct. A novel containment concept is introduced which is fabricated out of modular sections of polycarbonate glazed into a Unistrut metal frame. A containment study for a high speed centrifuge is performed which includes the development of parameters for secondary containment design. The Unistrut/polycarbonate shield framing concept is presented including design details and proof testing procedures. The economical fabrication and modularity of the design indicates a usefulness for this shielding system in a wide variety of containment scenarios.

  15. Multiply-agile encryption in high speed communication networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, L.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Witzke, E.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different applications have different security requirements for data privacy, data integrity, and authentication. Encryption is one technique that addresses these requirements. Encryption hardware, designed for use in high-speed communications networks, can satisfy a wide variety of security requirements if that hardware is key-agile, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile. Hence, multiply-agile encryption provides enhanced solutions to the secrecy, interoperability and quality of service issues in high-speed networks. This paper defines these three types of agile encryption. Next, implementation issues are discussed. While single-algorithm, key-agile encryptors exist, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile encryptors are still research topics.

  16. Modular high speed counter employing edge-triggered code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanstraelen, G.F.

    1993-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed modular counter (100) utilizing a novel counting method in which the first bit changes with the frequency of the driving clock, and changes in the higher order bits are initiated one clock pulse after a 0'' to 1'' transition of the next lower order bit. This allows all carries to be known one clock period in advance of a bit change. The present counter is modular and utilizes two types of standard counter cells. A first counter cell determines the zero bit. The second counter cell determines any other higher order bit. Additional second counter cells are added to the counter to accommodate any count length without affecting speed.

  17. Harmonic mean, the Gamma factor and Speed of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandru Iyer

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the harmonic mean and special relativity is concisely elucidated. The arguments in favor and against SRT are explored. It is shown that the ratio of the speed of light to the harmonic mean of the onward and return speeds of light in a moving frame under Newtonian mechanics, when equitably distributed between space and time as a correction, leads to the Lorentz transformation. This correction implies an apparent contraction of objects and time dilation. However, the symmetry of the onward and inverse transformations give a different meaning to the gamma factor

  18. The number e^{(1/2)} is the ratio between the time of maximum value and the time of maximum growth rate for restricted growth phenomena?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-Niu Wu

    2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    For many natural process of growth, with the growth rate independent of size due to Gibrat law and with the growth process following a log-normal distribution, the ratio between the time (D) for maximum value and the time (L) for maximum growth rate (inflexion point) is then equal to the square root of the base of the natural logarithm (e^{1/2}). On the logarithm scale this ratio becomes one half ((1/2)). It remains an open question, due to lack of complete data for various cases with restricted growth, whether this e^{1/2} ratio can be stated as e^{1/2}-Law. Two established examples already published, one for an epidemic spreading and one for droplet production, support however this ratio. Another example appears to be the height of humain body. For boys the maximum height occurs near 23 years old while the maximum growth rate is at the age near 14, and there ratio is close to e^{1/2}. The main theoretical base to obtain this conclusion is problem independent, provided the growth process is restricted, such as public intervention to control the spreading of communicable epidemics, so that an entropy is associated with the process and the role of dissipation, representing the mechanism of intervention, is maximized. Under this formulation the principle of maximum rate of entropy production is used to make the production process problem independent.

  19. EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE), Curtin University of Technology, WA Abstract: Variable speed wind turbine generators provide the opportunity to capture more power than fixed speed turbines. However the variable speed machine output can

  20. Development Impacts of high-speed rail : megalopolis formation and implications for Portugal's Lisbon-Porto High-Speed Rail Link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melibaeva, Sevara (Sevara Mukhtarovna)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed rail (HSR) has been gaining acceptance worldwide with development of rail technology and rising concerns over climate change and congestion in airports and on roads. The implementation of high-speed rail lines ...

  1. Use of Two Distillation Columns in Systems with Maximum Temperature Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Use of Two Distillation Columns in Systems with Maximum Temperature Limitations Rebecca H. Masel, Pennsylvania 18015, United States ABSTRACT: Maximum temperature limitations are encountered in distillation of the bottoms product fixes the column base pressure and, hence, the condenser pressure. The distillate

  2. Maximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    chargers do not perform the maximum power point tracking [2], [3] of the solar panel. We excludeMaximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones Abstract--Battery life poor capacity utilization during solar energy harvesting. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate

  3. LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

  4. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while frictional dissipation rate balances the energy production rate near the radius of maximum wind (RMW

  5. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    0 Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while frictional dissipation rate balances the energy production rate near the radius of maximum wind (RMW

  6. Efficiency at maximum power of low dissipation Carnot engines Massimiliano Esposito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawai, Ryoichi

    Efficiency at maximum power of low dissipation Carnot engines Massimiliano Esposito Center the efficiency at maximum power, , of engines performing finite-time Carnot cycles between a hot and a cold reservoir at temperatures Th and Tc, respectively. For engines reaching Carnot efficiency C = 1 - Tc

  7. Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited State Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited a theoretical limit for the maximum energy conversion efficiency of single junction photovoltaic cells for the efficiency variations observed for real photovoltaic devices today.4-6 Here, we show that the extractable

  8. Maximum-Power-Point Tracking Method of Photovoltaic Using Only Single Current Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    » «Solar cell systems» Abstract This paper describes a novel strategy of maximum-power-point tracking point using only a single current sensor, i.e., a Hall-effect CT. Output power of the photovoltaic can-climbing method is employed to seek the maximum power point, using the output power obtained from only the current

  9. An Improved Maximum Likelihood Formulation for Accurate Genome Assembly Aditya Varma, Abhiram Ranade and Srinivas Aluru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranade, Abhiram G.

    An Improved Maximum Likelihood Formulation for Accurate Genome Assembly Aditya Varma, Abhiram maximum likelihood method for genome assembly. We formulate the problem as one of direct convex estimate of the length of the genome or the need to use further expectation minimization to predict

  10. How Is the Maximum Entropy of a Quantized Surface Related to Its Area?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich; R. V. Korkin

    2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy of a quantized surface is demonstrated to be proportional to the surface area in the classical limit. The result is valid in loop quantum gravity, and in a somewhat more general class of approaches to surface quantization. The maximum entropy is calculated explicitly for some specific cases.

  11. A speed prediction model for a U.S. operating speed-based design consistency procedure on two-lane rural highways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottesen, Jeffery Lynn

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was selected (MSE=l0. 43, R'=0. 802). No significant difference was found between the estimated values gencratcd by fourth-order polynomial model and the simple linear model (or=0. 05). Other factors such as the posted speed limit and operational... the design speed concept exclusively. ~g speed- based geometric design attempts to do what the design speed concept originally intended: Transportation Resemh Record 1195, National Research Council, Washington, D. C. , 1988, is used as a model...

  12. Analyticity, Convergence and Convergence Rate of Recursive Maximum Likelihood Estimation in Hidden Markov Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadi?, Vladislav B

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers the asymptotic properties of the recursive maximum likelihood estimation in hidden Markov models. The paper is focused on the asymptotic behavior of the log-likelihood function and on the point-convergence and convergence rate of the recursive maximum likelihood estimator. Using the principle of analytical continuation, the analyticity of the asymptotic log-likelihood function is shown for analytically parameterized hidden Markov models. Relying on this fact and some results from differential geometry (Lojasiewicz inequality), the almost sure point-convergence of the recursive maximum likelihood algorithm is demonstrated, and relatively tight bounds on the convergence rate are derived. As opposed to the existing result on the asymptotic behavior of maximum likelihood estimation in hidden Markov models, the results of this paper are obtained without assuming that the log-likelihood function has an isolated maximum at which the Hessian is strictly negative definite.

  13. Unification of Field Theory and Maximum Entropy Methods for Learning Probability Densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Justin B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bayesian field theory and maximum entropy are two methods for learning smooth probability distributions (a.k.a. probability densities) from finite sampled data. Both methods were inspired by statistical physics, but the relationship between them has remained unclear. Here I show that Bayesian field theory subsumes maximum entropy density estimation. In particular, the most common maximum entropy methods are shown to be limiting cases of Bayesian inference using field theory priors that impose no boundary conditions on candidate densities. This unification provides a natural way to test the validity of the maximum entropy assumption on one's data. It also provides a better-fitting nonparametric density estimate when the maximum entropy assumption is rejected.

  14. Energy Implications of Retrofitting Retail Sector Rooftop Units with Stepped-Speed and Variable-Speed Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, D.; Romero, R.; Herrmann, L.; Benne, K.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial retailers understand that retrofitting constant-speed RTU fan motors with stepped- or variable-speed alternatives could save significant energy in most U.S. climate zones. However, they lack supporting data, both real-world and simulation based, on the cost effectiveness and climate zone-specific energy savings associated with this measure. Thus, building managers and engineers have been unable to present a compelling business case for fan motor upgrades to upper management. This study uses whole-building energy simulation to estimate the energy impact of this type of measure so retailers can determine its economic feasibility.

  15. Ris-R-Report LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the approaching wind fields from this vantage point. Time series of wind speed measurements from the lidar with 50: Time series of the yaw misalignment 67 #12;4 Risø-R-1741(EN) Preface Mikael Rasmussen and Per Hansen is acknowledged for safety supervision of the operation of the NM80 research turbine. The Spin

  16. Speeding up Ozone Profile Retrieval using Machine Learning Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmerich, Michael

    Speeding up Ozone Profile Retrieval using Machine Learning Techniques L.M. Strijbosch April 25 to the process of ozone profile retrieval, a method for retrieving a global ozone distribution from satellite Machines are selected to replace the forward model, which is the slowest part of ozone profile retrieval

  17. Speed and Energy Performance Asynchronous MIPS R3000 Microprocessor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speed and Energy Performance of an Asynchronous MIPS R3000 Microprocessor Alain J. Martin Mika R3000 microprocessor. The de- sign is almost entirely QDI and introduces a new #12;ne pipelines. 1 Introduction Asynchronous techniques for digital VLSI, in particular microprocessors

  18. Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed: preliminary full scale experiments By: Kim Klaka of experiment were conducted ­ free roll decay tests and irregular wave tests. An inclining test was also with and without the mainsail hoisted, in very light winds. The irregular wave tests were conducted again in very

  19. TorqueSpeed Relationships of Na+ -driven Chimeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Richard

    , H+ in Escherichia coli and Na+ in marine Vibrio species, driven by an inward-directed electrochemiTorque­Speed Relationships of Na+ -driven Chimeric Flagellar Motors in Escherichia coli Yuichi in Escherichia coli promises to reveal the mechanism of the motor in unprecedented detail. We measured torque

  20. Ready...Set...MENTOR! A Speed Mentoring Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Ready...Set...MENTOR! A Speed Mentoring Toolkit Introduction: Mentoring describes a developmental relationship between a mentor, who is a person with experience, skills and knowledge, and a protégé, who and work contexts. Informal mentoring may emerge between partners who spontaneously discover each other

  1. HIGH SPEED RAIL COSTS, BENEFITS, AND FINANCING RAYMOND H. ELLIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Corridor PHASE 1 ­ TAMPA TO ORLANDO #12;FLORIDA TAMPA ­ ORLANDO (PHASE 1) HSR CAPITAL COST · Estimated Incremental Capital Cost Capital Cost Year of (Billions (Billions Completion Expenditure Section 2010$) 2010$) of Section Capital Cost #12;CALIFORNIA HIGH SPEED RAIL PHASE 1 CAPITAL COSTS SECTION INCREMENTAL CAPITAL

  2. Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price Jin-Chuan Duan, Yazhen Wang that as the time interval between two consecutive observations shrinks to zero, a properly constructed GARCH model will weakly converge to a bivariate diffusion. Naturally the European option price under the GARCH model

  3. Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yazhen

    Convergence Speed of GARCH Option Price to Diffusion Option Price Jin-Chuan Duan National constructed GARCH model will weakly converge to a bi- variate diffusion. Naturally the European option price under the GARCH model will also converge to its bivariate diffusion counterpart. This paper investigates

  4. High-speed pulse-shape generator, pulse multiplexer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention combines arbitrary amplitude high-speed pulses for precision pulse shaping for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The circuitry combines arbitrary height pulses which are generated by replicating scaled versions of a trigger pulse and summing them delayed in time on a pulse line. The combined electrical pulses are connected to an electro-optic modulator which modulates a laser beam. The circuit can also be adapted to combine multiple channels of high speed data into a single train of electrical pulses which generates the optical pulses for very high speed optical communication. The invention has application in laser pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion, in optical data links for computers, telecommunications, and in laser pulse shaping for atomic excitation studies. The invention can be used to effect at least a 10.times. increase in all fiber communication lines. It allows a greatly increased data transfer rate between high-performance computers. The invention is inexpensive enough to bring high-speed video and data services to homes through a super modem.

  5. Sensor-bedazzled balloon catheter speeds up heart surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Sensor-bedazzled balloon catheter speeds up heart surgery By Janet Fang | Mar 7, 2011 | 0 Comments A little while ago, cardiologists improved open-heart surgery by using super thin, flexible balloon, says Rogers. Currently, heart surgeons map tissue using pointed catheters with electrodes, which

  6. A Machian Version of Einstein's Variable Speed of Light Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Unzicker; Jan Preuss

    2015-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a little known fact that while he was developing his theory of general relativity, Einstein's initial idea was a variable speed of light theory. Indeed space-time curvature can be mimicked by a speed of light $c(r)$ that depends on the distribution of masses. Einstein's 1911 theory was considerably improved by Robert Dicke in 1957, but only recently has the equivalence of the variable speed of light approach to the conventional formalism been demonstrated (Broekaert, 2008). Using Green's functions, we show that Einstein's 1911 idea can be expressed in an analytic form, similar to the Poisson equation. Using heuristic arguments, we derive a simple formula that directly relates curvature $w$ to the local speed of light, $w= -c^2 \\Delta \\frac{1}{c^2}$. In contrast to the conventional formulation, this allows for a Machian interpretation of general relativity and the gravitational constant $G$. Gravity, though described by local equations, has its origin in all other masses in the universe.

  7. PHOTOACOUSTIC AND THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY WITH AN UNCERTAIN WAVE SPEED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    PHOTOACOUSTIC AND THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY WITH AN UNCERTAIN WAVE SPEED LAURI OKSANEN AND GUNTHER UHLMANN Abstract. We consider the mathematical model of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography. In Thermoacoustic tomography (TAT), see e.g. [8], low frequency microwaves, with wavelengths on the order of 1m

  8. Effect of shrink fits on threshold speeds of rotordynamic instability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Baz, Khalid A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the effect of shrink fits on the threshold speeds of rotor instability. Shrink or press fit components in built-up rotors are known sources of internal friction damping. The internal friction damping increases...

  9. Calculator program optimizes bit weight, rotary speed, reducing drilling cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.A.

    1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Bit selection, bit weight, and rotary speed have repeatedly proven to be the most important and commonly overlooked alterable factors which control penetration rate, footage, and overall drilling cost. This is particularly true in offshore operations where drilling costs are highest and the greatest cost savings stand to be achieved through implementation of proven optimization techniques. The myth that bit weights and rotary speeds cannot be optimized in directional holes has hindered the industry from using this virtually cost-free method for reducing drilling cost. The use of optimized bit weights and rotary speeds in conjunction with minimum cost bit programs based on cost per foot analysis of previous bit runs in the area was implemented on a five-well platform in the Grand Isle Block 20 field, offshore Louisiana. Each of the directional wells was drilled substantially faster and cheaper than the discovery well, which was a straight hole. Average reductions in footage cost of 31.3%, based on daily operating cost of $30,000/day, and increase in average daily footage drilled of 45.2% were effected by ''collectively optimizing'' drilling performance. The ''Optimizer'' program is an HP-41CV adaptation of the Bourgoyne and Young drilling model. It was used to calculate the optimum bit weights and rotary speeds based on field drilling tests; historical bit and bearing wear data; and current operating conditions, cost, and constraints.

  10. Simulations of High Speed Turbulent Jets in Crossflow Xiaochuan Chai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    Simulations of High Speed Turbulent Jets in Crossflow Xiaochuan Chai and Krishnan Mahesh-expanded sonic jet injected into a supersonic crossflow and an over-expanded supersonic jet injected into a subsonic crossflow. A finite volume compressible Navier­Stokes solver developed by Park & Mahesh (2007

  11. Simulations of High Speed Turbulent Jets in Crossflows Xiaochuan Chai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    Simulations of High Speed Turbulent Jets in Crossflows Xiaochuan Chai and Krishnan Mahesh-expanded sonic jet injected into a supersonic crossflow and an over-expanded supersonic jet injected into a subsonic crossflow, where the flow conditions are based on Santiago et al.'s (1997) and Beresh et al

  12. Possible Origin Of The Neutrino Speed Anomaly Reported By OPERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlomo Dado; Arnon Dar

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the OPERA collaboration reported a measurement of a superluminal speed of muon neutrinos travelling through the Earth's crust between their production site at CERN and their detection site under Gran Sasso, ~730 km away. The measurement was based on the assumption that the pulse shape of the neutrinos from the decay of parent mesons produced in proton-target collisions is the same as that of the incident protons. Here we argue that the effective column density of the target along the beam direction decreases with time during the 10.5 microseconds duration of the proton pulse. This is because of the thermal expansion and expulsion of target material along the beam by the energy-momentum deposition during the 10.5 microseconds pulse. The progresive reduction in the effective column density during the pulse decreases the neutrino production rate per incident proton. It could have advanced the mean production time of the detected neutrinos relative to that calculated from the proton pulse-shape, by an amount comparable to the measured neutrino lead time (60.7+/-6.9(stat) +/-7.4(sys) ns. This explanation implies that the planned measurements by OPERA of the speed of neutrinos produced in much shorter (a few ns) pulses, should yield a speed consistent with the speed of light in free space.

  13. Speeding Up SMT-Based Quantitative Program Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshia, Sanjit A.

    Speeding Up SMT-Based Quantitative Program Analysis Daniel J. Fremont and Sanjit A. Seshia-free program. These problems can be solved using a combi- nation of path enumeration, SMT solving, and model present a formalization and satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) based solution to a family

  14. High Speed Rail in Greece : methods for evaluating economic impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radopoulou, Stefania Christina

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Speed Rail is a mode that gains popularity every day. Many countries have such a network and others are on the way to adopting one. Greece, which is part of the European Union, is one of those countries that are looking ...

  15. On measurement of the isotropy of the speed of light

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [JLAB

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three experimental concepts investigating possible anisotropy of the speed of light are presented. They are based on i) beam deflection in a 180 degree magnetic arc, ii) narrow resonance production in an electron-positron collider, and iii) the ratio of magnetic moments of an electron and a positron moving in opposite directions.

  16. Probability distributions of land surface wind speeds over North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    . Jones, A. Dai, S. Biner, D. Caya, and K. Winger (2010), Probability distributions of land surface wind distribution used for estimation of wind climate and annual winProbability distributions of land surface wind speeds over North America Yanping He,1 Adam Hugh

  17. SUPER HIGH-SPEED MINIATURIZED PERMANENT MAGNET SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Thomas

    with the design of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) to operate at super-high speed with high efficiency. The designed and fabricated PMSM was successfully tested to run upto 210,000 rpm The designed PMSM has 2000 W concept of electrical machines. After that, the modeling of PMSM for dynamic simulation is provided

  18. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for agency action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action, and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process provides NNSA with environmental information that can be used in developing mitigative actions, if necessary, to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the quality of the human environment and natural ecosystems should NNSA decide to proceed with implementing the Proposed Action at LANL. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA, and this EA, is to aid NNSA officials in making decisions based on an understanding of environmental consequences and in taking actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment.

  19. Corridor Information Corridor Length (miles)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Rest of PA Allentown PA-NJ Harrisburg Philadelphia PA PA PA US-22 WB I-83 NB Schuylkill Expy/I-76 WB 15

  20. Corridor Information Corridor Length (miles)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Expy/I-290 WB I-290 WB Stevenson Expy/I-55 NB S Ashland Ave/Exit 28B I-88/Exit 15A US-20/US-45/US-12

  1. Three Mile Island Unit 1 Main Steam Line Break Three-Dimensional Neutronics/Thermal-Hydraulics Analysis: Application of Different Coupled Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Auria, Francesco [Universita di Pisa (Italy); Moreno, Jose Luis Gago [Universidad Politecnica de Barcelona (Spain); Galassi, Giorgio Maria [Universita di Pisa (Italy); Grgic, Davor [University of Zagreb (Croatia); Spadoni, Antonino [Universita di Pisa (Italy)

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive analysis of the double ended main steam line break (MSLB) accident assumed to occur in the Babcock and Wilcox Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) has been carried out at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione of the University of Pisa, Italy, in cooperation with the University of Zagreb, Croatia. The overall activity has been completed within the framework of the participation in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development-Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations-Nuclear Science Committee pressurized water reactor MSLB benchmark.Thermal-hydraulic system codes (various versions of Relap5), three-dimensional (3-D) neutronics codes (Parcs, Quabbox, and Nestle), and one subchannel code (Cobra) have been adopted for the analysis. Results from the following codes (or code versions) are assumed as reference:1. Relap5/mod3.2.2, beta version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Parcs code parallel virtual machine (PVM) coupling2. Relap5/mod3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Quabbox code (direct coupling)3. Relap5/3D code coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Nestle code.The influence of PVM and of direct coupling is also discussed.Boundary and initial conditions of the system, including those relevant to the fuel status, have been supplied by Pennsylvania State University in cooperation with GPU Nuclear Corporation (the utility, owner of TMI) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The comparison among the results obtained by adopting the same thermal-hydraulic nodalization and the coupled code version is discussed in this paper.The capability of the control rods to recover the accident has been demonstrated in all the cases as well as the capability of all the codes to predict the time evolution of the assigned transient. However, one stuck control rod caused some 'recriticality' or 'return to power' whose magnitude is largely affected by boundary and initial conditions.

  2. Adjustable speed drives: Applications and R&D needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovic, V.R.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The largest opportunity for the growth of adjustable speed drives (ASDs) during the next 5-6 years is in pump, fan and compressor (PFC) applications where a constant, fixed speed operation is converted to adjustable speed in order to realize energy savings. Inverter supplied induction motors are and will continue to be predominately used in these applications. Over the long term (10-15 years), the greatest ASD growth is expected in large volume consumer applications: first in hybrid electric vehicles (EVs) and in residential heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC). Both induction and a variety of AC Permanent Magnet motors are expected to be the dominant technology in this new field. The traditional ASD applications in industries which require adjustable speed (such as machine tools, robotics, steel rolling, extruders, paper mill finishing lines, etc.) offer a relatively limited potential for above average ASD growth since most of these applications have already converted to electronic speed control. As a result, ASD growth in this sector will essentially track the growth of the corresponding industries. If realized, both short and long term ASD growth opportunities will result in significant advancements of ASD technology, which will then substantially affect all other, more fragmented, ASD applications. In fact, any single large volume ASD application will serve as a catalyst for improving ASD characteristics in all other ASD applications with the same voltage rating. ASD cost and reliability (defined in the context of application compatibility) are the two most important factors which will determine whether the ASD growth opportunities are realized. Conversely, any technological improvement which carries a cost increase will be restricted to niche applications, at best. Consequently, future R & D efforts should be directed to secure reduction in ASD cost and improvement in ASD reliability. A specific action plan is outlined in this report.

  3. Atlantic Ocean circulation at the last glacial maximum : inferences from data and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dail, Holly Janine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing in the Atlantic Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18-21 thousand years before present). Relative to the pre-industrial climate, LGM atmospheric CO? ...

  4. Tropical climate variability from the last glacial maximum to the present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Kristina Ariel

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the nature and magnitude of tropical climate variability from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. The temporal variability of two specific tropical climate phenomena is examined. The first is the ...

  5. Investigating the angle or response and maximum stability of a cohesive granular pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Sara Alice, 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I investigate the static and dynamic properties of a granular heap made cohesive by an interstitial fluid. I present the results of experimental work measuring the maximum angle of stability and the angle ...

  6. Dynamical Reconstruction of Upper-Ocean Conditions in the Last Glacial Maximum Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    Proxies indicate that the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Atlantic Ocean was marked by increased meridional and zonal near sea surface temperature gradients relative to today. Using a least squares fit of a full general circulation ...

  7. Achieving Consistent Maximum Brake Torque with Varied Injection Timing in a DI Diesel Engine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Timothy H

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , revealing the premixed and diffusion burn fractions as well as important engine and exhaust design criteria such as maximum in-cylinder pressure and exhaust composition. These results are significant in diesel engine design because cheaper, lighter engines...

  8. Microcontroller Servomotor for Maximum Effective Power Point for Solar Cell System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khalidy, M.; Al-Rawi, O.; Noaman, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a Maximum Power point (MPP) tracking algorithm is developed using dual-axis servomotor feedback tracking control system. An efficient and accurate servomotor system is used to increase the system efficiency ...

  9. Submodule Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.

    This paper explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic applications through the use of submodule integrated maximum power point trackers (MPPT). We propose a system architecture that provides ...

  10. Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane the current study and the previous measurements in similar flames with methane, ethane, and propane flames

  11. Microcontroller Servomotor for Maximum Effective Power Point for Solar Cell System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khalidy, M.; Al-Rawi, O.; Noaman, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a Maximum Power point (MPP) tracking algorithm is developed using dual-axis servomotor feedback tracking control system. An efficient and accurate servomotor system is used to increase the system efficiency and reduces the solar cell...

  12. Maximum Network Lifetime in Wireless Sensor Networks with Adjustable Sensing Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    1 Maximum Network Lifetime in Wireless Sensor Networks with Adjustable Sensing Ranges Mihaela problem in wireless sensor networks with adjustable sensing range. Communication and sensing consume Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) constitute the foundation of a broad range of applications related

  13. Parameterization of Maximum Wave Heights Forced by Hurricanes: Application to Corpus Christi, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Sym 1978-

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    sensitivity based on the investigation of several hurricane parameters. Also presented is the development of parameterized maximum significant wave height models. These are determined by incorporating three forms of an equivalent fetch into (1) dimensionless...

  14. A more efficient formulation for computation of the maximum loading points in electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Electrical Engineering; Jean-Jumeau, R. [Electricite d`Haita, Port-au-Prince (Haiti)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a more efficient formulation for computation of the maximum loading points. A distinguishing feature of the new formulation is that it is of dimension (n + 1), instead of the existing formulation of dimension (2n + 1), for n-dimensional load flow equations. This feature makes computation of the maximum loading points very inexpensive in comparison with those required in the existing formulation. A theoretical basis for the new formulation is provided. The new problem formulation is derived by using a simple reparameterization scheme and exploiting the special properties of the power flow model. Moreover, the proposed test function is shown to be monotonic in the vicinity of a maximum loading point. Therefore, it allows one to monitor the approach to maximum loading points during the solution search process. Simulation results on a 234-bus system are presented.

  15. Acoustic Space Dimensionality Selection and Combination using the Maximum Entropy Principle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-Haleem, Yasser H; Renals, Steve; Lawrence, Neil D

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we propose a discriminative approach to acoustic space dimensionality selection based on maximum entropy modelling. We form a set of constraints by composing the acoustic space with the space of phone classes, and use a continuous...

  16. Measurement strategies for estimating long-term average wind speeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Houston, S.; Wegley, H.L.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty and bias in estimates of long-term average wind speeds inherent in continuous and intermittent measurement strategies are examined by simulating the application of the strategies to 40 data sets. Continuous strategies have smaller uncertainties for fixed duration measurement programs, but intermittent strategies make more efficient use of instruments and have smaller uncertainties for a fixed amount of instrument use. Continuous strategies tend to give biased estimates of the long-term annual mean speed unless an integral number of years' data is collected or the measurement program exceeds 3 years in duration. Intermittent strategies with three or more month-long measurement periods per year do not show any tendency toward bias.

  17. High-speed, sub-pull-in voltage MEMS switching.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spahn, Olga Blum; Brewer, Steven; Olsson, Roy H.; Bogart, Gregory R.; Luck, David L.; Watts, Michael R.; Shaw, Michael J.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul James; Tigges, Christopher P.; Grossetete, Grant David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have proposed and demonstrated MEMS switching devices that take advantage of the dynamic behavior of the MEMS devices to provide lower voltage actuation and higher switching speeds. We have explored the theory behind these switching techniques and have demonstrated these techniques in a range of devices including MEMS micromirror devices and in-plane parallel plate MEMS switches. In both devices we have demonstrated switching speeds under one microsecond which has essentially been a firm limit in MEMS switching. We also developed low-loss silicon waveguide technology and the ability to incorporate high-permittivity dielectric materials with MEMS. The successful development of these technologies have generated a number of new projects and have increased both the MEMS switching and optics capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories.

  18. Development of a high speed crowbar for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrichs, C. Jr.; Lyles, J.T.M.; Doub, J.M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of the four 200 MHz Final Power Amplifiers (FPAs) in the LANSCE proton linac has its own capacitor bank and crowbar. The dissipation in the 10{Omega} crowbar limiting resistor is as high as 67 kW, and oil cooling is used. The authors stated upgrade goal was to substantially reduce the limiting resistor dissipation and eliminate the oil cooling. Early tests showed that the fault energy quickly rose to unacceptable levels as the current limiting resistance was reduced. FPA arcs are normally quenched by interrupting the FPA modulator current, and the crowbar waits 10 {mu}s for this to occur. The successful upgrade strategy was to replace the 10{Omega} resistor with a 3{Omega} air cooled resistor and to add a high speed crowbar circuit which operates only if there are simultaneous arcs in the FPA and its modulator. This paper describes the high speed circuit and its interface with the existing crowbar. Test results are also given.

  19. Correction due to finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D; Zanimonskiy, Y Y

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correction due to finite speed of light is among the most inconsistent ones in absolute gravimetry. Formulas reported by different authors yield corrections scattered up to 8 $\\mu$Gal with no obvious reasons. The problem, though noted before, has never been studied, and nowadays the correction is rather postulated than rigorously proven. In this paper we investigate the problem from several prospectives, find the corrections for different types of absolute gravimeters, and establish relationships between different ways of implement them. The obtained results enabled us to analyze and understand the discrepancies in the results of other authors. We found that the correction derived from the Doppler effect is accountable only for $\\tfrac{2}{3}$ of the total correction due to finite speed of light, if no signal delays are considered. Another major source of inconsistency was found in the tacit use of simplified trajectory models.

  20. High Speed Reconfigurable FFT Design by Vedic Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Ashish; Sarin, R K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is a computationally intensive digital signal processing (DSP) function widely used in applications such as imaging, software-defined radio, wireless communication, instrumentation. In this paper, a reconfigurable FFT design using Vedic multiplier with high speed and small area is presented. Urdhava Triyakbhyam algorithm of ancient Indian Vedic Mathematics is utilized to improve its efficiency. In the proposed architecture, the 4x4 bit multiplication operation is fragmented reconfigurable FFT modules. The 4x4 multiplication modules are implemented using small 2x2bit multipliers. Reconfigurability at run time is provided for attaining power saving. The reconfigurable FFT has been designed, optimized and implemented on an FPGA based system. This reconfigurable FFT is having the high speed and small area as compared to the conventional FFT.

  1. An Analysis of Maximum Residential Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J. S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems in Hot and Humid Climates, Orlando, Florida, July 24-26, 2006 Methodology 1. Development of the Basecase Simulation Model 2. Analysis of Energy Saving Measures 3. Development of the Maximum Energy-Efficient House 4. Economic Analysis DOE-2 Input...AN ANALYSIS OF MAXIMUM RESIDENTIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES Mini Malhotra Graduate Research Assistant Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Professor/Associate Director Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University College...

  2. ON THE PROBLEM OF UNIQUENESS FOR THE MAXIMUM STIRLING NUMBER(S) OF THE SECOND KIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomerance, Carl

    ON THE PROBLEM OF UNIQUENESS FOR THE MAXIMUM STIRLING NUMBER(S) OF THE SECOND KIND E. Rodney Say that an integer n is exceptional if the maximum Stirling number of the second kind S(n, k) occurs or equal to x is O(x3/5+ ), for any > 0. 1. Introduction Let S(n, k) be the Stirling number of the second

  3. A stochastic model for sediment yield using the Principle of Maximum Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, V. P.; Krstanovic, P. F.

    WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 23, NO. 5, PAGES 781-793, MAY 1987 A Stochastic Model for Sediment Yield Using the Principle of Maximum Entropy V. P. SINGH AND P. F. KRSTANOVIC Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton... Rouge The principle of maximum entropy was applied to derive a stochastic model for sediment yield from upland watersheds. By maximizing the conditional entropy subject to certain constraints, a probability distribution of sediment yield conditioned...

  4. Adjustable Speed AC Motor Drives-Applications Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enjeti, P.

    Adjustable Speed AC Motor Drives Applications Problems by Dr. P. Enjeti Power Quality Laboratory Department ofElectrical Engineering Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 Tel: 409-845-7466 Fax: 409-845-6259 Email..., it generates side effects, some which have been recognized only recently. This paper presents a comprehensive coverage of application issues of PWM inverter controlled ac motor drives which include damage to motor insulation due to reflected voltages caused...

  5. Adjustable Speed Drives as Applied to Centrifugal Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarc, D. A.; Robechek, J. D.; Connors, D. P.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Required Power In addition to energy savings, which are discussed in detail later, operation at reduced pressures can result in longer pump seal life, reduced impeller wear, and less system vibration and noise. These benefits could provide additional... FLOW CONTROL TECHNIQUES Historically, centrifugal pumps have been driven by fixed speed A-C motors and reduced flow has been achieved by using control valves as shown in Figure 8. Closing the valve reduces the flow by increasing the friction...

  6. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative High-Speed Shaft Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.; McNiff, B.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation has been added to the high-speed shaft, pinion, and tapered roller bearing pair of the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative gearbox to measure loads and temperatures. The new shaft bending moment and torque instrumentation was calibrated and the purpose of this document is to describe this calibration process and results, such that the raw shaft bending and torque signals can be converted to the proper engineering units and coordinate system reference for comparison to design loads and simulation model predictions.

  7. Laboratory implementation of variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinger, D.S. [Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States)] [Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Miller, A.A. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)] [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Robinson, M.C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve the performance of wind turbines, various control schemes such as variable speed operation have been proposed. Testing of these control algorithms on a full scale system is very expensive. To test these systems simulation, we developed programs and small scale laboratory experiments. We used this system to verify a control method that attempts to keep the turbine operating at its peak power coefficient. Both the simulations and the experiments verified the principle of operation of this control scheme.

  8. High-speed Laser Micromachining with Copper Bromide Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balchev, I I; Minkovski, N I; Sabotinov, N V; Balchev, Ivaylo I.; Kostadinov, Ivan K.; Minkovski, Nikolai I.; Sabotinov, Nikola V.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the copper bromide (CuBr) laser as an attractive tool in the micro-machining of different materials has been demonstrated. High-quality drilling by trepanning and precision cutting was established on several materials with a negligible heat-affected zone (HAZ). That good performance was a result of the combination of high power visible radiation, short pulses, and close to the diffraction-limited laser beam quality with high-speed galvo scanner beam steering.

  9. A preliminary evaluation of a speed threshold incident detection algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolb, Stephanie Lang

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . , . Event Scan Algorithm . Neural Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . California Algorithm ?8 with Fuzzy Logic Selected Algorithms Page 20 21 22 24 24 25 26 27 28 28 30 32 32 33 33 33 33... 7 California Algorithm ?10 Decision Tree 12 14 15 8 Speed/Flow Curve 9 McMaster Algorithm Template 15 25 10 Traffic Flow Relationships Applied in the Dynamic Model Algorithm. . . 26 11 Multi-Layer Feed-Forward Neural Network 12 Membership...

  10. Extended cage adjustable speed electric motors and drive packages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotor cage of a motor is extended, a second stator is coupled to this extended rotor cage, and the windings have the same number of poles. The motor torque and speed can be controlled by either injecting energy into or extracting energy out from the rotor cage. The motor produces less harmonics than existing doubly-fed motors. Consequently, a new type of low cost, high efficiency drive is produced.

  11. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  12. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Leonard, E-mail: kimlh@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

  13. High-speed rail commuting in the United States : a case study in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasuya, Shuichi, 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed rail (HSR) is primarily for intermediate distance intercity passenger travel. The concept of high-speed rail commuting is to provide short distance commuting transportation service on dedicated HSR, by sharing ...

  14. Validation of and enhancements to an operating-speed-based geometric design consistency evaluation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Kent Michael

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents efforts to validate two elements related to an operating-speed-based geometric design consistency evaluation procedure: (1) the speed reduction estimation ability of the model, and (2) assumptions about acceleration...

  15. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    341–345. Yuan, X. , 2004: High-wind-speed evaluation in theCosca, 2004: Effects of wind speed and gas exchange param-dust emission caused by wind erosion. J. Geophys. Res. ,

  16. Relationship between speed distribution measures and rural two-lane highway characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Jon Michael

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the behavior of speed population distributions on rural two-lane highways is needed to address driver error associated with elements of the highway. Previous research has identified a direct relationship between speed variance...

  17. Design, fabrication and mechanical optimization of a flexural high speed nanopositioning imaging stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panas, Robert M. (Robert Matthew)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this research is to generate the knowledge required to design, fabricate and operate a device capable of high speed nano-scale vertical positioning of microscopy samples. The high speed focusing device (HSFD) ...

  18. United States- Land Based and Offshore Annual Average Wind Speed at 100 Meters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full-size, high resolution version of the 100-meter land-based and offshore wind speed resource map.

  19. Revision to Physical Review B Maximum superheating and undercooling: systematics, molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    superheating is particularly challenging due to a paucity in experimental data. Shock-state sound-speed an undercooled liquid) depends on a dimensionless nucle- ation barrier parameter and the heating (or cooling) rate Q. depends on the material: 163 sl/(3kTmH2 m) where sl is the solid-liquid interfacial energy

  20. Maximum superheating and undercooling: Systematics, molecular dynamics simulations, and dynamic experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in experimental data. Shock-state sound-speed and temperature measurements on metals, alkali halides in a superheated solid or an undercooled liquid depends on a dimensionless nucleation barrier parameter and the heating or cooling rate Q. depends on the material: 16 sl 3 /(3kTm Hm 2 ) where sl is the solid-liquid

  1. An Informatic Rationale for the Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Scott

    An Informatic Rationale for the Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off R. W. Soukoreff and I. S. Mac argues that the speed-accuracy trade-off arises as a consequence of Shannon's Fundamental Theorem processors, and that motivation is a necessary condition of the speed-accuracy trade- off. Keywords

  2. Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets David Jon by raindrop impacts. We use high-speed imaging of drop impacts on dry sand to describe the drop (2007), Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets, J

  3. Control strategy of a variable speed wind turbine with multipole permanent magnet synchronous generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    values. Keywords: permanent magnet synchronous generator, variable speed wind turbine, direct driven wind). A multipole synchronous generator connected to a power converter can operate at low speeds, so that a gear canControl strategy of a variable speed wind turbine with multipole permanent magnet synchronous

  4. Validation of and enhancements to an operating-speed-based geometric design consistency evaluation model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Kent Michael

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .05 significance level. Analysis of observed 85th percentile speeds revealed that the current speed-profile model fits the observed data reasonably well. Hypothesis tests of mean observed 85th percentile speeds on tangents resulted in the conclusion that the mean...

  5. The effect of luminance on simulated driving speed Sarah J. Pritchard and Stephen T. Hammett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    The effect of luminance on simulated driving speed Sarah J. Pritchard and Stephen T. Hammett§ Dept such as contrast, luminance and adaptation duration. It has been suggested that such changes in perceived speed may influence driving behaviour. In order to evaluate the effect of luminance on driving speed we have measured

  6. WAVE SPEEDS FOR AN ELASTOPLASTIC MODEL FOR TWODIMENSIONAL DEFORMATIONS WITH A NONASSOCIATIVE FLOW RULE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WAVE SPEEDS FOR AN ELASTOPLASTIC MODEL FOR TWO­DIMENSIONAL DEFORMATIONS WITH A NON­ASSOCIATIVE FLOW of variables, the character­ istic speeds of plane wave solutions of the system are computed. For both plastic and elastic deformations, there are two nonzero wave speeds, referred to as fast and slow waves. It is shown

  7. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    resources force the use of coarse-resolution GCMs, which do not resolve finer-scale wind speed fluctuationsObserved and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias (Manuscript received 10 December 2007, in final form 8 April 2008) ABSTRACT Climatological surface wind speed

  8. MODELING AND VALIDATION OF A HIGH SPEED ROTARY PWM ON/OFF VALVE Haink C. Tu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    MODELING AND VALIDATION OF A HIGH SPEED ROTARY PWM ON/OFF VALVE Haink C. Tu Center for Compact-speed on/off valves are a critical technology for enabling digital control of hydraulic systems via pulse-width- modulation (PWM). High-speed valves, when used in virtually variable displacement pumps (VVDP), increase

  9. The Accuracy of Radar Estimates of Ice Terminal Fall Speed from Vertically Pointing Doppler Radar Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protat, Alain

    The Accuracy of Radar Estimates of Ice Terminal Fall Speed from Vertically Pointing Doppler Radar and 2835 MHz) are used to characterize the terminal fall speed of hydrometeors and the vertical air motion air velocity in ice clouds is small on average, as is assumed in terminal fall speed retrieval methods

  10. Between-sex Variation in Running Speed and a Potential Cost of Leg Autotomy in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christopher A.

    Between-sex Variation in Running Speed and a Potential Cost of Leg Autotomy in the Wolf Spider of losing a leg is a reduction in burst running speed, which may affect prey capture and predator avoidance differed in either sprint speed or the potential cost of leg loss. Autotomy was fairly common in the field

  11. Period-luminosity and period-luminosity-colour relations for Mira variables at maximum light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Kanbur; M. A. Hendry; D. Clarke

    1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we confirm the existence of period-luminosity (PL) and period-luminosity-colour (PLC) relations at maximum light for O and C Mira variables in the LMC. We demonstrate that in the J and H bands the maximum light PL relations have a significantly smaller dispersion than their counterparts at mean light, while the K band and bolometric PL relations have a dispersion comparable to that at mean light. In the J, H and K bands the fitted PL relations for the O Miras are found to have smaller dispersion than those for the C Miras, at both mean and maximum light, while the converse is true for the relations based on bolometric magnitudes. The inclusion of a non-zero log period term is found to be highly significant in all cases except that of the C Miras in the J band, for which the data are found to be consistent with having constant absolute magnitude. This suggests the possibility of employing C Miras as standard candles. We suggest both a theoretical justification for the existence of Mira PL relations at maximum light and a possible explanation of why these relations should have a smaller dispersion than at mean light. The existence of such maximum light relations offers the possibility of extending the range and improving the accuracy of the Mira distance scale to Galactic globular clusters and to other galaxies.

  12. HFIR Vessel Maximum Permissible Pressures for Operating Period 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Inger, J.R.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending the life of the HFIR pressure vessel from 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW) requires an updated calculation of the maximum permissible pressure for a range in vessel operating temperatures (40-120 F). The maximum permissible pressure is calculated using the equal-potential method, which takes advantage of knowledge gained from periodic hydrostatic proof tests and uses the test conditions (pressure, temperature, and frequency) as input. The maximum permissible pressure decreases with increasing time between hydro tests but is increased each time a test is conducted. The minimum values that occur just prior to a test either increase or decrease with time, depending on the vessel temperature. The minimum value of these minimums is presently specified as the maximum permissible pressure. For three vessel temperatures of particular interest (80, 88, and 110 F) and a nominal time of 3.0 EFPY(100 MVV)between hydro tests, these pressures are 677, 753, and 850 psi. For the lowest temperature of interest (40 F), the maximum permissible pressure is 295 psi.

  13. On the maximum value of the cosmic abundance of oxygen and the oxygen yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan; J. M. Vilchez

    2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for the maximum oxygen abundance in spiral galaxies. Because this maximum value is expected to occur in the centers of the most luminous galaxies, we have constructed the luminosity - central metallicity diagram for spiral galaxies, based on a large compilation of existing data on oxygen abundances of HII regions in spiral galaxies. We found that this diagram shows a plateau at high luminosities (-22.3 oxygen abundance 12+log(O/H) ~ 8.87. This provides strong evidence that the oxygen abundance in the centers of the most luminous metal-rich galaxies reaches the maximum attainable value of oxygen abundance. Since some fraction of the oxygen (about 0.08 dex) is expected to be locked into dust grains, the maximum value of the true gas+dust oxygen abundance in spiral galaxies is 12+log(O/H) ~ 8.95. This value is a factor of ~ 2 higher than the recently estimated solar value. Based on the derived maximum oxygen abundance in galaxies, we found the oxygen yield to be about 0.0035, depending on the fraction of oxygen incorporated into dust grains.

  14. The high-speed after pulse measurement system for PMT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaping Cheng; Sen Qian; Zhe Ning; Jingkai Xia; Wenwen Wang; Yifang Wang; Jun Cao; Xiaoshan Jiang; Zheng Wang; Xiaonan Li; Ming Qi; Yuekun Heng; Shulin Liu; Xiangcui Lei; Zhi Wu

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system employing a desktop FADC has been developed to investigate the features of 8 inches Hamamatsu PMT. The system stands out for its high-speed and informative results as a consequence of adopting fast waveform sampling technology. Recording full waveforms allows us to perform digital signal processing, pulse shape analysis, and precision timing extraction. High precision after pulse time and charge distribution characteristics are presented in this manuscript. Other photomultipliers characteristics, such as dark rate and transit time spread, can also be obtained by exploiting waveform analysis using this system.

  15. Effect of shrink fits on threshold speeds of rotordynamic instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Baz, Khalid A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flexibility ratio k~Y Flexibility ratio k jk? Rotor critical speed on rigid supports (rad/s) Rotor mass (Ib-s /in, kg-s /m) Foundation damping coefficient (lb-s/in, ?/m) Rotor internal damping coefficient (lb-s/in, ?/m) Foundation damping = ci/mq (rad/s...) Rotor internal damping = cq/mq (rad/s) D W E Es Ea? Eah Es Damping ratio = Dz/D~ Weight (lb, N) Young's modulus (lb/in, N/m ) Energy dissipation (lb-in, N-m) Energy dissipation due to viscous damping (lb-in, N-m) Energy dissipation due...

  16. Watercut Measurement Method by Using High Speed Impedance Sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdogan, Burak

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    [3]. The ambivalent range width depends on how the dispersion is produced [6]. Various parameters which affect the phase inversion and ambivalent range have been investigated in an agitated tank by different researchers [2,3,5,6,7,8]. The impeller... size [5,8], tank impeller diameter ratio [5], and density difference of liquids [5,7,8] do 3 not have important effect on the ambivalent range. Ambivalent range narrows by increasing the agitation speed [2, 6]. According to Norato et al...

  17. VERY HIGH-SPEED DRILL STRING COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Pixton

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of a high-speed digital data transmission system for drill pipe is described. Passive transmission of digital data through 1000 ft of telemetry drill pipe has been successfully achieved. Data rates of up to 2 Mbit/sec have been tested through the 1000 ft system with very low occurrence of data errors: required error correction effort is very low or nonexistent. Further design modifications have been made to improve manufacturability and high pressure robustness of the transmission line components. Failure mechanisms of previous designs at high pressure and high temperature are described. Present design limitations include high temperature application.

  18. High speed, long distance, data transmission multiplexing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariotti, Razvan (Boulder, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed serial data transmission multiplexing circuit, which is operable to accurately transmit data over long distances (up to 3 Km), and to multiplex, select and continuously display real time analog signals in a bandwidth from DC to 100 Khz. The circuit is made fault tolerant by use of a programmable flywheel algorithm, which enables the circuit to tolerate one transmission error before losing synchronization of the transmitted frames of data. A method of encoding and framing captured and transmitted data is used which has a low overhead and prevents some particular transmitted data patterns from locking an included detector/decoder circuit.

  19. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority Firm Exchange . .Probing

  20. NREL Invention Speeds Solar Cell Quality Testing for Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate1,StewardshipEnvironmentalNRELInvention Speeds

  1. Spectral Modeling of SNe Ia Near Maximum Light: Probing the Characteristics of Hydro Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Baron; S. Bongard; David Branch; Peter H. Hauschildt

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed detailed NLTE spectral synthesis modeling of 2 types of 1-D hydro models: the very highly parameterized deflagration model W7, and two delayed detonation models. We find that overall both models do about equally well at fitting well observed SNe Ia near to maximum light. However, the Si II 6150 feature of W7 is systematically too fast, whereas for the delayed detonation models it is also somewhat too fast, but significantly better than that of W7. We find that a parameterized mixed model does the best job of reproducing the Si II 6150 line near maximum light and we study the differences in the models that lead to better fits to normal SNe Ia. We discuss what is required of a hydro model to fit the spectra of observed SNe Ia near maximum light.

  2. Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

  3. Extracting maximum petrophysical and geological information from a limited reservoir database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.; Chawathe, A.; Ouenes, A. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of old fields lacking sufficient core and log data is a challenging task. This paper describes a methodology that uses new and conventional tools to build a reliable reservoir model for the Sulimar Queen field. At the fine scale, permeability measured on a fine grid with a minipermeameter was used in conjunction with the petrographic data collected on multiple thin sections. The use of regression analysis and a newly developed fuzzy logic algorithm led to the identification of key petrographic elements which control permeability. At the log scale, old gamma ray logs were first rescaled/calibrated throughout the entire field for consistency and reliability using only four modem logs. Using data from one cored well and the rescaled gamma ray logs, correlations between core porosity, permeability, total water content and gamma ray were developed to complete the small scale characterization. At the reservoir scale, outcrop data and the rescaled gamma logs were used to define the reservoir structure over an area of ten square miles where only 36 wells were available. Given the structure, the rescaled gamma ray logs were used to build the reservoir volume by identifying the flow units and their continuity. Finally, history-matching results constrained to the primary production were used to estimate the dynamic reservoir properties such as relative permeabilities to complete the characterization. The obtained reservoir model was tested by forecasting the waterflood performance and which was in good agreement with the actual performance.

  4. What is the maximum rate at which entropy of a string can increase?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ropotenko, Kostyantyn [State Administration of Communications, Ministry of Transport and Communications of Ukraine 22, Khreschatyk, 01001, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    According to Susskind, a string falling toward a black hole spreads exponentially over the stretched horizon due to repulsive interactions of the string bits. In this paper such a string is modeled as a self-avoiding walk and the string entropy is found. It is shown that the rate at which information/entropy contained in the string spreads is the maximum rate allowed by quantum theory. The maximum rate at which the black hole entropy can increase when a string falls into a black hole is also discussed.

  5. Hydrodynamic Relaxation of an Electron Plasma to a Near-Maximum Entropy State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, D. J.; Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Mitchell, T. B.; Aziz, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Montgomery, D. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical relaxation of a pure electron plasma in a Malmberg-Penning trap is studied, comparing experiments, numerical simulations and statistical theories of weakly dissipative two-dimensional (2D) turbulence. Simulations confirm that the dynamics are approximated well by a 2D hydrodynamic model. Statistical analysis favors a theoretical picture of relaxation to a near-maximum entropy state with constrained energy, circulation, and angular momentum. This provides evidence that 2D electron fluid relaxation in a turbulent regime is governed by principles of maximum entropy.

  6. Maximum-Entropy Closures for Kinetic Theories of Neuronal Network Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangan, Aaditya V.; Cai, David [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze (1+1)D kinetic equations for neuronal network dynamics, which are derived via an intuitive closure from a Boltzmann-like equation governing the evolution of a one-particle (i.e., one-neuron) probability density function. We demonstrate that this intuitive closure is a generalization of moment closures based on the maximum-entropy principle. By invoking maximum-entropy closures, we show how to systematically extend this kinetic theory to obtain higher-order (1+1)D kinetic equations and to include coupled networks of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

  7. Maximum Entropy Models of Shortest Path and Outbreak Distributions in Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauckhage, Christian; Hadiji, Fabian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of networks are often characterized in terms of features such as node degree distributions, average path lengths, diameters, or clustering coefficients. Here, we study shortest path length distributions. On the one hand, average as well as maximum distances can be determined therefrom; on the other hand, they are closely related to the dynamics of network spreading processes. Because of the combinatorial nature of networks, we apply maximum entropy arguments to derive a general, physically plausible model. In particular, we establish the generalized Gamma distribution as a continuous characterization of shortest path length histograms of networks or arbitrary topology. Experimental evaluations corroborate our theoretical results.

  8. High-speed micro-electro-discharge machining.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandrasekar, Srinivasan Dr. (.School of Industrial Engineering, West Lafayette, IN); Moylan, Shawn P. (School of Industrial Engineering, West Lafayette, IN); Benavides, Gilbert Lawrence

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When two electrodes are in close proximity in a dielectric liquid, application of a voltage pulse can produce a spark discharge between them, resulting in a small amount of material removal from both electrodes. Pulsed application of the voltage at discharge energies in the range of micro-Joules results in the continuous material removal process known as micro-electro-discharge machining (micro-EDM). Spark erosion by micro-EDM provides significant opportunities for producing small features and micro-components such as nozzle holes, slots, shafts and gears in virtually any conductive material. If the speed and precision of micro-EDM processes can be significantly enhanced, then they have the potential to be used for a wide variety of micro-machining applications including fabrication of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) components. Toward this end, a better understanding of the impacts the various machining parameters have on material removal has been established through a single discharge study of micro-EDM and a parametric study of small hole making by micro-EDM. The main avenues for improving the speed and efficiency of the micro-EDM process are in the areas of more controlled pulse generation in the power supply and more controlled positioning of the tool electrode during the machining process. Further investigation of the micro-EDM process in three dimensions leads to important design rules, specifically the smallest feature size attainable by the process.

  9. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolie, Victor W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  10. Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

  11. Effects of turbulence on power generation for variable-speed wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary advantages of variable-speed wind turbines over fixed-speed turbines should be improved aerodynamic efficiency. With variable-speed generation, in order to maintain a constant ratio of wind speed to tip speed, the wind turbine changes rotor speed as the wind speed changes. In this paper we compare a stall-controlled, variable-speed wind turbine to a fixed-speed turbine. The focus of this paper is to investigate the effects of variable speed on energy capture and its ability to control peak power. We also show the impact of turbulence on energy capture in moderate winds. In this report, we use a dynamic simulator to apply different winds to a wind turbine model. This model incorporates typical inertial and aerodynamic performance characteristics. From this study we found a control strategy that makes it possible to operate a stall-controlled turbine using variable speed to optimize energy capture and to control peak power. We also found that turbulence does not have a significant impact on energy capture.

  12. Advanced Ultra-High Speed Motor for Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Impact Technologies LLC; University of Texas at Arlington

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three (3) designs have been made for two sizes, 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) and 4.29 cm (1.69 inch) outer diameters, of a patented inverted configured Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines (PMSM) electric motor specifically for drilling at ultra-high rotational speeds (10,000 rpm) and that can utilize advanced drilling methods. Benefits of these motors are stackable power sections, full control (speed and direction) of downhole motors, flow hydraulics independent of motor operation, application of advanced drilling methods (water jetting and abrasive slurry jetting), and the ability of signal/power electric wires through motor(s). Key features of the final designed motors are: fixed non-rotating shaft with stator coils attached; rotating housing with permanent magnet (PM) rotor attached; bit attached to rotating housing; internal channel(s) in a nonrotating shaft; electric components that are hydrostatically isolated from high internal pressure circulating fluids ('muds') by static metal to metal seals; liquid filled motor with smoothed features for minimized turbulence in the motor during operation; and new inverted coated metal-metal hydrodynamic bearings and seals. PMSM, Induction and Switched Reluctance Machines (SRM), all pulse modulated, were considered, but PMSM were determined to provide the highest power density for the shortest motors. Both radial and axial electric PMSM driven motors were designed with axial designs deemed more rugged for ultra-high speed, drilling applications. The 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) OD axial inverted motor can generate 4.18KW (5.61 Hp) power at 10,000 rpm with a 4 Nm (2.95 ft-lbs) of torque for every 30.48 cm (12 inches) of power section. The 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) OD radial inverted motor can generate 5.03 KW (6.74 Hp) with 4.8 Nm (3.54 ft-lb) torque at 10,000 rpm for every 30.48 cm (12 inches) of power section. The 4.29 cm (1.69 inch) OD radial inverted motor can generate 2.56 KW (3.43 Hp) power with 2.44 Nm (1.8 ft-lb) torque at full speed 10,000 rpm for every 30.48 cm (12 inches) of power section. Operating conditions are 300 voltage AC at the motor leads. Power voltage losses in the cables/wirelines to the motor(s) are expected to be about 10% for 5000 feet carrying 2 amperes. Higher voltages and better insulators can lower these losses and carry more amperes. Cutting elements for such high tip velocities are currently not available, consequently these motors will not be built at this time. However, 7.62 cm (3 inch) OD, low speed, PMSM radial electric motors based on this project design are being built under a 2006 Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology 'proof of concept' grant.

  13. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  14. Analysis and Optimization of Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odam, Kofi

    , Charles R. Sullivan, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper analyzes the effect of noise on sev- eral maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms for photovoltaic systems. Noise is an essential of the signals, mitigating the noise. The effect of noise and other parameters on tracking performance

  15. Maximum Output Amplitude of Linear Systems for certain Input Constraints1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    of this input and calculates the maximum amplitude of the output. The solution of this problem is a necessary, Linear Sys- tems. 1 Introduction and Motivation Most practical control problems are dominated by hard bounds. Valves can only be operated between fully open and fully closed, pumps and compressors have

  16. Blind Equalization via Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Seungjin CHOI x1 and Andrzej CICHOCKI y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Seungjin

    Blind Equalization via Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Separation Seungjin CHOI x1, RIKEN 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi Saitama 351-0198, JAPAN Abstract Blind equalization of single input multiple output (SIMO) FIR channels can be refor- mulated as the problem of blind source separation

  17. Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison of time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 5 King's College induced in light-absorbing materials can be observed either as a transient signal in time domain

  18. Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part I: Maximum Solar Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Jerry Y.

    Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part I: Maximum Solar Heating CHRISTOPHER M. HARTMAN AND JERRY Y. HARRINGTON Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania November 2004) ABSTRACT The effects of solar heating and infrared cooling on the vapor depositional growth

  19. Maximum principle and bang-bang property of time optimal controls for Schrodinger type systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Maximum principle and bang-bang property of time optimal controls for Schr¨odinger type systems J conditions for the bang- bang property of optimal controls. The results are then applied to some systems-Bang property, Schr¨odinger equation 1 Introduction Time optimal control is a classical problem for linear

  20. Recursive maximum likelihood estimation for structural health monitoring: Kalman and particle filter implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recursive maximum likelihood estimation for structural health monitoring: Kalman and particle by a likelihood approach. In a first part the structural health monitoring problem is written in term of recursive al [6] in a more simple framework. Particle approximation for health monitoring was already proposed