Sample records for mile hole area

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Standard X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analyses were used in the...

  2. Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScottsOklahoma: EnergySeoulSettlers Hill

  3. Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir JumpCaliforniaGroup LLCSettler's TrailSeven

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity...

  5. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 -...

  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

  8. Entropy and Area of Black Holes in Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple arguments related to the entropy of black holes strongly constrain the spectrum of the area operator for a Schwarzschild black hole in loop quantum gravity. In particular, this spectrum is fixed completely by the assumption that the black hole entropy is maximum. Within the approach discussed, one arrives in loop quantum gravity at a quantization rule with integer quantum numbers $n$ for the entropy and area of a black hole.

  9. Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zacharakis, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zacharakis,...

  10. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Ross, 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  11. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1991 - 1991 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1978 - 1985 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  13. Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008) Exploration...

  14. Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BVEnergy Information

  15. Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIremNot2007) | Open EnergyOpenEnergyEnergy

  16. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) | Open(Thompson,2006) | Open2009) | Open

  17. Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy ResourcesRock Lab|

  18. Statistics of black hole radiance and the horizon area spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekenstein, Jacob D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistical response of a Kerr black hole to incoming quantum radiation has heretofore been studied by the methods of maximum entropy or quantum field theory in curved spacetime. Neither approach pretends to take into account the quantum structure of the black hole itself. To address this last issue we calculate here the conditional probability distribution associated with the hole's response by assuming that the horizon area has a discrete quantum spectrum, and that its quantum evolution corresponds to jumps between adjacent area eigenvalues, possibly occurring in series, with consequent emission or absorption of quanta, possibly in the same mode. This "atomic" model of the black hole is implemented in two different ways and recovers the previously calculated radiation statistics in both cases. The corresponding conditional probably distribution is here expressed in closed form in terms of an hypergeometric function.

  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area...

  20. Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300...

  1. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of core holes were drilled from 1984 to 1988 as a part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) to better understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal...

  2. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of core holes were drilled from 1984 to 1988 as a part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) to better understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal...

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (1993) Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThermalGr...

  4. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith, D. Wilson (1989) Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico:...

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Arnold...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Known shallow hot spot in Animas Valley Notes Four thermal gradient holes were authorized to be drilled by AMEX, but no results were...

  6. Slim Holes At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2OpenMaui

  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Edmunds...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the North Brawley, Heber, East Mesa, and Salton Sea Geothermal Areas. Notes Well logs, thermal gradient data, and magnetic data were correlated to form a better geologic...

  8. Slim Holes At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2 slimArea

  9. Slim Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim HolesNewberry Caldera Area (DOE

  10. Slim Holes At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim HolesNewberry Caldera Area

  11. Graphene oxide hole transport layers for large area, high efficiency organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Chris T. G.; Rhodes, Rhys W.; Beliatis, Michail J.; Imalka Jayawardena, K. D. G.; Rozanski, Lynn J.; Mills, Christopher A.; Silva, S. Ravi P., E-mail: s.silva@surrey.ac.uk [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene oxide (GO) is becoming increasingly popular for organic electronic applications. We present large active area (0.64?cm{sup 2}), solution processable, poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1, 3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl]:[6,6]-Phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PC{sub 70}BM) organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells, incorporating GO hole transport layers (HTL). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of ?5% is the highest reported for OPV using this architecture. A comparative study of solution-processable devices has been undertaken to benchmark GO OPV performance with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HTL devices, confirming the viability of GO devices, with comparable PCEs, suitable as high chemical and thermal stability replacements for PEDOT:PSS in OPV.

  12. Curriculum Vitae: Albie Felix Miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    pest management; biological control; food systems and sustainability; introduction to environmental science; nature and properties of soils; soil ecology; integrated soil fertility management; researchCurriculum Vitae: Albie Felix Miles Ph.D. Candidate Environmental Science, Policy and Management

  13. Trace-element geochemistry of gradient hole cuttings: Beowawe geothermal area, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, O.D.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from 26 shallow temperature-gradient drill holes and of surface rock samples reveals trace element distributions developed within these rocks as a consequence of chemical interaction with thermal fluid within the Beowawe geothermal area. The presently discharging thermal fluids are dilute in all components except silica, suggesting that the residence time of these fluids within the thermal reservoir has been short and that chemical interaction with the reservoir rock minimal. Interaction between these dilute fluids and rocks within the system has resulted in the development of weak chemical signatures. The absence of stronger signatures in rocks associated with the present system suggests that fluids have had a similar dilute chemistry for some time. The spatial distribution of elements commonly associated with geothermal systems, such as As, Hg and Li, and neither laterally nor vertically continuous. This suggests that there is not now, nor has there been in the past, pervasive movement of thermal fluid throughout the sampled rock but, instead, that isolated chemical anomalies represent distinct fluid-flow chanels. Discontinuous As, Li and Hg concentrations near White Canyon to the east of the presently active surface features record the effects of chemical interaction of rocks with fluids chemically unlike the presently discharging fluids. The observed trace element distributions suggest that historically the Beowawe area has been the center of more than one hydrothermal event and that the near-surface portion of the present hot-water geothermal system is controlled by a single source fracture, the Malpais Fault, or an intersection of faults at the sinter terrace.

  14. A note on Maxwell's equal area law for black hole phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan-Quan Lan; Jie-Xiong Mo; Wen-Biao Liu

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The state equation of the charged AdS black hole is reviewed in the $T-r$ plane. Thinking of the phase transition, the $T-S$, $P-V$, $P-\

  15. Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2 slim holes

  16. Slim Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness

  17. Slim Holes At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes Activity Date

  18. Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes Activity

  19. Slim Holes At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2 slim

  20. Slim Holes At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2

  1. Slim Holes At International Geothermal Area, Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2Open Energy

  2. Slim Holes At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2Open

  3. Slim Holes At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes

  4. Slim Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes

  5. Slim Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim HolesNewberry Caldera Areawell

  6. Slim Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim HolesNewberry

  7. Slim Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim HolesNewberryEnergy

  8. Slim Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim HolesNewberryEnergyEnergy

  9. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  10. HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (Fabrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fahrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fabrikant,

  11. HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than 10 miles from the nuclear plant at any time during thewithin 10 miles of the nuclear plant is about 51 of thewithin 50 miles of the nuclear plant is less than 1% of the

  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy) data wentOpenAlum Area

  13. Core Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, Et Al.,EtOpen

  14. Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, Et

  15. Core Holes At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Bargar, Et Al., 1995) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, EtOpen Energy

  16. Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, EtOpen

  17. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Chu, Et Al., 1990) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, EtOpenOpen

  18. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, EtOpenOpen1988)

  19. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Urban, Et Al., 1987) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong,

  20. Core Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong,Energy

  1. T:\\P roj ects\\CEC \\NG_ Utility S ervice T erri tories\\ Web m aps\\NG S ervice Area_W eb _ A siz e.m xd 0 50 10025 Miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Service Areas Service Area LONG BEACH GAS & OIL NO SERVICE OUTSIDE OF CALIFORNIA SERVICE CITY^_ PG&E SCG Southwest Gas Southwest Gas SDG&E City of Susanville City of Palo Alto Long Beach Gas & Oil City of Vernon Southwest Gas Sacramento Tuscarora T:\\P roj ects\\CEC \\NG_ Utility S ervice T erri

  2. Mile High: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Mile High Equipment, LLC finding that Ice-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  3. Finance Division EXTRA MILE AWARD PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Finance Division EXTRA MILE AWARD PROGRAM Nomination Form Instructions Any fulltime or parttime permanent or temporary SPA employee within the Finance Division who works 20 or more provided. The seven major departments within the Finance Division to choose from are described below

  4. Estimating Vehicle Miles Traveled on Local Roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiayu

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents a new method to estimate the local road vehicle miles traveled (VMT) with the concept of betweenness centrality. Betweenness centrality is a measure of a nodes or links centrality on a network that has been applied popularly...

  5. Slant hole completion test (1991) sidetrack ``as built`` report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1990, a slant hole test well, funded by the US Department of Energy, was drilled to 9,466 ft to evaluate the effectiveness of directional drilling in the tight, naturally fractured gas sands and coals of the Mesaverde Group. The surface location of the SHCT No. 1 is 700 ft south of the DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site in Section 34, T6S, R94W, Garfield County, Colorado, approximately 7.5 miles west of Rifle. Mechanical problems following cementing of a production liner resulted in loss of the completion interval, and operations were suspended. In early 1991, DOE decided to sidetrack the hole to permit production testing of the lost interval. The sidetrack was designed to parallel the original wellbore, but to be drilled 1,000 ft to the east to minimize the chances of encountering formation damage from the original hole. The sidetrack, like the original hole, was to intersect the paludal lenticular sands and coals at 60{degrees} and to penetrate the underlying Cozzette sand horizonally. The sidetrack was spudded May 12, 1991. After re-entering the well in late 1991, early production testing of the Cozzette showed that the 300 ft of in-pay horizontal hole can produce at rate 5 to 10 times higher than vertical wells in the same area. This report contains the geological summary and sidetrack drilling operations summary.

  6. Slant hole completion test (1991) sidetrack as built'' report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1990, a slant hole test well, funded by the US Department of Energy, was drilled to 9,466 ft to evaluate the effectiveness of directional drilling in the tight, naturally fractured gas sands and coals of the Mesaverde Group. The surface location of the SHCT No. 1 is 700 ft south of the DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site in Section 34, T6S, R94W, Garfield County, Colorado, approximately 7.5 miles west of Rifle. Mechanical problems following cementing of a production liner resulted in loss of the completion interval, and operations were suspended. In early 1991, DOE decided to sidetrack the hole to permit production testing of the lost interval. The sidetrack was designed to parallel the original wellbore, but to be drilled 1,000 ft to the east to minimize the chances of encountering formation damage from the original hole. The sidetrack, like the original hole, was to intersect the paludal lenticular sands and coals at 60{degrees} and to penetrate the underlying Cozzette sand horizonally. The sidetrack was spudded May 12, 1991. After re-entering the well in late 1991, early production testing of the Cozzette showed that the 300 ft of in-pay horizontal hole can produce at rate 5 to 10 times higher than vertical wells in the same area. This report contains the geological summary and sidetrack drilling operations summary.

  7. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fact 860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Fact 860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the...

  8. Place Last Name First Name Gender Age Category Swim Lengths Swim Distance Bike Distance Run Distance Overall Distance 1 Happe Andy M 18-24 91.00 lengths 1.379 miles 16.200 miles 4.360 miles 21.939 miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Distance Overall Distance 1 Happe Andy M 18-24 91.00 lengths 1.379 miles 16.200 miles 4.360 miles 21.939 miles 2 Blazek Joseph M 18-24 72.00 lengths 1.091 miles 15.500 miles 3.760 miles 20.351 miles 3 Neuharth Jarrod M 18-24 48.00 lengths 0.727 miles 15.700 miles 3.150 miles 19.577 miles 4 Johnson Gabriel M 18

  9. Place Last Name First Name Gender Age Category Swim Lengths Swim Distance Bike Distance Run Distance Overall Distance 1 Guenter Jim M 40-49 92.00 lengths 1.394 miles 17.300 miles 4.360 miles 23.054 miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Distance Overall Distance 1 Guenter Jim M 40-49 92.00 lengths 1.394 miles 17.300 miles 4.360 miles 23 M 18-24 91.00 lengths 1.379 miles 16.200 miles 4.360 miles 21.939 miles 4 Gabrielsen Susanne F 25.00 lengths 0.894 miles 16.700 miles 3.770 miles 21.364 miles 6 Porter Paul M 50+ 53.00 lengths 0.803 miles 16

  10. ERRATA SHEET for ''Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. B. Prothro; S. L. Drellack, Jr.; B. M. Allen

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conversion error has been discovered in the physical property data table for Emplacement Hole U-19bg (Supplemental Data) presented on Page 89. Data in the column labeled ''Bulk Density (g/cc)'' are actually presented in pounds per cubic foot rather than grams per cubic centimeter. The following table presents the bulk density values for U-19bg in pounds per cubic foot and grams per cubic centimeter.

  11. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  12. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  13. EIS-0025: Miles City-New Underwood 230-kV Electrical Transmission Line, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energys Western Area Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposed action to construct a 3.28-mile, 230-kV transmission line between Miles City and Baker, Montana , Hettinger, North Dakota , and New Underwood , South Dakota , in Custer and Fallon Counties in Montana, Adams , Bowman , and Slope Counties in North Dakota and Meade, Pennington, and Perkins Counties in South Dakota.

  14. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayPeachThree Mile

  15. Miles Electric Vehicles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickeyDelaware:Midwest, Wyoming:MilamMiles

  16. Three Mile Canyon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoulOaks,Mile Canyon Jump to:

  17. Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

  18. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  19. NASA Green Flight Challenge: Conceptual Design Approaches and Technologies to Enable 200 Passenger Miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Miles per Gallon Douglas P. Wells* NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 The Green 50 passenger-miles per gallon and this competition will push teams to greater than 200 passenger-miles per gallon. The aircraft must also fly at least 100 miles per hour for 200 miles. The total prize

  20. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline The prices of gasoline and diesel fuel affect the transportation sector in many...

  1. Odometer Versus Self-Reported Estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings described here compare odometer readings with self-reported estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) to investigate to what extent self-reported VMT is a reliable surrogate for odometer-based VMT.

  2. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with...

  3. Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. K. Townsend

    1997-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lecture notes for a 'Part III' course 'Black Holes' given in DAMTP, Cambridge. The course covers some of the developments in Black Hole physics of the 1960s and 1970s.

  4. Taking the tire the final mile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, G.A. [Scott County Health Dept., Davenport, IA (United States); Wuestenberg, T.; Hall, J.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990 the Scott County Health Department formed a local Waste Tire Task Force to address the growing problem of illegally dumped tires in Scott County, Iowa. Strategies developed by the task force included providing convenient, low cost disposal; increasing public awareness; and promoting participation in recycling efforts. The task force has held several free waste tire collections, including Waste Tire Amnesty Days and an Earth Week event. At the recommendation of the task force, regular tire disposal fees at the Scott County Landfill, operated by the Scott Area Solid Waste Management Commission, were also reduced. Through the task force efforts, 107,000 waste tires, including several stockpiles, have been recovered in Scott County. Many were recycled, some at a local cement plant, which used them as fuel for a test burn. Complaints to the health department regarding accumulations of waste tires have decreased. The commitment to managing waste tires in Scott County is ongoing; the most recent free, tire disposal day was held in May 1994.

  5. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  6. Wireless Network Interface Energy Conservation for Bottlenecked First Mile Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Surendar

    user using the limited upstream capacity of the home broad- band link. We analyze the behavior of two- posed by this behavior on a client side energy saving mechanism. We also describe techniques that allowWireless Network Interface Energy Conservation for Bottlenecked First Mile Networks Surendar

  7. Equity Evaluation of Vehicle Miles Traveled Fees in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Lisa Kay

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the infrastructure but the money needed to maintain and improve roadways is not being adequately generated. One proposed alternative to the gas tax is the creation of a vehicle miles traveled (VMT) fee; with equity being a crucial issue to consider. This research...

  8. Equity Evaluation of Vehicle Miles Traveled Fees in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Lisa Kay

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the infrastructure but the money needed to maintain and improve roadways is not being adequately generated. One proposed alternative to the gas tax is the creation of a vehicle miles traveled (VMT) fee; with equity being a crucial issue to consider. This research...

  9. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  10. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  11. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  12. Absorption cross section in Lifshitz black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taeyoon Moon; Yun Soo Myung

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the absorption cross section of a minimally coupled scalar in the Lifshitz black hole obtained from the new massive gravity. The absorption cross section reduces to the horizon area in the low energy and massless limit of s-wave mode propagation, indicating that the Lifshitz black hole also satisfies the universality of low energy absorption cross section for black holes.

  13. Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japans Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

  14. 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    00,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) Presentation given at DEER...

  15. Boise State University Automobile Use Mileage Log (Documentation for Business Miles)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Boise State University Automobile Use Mileage Log (Documentation for Business Miles) Rev. 03 University Automobile Use Mileage Log (Documentation for Business Miles) Rev. 03/10 PAGE ____ (IF YOU NEED

  16. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (MillionNine Mile Point Nuclear

  17. Artificial ozone holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Dolya

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This article considers an opportunity of disinfecting a part of the Earth surface, occupying a large area of ten thousand square kilometers. The sunlight will cause dissociation of molecular bromine into atoms; each bromine atom kills thirty thousand molecules of ozone. Each bromine plate has a mass of forty milligrams grams and destroys ozone in the area of hundred square meters. Thus, to form the ozone hole over the area of ten thousand square kilometers, it is required to have the total mass of bromine equal to the following four tons.

  18. Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

  19. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert.

  20. Seven Mile, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScottsOklahoma: EnergySeoulSettlers HillMile, Ohio:

  1. Results of the radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York (TNY002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Uziel, M.S.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in November 1991 and May 1996. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been transported into the creek. The survey included a surface gamma scan in accessible areas near the creek and the collection of soil, sediment, and core samples for radionuclide analyses. Survey results indicate that no significant material originating at the Linde plant is presently in the creek. Three of the 1991 soil sample locations on the creek bank and one near the lake contained slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U with radionuclide distributions similar to that found in materials resulting from former processing activities at the Linde site.

  2. Mitigation of light rail transit construction on jurisdictional areas in the White Rock Creek floodplain, Dallas, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieffer, Emily; Smiley, Jerry

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AREAS IN THE WHITE ROCK CREEK FLOODPLAIN, DALLAS, TEXAS1.2-miles of the White Rock Creek floodplain near theconfluence of three creeks and adjacent to approximately

  3. Entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanwi Ghosh; Soumitra SenGupta

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using brick wall method the entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole is determined for both asymptotically flat and non-flat cases. The entropy turns out to be proportional to the horizon area of the black hole confirming the Beckenstien, Hawking area-entropy formula for black holes. The leading order logarithmic corrections to the entropy are also derived for such black holes.

  4. Quantum black hole inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Altaie

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we follow a new approach for particle creation by a localized strong gravitational field. The approach is based on a definition of the physical vacuum drawn from Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Using the fact that the gravitational field red-shifts the frequency modes of the vacuum, a condition on the minimum stregth of the gravitational field required to achieve real particle creation is derived. Application of this requirement on a Schwartzchid black hole resulted in deducing an upper limit on the region, outside the event horizon, where real particles can be created. Using this regional upper limit, and considering particle creation by black holes as a consequence of the Casimir effect, with the assumption that the created quanta are to be added to the initial energy, we deduce a natural power law for the development of the event horizon, and consequently a logarithmic law for the area spectrum of an inflating black hole. Application of the results on a cosmological model shows that if we start with a Planck-dimensional black hole, then through the process of particle creation we end up with a universe having the presently estimated critical density. Such a universe will be in a state of eternal inflation.

  5. Accident at Three Mile Island: the human dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sills, D.L.; Wolf, C.P.; Shelanski, V.B. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 19 chapters, divided according to the following Parts: (1) Public Perceptions of Nuclear Energy; (2) Local Responses to Nuclear Plants; (3) Institutional Responsibilities for Nuclear Energy; (4) The Interaction of Social and Technical Systems; and (5) Implications for Public Policy. All of the abstracts will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); three will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). At the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (the Kemeny Commission), the Social Science Research Council commissioned social scientists to write a series of papers on the human dimensions of the event. This volume includes those papers, in revised and expanded form, and a comprehensive bibliography of published and unpublished social science research on the accident and its aftermath.

  6. Notices 20 Miles Northwest of Rapid City SD Rapid City SD 57702

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notices 20 Miles Northwest of Rapid City SD Rapid City SD 57702 Landholding Agency: Agriculture Property Number: 15201410016 Status: Excess Comments: off-site removal only; 55 sq....

  7. Black Hole Interior Mass Formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue by explicit computations that, although the area product, horizon radii product, entropy product and \\emph {irreducible mass product} of the event horizon and Cauchy horizon are universal, the \\emph{surface gravity product}, \\emph{surface temperature product} and \\emph{Komar energy product} of the said horizons do not seem to be universal for Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole space-time. We show the black hole mass formula on the \\emph{Cauchy horizon} following the seminal work by Smarr\\cite{smarr} for the outer horizon. We also prescribed the \\emph{four} laws of black hole mechanics for the \\emph{inner horizon}. New definition of the extremal limit of a black hole is discussed.

  8. area southern gangdese: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    179 TEXAS 1 VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS CiteSeer Summary: Texas Panhandle cover an area of approximately 50,000 square miles. That portion lying south...

  9. amacuzac area southern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    178 TEXAS 1 VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS CiteSeer Summary: Texas Panhandle cover an area of approximately 50,000 square miles. That portion lying south...

  10. area southern ribeira: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    180 TEXAS 1 VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS CiteSeer Summary: Texas Panhandle cover an area of approximately 50,000 square miles. That portion lying south...

  11. area south eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  12. area south china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  13. Shape of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Mara E Gabach

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that celestial bodies tend to be spherical due to gravity and that rotation produces deviations from this sphericity. We discuss what is known and expected about the shape of black holes' horizons from their formation to their final, stationary state. We present some recent results showing that black hole rotation indeed manifests in the widening of their central regions, limits their global shapes and enforces their whole geometry to be close to the extreme Kerr horizon geometry at almost maximal rotation speed. The results depend only on the horizon area and angular momentum. In particular they are entirely independent of the surrounding geometry of the spacetime and of the presence of matter satisfying the strong energy condition. We also discuss the the relation of this result with the Hoop conjecture.

  14. Coronal Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are establish...

  15. RHIC | Black Holes?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in...

  16. 51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

  17. Rotordynamic evaluation of frequency dependent impedances of hole-pattern gas damper seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Christopher George

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hole-pattern seals are compared with one smooth bore seal. The two hole-pattern seals have cell depths of 2.03 mm and 3.18 mm with a cell diameter of 1.59 mm. The hole area density factor for both hole-pattern seals is 43%. The L/D ratio...

  18. Regulations for Gas Transmission Lines Less than Ten Miles Long (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any person who wishes to construct a gas transmission line that is less than ten miles long must file documents describing the construction plans and potential land use and environmental impacts of...

  19. Autonomous personal vehicle for the first- and last-mile transportation services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Z. J.

    This paper describes an autonomous vehicle testbed that aims at providing the first- and last- mile transportation services. The vehicle mainly operates in a crowded urban environment whose features can be extracted a ...

  20. EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Z d ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES, AND THOMAS WARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Z d ­ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES spaces was proposed by Boyle and Lind in terms of expansive behavior along lower­dimensional subspaces

  1. EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES, AND THOMAS WARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES spaces was proposed by Boyle and Lind in terms of expansive behavior along lower-dimensional subspaces

  2. Regulations for Electric Transmission and Fuel Gas Transmission Lines Ten or More Miles Long (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any person who wishes to construct an electric or gas transmission line that is more than ten miles long must file documents describing the construction plans and potential land use and...

  3. Topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Ronggen [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China) and Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao Liming [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ohta, Nobuyoshi [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We find topological (charged) black holes whose horizon has an arbitrary constant scalar curvature 2k in Horava-Lifshitz theory. Without loss of generality, one may take k=1, 0, and -1. The black hole solution is asymptotically anti-de Sitter with a nonstandard asymptotic behavior. Using the Hamiltonian approach, we define a finite mass associated with the solution. We discuss the thermodynamics of the topological black holes and find that the black hole entropy has a logarithmic term in addition to an area term. We find a duality in Hawking temperature between topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory and Einstein's general relativity: the temperature behaviors of black holes with k=1, 0, and -1 in Horava-Lifshitz theory are, respectively, dual to those of topological black holes with k=-1, 0, and 1 in Einstein's general relativity. The topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory are thermodynamically stable.

  4. Tables of co-located geothermal-resource sites and BLM Wilderness Study Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, D.; Dorscher, M.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matched pairs of known geothermal wells and springs with BLM proposed Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) were identified by inspection of WSA and Geothermal resource maps for the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. A total of 3952 matches, for geothermal sites within 25 miles of a WSA, were identified. Of these, only 71 (1.8%) of the geothermal sites are within one mile of a WSA, and only an additional 100 (2.5%) are within one to three miles. Approximately three-fourths of the matches are at distances greater than ten miles. Only 12 of the geothermal sites within one mile of a WSA have surface temperatures reported above 50/sup 0/C. It thus appears that the geothermal potential of WSAs overall is minimal, but that evaluation of geothermal resources should be considered in more detail for some areas prior to their designation as Wilderness.

  5. Strings, black holes, and quantum information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We find multiple relations between extremal black holes in string theory and 2- and 3-qubit systems in quantum information theory. We show that the entropy of the axion-dilaton extremal black hole is related to the concurrence of a 2-qubit state, whereas the entropy of the STU black holes, Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) as well as non-BPS, is related to the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state. We relate the 3-qubit states with the string theory states with some number of D-branes. We identify a set of large black holes with the maximally entangled Greenberger, Horne, Zeilinger (GHZ) class of states and small black holes with separable, bipartite, and W states. We sort out the relation between 3-qubit states, twistors, octonions, and black holes. We give a simple expression for the entropy and the area of stretched horizon of small black holes in terms of a norm and 2-tangles of a 3-qubit system. Finally, we show that the most general expression for the black hole and black ring entropy in N=8 supergravity/M theory, which is given by the famous quartic Cartan E{sub 7(7)} invariant, can be reduced to Cayley's hyperdeterminant describing the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state.

  6. www.coe.ttu.edu 50-200 miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    % Petroleum Engineering 14% the whitacre college of engineering is one of the wall Street Journal's "top 25 and private companies, nonprofit organizations and federal agencies. The Wall Street Journal list identifies--areas that are growing, pay well and offer high levels of satisfaction. wall Street Journal Ranks texas tech in top 25

  7. Spectroscopy of the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deyou Chen; Haitang Yang

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropy spectrum of a spherically symmetric black hole was derived via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule in Majhi and Vagenas's work. Extending this work to charged and rotating black holes, we quantize the horizon area and the entropy of an Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion (EMDA) black hole via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule and the adiabatic invariance. The result shows the area spectrum and the entropy spectrum are respectively equally spaced and independent on the parameters of the black hole.

  8. Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

  9. Towards Black Hole Entropy in Shape Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Herczeg; Vasudev Shyam

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape dynamics is classical theory of gravity which agrees with general relativity in many important cases, but possesses different gauge symmetries and constraints. Rather than spacetime diffeomorphism invariance, shape dynamics takes spatial diffeomorphism invariance and spatial Weyl invariance as the fundamental gauge symmetries associated with the gravitational field. Since the area of the event horizon of a black hole transforms under a generic spatial Weyl transformation, there has been some doubt that one can speak sensibly about the thermodynamics of black holes in shape dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to show that by treating the event horizon of a black hole as an interior boundary, one can recover familiar notions of black hole thermodynamics in shape dynamics and define a gauge invariant entropy that agrees with general relativity.

  10. Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus for Breaking News: Is there a winner? Miles Osborne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Miles

    Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus for Breaking News: Is there a winner? Miles Osborne School Media have be- gun to carry news. Here we examine how Facebook, Google Plus and Twitter report Facebook or Google Plus. Face- book and Google Plus largely repost newswire stories and their main research

  11. Parallelising the dual revised simplex method Julian Hall1 Qi Huangfu2 Miles Lubin3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Parallelising the dual revised simplex method Julian Hall1 Qi Huangfu2 Miles Lubin3 1School Parallelising the dual revised simplex method: Overview Background Three approaches Multiple iteration Conclusions Julian Hall Parallelising the dual revised simplex method 2 / 42 Linear programming (LP) minimize

  12. TTrraavveell GGuuiiddee 1. Student Affairs REQUIRES overnight lodging when driving an Avis vehicle over 500 miles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    TTrraavveell GGuuiiddee 1. Student Affairs REQUIRES overnight lodging when driving an Avis vehicle over 500 miles. 2. Avis car rental (state contract) The vehicle is automatically covered under.) This will negate the contract and insurance coverage. You must use a compact car unless a different vehicle

  13. The Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is home to a two-mile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    -program laboratory for photon science, astrophysics, and accelerator and particle physics research. Six scientists promises to be just as extraordinary. #12;Accelerator Physics Particle accelerators are the working engines#12;The Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is home to a two-mile linear accelerator

  14. Crisis contained, The Department of Energy at Three Mile Island: a history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantelon, P L; Williams, R C

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An account is given of the response of US DOE to the Three Mile Island-2 accident on March 28, 1979. The accident is treated as though it was a military battle. A synoptic chronologgy of the accident events and of DOE and other responses is included. (DLC)

  15. Black hole entropy with and without log correction in loop quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mitra

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Earlier calculations of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity have given a term proportional to the area with a correction involving the logarithm of the area when the area eigenvalue is close to the classical area. However the calculations yield an entropy proportional to the area eigenvalue with no such correction when the area eigenvalue is large compared to the classical area.

  16. Dynamics of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review of current theory of black-hole dynamics, concentrating on the framework in terms of trapping horizons. Summaries are given of the history, the classical theory of black holes, the defining ideas of dynamical black holes, the basic laws, conservation laws for energy and angular momentum, other physical quantities and the limit of local equilibrium. Some new material concerns how processes such as black-hole evaporation and coalescence might be described by a single trapping horizon which manifests temporally as separate horizons.

  17. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR); Liberman, Vladimir (Needham, MA); Morse, Jeffrey (Martinez, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  18. Quantum Geometry and Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G., J Fernando Barbero

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overall picture of the advances in the description of black hole physics from the perspective of loop quantum gravity. After an introduction that discusses the main conceptual issues we present some details about the classical and quantum geometry of isolated horizons and their quantum geometry and then use this scheme to give a natural definition of the entropy of black holes. The entropy computations can be neatly expressed in the form of combinatorial problems solvable with the help of methods based on number theory and the use of generating functions. The recovery of the Bekenstein-Hawking law and corrections to it is explained in some detail. After this, due attention is paid to the discussion of semiclassical issues. An important point in this respect is the proper interpretation of the horizon area as the energy that should appear in the statistical-mechanical treatment of the black hole model presented here. The chapter ends with a comparison between the microscopic and semiclassical app...

  19. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

  20. Rotating Hairy Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct stationary black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing non-trivial non-abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent non-perturbative rotating hairy black holes.

  1. Disregarding the 'Hole Argument'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Roberts

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Weatherall has suggested that Einstein's hole argument, as presented by Earman and Norton (1987), is based on a misleading use of mathematics. I argue on the contrary that Weatherall demands an implausible restriction on how mathematics is used. The hole argument, on the other hand, is in no new danger at all.

  2. Robin Miles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources Resources About1KennamerRobertV. O'NeillRobin

  3. The determination of settling velocities for sewage sludge disposed at 106-Mile Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Daniel Saul

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DBTERMZNATZON OF SETTLING VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSED AT 106-MILE SITE A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THB DETERMZNATZON OF SBTTLZNG VELOCZTZES FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE DZSPOSBD AT 106-MZLE SZTB A Thesis by DANIEL SAUL HERNANDEZ Approved as to style and content by: James S. Bonner '(Chair...

  4. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Frio sandstones, Nine Mile Point Field, Aransas County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Raina Rae

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Ma) or Suh) ect: Geology DEPOSZTZONAL ENVIRCNMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOCY OF THE FRIO SANDSTONES ~ NINE MILE POI?f FIELD y ARANSAS CXIPIY ~ TEXAS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ttee) ead... of Department (M August 1976 Depositional Environment and Reservoir Norphology of the Frio Sandstones, N1ne Nile Point Field, Aransas County~ Texas (August 1975) ~ Rains Rae Powell~ B, S? ~ Stephen F Austin State University Ch~ of Advisory Caamitteee Dr...

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

  6. The Downtown Area of Jonestown, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booth, Geoffrey; Molina, Daniel; Santos, Alexander; Garcia, Laura; Garcia, Sarah; Olivarez, Cristopher; Wolff, Alec; Richarson, Jennifer; Romero, Megan; Beckett, Katherine; Strom, Robert; Cheek, Joseph; Davis, Zachary; Guerra, Daniel; McIntyre, Scott; Bishop, William; Hoff, Austin; Hernandez, Alex; Stewart, Sean; Kulka, William; Whitis, Dillon; Couvillion, Sarah; English, Garrett; Vasylyeva, Anastasiya; Allen, Jacob; Jorgenson, Davis; Kaska, Michael; Terrazas, Nathan; Barnete, Beau; Garcia, Karina; Cruz, Sarah; Harwell, Ethan

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    for walking and running Research (including source): No name trail was about half a mile long and Jones Brothers Park is a huge 32 acre park. Source- (Personal experience and City of Jonestown website) Analysis: On my visit to Jonestown we got to walk... of public parks and exercise areas Research (including source): Jones Brother Park, Firemens Park, Veterans Park, No name trial- Source (Marilee Pfannstiel, City of Jonestown Website) Analysis: All three parks are great for community gatherings...

  7. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

  8. On Noncommutative Black Holes Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faizal, Mir; Ulhoa, S C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we will analyze noncommutative deformation of the Schwarzschild black holes and Kerr black holes. We will perform our analysis by relating the commutative and the noncommutative metrics using an Moyal product. We will also analyze the thermodynamics of these noncommutative black hole solutions. We will explicitly derive expression for the corrected entropy and temperature of these black hole solutions.

  9. Geological oceanography of the Atchafalaya Bay area, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Warren Charles

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    off the river mouth, and 2. Mud-flat sediments on the coast west of Atchafalaya Bay to form the 7-mile-wide stretch of marshland which extends for 60 miles (Figure 3, p. 14). B. The contemporary rapid increase in discharge of the Atchafalaya River... area of the recently formed Atchafalaya River, and the site at which a great new river delta will eventually form. Engineering operations undertaken near the head of the Atchafalaya River in central Louisiana in the mid-19th century to open a...

  10. Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

  11. Holes in Spectral Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of an atom in the presence of a static perturbation is investigated. The perturbation couples a decaying state with a nondecaying state. A "hole" appears in the emission line at a frequency equal to the frequency difference between...

  12. Do Black Holes Exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1993-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of information loss in black hole formation and the associated violations of basic laws of physics, such as conservation of energy, causality and unitarity, are avoided in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory, if the NGT charge of a black hole and its mass satisfy an inequality that does not violate any known experimental data and allows the existence of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  13. Helical superconducting black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct novel static, asymptotically $AdS_5$ black hole solutions with Bianchi VII$_0$ symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, non-isotropic dual ground states with emergent scaling symmetry.

  14. Compilation of Earthquakes from 1850-2007 within 200 miles of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Seth Carpenter

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An updated earthquake compilation was created for the years 1850 through 2007 within 200 miles of the Idaho National Laboratory. To generate this compilation, earthquake catalogs were collected from several contributing sources and searched for redundant events using the search criteria established for this effort. For all sets of duplicate events, a preferred event was selected, largely based on epicenter-network proximity. All unique magnitude information for each event was added to the preferred event records and these records were used to create the compilation referred to as INL1850-2007.

  15. The effect of injection hole geometry on flat plate film cooling and heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madsen, Eric Perry

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conducted at 50 000 Reynolds number , wi th bo th a ir and C02 inject ion and at f our b lowing ratios for r\\ and a l l five b lowing ratios for h . Each slot con f igurat ion was designed to give a total cross-sectional area equal to that of the holes... Averaged Heat Trans fer Coeff icient Ratio for 45? Hole Injection 20 approx imate ly 1.05. In contrast to 0? hole injection, 45? hole inject ion projects a larger cross-sect ional area to the mainf low, wh i ch results i n h igher turbu lence...

  16. Black hole accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an introduction to models of accretion discs around black holes. After a presentation of the non-relativistic equations describing the structure and evolution of geometrically thin accretion discs we discuss their steady-state solutions and compare them to observation. Next we describe in detail the thermal-viscous disc instability model and its application to dwarf novae for which it was designed and its X-ray irradiated-disc version which explains the soft X--ray transients, i.e. outbursting black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We then turn to the role of advection in accretion flow onto black holes illustrating its action and importance with a toy model describing both ADAFs and slim discs. We conclude with a presentation of the general-relativistic formalism describing accretion discs in the Kerr space-time.

  17. Thermodynamical instability of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to Hawking radiation of black hole with a given spacetime structure, we consider a competitive transition due to a heat transfer from a hotter inner horizon to a colder outer horizon of Kerr black hole, that results in a stable thermodynamical state of extremal black hole. In this process, by supposing an emission of gravitational quanta, we calculate the mass of extremal black hole in the final state of transition.

  18. Towards noncommutative quantum black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Dominguez, J. C.; Obregon, O.; Sabido, M.; Ramirez, C. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, P.O. Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study noncommutative black holes. We use a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate the Hawking's temperature and entropy for the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 542: Disposal Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Pastor

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 542 is located in Areas 3, 8, 9, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 542 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-07, ''UD-3a Disposal Hole''; (2) 03-20-09, ''UD-3b Disposal Hole''; (3) 03-20-10, ''UD-3c Disposal Hole''; (4) 03-20-11, ''UD-3d Disposal Hole''; (5) 06-20-03, ''UD-6 and UD-6s Disposal Holes''; (6) 08-20-01, ''U-8d PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; (7) 09-20-03, ''U-9itsy30 PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; and (8) 20-20-02, ''U-20av PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 30, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 542. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 542 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Conduct geophysical surveys to locate previously unidentified features at CASs 03-20-07, 03-20-09, 03-20-10, 03-20-11, and 06-20-03. (4) Perform field screening. (5) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (6) Collect quality control samples for laboratory analyses to evaluate the performance of measurement systems and controls based on the requirements of the data quality indicators. (7) If COCs are present at the surface/near surface (< 15 feet below ground surface), collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (8) If COCs are present in the subsurface (i.e., base of disposal hole), collect additional samples to define the vertical extent of contamination. A conservative use restriction will be used to encompass the lateral extent of subsurface contamination. (9) Stake or flag sample locations in the field, and record coordinates through global positioning systems surveying. (10) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  20. Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngangbam Ishwarchandra; Ng. Ibohal; K. Yugindro Singh

    2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present an exact solution of Einstein's field equations describing the Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background. It is also regarded as an embedded solution that the Schwarzschild black hole is embedded into the dark energy space producing Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole. It is found that the space-time geometry of Schwarzschild-dark energy solution is non-vacuum Petrov type $D$ in the classification of space-times. We study the energy conditions (like weak, strong and dominant conditions) for the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution. We also find that the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution violates the strong energy condition due to the negative pressure leading to a repulsive gravitational force of the matter field in the space-time. It is shown that the time-like vector field for an observer in the Schwarzschild-dark energy space is expanding, accelerating, shearing and non-rotating. We investigate the surface gravity and the area of the horizons for the Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole.

  1. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  2. Black Holes at Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Webber

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In theories with large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity, black holes are copiously produced in particle collisions at energies well above the Planck scale. I briefly review some recent work on the phenomenology of this process, with emphasis on theoretical uncertainties and possible strategies for measuring the number of extra dimensions.

  3. Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles

  4. Fact #848: November 24, 2014 Nearly Three-Fourths of New Cars have Fuel Economy above 25 Miles per Gallon- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #848: November 24, 2014 Nearly Three-Fourths of New Cars have Fuel Economy above 25 Miles per Gallon

  5. A fluid of black holes at the beginning of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Diaz; M. A. Per; A. Segui

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The most entropic fluid can be related to a dense gas of black holes that we use to study the beginning of the universe. We encounter difficulties to compatibilize an adiabatic expansion with the growing area for the coalescence of black holes. This problem may be circumvented for a quantum black hole fluid, whose classical counterpart can be described by a percolating process at the critical point. This classical regime might be related to the energy content of the current universe.

  6. Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists of 5 thermal artesian wells located within one mile of Colorado Highway 115 from Penrose on the north to the Arkansas river on the south. The western group, located in and adjacent to Canon City, consists of one thermal spring on the south bank of the Arkansas River on the west side of Canon City, a thermal well in the northeast corner of Canon City, another well along the banks of Four Mile Creek east of Canon City and a well north of Canon City on Four Mile Creek. All the thermal waters in the Canon City Embayment, of which the study area is part of, are found in the study area. The thermal waters unlike the cold ground waters of the Canon City Embayment, are a calcium-bicarbonate type and range in temperature from 79 F (26 C) to a high of 108 F (42 C). The total combined surface discharge o fall the thermal water in the study area is in excess of 532 acre feet (A.F.) per year.

  7. Generalized uncertainty principle and black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Abhijit Dutta; Anirban Saha

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole thermodynamics using the simplest form of the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) proposed in the literature. The expressions for the mass-temperature relation, heat capacity and entropy are obtained in both cases from which the critical and remnant masses are computed. Our results are exact and reveal that these masses are identical and larger than the so called singular mass for which the thermodynamics quantities become ill-defined. The expression for the entropy reveals the well known area theorem in terms of the horizon area in both cases upto leading order corrections from GUP. The area theorem written in terms of a new variable which can be interpreted as the reduced horizon area arises only when the computation is carried out to the next higher order correction from GUP.

  8. BLACK HOLE AURORA POWERED BY A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Masaaki [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aichi University of Education, Kariya, Aichi 448-8542 (Japan); Takahashi, Rohta, E-mail: takahasi@phyas.aichi-edu.ac.j [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for high-energy emission sources generated by a standing magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) shock in a black hole magnetosphere. The black hole magnetosphere would be constructed around a black hole with an accretion disk, where a global magnetic field could be originated by currents in the accretion disk and its corona. Such a black hole magnetosphere may be considered as a model for the central engine of active galactic nuclei, some compact X-ray sources, and gamma-ray bursts. The energy sources of the emission from the magnetosphere are the gravitational and electromagnetic energies of magnetized accreting matters and the rotational energy of a rotating black hole. When the MHD shock generates in MHD accretion flows onto the black hole, the plasma's kinetic energy and the black hole's rotational energy can convert to radiative energy. In this Letter, we demonstrate the huge energy output at the shock front by showing negative energy postshock accreting MHD flows for a rapidly rotating black hole. This means that the extracted energy from the black hole can convert to the radiative energy at the MHD shock front. When an axisymmetric shock front is formed, we expect a ring-shaped region with very hot plasma near the black hole; this would look like an 'aurora'. The high-energy radiation generated from there would carry to us the information for the curved spacetime due to the strong gravity.

  9. Quantized black holes, their spectrum and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Under quite natural general assumptions, the following results are obtained. The maximum entropy of a quantized surface is demonstrated to be proportional to the surface area in the classical limit. The general structure of the horizon spectrum is found. In the special case of loop quantum gravity, the value of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is found. The discrete spectrum of thermal radiation of a black hole fits the Wien profile. The natural widths of the lines are much smaller than the distances between them. The total intensity of the thermal radiation is estimated. If the density of quantized primordial black holes is close to the present upper limit on the dark-matter density in our Solar system, the sensitivity of modern detectors is close to that necessary for detecting this radiation.

  10. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers UC Davis Water Management Research Group Aplication Efficiency: Dry Beans 2001 Developed as a cooperative project between University of California, Davis United States Geological Survey and California Department of Water Resources Map prepared

  11. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24 nautical miles offshore of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to fund Virginia Electric and Power Company's Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP). The proposed VOWTAP project consists of design, construction and operation of a 12 megawatt offshore wind facility located approximately 24 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA on the Outer Continental Shelf.

  12. South Dakota DOT 1) Rural PCCP -0.0 Band California Profilograph and incentive for less than 25" per mile max incentive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Profilograph - Bonus paid for less than 5" per mile. Max bonus is 103.5% for 2.9" PI or less and lift) - Bonus paid for 50 IRI or less, Max Bonus is $180 per 0.1 mile per lane for 35 or less IRI. 2

  13. Quantum corrections to the entropy of Einstein-Maxwell dilaton-axion black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Akbar; K. Saifullah

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the corrections to the entropy of Einstein-Maxwell dilaton-axion black holes beyond semiclassical approximations. We consider the entropy of the black hole as a state variable and derive these corrections using the exactness criteria of the first law of thermodynamics. We note that from this general frame-work the entropy corrections for "simpler" black holes like Schwarzschild, Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m and anti-de Sitter-Schwarzschild black holes follow easily. This procedure gives us the modified area law as well.

  14. Foreigners in Areas of China Under Communist Jurisdiction before 1949: Biographical Notes and a Comprehensive Bibliography of the Yenan Hui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, Margaret; Bays, Daniel H.; Snow, Helen Foster

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to travel by foot to Liberated Areas of Shansi-Chahar-Hopei Border Region, 1000 miles in 3 months in 8th Route Army guerrilla areas. In west China he worked for the Chinese Industrial Cooperatives and after marrying Nancy in Chengtu in 1940...

  15. Black holes in massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babichev, Eugeny

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the black hole solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact black hole solutions, analogous to those of General Relativity. In addition to these solutions, hairy black holes -- solutions with no correspondent in General Relativity -- have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of the Birkhoff's theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these black holes richer and more complex than those of General Relativity. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild black hole exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical black holes are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability o...

  16. Black Hole's 1/N Hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali; Cesar Gomez

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the standard view classically black holes carry no hair, whereas quantum hair is at best exponentially weak. We show that suppression of hair is an artifact of the semi-classical treatment and that in the quantum picture hair appears as an inverse mass-square effect. Such hair is predicted in the microscopic quantum description in which a black hole represents a self-sustained leaky Bose-condensate of N soft gravitons. In this picture the Hawking radiation is the quantum depletion of the condensate. Within this picture we show that quantum black hole physics is fully compatible with continuous global symmetries and that global hair appears with the strength B/N, where B is the global charge swallowed by the black hole. For large charge this hair has dramatic effect on black hole dynamics. Our findings can have interesting astrophysical consequences, such as existence of black holes with large detectable baryonic and leptonic numbers.

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs. Data from these surveys will be integrated with older data from Chevron Minerals 1979 drill hole. Notes The gravity survey covered an area of approximately 34 km2...

  18. Observational Evidence for Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh Narayan; Jeffrey E. McClintock

    2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Astronomers have discovered two populations of black holes: (i) stellar-mass black holes with masses in the range 5 to 30 solar masses, millions of which are present in each galaxy in the universe, and (ii) supermassive black holes with masses in the range 10^6 to 10^{10} solar masses, one each in the nucleus of every galaxy. There is strong circumstantial evidence that all these objects are true black holes with event horizons. The measured masses of supermassive black hole are strongly correlated with properties of their host galaxies, suggesting that these black holes, although extremely small in size, have a strong influence on the formation and evolution of entire galaxies. Spin parameters have recently been measured for a handful of black holes. Based on the data, there is an indication that the kinetic power of at least one class of relativistic jet ejected from accreting black holes may be correlated with black hole spin. If verified, it would suggest that these jets are powered by a generalized Penrose process mediated by magnetic fields.

  19. Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, D.; Adams, J. W.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation.

  20. Characterization of solids in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, D. O.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the impact of poor water clarity on defueling operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station, a study was undertaken to characterize suspended particulates in the reactor defueling water. The examination included cascade filtration through Nuclepore filters of progressively smaller pore sizes, using three water samples obtained at different times and after varying degrees of clarification. The solids collected on the filters were examined with a scanning electron microscope and analyzed with energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence. A wide variety of solids was observed, and 26 elements were detected. These included all the materials expected from the reactor system (uranium, zirconium, silver, cadmium, indium, iron, chromium, and nickel), chemicals and zeolites used to decontaminate the water (aluminum, silicon, sodium), common impurities (potassium, chlorine, sulfur, magnesium, calcium, and others), as well as some unexpected metals (molybdenum, manganese, bromine, and lead). There was also evidence for the presence of organic material. A diverse assortment of particles with widely varying surface properties was found to be present.

  1. Evaluation of special safety issues associated with handling the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrie, J.O.; Appel, J.N.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of recent tests and analyses evaluating safety concerns relating to Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) core debris pyrophoricity, radiolytic hydrogen and oxygen, and the potential for steam generation in shipping canisters during a fire. Recommendations drawn from these results include the following: (1) hydrogen-oxygen recombiners should be installed in each core debris canister, (2) water should be removed from each canister by drip drying (no vacuum pumping is required), (3) the maximum weight of the loaded, dewatered canisters and the minimum volume of gas/vapor in each canister should be controlled and measured by weighting before and after dewatering, (4) a cover gas of approximately two atmospheres of argon should be added to each canister, (5) each canister should be weighed and pressure checked prior to shipping, (6) the shipping cask should be designed to limit the temperature of the canister contents after the standard hypothetical accident (fire) such that the design pressure of the canister/cask will not be exceeded, (7) provisions should be made for canister venting during long-term storage and for cask venting in the event of an overpressure condition resulting from an ''extended'' fire, and (8) some pyrophoricity testing of samples taken during defueling should be conducted to assure adequate safety-related information during canister opening.

  2. A critical essay: Ten mile emergency planning zones, pro or con

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDurmon, G.W.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NRC's current emergency planning regulations are based on source term data which has come into question. Indeed, many current models indicate that source terms can be calculated which are one or more orders of magnitude lower than those from WASH-1400. However, there remains a number of unresolved technical issues between the NRC and the Industry Downgraded Core Research Program (IDCOR) calculated source terms which presents a very large uncertainty for the determined values. In addition, there remains questions concerning the integrity of containment, and the emphasis which should be placed on operator intervention. These results have caused both the NRC and the APS to state that source terms cannot be lowered for all radionuclides and all nuclear power plants at this time. Data from NUREG-1150, along with the statements of other experts, do seem to demonstrate that evacuation, as a means of dose minimization, has been overemphasized under the current regulations. While an appropriate evacuation planning distance, specific to each plant, would vary according to a number of factors such as population density, available transportation, typical housing structures for shelter, type of plant containment, etc., current methods of emergency planning must also address these issues. In light of this and the dose estimates across the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ), it would seem that detailed emergency plans out to ten miles which place an emphasis on evacuation are unnecessary from a health physics perspective, and bear heavy socioeconomic costs. 14 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Heatup of the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to current perceptions of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, corium largely relocated into the reactor vessel lower head at {approximately}224 min into the accident. Defueling examinations have revealed that the corium relocated from the molten core region to the lower head predominantly by way of drainage through the core former region (CFR) located between the vertical baffle plates immediately surrounding the fuel assemblies and the core barrel. An analysis has been carried out to assess the heatup of the reactor vessel lower head during the core relocation event, particularly the potential for a melting attack on the lower head wall and the in-core instrument nozzle penetration weldments. The analysis employed the THIRMAL computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to predict the breakup and quenching or corium jets under film boiling conditions as well as the size distributions and quenching of the resultant molten droplets. The transient heatup and ablation of the vessel wall and penetration weldments due to impinging corium jets was calculated using the MISTI computer code.

  4. Historical summary of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris transportation campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Tyacke, M.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Quinn, G.J. [Wastren, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of the damaged core materials from the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for examination and storage presented many technical and institutional challenges, including assessing the ability to transport the damaged core; removing and packaging core debris in ways suitable for transport; developing a transport package that could both meet Federal regulations and interface with the facilities at TMI-2 and the INEL; and developing a transport plan, support logistics, and public communications channels suited to the task. This report is a historical summary of how the US Department of Energy addressed those challenges and transported, received, and stored the TMI-2 core debris at the INEL. Subjects discussed include preparations for transport, loading at TMI-2, institutional issues, transport operations, receipt and storage at the INEL, governmental inquiries/investigations, and lessons learned. Because of public attention focused on the TMI-2 Core Debris Transport Program, the exchange of information between the program and public was extensive. This exchange is a focus for parts of this report to explain why various operations were conducted as they were and why certain technical approaches were employed. And, because of that exchange, the program may have contributed to a better public understanding of such actions and may contribute to planning and execution of similar future actions.

  5. Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiester, T.R.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

  6. Kerr black holes with scalar hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a family of solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field, describing asymptotically flat, spinning black holes with scalar hair and a regular horizon. These hairy black holes (HBHs) are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Besides mass M and angular momentum J, they carry a conserved, continuous Noether charge Q measuring the scalar hair. HBHs branch off from the Kerr metric at the threshold of the superradiant instability and reduce to spinning boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon area. They overlap with Kerr black holes for a set of (M,J) values. A single Killing vector field preserves the solutions, tangent to the null geodesic generators of the event horizon. HBHs can exhibit sharp physical differences when compared to the Kerr solution, such as J/M^2>1, quadrupole moment larger than J^2/M and larger orbital angular velocity at the innermost stable circular orbit. Families of HBHs connected to the Kerr geometry should exist in scalar (...

  7. Nearly extremal apparent horizons in simulations of merging black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geoffrey Lovelace; Mark A. Scheel; Robert Owen; Matthew Giesler; Reza Katebi; Bela Szilagyi; Tony Chu; Nicholas Demos; Daniel A. Hemberger; Lawrence E. Kidder; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Nousha Afshari

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin angular momentum $S$ of an isolated Kerr black hole is bounded by the surface area $A$ of its apparent horizon: $8\\pi S \\le A$, with equality for extremal black holes. In this paper, we explore the extremality of individual and common apparent horizons for merging, rapidly spinning binary black holes. We consider simulations of merging black holes with equal masses $M$ and initial spin angular momenta aligned with the orbital angular momentum, including new simulations with spin magnitudes up to $S/M^2 = 0.994$. We measure the area and (using approximate Killing vectors) the spin on the individual and common apparent horizons, finding that the inequality $8\\pi S A$ and for which our lower bound on their Booth-Fairhurst extremality exceeds unity. These superextremal surfaces are always surrounded by marginally outer trapped surfaces (i.e., by apparent horizons) with $8\\pi Shole. (Abstract abbreviated.)

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal...

  9. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Additional References Retrieved from...

  10. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Fawcett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    John W. Geissman, Giday WoldeGabriel, Craig D. Allen, Catrina M. Johnson, Susan J. Smith (2007) Two Middle Pleistocene Glacial-Interglacial Cycles from the Valle Grande, Jemez...

  11. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lachenbruch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regime of Long Valley Caldera. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):763-768. J.L. Smith,R.W. Rex. 1977. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera. () : American...

  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References S. H. Ward, W. T. Parry, W. P. Nash, W. R. Sill, K. L. Cook, R. B. Smith, D. S. Chapman, F. H. Brown, J. A. Whelan, J. R. Bowman (1978) A Summary of the...

  13. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    studies, and seem to prove useful in most cases (Flexser, 1991; Goff et al., 1991; Smith and Suemnicht, 1991). Results from these studies are also summarized in Sorey et al....

  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regime of Long Valley Caldera. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):763-768. J.L. Smith,R.W. Rex. 1977. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera. () : American...

  15. Thermal Gradient Holes At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Purtymun...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valles caldera in order to locate an of high heat flow that would serve as a favorable test site for the HDR concept. Notes Data from these wells are report in Reiter et al....

  16. Thermal Gradient Holes At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Geothermal Inc. (2010) Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement U.S. Geothermal Inc. (2009) U.S. Geothermal Starts New Drilling...

  17. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault zones. The focus of Lake City Geothermal's current effort is on enhancing the site interpretation by re-evaluating the existing seismic data, conducting a detailed gravity...

  18. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    R.A. Cunniff, R.L. Bowers (2003) Final Report: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase II: Animas Valley, New Mexico Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  19. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,New York: Energy Resources2003) |

  20. Slim Holes At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPowerSilcioEthanolSkyline HighSleepingDoDAlum

  1. Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1974) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy) dataOpen

  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy)

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year openEnergy2003) | Open

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zacharakis,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year openEnergy2003)Energy|2008) ||1981)

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands,EnergyHot-Dry-Rock

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands,EnergyHot-Dry-RockAl., 1993) |

  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski, 2006)

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lachenbruch,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski, 2006)|Al.,Et

  9. The Ozone Hole Some perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    The Ozone Hole Some perspective The British Antarctic Survey The "Ozone Hole" International of the predicted ozone losses! This was quite a controversy. Ultimately, ozone losses started appearing in the late 1980s (see Figure below), but by then, there was already a credibility issue for ozone scientists. #12

  10. Optical black holes and solitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn Westmoreland

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We exhibit a static, cylindrically symmetric, exact solution to the Euler-Heisenberg field equations (EHFE) and prove that its effective geometry contains (optical) black holes. It is conjectured that there are also soliton solutions to the EHFE which contain black hole geometries.

  11. Black Holes of Negative Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, regions of negative energy density can undergo gravitational collapse into a black hole. The resultant exterior black hole spacetimes necessarily have negative mass and non-trivial topology. A full theory of quantum gravity, in which topology-changing processes take place, could give rise to such spacetimes.

  12. Peer review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Vessel Investigation Project metallurgical examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohl, R.W.; Gaydos, R.G.; Vander Voort, G.F.; Diercks, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifteen samples recovered from the lower head of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel were subjected to detailed metallurgical examinations by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), with supporting work carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and several of the European participants. These examinations determined that a portion of the lower head, a so-called elliptical ``hot spot`` measuring {approx}0.8 {times} 1 m, reached temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C during the accident and cooled from these temperatures at {approx}10--100{degrees}C/min. The remainder of the lower head was found to have remained below the ferrite-toaustenite transformation temperature of 727{degrees}C during the accident. Because of the significance of these results and their importance to the overall analysis of the TMI accident, a panel of three outside peer reviewers, Dr. Robert W. Bohl, Mr. Richard G. Gaydos, and Mr. George F. Vander Voort, was formed to conduct an independent review of the metallurgical analyses. After a thorough review of the previous analyses and examination of photo-micrographs and actual lower head specimens, the panel determined that the conclusions resulting from the INEL study were fundamentally correct. In particular, the panel reaffirmed that four lower head samples attained temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C, and perhaps as high as 1150--1200{degrees}C in one case, during the accident. They concluded that these samples subsequently cooled at a rate of {approx}50--125{degrees}C/min in the temperature range of 600--400{degrees}C, in good agreement with the original analysis. The reviewers also agreed that the remainder of the lower head samples had not exceeded the ferrite-to-austenite transformation temperature during the accident and suggested several refinements and alternative procedures that could have been employed in the original analysis.

  13. Corrections to entropy and thermodynamics of charged black hole using generalized uncertainty principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Eiman Abou El Dahab

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there has been much attention devoted to resolving the quantum corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking (black hole) entropy, which relates the entropy to the cross-sectional area of the black hole horizon. Using generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), corrections to the geometric entropy and thermodynamics of black hole will be introduced. The impact of GUP on the entropy near the horizon of three types of black holes; Schwarzschild, Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger and Reissner-Nordstr\\"om is determined. It is found that the logarithmic divergence in the entropy-area relation turns to be positive. The entropy $S$, which is assumed to be related to horizon's two-dimensional area, gets an additional terms, for instance $2\\, \\sqrt{\\pi}\\, \\alpha\\, \\sqrt{S}$, where $\\alpha$ is the GUP parameter.

  14. Binary Black Holes in Quasi-Stationary Circular Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian D. Baker

    2002-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method of determining solutions to the constraint equations of General Relativity approximately describing binary black holes in quasi-stationary circular orbits. Black holes with arbitrary linear momenta are constructed in the manner suggested by Brandt and Brugmann. The quasi-stationary circular orbits are determined by local minima in the ADM mass in a manner similar to Baumgarte and Cook; however, rather than fixing the area of the apparent horizon, we fix the value of the bare masses of the holes. We numerically generate an evolutionary sequence of quasi-stationary circular orbits up to and including the innermost stable circular orbit. We compare our results with post-Newtonian expectations as well as the results of Cook and Baumgarte. We also generate additional numerical results describing the dynamics of the geometry due to the emission of gravitational radiation.

  15. Strings, higher curvature corrections, and black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Mohaupt

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review old and recent results on subleading contributions to black hole entropy in string theory.

  16. Thermodynamics of Black Hole Horizons and Kerr/CFT Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Shen-xiu Liu; Jia-ju Zhang

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the thermodynamics of the inner horizon and its implication on the holographic description of the black hole. We focus on the black holes with two physical horizons. Under reasonable assumption, we prove that the first law of thermodynamics of the outer horizon always indicates that of the inner horizon. As a result, the fact that the area product being mass-independent is equivalent to the relation $T_+S_+=T_-S_-$, with $T_\\pm$ and $S_\\pm$ being the Hawking temperatures and the entropies of the outer and inner horizon respectively. We find that the mass-independence of area product breaks down in general Myers-Perry black holes with spacetime dimension $d\\geq6$ and Kerr-AdS black holes with $d\\geq4$. Moreover we discuss the implication of the first laws of the outer and inner horizons on the thermodynamics of the right- and left-moving sectors of dual CFT in Kerr/CFT correspondence. We show that once the relation $T_+S_+=T_-S_-$ is satisfied, the central charges of two sectors must be same. Furthermore from the thermodynamics relations, we read the dimensionless temperatures of microscopic CFT, which are in exact agreement with the ones obtained from hidden conformal symmetry in the low frequency scattering off the black holes, and then determine the central charges. This method works well in well-known cases in Kerr/CFT correspondence, and reproduce successfully the holographic pictures for 4D Kerr-Newman and 5D Kerr black holes. We go on to predict the central charges and temperatures of a possible holographic CFT description dual to 5D doubly rotating black ring.

  17. Alternate Explosions: Collapse and Accretion Events with Red Holes instead of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Graber

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A red hole is "just like a black hole" except it lacks an event horizon and a singularity. As a result, a red hole emits much more energy than a black hole during a collapse or accretion event. We consider how a red hole solution can solve the "energy crisis" and power extremely energetic gamma ray bursts and hypernovae.

  18. Kirkland gets license in hot Philippines area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, A.S.

    1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Kirkland As, Oslo, has received a geophysical survey and exploration contract (GSEC) in a sizzling exploration and development theater off the Philippines. The license covers about 6,000 sq miles of undisputed waters, with depths mostly less than 300 ft, and lies in the Reed Bank area off Northwest Palawan Island, where several major oil and gas strikes have been made recently. Kirkland has 1 year in which to carry out its seismic work commitment. The terms of the GSEC then give an option to drill one well in a 6 month period. Once the results have been analyzed, the company can either drill another well or enter into a service contract for the license. Kirkland has a 65% share in the license, with the remainder split between Philippine companies Philodrill Corp., Beguet Mining Corp. subsidiary Petrofields, and Seafront Resources Corp. The Philippines is one of Kirkland's main areas of activity, the Kirkland Commercial Manager Ralph Baxter.

  19. Thermodynamics of regular black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2008-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

  20. Fishing in Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Brotas

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coordinate system $(\\bar{x},\\bar{t})$ defined by $r = 2m + K\\bar{x}- c K \\bar{t}$ and $t=\\bar{x}/cK - 1 /cK \\int_{r_a}^r (1- 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2} (1 - 2m/r)^{-1}dr$ allow us to write the Schwarzschild metric in the form: \\[ds^2=c^2 d\\bar{t}^2 + (W^2/K^2 - 2W/K) d\\bar{x}^2 + 2c (1 + W/K) d\\bar{x}d\\bar{t} - r^2 (d\\theta^2 + cos^2\\theta d\\phi^2)\\] with $W=(1 - 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2}$, in which the coefficients' pathologies are moved to $r_K = 2m/(1+K^2)$. This new coordinate system is used to study the entrance into a black hole of a rigid line (a line in which the shock waves propagate with velocity c).

  1. A review of "Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company" by Miles Ogborn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nechtman, Tillman W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2007. xiii + 318 pp. + 22 illus. $40.00. Review by TILLMAN W. NECHTMAN, SKIDMORE COLLEGE. The India Office Records... Company (EIC) and the English/British empire in South Asia. Miles Ogborn?s impressive new book, Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company, approaches this same archive from an important new direction. Rather than reading...

  2. Review of Destructive Assay Methods for Nuclear Materials Characterization from the Three Mile Island (TMI) Fuel Debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla J. Miller

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of the literature review that was performed and based on previous work performed at the Idaho National Laboratory studying the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear reactor accident, specifically the melted fuel debris. The purpose of the literature review was to document prior published work that supports the feasibility of the analytical techniques that were developed to provide quantitative results of the make-up of the fuel and reactor component debris located inside and outside the containment. The quantitative analysis provides a technique to perform nuclear fuel accountancy measurements

  3. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for agency action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action, and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process provides NNSA with environmental information that can be used in developing mitigative actions, if necessary, to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the quality of the human environment and natural ecosystems should NNSA decide to proceed with implementing the Proposed Action at LANL. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA, and this EA, is to aid NNSA officials in making decisions based on an understanding of environmental consequences and in taking actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment.

  4. Thermodynamics and Gauge Gravity Correspondence for a Generalized Charged Rotating Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majeed, Bushra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamics of Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole on the inner and outer horizons. Products of surface gravities, surface temperatures, Komar energies, electromagnetic potentials, angular velocities, areas, entropies, horizon radii and the irreducible masses at the Cauchy and the Event horizons are calculated. It is observed that the product of surface gravities, surface temperature product and product of Komar energies, electromagnetic potentials and angular velocities at the horizons are not universal quantities for Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole. Products of areas and entropies at both the horizons are independent of mass of the black hole. Heat capacity is calculated and phase transition is observed, under certain conditions on r. Using the thermodynamics method with quantized charges (known as re?ned thermodynamics), the central charges and the holographic pictures (J-picture, Q-picture, and P-picture) of the dual CFT for Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole are determined.

  5. Thermodynamics and Gauge Gravity Correspondence for a Generalized Charged Rotating Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushra Majeed; Mubasher Jamil

    2015-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamics of Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole on the inner and outer horizons. Products of surface gravities, surface temperatures, Komar energies, electromagnetic potentials, angular velocities, areas, entropies, horizon radii and the irreducible masses at the Cauchy and the Event horizons are calculated. It is observed that the product of surface gravities, surface temperature product and product of Komar energies, electromagnetic potentials and angular velocities at the horizons are not universal quantities for Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole. Products of areas and entropies at both the horizons are independent of mass of the black hole. Heat capacity is calculated and phase transition is observed, under certain conditions on r. Using the thermodynamics method with quantized charges (known as re?ned thermodynamics), the central charges and the holographic pictures (J-picture, Q-picture, and P-picture) of the dual CFT for Kerr-Newman-Kasuya black hole are determined.

  6. Persistent Source Influences on the Trailing Edge of a Groundwater Plume, and Natural Attenuation Timeframes: The F-Area Savannah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    , California Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, South Carolina *S Supporting Information Timeframes: The F-Area Savannah River Site Jiamin Wan,, * Tetsu K. Tokunaga, Wenming Dong, Miles E. Denham, and Susan S. Hubbard Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley

  7. Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    Kerry Noble (maternity cover for Alex Fernandes) k.noble@qmul.ac.uk 020 7882 7910 Science and careful investment in world-leading staff in our various subject areas sustained over the past few years thriller took an arresting and compelling look at how technology could transform Britain

  8. An Econometric Analysis of the Elasticity of Vehicle Travel with Respect to Fuel Cost per Mile Using RTEC Survey Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Kahn, J.; Gibson, R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of econometric estimation of the ''rebound effect'' for household vehicle travel in the United States based on a comprehensive analysis of survey data collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) at approximately three-year intervals over a 15-year period. The rebound effect is defined as the percent change in vehicle travel for a percent change in fuel economy. It summarizes the tendency to ''take back'' potential energy savings due to fuel economy improvements in the form of increased vehicle travel. Separate vehicles use models were estimated for one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-vehicle households. The results are consistent with the consensus of recently published estimates based on national or state-level data, which show a long-run rebound effect of about +0.2 (a ten percent increase in fuel economy, all else equal, would produce roughly a two percent increase in vehicle travel and an eight percent reduction in fuel use). The hypothesis that vehicle travel responds equally to changes in fuel cost-per-mile whether caused by changes in fuel economy or fuel price per gallon could not be rejected. Recognizing the interdependency in survey data among miles of travel, fuel economy and price paid for fuel for a particular vehicle turns out to be crucial to obtaining meaningful results.

  9. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeghi, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  10. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sadeghi; Kh. Jafarzade

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  11. Energy on black hole spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Corichi

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the issue of defining energy for test particles on a background black hole spacetime. We revisit the different notions of energy as defined by different observers. The existence of a time-like isometry allows for the notion of a total conserved energy to be well defined, and subsequently the notion of a gravitational potential energy is also meaningful. We then consider the situation in which the test particle is adsorbed by the black hole, and analyze the energetics in detail. In particular, we show that the notion of horizon energy es defined by the isolated horizons formalism provides a satisfactory notion of energy compatible with the particle's conserved energy. As another example, we comment a recent proposal to define energy of the black hole as seen by an observer at rest. This account is intended to be pedagogical and is aimed at the level of and as a complement to the standard textbooks on the subject.

  12. Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by of a mile toward the north and is located over mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

  13. Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

  14. Introduction to Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henry Lambert

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    These lecture notes are an elementary and pedagogical introduction to the black hole evaporation, based on a lecture given by the author at the Ninth Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics and are intended for PhD students. First, quantum field theory in curved spacetime is studied and tools needed for the remaining of the course are introduced. Then, quantum field theory in Rindler spacetime in 1+1 dimensions and in the spacetime of a spherically collapsing star are considered, leading to Unruh and Hawking effects, respectively. Finally, some consequences such as thermodynamics of black holes and information loss paradox are discussed.

  15. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch Areas

  16. Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don N. Page

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

  17. Signatures of black holes at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Cavaglia; Romulus Godang; Lucien M. Cremaldi; Donald J. Summers

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Signatures of black hole events at CERN's Large Hadron Collider are discussed. Event simulations are carried out with the Fortran Monte Carlo generator CATFISH. Inelasticity effects, exact field emissivities, color and charge conservation, corrections to semiclassical black hole evaporation, gravitational energy loss at formation and possibility of a black hole remnant are included in the analysis.

  18. Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12;Einstein's Miraculous Year: 1905 Einstein, A. "Uber einen die Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light. Einstein, A. "Uber die von der molekularkinetischen

  19. From Pinholes to Black Holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Pinhole photography has made major contributions to astrophysics through the use of coded apertures. Coded apertures were instrumental in locating gamma-ray bursts and proving that they originate in faraway galaxies, some from the birth of black holes from the first stars that formed just after the big bang.

  20. Transformer failure and common-mode loss of instrument power at Nine Mile Point Unit 2 on August 13, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 13, 1991, at Nine Mile Point Unit 2 nuclear power plant, located near Scriba, New York, on Lake Ontario, the main transformer experienced an internal failure that resulted in degraded voltage which caused the simultaneous loss of five uninterruptible power supplies, which in turn caused the loss of several nonsafety systems, including reactor control rod position indication, some reactor power and water indication, control room annunciators, the plant communications system, the plant process computer, and lighting at some locations. The reactor was subsequently brought to a safe shutdown. Following this event, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission dispatched an Incident Investigation Team to the site to determine what happened, to identify the probable causes, and to make appropriate findings and conclusions. This report describes the incident, the methodology used by the team in its investigation, and presents and the team's findings and conclusions. 59 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. Geology of the Normangee Lake area, Leon County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anspach, David Harold

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The back-bar lagoon was invaded by a major delta that advanced from the north and succeeding deposition was that of small delta lobes and crevasses that built into interdistributary bays. The Stone City Formation was deposited during the transition from... of the Claiborne Group across the state of Texas. Location The Normangee Lake area comprises about 30. 7 square miles, partly in southwestern Leon County, Texas, and partly in north- western Madison County, Texas. These counties are located in the eastern part...

  2. Black Hole Radiation and Volume Statistical Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The simplest possible equation for Hawking radiation, and other black hole radiated power is derived in terms of black hole density. Black hole density also leads to the simplest possible model of a gas of elementary constituents confined inside a gravitational bottle of Schwarzchild radius at tremendous pressure, which yields identically the same functional dependence as the traditional black hole entropy. Variations of Sbh can be obtained which depend on the occupancy of phase space cells. A relation is derived between the constituent momenta and the black hole radius which is similar to the Compton wavelength relation.

  3. Effective Polymer Dynamics of D-Dimensional Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Peltola; G. Kunstatter

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two different effective polymerization schemes applied to D-dimensional, spherically symmetric black hole interiors. It is shown that polymerization of the generalized area variable alone leads to a complete, regular, single-horizon spacetime in which the classical singularity is replaced by a bounce. The bounce radius is independent of rescalings of the homogeneous internal coordinate, but does depend on the arbitrary fiducial cell size. The model is therefore necessarily incomplete. It nonetheless has many interesting features: After the bounce, the interior region asymptotes to an infinitely expanding Kantowski-Sachs spacetime. If the solution is analytically continued across the horizon, the black hole exterior exhibits asymptotically vanishing quantum-corrections due to the polymerization. In all spacetime dimensions except four, the fall-off is too slow to guarantee invariance under Poincare transformations in the exterior asymptotic region. Hence the four-dimensional solution stands out as the only example which satisfies the criteria for asymptotic flatness. In this case it is possible to calculate the quantum-corrected temperature and entropy. We also show that polymerization of both phase space variables, the area and the conformal mode of the metric, generically leads to a multiple horizon solution which is reminiscent of polymerized mini-superspace models of spherically symmetric black holes in Loop Quantum Gravity.

  4. Effective polymer dynamics of D-dimensional black hole interiors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltola, Ari; Kunstatter, Gabor [Department of Physics, The University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada)

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two different effective polymerization schemes applied to D-dimensional, spherically symmetric black hole interiors. It is shown that polymerization of the generalized area variable alone leads to a complete, regular, single-horizon spacetime in which the classical singularity is replaced by a bounce. The bounce radius is independent of rescalings of the homogeneous internal coordinate, but does depend on the arbitrary fiducial cell size. The model is therefore necessarily incomplete. It nonetheless has many interesting features: After the bounce, the interior region asymptotes to an infinitely expanding Kantowski-Sachs spacetime. If the solution is analytically continued across the horizon, the black hole exterior exhibits asymptotically vanishing quantum corrections due to the polymerization. In all spacetime dimensions except four, the falloff is too slow to guarantee invariance under Poincare transformations in the exterior asymptotic region. Hence, the four-dimensional solution stands out as the only example which satisfies the criteria for asymptotic flatness. In this case it is possible to calculate the quantum-corrected temperature and entropy. We also show that polymerization of both phase space variables, the area and the conformal mode of the metric, generically leads to a multiple horizon solution which is reminiscent of polymerized minisuperspace models of spherically symmetric black holes in loop quantum gravity.

  5. Black Hole Entropy and the Dimensional Continuation of the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baados, Mximo; Zanelli, Jorge; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.72.957

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euclidean black hole has topology $\\Re^2 \\times {\\cal S}^{d-2}$. It is shown that -in Einstein's theory- the deficit angle of a cusp at any point in $\\Re^2$ and the area of the ${\\cal S}^{d-2}$ are canonical conjugates. The black hole entropy emerges as the Euler class of a small disk centered at the horizon multiplied by the area of the ${\\cal S}^{d-2}$ there.These results are obtained through dimensional continuation of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. The extension to the most general action yielding second order field equations for the metric in any spacetime dimension is given.

  6. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico-IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa-UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Astronomical Institute of Kharkov, V. N. Karazin National University, 35 Sumskaya Street, Kharkov, 61022 (Ukraine)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to be less difficult than one could think of it.

  7. Black Hole Evaporation as a Nonequilibrium Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiromi Saida

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    When a black hole evaporates, there arises a net energy flow from the black hole into its outside environment due to the Hawking radiation and the energy accretion onto black hole. Exactly speaking, due to the net energy flow, the black hole evaporation is a nonequilibrium process. To study details of evaporation process, nonequilibrium effects of the net energy flow should be taken into account. In this article we simplify the situation so that the Hawking radiation consists of non-self-interacting massless matter fields and also the energy accretion onto the black hole consists of the same fields. Then we find that the nonequilibrium nature of black hole evaporation is described by a nonequilibrium state of that field, and we formulate nonequilibrium thermodynamics of non-self-interacting massless fields. By applying it to black hole evaporation, followings are shown: (1) Nonequilibrium effects of the energy flow tends to accelerate the black hole evaporation, and, consequently, a specific nonequilibrium phenomenon of semi-classical black hole evaporation is suggested. Furthermore a suggestion about the end state of quantum size black hole evaporation is proposed in the context of information loss paradox. (2) Negative heat capacity of black hole is the physical essence of the generalized second law of black hole thermodynamics, and self-entropy production inside the matter around black hole is not necessary to ensure the generalized second law. Furthermore a lower bound for total entropy at the end of black hole evaporation is given. A relation of the lower bound with the so-called covariant entropy bound conjecture is interesting but left as an open issue.

  8. Operation of a Joint Utility/Industry Ambient Air Monitoring Program in the Houston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kush, J. A.

    of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit and ESL-IE-91-06-28 Proceedings from the 13th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 12-13, 1991 Texas Air Control Board (TACB) construction and operating permit requirements. The objectives... member companies with representative criteria pollutant and meteorological data for industry located within a 900 square mile area encompassing east Harris and west Chambers Counties. Data from this network has been approved by the ACB and EPA Region VI...

  9. BSW process of the slowly evaporating charged black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liancheng Wang; Feng He; Xiangyun Fu

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the BSW process of the slowly evaporating charged black hole. It can be found that the BSW process will also arise near black hole horizon when the evaporation of charged black hole is very slow. But now the background black hole does not have to be an extremal black hole, and it will be approximately an extremal black hole unless it is nearly a huge stationary black hole.

  10. Directions to Virginia Tech Chemistry Department from Interstate 81 Follow I-81 to Exit 118-B. Follow US 460 West about 6 miles. Upon entering Blacksburg, do NOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Directions to Virginia Tech Chemistry Department from Interstate 81 Follow I-81 to Exit 118-B. Follow US 460 West about 6 miles. Upon entering Blacksburg, do NOT use "Business" US 460 which is also called Main Street. Bear left and stay on the freeway. The first traffic light on US 460 will be Virginia

  11. WORD PROBLEMS 1. Suppose your car gets 25 miles per gallon of gasoline and the price of gas is $3.50 per gallon. Write

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koban, Nic

    WORD PROBLEMS 1. Suppose your car gets 25 miles per gallon of gasoline and the price of gas is $3.50 per gallon. Write your monthly gasoline cost C in terms of the distance D that you travel each month

  12. UMore Park Update October 2013 UMore Park. The University of Minnesota Outreach, Research and Education (UMore) Park is a 5,000-acre site 25 miles southeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    UMore Park Update ­ October 2013 UMore Park. The University of Minnesota Outreach, Research and Education (UMore) Park is a 5,000-acre site 25 miles southeast of the Twin Cities at the suburban presentation set for October 11 The UMore Development LLC will provide an update on UMore Park activities

  13. Vehicle engine use when no longer in transit; exceptions -Vehicle idling gets zero miles per gallon; unnecessary idling wastes fuel and pollutes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Vehicle engine use when no longer in transit; exceptions - Vehicle idling gets zero miles per, no University vehicle or piece of equipment is to be idled in a non-emergency situation. The operator of the vehicle/equipment is to turn-off the unit and the keys are to be removed from the ignition. EXEMPTIONS

  14. Flame structure of wall-impinging diesel fuel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Jian; Moon, Seoksu; Nishida, Keiya; Matsumoto, Yuhei [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, University of Hiroshima, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8527 (Japan); Zhang, Yuyin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo, 101-8457 (Japan)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an investigation of the flame structure of wall-impinging diesel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles in a constant-volume combustion vessel at experimental conditions typical of a diesel engine. The particular emphasis was on the effect of the included angle between two orifices (0-15 deg. in current study) on the flame structure and combustion characteristics under various simulated engine load conditions. The laser absorption scattering (LAS) technique was applied to analyze the spray and mixture properties. Direct flame imaging and OH chemiluminescence imaging were utilized to quantify the ignition delay, flame geometrical parameters, and OH chemiluminescence intensity. The images show that the asymmetric flame structure emerges in wall-impinging group-hole nozzle sprays as larger included angle and higher engine load conditions are applied, which is consistent with the spray shape observed by LAS. Compared to the base nozzle, group-hole nozzles with large included angles yield higher overall OH chemiluminescence intensity, wider flame area, and greater proportion of high OH intensity, implying the better fuel/air mixing and improved combustion characteristics. The advantages of group-hole nozzle are more pronounced under high load conditions. Based on the results, the feasibility of group-hole nozzle for practical direct injection diesel engines is also discussed. It is concluded that the asymmetric flame structure of a group-hole nozzle spray is favorable to reduce soot formation over wide engine loads. However, the hole configuration of the group-hole nozzle should be carefully considered so as to achieve proper air utilization in the combustion chamber. Stoichiometric diesel combustion is another promising application of group-hole nozzle. (author)

  15. Hanford Area 1990 population and 50-year projections. [Appendix contains computer programming for population projections and graphs showing them by grid areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.M.; Scott, M.J.; Shindle, S.F.; Napier, B.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Batishko, N.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Davis, M.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Pittenger, D.B. (Demographics Lab., Olympia, WA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex and comprehensive safety analysis activities carried out at Hanford for nonreactor nuclear facilities require data from a number of scientific and engineering disciplines. The types of data that are required include data pertaining to current population and population projections. The types of data found in this document include 1990 census totals for residential population within a 50-mile radius of the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Area meteorological towers. This document also contains 50-year projections for residential populations within a 50-mile radius of these four meteorological towers. The analysis of population projections indicates that residential population within a 50-mile radius of the four meteorological towers in question will continue to grow through 2040, although at a slower rate each decade. In all cases, the highest growth is projected for the decade ending in the year 2000. The annual growth rate for this period is projected to be 0.646, 0.633, 0.543, and 0.570 in the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Areas, respectively. By 2040, these growth rates are projected to drop to 0.082, 0.068, 0.078, 0.078, respectively. 4 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  17. 20 y 50 y 500 y Geological characterization of the TEEP study area is based on the examination of two deep wells,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Geological characterization of the TEEP study area is based on the examination of two deep by 360 km2) structural basin, bounded by the Big Horn Mountains and Casper Arch on the west, Miles City to the south, located in northeast Wyoming and eastern The Two Elk Energy Park (TEEP) is a commercialscale

  18. EIS-0323-S1: Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report, Placer, Sacramento, and Sutter Counties, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construction and operation has been proposed of approximately 31 to 38 miles of new, double-circuit, 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Western's O'Banion Substation and the area just south of SMUD's Elverta Substation and the reconstruciton of SMUD's existing 230-kV/115kV transmission line between SMUD's Elverta and Natomas substations.

  19. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  20. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area. 3 figs.

  1. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, Steve H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pigott, William R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  2. Subsurface geology and potential for geopressured-geothermal energy in the Turtle Bayou field-Kent Bayou field area, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D.R.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 216 square mile area approximately 65 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, has been geologically evaluated to determine its potential for geopressured-geothermal energy production. The structural and stratigraphic analyses were made with emphasis upon the Early and Middle Miocene age sediments which lie close to and within the geopressured section. Three geopressured sands, the Robulus (43) sand, Cibicides opima sand, and Cristellaria (I) sand, are evaluated for their potential of producing geothermal energy. Two of these sands, the Robulus (43) sand and the Cibicides opima sand, meet several of the United States Department of Energy's suggested minimum requirements for a prospective geopressured-geothermal energy reservoir.

  3. Black holes are almost optimal quantum cloners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adami; G. Ver Steeg

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If black holes were able to clone quantum states, a number of paradoxes in black hole physics would disappear. However, the linearity of quantum mechanics forbids exact cloning of quantum states. Here we show that black holes indeed clone incoming quantum states with a fidelity that depends on the black hole's absorption coefficient, without violating the no-cloning theorem because the clones are only approximate. Perfectly reflecting black holes are optimal universal "quantum cloning machines" and operate on the principle of stimulated emission, exactly as their quantum optical counterparts. In the limit of perfect absorption, the fidelity of clones is equal to what can be obtained via quantum state estimation methods. But for any absorption probability less than one, the cloning fidelity is nearly optimal as long as $\\omega/T\\geq10$, a common parameter for modest-sized black holes.

  4. Remarks on Renormalization of Black Hole Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Sung Ku Kim; Kwang-Sup Soh; Jae Hyung Yee

    1996-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We elaborate the renormalization process of entropy of a nonextremal and an extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole by using the Pauli-Villars regularization method, in which the regulator fields obey either the Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac distribution depending on their spin-statistics. The black hole entropy involves only two renormalization constants. We also discuss the entropy and temperature of the extremal black hole.

  5. Hole cleaning requirements with seabed returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordt, David Paul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of different non-Newtonian fluids 56 INTRODUCTION A drilling fluid is used for removing cuttings from the hole, controlling subsurface pressures, preventing caving-in of the formations, suspension of cuttings, weighting materials, and many other uses... of the hole. The drilling problems related to hole cleaning can occur at low as well as high annular velocities. Cuttings can travel no faster than the fluid in which they are transported; however, they can travel more slowly. Their fall (slip) rate...

  6. Probing the Constituent Structure of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas Gruending; Stefan Hofmann; Sophia Mller; Tehseen Rug

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the cross section for scattering processes between graviton emitters on the near side of a Schwarzschild surface and absorbers on its far side, that is black hole constituents. We show that these scatterings allow to directly extract structural observables such as the momentum distribution of black hole constituents. For this we employ a quantum bound state description originally developed in quantum chromodynamics and recently applied to general relativity that allows to consider black holes in a relativistic Hartree like framework.

  7. Black hole initial data without elliptic equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istvn Rcz; Jeffrey Winicour

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore whether a new method to solve the constraints of Einstein's equations, which does not involve elliptic equations, can be applied to provide initial data for black holes. We show that this method can be successfully applied to a nonlinear perturbation of a Schwarzschild black hole by establishing the well-posedness of the resulting constraint problem. We discuss its possible generalization to the boosted, spinning multiple black hole problem.

  8. Absorption cross section of RN black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sini R.; V. C. Kuriakose

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a charged scalar field in the RN black hole space time is studied using WKB approximation. In the present work it is assumed that matter waves can get reflected from the event horizon. Using this effect, the Hawking temperature and the absorption cross section for RN black hole placed in a charged scalar field are calculated. The absorption cross section $\\sigma _{abs}$ is found to be inversely proportional to square of the Hawking temperature of the black hole.

  9. Black holes with massive graviton hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Brito; Vitor Cardoso; Paolo Pani

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    No-hair theorems exclude the existence of nontrivial scalar and massive vector hair outside four-dimensional, static, asymptotically flat black-hole spacetimes. We show, by explicitly building nonlinear solutions, that black holes can support massive graviton hair in theories of massive gravity. These hairy solutions are, most likely, the generic end state of the recently discovered monopole instability of Schwarzschild black holes in massive graviton theories.

  10. Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

  11. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  12. Thermoelectric DC conductivities from black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic expression for the DC electrical conductivity in terms of black hole horizon data was recently obtained for a class of holographic black holes exhibiting momentum dissipation. We generalise this result to obtain analogous expressions for the DC thermoelectric and thermal conductivities. We illustrate our results using some holographic Q-lattice black holes as well as for some black holes with linear massless axions, in both $D=4$ and $D=5$ bulk spacetime dimensions, which include both spatially isotropic and anisotropic examples. We show that some recently constructed ground states of holographic Q-lattices, which can be either electrically insulating or metallic, are all thermal insulators.

  13. Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

  14. Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  15. Lower Dimensional Black Holes: Inside and Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    I survey the physics of black holes in two and three spacetime dimensions, with special attention given to an understanding of their exterior and interior properties.

  16. Approximate initial data for binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth A. Dennison; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Harald P. Pfeiffer

    2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct approximate analytical solutions to the constraint equations of general relativity for binary black holes of arbitrary mass ratio in quasicircular orbit. We adopt the puncture method to solve the constraint equations in the transverse-traceless decomposition and consider perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes caused by boosts and the presence of a binary companion. A superposition of these two perturbations then yields approximate, but fully analytic binary black hole initial data that are accurate to first order in the inverse of the binary separation and the square of the black holes' momenta.

  17. A new spin on black hole hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that scalar hair can be added to rotating, vacuum black holes of general relativity. These hairy black holes (HBHs) clarify a lingering question concerning gravitational solitons: if a black hole can be added at the centre of a boson star, as it typically can for other solitons. We argue that it can, but only if it is spinning. The existence of such HBHs is related to the Kerr superradiant instability triggered by a massive scalar field. This connection leads to the following conjecture: a (hairless) black hole which is afflicted by the superradiant instability of a given field must allow hairy generalizations with that field.

  18. Assessment of the Geothermal Potential Within the BPA Marketing Area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, John W.; Allen, Eliot D.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of geothermal energy is estimated that can be used for direct heat applications and electrical power generation within the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) marketing area. The BPA marketing area includes three principal states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and portions of California, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, and Utah bordering on these three states. This area covers approximately 384,000 square miles and has an estimated population of 6,760,000. The total electrical geothermal potential within this marketing area is 4077 MW/sub e/ from hydrothermal resources and 16,000 MW/sub e/ from igneous systems, whereas the total thermal (wellhead) potential is 16.15 x 10/sup 15/ Btu/y. Approximately 200 geothermal resource sites were initially identified within the BPA marketing area. This number was then reduced to about 100 sites thought to be the most promising for development by the year 2000. These 100 sites, due to load area overlap, were grouped into 53 composite sites; 21-3/4 within BPA preference customer areas and 31-1/4 within nonpreference customer areas. The geothermal resource potential was then estimated for high-temperature (> 302/sup 0/F = 150/sup 0/C), intermediate-temperature (194 to 302/sup 0/F = 90 to 150/sup 0/C), and low-temperature (< 194/sup 0/F = 90/sup 0/C) resources.

  19. Near Horizon Structure of Extremal Vanishing Horizon Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeghian, S; Vahidinia, M H; Yavartanoo, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the near horizon structure of Extremal Vanishing Horizon (EVH) black holes, extremal black holes with vanishing horizon area with a vanishing one-cycle on the horizon. We construct the most general near horizon EVH and near-EVH ansatz for the metric and other fields, like dilaton and gauge fields which may be present in the theory. We prove that (1) the near horizon EVH geometry for generic gravity theory in generic dimension has a three dimensional maximally symmetric subspace; (2) if the matter fields of the theory satisfy strong energy condition either this 3d part is AdS$_3$, or the solution is a direct product of a locally 3d flat space and a $d-3$ dimensional part; (3) these results extend to the near horizon geometry of near-EVH black holes, for which the AdS$_3$ part is replaced with BTZ geometry. We present some specific near horizon EVH geometries in 3, 4 and 5 dimensions for which there is a classification. We also briefly discuss implications of these generic results for generic (gauged) ...

  20. Surface tension, hydrophobicity, and black holes: The entropic connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. E. Callaway

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent calculations have shown that the linear proportionality between black hole entropy and area can be explained by performing a density matrix calculation for a massless free field theory. By applying the same formalism to an empirical fluid ``field theory,'' entropic quantities such as surface tension can be calculated in a novel fashion. Good agreement with experiment is obtained for a number of liquids. This approach may lead to a practical new technique for the evaluation of thermodynamic quantities important entropic components. Implications for the protein folding problem are discussed.

  1. Thermodynamics and Spectroscopy of Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by Quintessence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R Tharanath; V C Kuriakose

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamic and spectroscopic behaviour of Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by quintessence are studied. We have derived the thermodynamic quantities and studied their behaviour for different values of quintessence parameter. We put the background space-time into the Kruskal-like coordinate to find the period with respect to Elucidean time. Also assuming that the adiabatic invariant obeys Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule, detailed study of area spectrum and entropy spectrum have been done for special cases of the quintessece state parameter. We find that the spectra are equally spaced.

  2. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  3. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  4. Rotating embedded black holes: Entropy and Hawking's radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng Ibohal

    2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we derive a class of rotating embedded black holes. Then we study Hawking's radiation effects on these embedded black holes. The surface gravity, entropy and angular velocity are given for each of these black holes.

  5. Film cooling and heat transfer of steam through an inclined injection hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hun Way

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer coefficient at blowing rate M 0. 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 NOMENCLATURE Symbol Description area circumference of the cross sectional area Cp D E, , Es, Es drag coefficient specific heat diameter of the injection hole minor... the experimental data at low blowing rates; however, the extension to higher injection rates is not correct, and an injected fluid other than air is not discussed. Goldstein [2] reviewed a number of semi- empirical correlations and predictions for two...

  6. Hairy black holes in N=2 gauged supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federico Faedo; Dietmar Klemm; Masato Nozawa

    2015-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct black holes with scalar hair in a wide class of four-dimensional N=2 Fayet-Iliopoulos gauged supergravity theories that are characterized by a prepotential containing one free parameter. Considering the truncated model in which only a single real scalar survives, the theory is reduced to an Einstein-scalar system with a potential, which admits at most two AdS critical points and is expressed in terms of a real superpotential. Our solution is static, admits maximally symmetric horizons, asymptotically tends to AdS space corresponding to an extremum of the superpotential, but is disconnected from the Schwarzschild-AdS family. The condition under which the spacetime admits an event horizon is addressed for each horizon topology. It turns out that for hyperbolic horizons the black holes can be extremal. In this case, the near-horizon geometry is AdS_2 x H^2, where the scalar goes to the other, non-supersymmetric, critical point of the potential. Our solution displays fall-off behaviours different from the standard one, due to the fact that the mass parameter $m^2=-2/\\ell^2$ at the supersymmetric vacuum lies in a characteristic range $m^2_{BF}\\le m^2\\le m^2_{\\rm BF}+\\ell^{-2}$ for which the slowly decaying scalar field is also normalizable. Nevertheless, we identify a well-defined mass for our spacetime, following the prescription of Hertog and Maeda. Quite remarkably, the product of all horizon areas is not given in terms of the asymptotic cosmological constant alone, as one would expect in absence of electromagnetic charges and angular momentum. Our solution shows qualitatively the same thermodynamic behaviour as the Schwarzschild-AdS black hole, but the entropy is always smaller for a given mass and AdS curvature radius. We also find that our spherical black holes are unstable against radial perturbations.

  7. Black Holes at the LHC: Progress since 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Seong Chan [FRDP, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the recent noticeable progresses in black hole physics focusing on the up-coming super-collider, the LHC. We discuss the classical formation of black holes by particle collision, the greybody factors for higher dimensional rotating black holes, the deep implications of black hole physics to the 'energy-distance' relation, the security issues of the LHC associated with black hole formation and the newly developed Monte-Carlo generators for black hole events.

  8. Gravitating discs around black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas; J. -M. Hure; O. Semerak

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid discs and tori around black holes are discussed within different approaches and with the emphasis on the role of disc gravity. First reviewed are the prospects of investigating the gravitational field of a black hole--disc system by analytical solutions of stationary, axially symmetric Einstein's equations. Then, more detailed considerations are focused to middle and outer parts of extended disc-like configurations where relativistic effects are small and the Newtonian description is adequate. Within general relativity, only a static case has been analysed in detail. Results are often very inspiring, however, simplifying assumptions must be imposed: ad hoc profiles of the disc density are commonly assumed and the effects of frame-dragging and completely lacking. Astrophysical discs (e.g. accretion discs in active galactic nuclei) typically extend far beyond the relativistic domain and are fairly diluted. However, self-gravity is still essential for their structure and evolution, as well as for their radiation emission and the impact on the environment around. For example, a nuclear star cluster in a galactic centre may bear various imprints of mutual star--disc interactions, which can be recognised in observational properties, such as the relation between the central mass and stellar velocity dispersion.

  9. Topological Black Holes in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kowalski-Glikman; D. Nowak-Szczepaniak

    2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the black hole solutions with horizons of non-trivial topology and investigate their properties in the framework of an approach to quantum gravity being an extension of Bohm's formulation of quantum mechanics. The solutions we found tend asymptotically (for large $r$) to topological black holes. We also analyze the thermodynamics of these space-times.

  10. Primordial black holes and asteroid danger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Shatskiy

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Probability for a primordial black hole to invade the Kuiper belt was calculated. We showed that primordial black holes of certain masses can significantly change asteroids' orbits. These events may result in disasters, local for our solar system and global for the Earth (like the Tunguska meteorite). We also estimated how often such events occur.

  11. Dynamics of Primordial Black Hole Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; K. Jedamzik

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical investigation of the gravitational collapse of horizon-size density fluctuations to primordial black holes (PBHs) during the radiation-dominated phase of the Early Universe. The collapse dynamics of three different families of initial perturbation shapes, imposed at the time of horizon crossing, is computed. The perturbation threshold for black hole formation, needed for estimations of the cosmological PBH mass function, is found to be $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.7$ rather than the generally employed $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 1/3$, if $\\delta$ is defined as $\\Delta M/\\mh$, the relative excess mass within the initial horizon volume. In order to study the accretion onto the newly formed black holes, we use a numerical scheme that allows us to follow the evolution for long times after formation of the event horizon. In general, small black holes (compared to the horizon mass at the onset of the collapse) give rise to a fluid bounce that effectively shuts off accretion onto the black hole, while large ones do not. In both cases, the growth of the black hole mass owing to accretion is insignificant. Furthermore, the scaling of black hole mass with distance from the formation threshold, known to occur in near-critical gravitational collapse, is demonstrated to apply to primordial black hole formation.

  12. Black holes cannot support conformal scalar hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Zannias

    1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the only static asymptotically flat non-extrema black hole solution of the Einstein-conformally invariant scalar field equations having the scalar field bounded on the horizon, is the Schwarzschild one. Thus black holes cannot be endowed with conformal scalar hair of finite length.

  13. Quantum Entropy of Charged Rotating Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a method for obtaining the one-loop quantum corrections to the tree-level entropy for a charged Kerr black hole. Divergences which appear can be removed by renormalization of couplings in the tree-level gravitational action in a manner similar to that for a static black hole.

  14. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  15. Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking Materials for Blue Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking...

  16. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues....

  17. T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site...

  18. Can Superconducting Cosmic Strings Piercing Seed Black Holes Generate Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Matthew J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a large number of supermassive black holes at redshifts $z> 6$, when the Universe was only nine hundred million years old, has raised the fundamental question of how such massive compact objects could form in a (cosmologically) short time interval. Each of the proposed standard scenarios for black hole formation, involving rapid accretion of seed black holes, or black hole mergers, faces severe theoretical difficulties in explaining the short time formation of supermassive objects. In the present Letter, we propose an alternative scenario for the formation of supermassive black holes in the early Universe in which energy transfer from superconducting cosmic strings, piercing small seed black holes, is the main physical process leading to rapid mass increase. The increase in mass of a primordial seed black hole pierced by two antipodal strings is estimated and it is shown that this increases linearly in time. Due to the high energy transfer rate from the cosmic strings, we find that supermassi...

  19. miles-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97 Upper TroposphericIVertical Velocity

  20. Modal shifts in short-haul passenger travel and the consequent energy impacts. [Intercity travel under 500 miles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to evaluate the impacts of strategies to effect modal shifts in short-haul passenger travel (defined herein as intercity travel under 500 miles) from energy-intensive modes to those modes that are less energy-intensive. A series of individual strategies, ranging from incentives to the less energy-intensive modes (bus, rail) to penalties to the more energy-intensive modes (auto, air) was examined to determine energy saved and policy implications relative to strategy implementation. The most effective of the individual strategies were then combined in all permutations, and the analysis was repeated. As part of the analytical process, effects of factors other than energy (user cost and time, emissions, government subsidy, and travel fatailities) were examined in a benefit/cost analysis. Finally, energy savings, benefit/cost impacts, implementation considerations, and policy implications were evaluated to arrive at conclusions as to the effectiveness of the more-influential strategies and to the overall effectiveness of induced modal shifts. The principal conclusion of the study is that the maximum 1980 energy saving that might be realized by modal shifts, discounting the concurrent effects of demand suppression and improvement of mode efficiency, is approximately 83 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (46,500 bbl gasoline per day), 3.8% of the total projected 1980 energy consumption in the short-haul transportation sector and 0.23% of the total US petroleum use. It was also concluded that strategies to achieve these small savings by modal shifts would result in significant economic, social, and business disruptions.

  1. Lower head creep rupture failure analysis associated with alternative accident sequences of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sang Lung, Chan [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich and Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, Zurich, Switzerland, 8001 (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this lower head creep rupture analysis is to assess the current version of MELCOR 1.8.5-RG against SCDAP/RELAP5 MOD 3.3kz. The purpose of this assessment is to investigate the current MELCOR in-vessel core damage progression phenomena including the model for the formation of a molten pool. The model for stratified molten pool natural heat transfer will be included in the next MELCOR release. Presently, MELCOR excludes the gap heat-transfer model for the cooling associated with the narrow gap between the debris and the lower head vessel wall. All these phenomenological models are already treated in SCDAP/RELAP5 using the COUPLE code to model the heat transfer of the relocated debris with the lower head based on a two-dimensional finite-element-method. The assessment should determine if current MELCOR capabilities adequately cover core degradation phenomena appropriate for the consolidated MELCOR code. Inclusion of these features should bring MELCOR much closer to a state of parity with SCDAP/RELAP5 and is a currently underway element in the MELCOR code consolidation effort. This assessment deals with the following analysis of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) alternative accident sequences. The TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-1 includes the continuation of the base case of the TMI-2 accident with the Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP) tripped, and the High Pressure Injection System (HPIS) throttled after approximately 6000 s accident time, while in the TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-2, the reactor coolant pumps is tripped after 6000 s and the HPIS is activated after 12,012 s. The lower head temperature distributions calculated with SCDAP/RELAP5 are visualized and animated with open source visualization freeware 'OpenDX'. (author)

  2. Revisiting Insights from Three Mile Island Unit 2 Postaccident Examinations and Evaluations in View of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Corradini; Larry Ott; Randall Gauntt; Dana Powers

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979, led industry and regulators to enhance strategies to protect against severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants. Investigations in the years after the accident concluded that at least 45% of the core had melted and that nearly 19 tonnes of the core material had relocated to the lower head. Postaccident examinations indicate that about half of that material formed a solid layer near the lower head and above it was a layer of fragmented rubble. As discussed in this paper, numerous insights related to pressurized water reactor accident progression were gained from postaccident evaluations of debris, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) specimens, and nozzles taken from the RPV. In addition, information gleaned from TMI-2 specimen evaluations and available data from plant instrumentation were used to improve severe accident simulation models that form the technical basis for reactor safety evaluations. Finally, the TMI-2 accident led the nuclear community to dedicate considerable effort toward understanding severe accident phenomenology as well as the potential for containment failure. Because available data suggest that significant amounts of fuel heated to temperatures near melting, the events at Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 offer an unexpected opportunity to gain similar understanding about boiling water reactor accident progression. To increase the international benefit from such an endeavor, we recommend that an international effort be initiated to (a) prioritize data needs; (b) identify techniques, samples, and sample evaluations needed to address each information need; and (c) help finance acquisition of the required data and conduct of the analyses.

  3. EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EIS for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) in eastern Ventura County, California, approximately 29 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. (DOEs operations bordered the Northern Buffer Zone. DOE is responsible for soil cleanup in Area IV and the Northern Buffer Zone.) In the EIS, DOE will evaluate reasonable alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, and disposal of all resulting waste at permitted facilities.

  4. Black hole and holographic dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the connection between black hole and holographic dark energy. We examine the issue of the equation of state (EOS) for holographic energy density as a candidate for the dark energy carefully. This is closely related to the EOS for black hole, because the holographic dark energy comes from the black hole energy density. In order to derive the EOS of a black hole, we may use its dual (quantum) systems. Finally, a regular black hole without the singularity is introduced to describe an accelerating universe inside the cosmological horizon. Inspired by this, we show that the holographic energy density with the cosmological horizon as the IR cutoff leads to the dark energy-dominated universe with $\\omega_{\\rm \\Lambda}=-1$.

  5. Quantum Black Hole Model and Hawking's Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Berezin

    1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The black hole model with a self-gravitating charged spherical symmetric dust thin shell as a source is considered. The Schroedinger-type equation for such a model is derived. This equation appeared to be a finite differences equation. A theory of such an equation is developed and general solution is found and investigated in details. The discrete spectrum of the bound state energy levels is obtained. All the eigenvalues appeared to be infinitely degenerate. The ground state wave functions are evaluated explicitly. The quantum black hole states are selected and investigated. It is shown that the obtained black hole mass spectrum is compatible with the existence of Hawking's radiation in the limit of low temperatures both for large and nearly extreme Reissner-Nordstrom black holes. The above mentioned infinite degeneracy of the mass (energy) eigenvalues may appeared helpful in resolving the well known information paradox in the black hole physics.

  6. Black Hole Thermodynamics Based on Unitary Evolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yu-Lei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we try to construct black hole thermodynamics based on the fact that, the formation and evaporation of a black hole can be described by quantum unitary evolutions. First, we show that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy $S_{BH}$ cannot be a Boltzmann or thermal entropy. To confirm this statement, we show that the original black hole's "first law" cannot be treated as the first law of thermodynamics formally, due to some missing metric perturbations caused by matter. Then, by including those (quantum) metric perturbations, we show that the black hole formation and evaporation can be described in a unitary manner effectively, through a quantum channel between the exterior and interior of the event horizon. In this way, the paradoxes of information loss and firewall can be resolved effectively. Finally, we show that black hole thermodynamics can be constructed in an ordinary way, by constructing statistical mechanics.

  7. Fourier Analysis of the BTZ Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian M. Tolfree

    2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we extend our previous work regarding the role of the Fourier transformation in bulk to boundary mappings to include the BTZ black hole. We follow standard procedures for modifying Fourier Transformations to accommodate quotient spaces and arrive at a bulk to boundary mapping in a black hole background. We show that this mapping is consistent with known results and lends a new insight into the AdS/CFT duality. We find that the micro-states corresponding to the entropy of a bulk scalar field are the Fourier coefficients on the boundary, which transform under the principal series representation of $SL(2,R)$. Building upon this we present a toy model to analyze the implications of this for the origin of black hole entropy. We find that the black hole micro-states live on the boundary and correspond to the possible emission modes of the black hole

  8. An electromagnetic black hole made of metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Qiang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, a black hole is a region of space with huge gravitational field in the means of general relativity, which absorbs everything hitting it including the light. In general relativity, the presence of matter-energy densities results in the motion of matter propagating in a curved spacetime1, which is similar to the electromagnetic-wave propagation in a curved space and in an inhomogeneous metamaterial2. Hence one can simulate the black hole using electromagnetic fields and metamaterials. In a recent theoretical work, an optical black hole has been proposed based on metamaterials, in which the numerical simulations showed a highly efficient light absorption3. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of electromagnetic black hole in the microwave frequencies. The proposed black hole is composed of non-resonant and resonant metamaterial structures, which can absorb electromagnetic waves efficiently coming from all directions due to the local control of electromagnetic fields. Hence the elect...

  9. Fermionic greybody factors in dilaton black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahed Abedi; Hessamaddin Arfaei

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the question of emission of fermions in the process of dilaton black hole evolution and its characters for different dilaton coupling constants $\\alpha$ is studied. The main quantity of interest, the greybody factors are calculated both numerically and in analytical approximation. The dependence of rates of evaporation and behaviour on the dilaton coupling constant is analyzed. Having calculated the greybody factors we are able to address the question of the final fate of the dilaton black hole. For that we also need to make dynamical treatment of the solution by considering the backreaction which will show a crucial effect on the final result. We find a transition line in $(Q/M, \\alpha)$ plane that separates the two regimes for the fate of the black hole, decay regime and extremal regime. In the decay regime the black hole completely evaporates, while in the extremal regime the black hole approaches the extremal limit by radiation and becomes stable.

  10. Black holes in Asymptotically Safe Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saueressig, Frank; D'Odorico, Giulio; Vidotto, Francesca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are among the most fascinating objects populating our universe. Their characteristic features, encompassing spacetime singularities, event horizons, and black hole thermodynamics, provide a rich testing ground for quantum gravity ideas. In this note we observe that the renormalization group improved Schwarzschild black holes constructed by Bonanno and Reuter within Weinberg's asymptotic safety program constitute a prototypical example of a Hayward geometry used to model non-singular black holes within quantum gravity phenomenology. Moreover, they share many features of a Planck star: their effective geometry naturally incorporates the one-loop corrections found in the effective field theory framework, their Kretschmann scalar is bounded, and the black hole singularity is replaced by a regular de Sitter patch. The role of the cosmological constant in the renormalization group improvement process is briefly discussed.

  11. Highly damped quasinormal modes and the small scale structure of quantum corrected black hole exteriors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babb, James; Kunstatter, Gabor [Department of Physics, The University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Daghigh, Ramin [Natural Sciences Department, Metropolitan State University, 700 East Seventh Street, Saint Paul, Minnesota, 55106 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasinormal modes provide valuable information about the structure of spacetime outside a black hole. There is also a conjectured relationship between the highly damped quasinormal modes and the semiclassical spectrum of the horizon area/entropy. In this paper, we show that for spacetimes characterized by more than one scale, the 'infinitely damped' modes in principle probe the structure of spacetime outside the horizon at the shortest length scales. We demonstrate this with the calculation of the highly damped quasinormal modes of the nonsingular, single-horizon, quantum corrected black hole derived in [A. Peltola and G. Kunstatter, Phys. Rev. D 79, 061501 (2009); ].

  12. Analysis of trip item non-response bias in the Houston-Galveston area council household travel surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, Arthur F

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    25 Trip Rate Comparisons Statistical Comparisons Coefficient of Variation Comparisons Expanded Trips Comparison . Expanded Vehicle Miles Traveled Comparison 27 42 47 69 72 CHAPTER V CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Page 74 Conclusions... Recommendations 74 76 REFERENCES 78 VITA 80 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 The three basic trip types 2 The basic trip purpose categories . 3 The eight counties composing the Houston-Galveston Study Area 15 4 Comparison of mean trip rates suatified by age...

  13. Gravitational waves versus black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevor W. Marshall

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that, in order for the gravitational field to be propagated as a wave, it is necessary for it to satisfy a further set of field equations, in addition to those of Einstein and Hilbert, and these equations mean there is a preferred coordinate frame, called the Global Inertial Frame, giving rise to a unique metric . The implication is that a true gravitational field is not compatible with Einstein's Principle of Equivalence, which is in contradiction with his other fundamental concept of locality. The additional field equations ensure that gravitational collapse does not go below the Schwarzschild radius, thereby excluding the possibility of singular solutions (black holes) of the Einstein-Hilbert equations. Such solutions would also violate Einstein's locality principle.

  14. Holes in the ghost condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krotov, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Moscow State University, Department of Physics, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya, 25, Moscow, 117259 (Russian Federation); Rebbi, C. [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rubakov, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, V. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik, Foeringer Ring 6, 80805, Munichn (Germany)

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recently proposed model of 'ghost condensation', spatially homogeneous states may mix, via tunneling, with inhomogeneous states which are somewhat similar to bubbles in the theory of false vacuum decay, the corresponding bubble nucleation rate being exponentially sensitive to the ultraviolet completion of the model. The conservation of energy and charge requires that the energy density is negative and the field is strongly unstable in a part of the nucleated bubble. Unlike in the theory of false vacuum decay, this region does not expand during subsequent real-time evolution. In the outer part, positive energy outgoing waves develop, which eventually form shocks. Behind the outgoing waves and away from the bubble center, the background settles down to its original value. The outcome of the entire process is thus a microscopic region of negative energy and strong field - 'hole in the ghost condensate' - plus a collection of outgoing waves (particles of the ghost condensate field) carrying away finite energy.

  15. Expanding the Area of Gravitational Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe how gravitational entropy is intimately connected with the concept of gravitational heat, expressed as the difference between the total and free energies of a given gravitational system. From this perspective one can compute these thermodyanmic quantities in settings that go considerably beyond Bekenstein's original insight that the area of a black hole event horizon can be identified with thermodynamic entropy. The settings include the outsides of cosmological horizons and spacetimes with NUT charge. However the interpretation of gravitational entropy in these broader contexts remains to be understood.

  16. Thermodynamics of Dyonic Lifshitz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Zingg

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes with asymptotic anisotropic scaling are conjectured to be gravity duals of condensed matter system close to quantum critical points with non-trivial dynamical exponent z at finite temperature. A holographic renormalization procedure is presented that allows thermodynamic potentials to be defined for objects with both electric and magnetic charge in such a way that standard thermodynamic relations hold. Black holes in asymptotic Lifshitz spacetimes can exhibit paramagnetic behavior at low temperature limit for certain values of the critical exponent z, whereas the behavior of AdS black holes is always diamagnetic.

  17. Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

  18. Black hole hair in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao Cao; Yi-Xin Chen; Jian-Long Li

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the property of matter in equilibrium with a static, spherically symmetric black hole in D-dimensional spacetime. It requires this kind of matter has an equation of state (\\omega\\equiv p_r/\\rho=-1/(1+2kn), k,n\\in \\mathbb{N}), which seems to be independent of D. However, when we associate this with specific models, some interesting limits on space could be found: (i)(D=2+2kn) while the black hole is surrounded by cosmic strings; (ii)the black hole can be surrounded by linear dilaton field only in 4-dimensional spacetime. In both cases, D=4 is special.

  19. Radion clouds around evaporating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Kaluza-Klein model, with a matter source associated with Hawking radiation from an evaporating black hole, is used to obtain a simple form for the radion effective potential. The environmental effect generally causes a matter-induced shift of the radion vacuum, resulting in the formation of a radion cloud around the hole. There is an albedo due to the radion cloud, with an energy dependent reflection coefficient that depends upon the size of the extra dimensions and the temperature of the hole.

  20. Rental rate includes liability insurance (LDW), vehicle licensing fees, unlimited roundtrip mileage; $0.25/mile for one-way rentals and no drop fees for vehicles that are picked up and returned in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    ; $0.25/mile for one-way rentals and no drop fees for vehicles that are picked up and returned in setting up direct billing for your department, please click link below: http://www

  1. Funding for the food miles project was provided through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Advancing Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food (ACAAF) Program. In Nova Scotia the program is delivered by Agri-Futures Nova Scotia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    Funding for the food miles project was provided through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.................................................................... 7 Energy .................................................................................. 9 Self grown? With these two questions at the fore, combing through various statistics and reports

  2. Thermodynamics of Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole: thermal stability of Nariai black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole in five dimensions by introducing two temperatures based on the standard and Bousso-Hawking normalizations. We use the first-law of thermodynamics to derive thermodynamic quantities. The two temperatures indicate that the Nariai black hole is thermodynamically unstable. However, it seems that black hole thermodynamics favors the standard normalization, and does not favor the Bousso-Hawking normalization.

  3. Black hole evolution: I. Supernova-regulated black hole growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubois, Yohan; Silk, Joseph; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of a supermassive black hole (BH) is determined by how much gas the host galaxy is able to feed it, which in turn is controlled by the cosmic environment, through galaxy mergers and accretion of cosmic flows that time how galaxies obtain their gas, but also by internal processes in the galaxy, such as star formation and feedback from stars and the BH itself. In this paper, we study the growth of a 10^12 Msun halo at z=2, which is the progenitor of an archetypical group of galaxies at z=0, and of its central BH by means of a high-resolution zoomed cosmological simulation, the Seth simulation. We study the evolution of the BH driven by the accretion of cold gas in the galaxy, and explore the efficiency of the feedback from supernovae (SNe). For a relatively inefficient energy input from SNe, the BH grows at the Eddington rate from early times, and reaches self-regulation once it is massive enough. We find that at early cosmic times z>3.5, efficient feedback from SNe forbids the formation of a settled...

  4. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  5. Tucker Wireline Open Hole Wireline Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.

    2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tucker Wireline unit ran a suite of open hole logs right behind the RMOTC logging contractor for comparison purposes. The tools included Dual Laterolog, Phased Induction, BHC Sonic, and Density-Porosity.

  6. Multipole moments of bumpy black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeland, Sarah Jane

    General relativity predicts the existence of black holes, compact objects whose spacetimes depend only on their mass, spin, and charge in vacuum (the no-hair theorem). As various observations probe deeper into the strong ...

  7. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Total round-trip power loss, coupling efficiency and themicron. Total round-trip power loss and coupling efficiencythe total fractional power loss per round trip, the hole

  8. Black Hole Thermodynamics in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas R. Mureika; John W. Moffat; Mir Faizal

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the thermodynamics of a non-rotating and rotating black hole in a modified theory of gravity that includes scalar and vector modifications to general relativity, which results in a modified gravitational constant $G = G_N(1+\\alpha)$ and a new gravitational charge $Q = \\sqrt{\\alpha G_N}M$. The influence of the parameter $\\alpha$ alters the non-rotating black hole's lifetime, temperature and entropy profiles from the standard Schwarzschild case. The thermodynamics of a rotating black hole is analyzed and it is shown to possess stable, cold remnants. The thermodynamic properties of a vacuum solution regular at $r=0$ are investigated and the solution without a horizon called a "gray hole" is not expected to possess an information loss problem.

  9. Energy of 4-Dimensional Black Hole, etc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy Palatnik

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter I suggest possible redefinition of mass density, not depending on speed of the mass element, which leads to a more simple stress-energy for an object. I calculate energy of black hole.

  10. Anosov maps with rectangular holes. Nonergodic cases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingenier'ia. Universidad de la Rep'ublica C.C. 30, Montevideo, Uruguay E­mail: roma@fing.edu.uy; Fax: (598 Partially supported by CONICYT (Uruguay). 1 #12; Running head: Anosov maps with rectangular holes Address

  11. Horizon Operator Approach to Black Hole Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. 't Hooft

    1994-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The $S$-matrix Ansatz for the construction of a quantum theory of black holes is further exploited. We first note that treating the metric tensor $g_{\\m\

  12. Topological Black Holes -- Outside Looking In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the general mathematical construction and physical picture of topological black holes, which are black holes whose event horizons are surfaces of non-trivial topology. The construction is carried out in an arbitrary number of dimensions, and includes all known special cases which have appeared before in the literature. I describe the basic features of massive charged topological black holes in $(3+1)$ dimensions, from both an exterior and interior point of view. To investigate their interiors, it is necessary to understand the radiative falloff behaviour of a given massless field at late times in the background of a topological black hole. I describe the results of a numerical investigation of such behaviour for a conformally coupled scalar field. Significant differences emerge between spherical and higher genus topologies.

  13. Spacetime constraints on accreting black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garofalo, David [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California 91109 (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spin dependence of accretion onto rotating Kerr black holes using analytic techniques. In its linear regime, angular momentum transport in MHD turbulent accretion flow involves the generation of radial magnetic field connecting plasma in a differentially rotating flow. We take a first principles approach, highlighting the constraint that limits the generation and amplification of radial magnetic fields, stemming from the transfer of energy from mechanical to magnetic form. Because the energy transferred in magnetic form is ultimately constrained by gravitational potential energy or Killing energy, the spin dependence of the latter allows us to derive spin-dependent constraints on the success of the accreting plasma to expel its angular momentum. We find an inverse relationship between this ability and black hole spin. If this radial magnetic field generation forms the basis for angular momentum transfer in accretion flows, accretion rates involving Kerr black holes are expected to be lower as the black hole spin increases in the prograde sense.

  14. Scattering map for two black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro P. S. de Moura; Patricio S. Letelier

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the motion of light in the gravitational field of two Schwarzschild black holes, making the approximation that they are far apart, so that the motion of light rays in the neighborhood of one black hole can be considered to be the result of the action of each black hole separately. Using this approximation, the dynamics is reduced to a 2-dimensional map, which we study both numerically and analytically. The map is found to be chaotic, with a fractal basin boundary separating the possible outcomes of the orbits (escape or falling into one of the black holes). In the limit of large separation distances, the basin boundary becomes a self-similar Cantor set, and we find that the box-counting dimension decays slowly with the separation distance, following a logarithmic decay law.

  15. Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, William E. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  16. Thermodynamics and evaporation of the noncommutative black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2007-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamics of the noncommutative black hole whose static picture is similar to that of the nonsingular black hole known as the de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. It turns out that the final remnant of extremal black hole is a thermodynamically stable object. We describe the evaporation process of this black hole by using the noncommutativity-corrected Vaidya metric. It is found that there exists a close relationship between thermodynamic approach and evaporation process.

  17. Spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikun Ding; Changqing Liu; Qian Guo

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators and, find that particle falling from infinity with zero velocity cannot collide with unbound energy when the noncommutative Kerr black hole is exactly extremal. Our results also show that the bigger of the spinning black hole's mass is, the higher of center of mass energy that the particles obtain. For small and medium noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole, the collision energy depends on the black holes' mass.

  18. Comment on "Black holes constrain varying constants"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Flambaum

    2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper [DDL] claims that the increase of the proton electric charge e leads to a (forbidden) decrease of black hole entropy, therefore, possible evidence for variation of $\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ [alpha] must be interpreted as a decrease of the speed of light. We argue that purely theoretical consideration of black holes possibly cannot give any model-independent limitations on variation of fundamental constants.

  19. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinec, Emil J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  20. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emil J. Martinec

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  1. Local temperature for dynamical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward; R. Di Criscienzo; M. Nadalini; L. Vanzo; S. Zerbini

    2008-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A local Hawking temperature was recently derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method, and is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. Descriptions are given of the operational meaning of the temperature, in terms of what observers measure, and its relation to the usual Hawking temperature for static black holes. Implications for the final fate of an evaporating black hole are discussed.

  2. Notes on Black Hole Fluctuations and Backreaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu; Alpan Raval; Sukanya Sinha

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In these notes we prepare the ground for a systematic investigation into the issues of black hole fluctuations and backreaction by discussing the formulation of the problem, commenting on possible advantages and shortcomings of existing works, and introducing our own approach via a stochastic semiclassical theory of gravity based on the Einstein-Langevin equation and the fluctuation-dissipation relation for a self-consistent description of metric fluctuations and dissipative dynamics of the black hole with backreaction of its Hawking radiance.

  3. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  4. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  5. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

  6. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences; Shevenell, L., Garside, L. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  7. The Revival of White Holes as Small Bangs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alon Retter; Shlomo Heller

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are extremely dense and compact objects from which light cannot escape. There is an overall consensus that black holes exist and many astronomical objects are identified with black holes. White holes were understood as the exact time reversal of black holes, therefore they should continuously throw away material. It is accepted, however, that a persistent ejection of mass leads to gravitational pressure, the formation of a black hole and thus to the "death of while holes". So far, no astronomical source has been successfully tagged a white hole. The only known white hole is the Big Bang which was instantaneous rather than continuous or long-lasting. We thus suggest that the emergence of a white hole, which we name a 'Small Bang', is spontaneous - all the matter is ejected at a single pulse. Unlike black holes, white holes cannot be continuously observed rather their effect can only be detected around the event itself. Gamma ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the universe. Long gamma-ray bursts were connected with supernova eruptions. There is a new group of gamma-ray bursts, which are relatively close to Earth, but surprisingly lack any supernova emission. We propose identifying these bursts with white holes. White holes seem like the best explanation of gamma-ray bursts that appear in voids. We also predict the detection of rare gigantic gamma-ray bursts with energies much higher than typically observed.

  8. Hamiltonian thermodynamics of three-dimensional dilatonic black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, Goncalo A. S.; Lemos, Jose P. S. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica-CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico-IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa-UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The action for a class of three-dimensional dilaton-gravity theories with a negative cosmological constant can be recast in a Brans-Dicke type action, with its free {omega} parameter. These theories have static spherically symmetric black holes. Those with well formulated asymptotics are studied through a Hamiltonian formalism, and their thermodynamical properties are found out. The theories studied are general relativity ({omega}{yields}{infinity}), a dimensionally reduced cylindrical four-dimensional general relativity theory ({omega}=0), and a theory representing a class of theories ({omega}=-3). The Hamiltonian formalism is set up in three dimensions through foliations on the right region of the Carter-Penrose diagram, with the bifurcation 1-sphere as the left boundary, and anti-de Sitter infinity as the right boundary. The metric functions on the foliated hypersurfaces are the canonical coordinates. The Hamiltonian action is written, the Hamiltonian being a sum of constraints. One finds a new action which yields an unconstrained theory with one pair of canonical coordinates (M,P{sub M}), M being the mass parameter and P{sub M} its conjugate momenta The resulting Hamiltonian is a sum of boundary terms only. A quantization of the theory is performed. The Schroedinger evolution operator is constructed, the trace is taken, and the partition function of the canonical ensemble is obtained. The black hole entropies differ, in general, from the usual quarter of the horizon area due to the dilaton.

  9. Investigation of laser percussion hole drilling by use of speckle correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yalukova, O.; Miroshnikova, N.; Gren, P.; Sarady, I.; Sjoedahl, M

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper speckle correlation is introduced as a tool to investigate the heat-influenced area during material processing with laser light. Two materials were investigated, a pure silver sheet and a sheet of SiC-diamond composite. The processing laser used in the experiments was a diode-pumped acousto-opticalQ-switched Nd:YAG laser that allowed percussion hole drilling to be performed using green light through a second-harmonic crystal. The measurements were performed using a continuous-wave He-Ne laser and a digital camera. The experimental results show that the heat-influenced area is {approx}5000 times larger than the actual hole being drilled and that it reaches a steady-state condition toward the end of the processing cycle.

  10. rise in elevation is the rough equivalent of a 150-mile journey away from the equator--so

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Steven K.

    variety of life-forms that survive amid thin soils, low oxygen, stagger- ing winds, powerful ultraviolet--so ecosystems in the mountains get stacked verti- cally. And the land area decreases as you climb, so new, Bolivia, seems specially evolved, too.A Belgian raised in Africa, the United States, and Argentina, he

  11. Holographic superconductor in the exact hairy black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Chanyong Park

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged black hole of hyperbolic horizon with scalar hair (charged Martinez-Troncoso-Zanelli: CMTZ black hole) as a model of analytic hairy black hole for holographic superconductor. For this purpose, we investigate the second order phase transition between CMTZ and hyperbolic Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-AdS (HRNAdS) black holes. However, this transition unlikely occur. As an analytic treatment for holographic superconductor, we develop superconductor in the bulk and superfluidity on the boundary using the CMTZ black hole below the critical temperature. The presence of charge destroys the condensates around the zero temperature, which is in accord with the thermodynamic analysis of the CMTZ black hole.

  12. The Environmental Impact of Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham Loeb

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The supermassive black holes observed at the centers of almost all present-day galaxies, had a profound impact on their environment. I highlight the principle of self-regulation, by which supermassive black holes grow until they release sufficient energy to unbind the gas that feeds them from their host galaxy. This principle explains several observed facts, including the correlation between the mass of a central black hole and the depth of the gravitational potential well of its host galaxy, and the abundance and clustering properties of bright quasars in the redshift interval of z~2-6. At lower redshifts, quasars might have limited the maximum mass of galaxies through the suppression of cooling flows in X-ray clusters. The seeds of supermassive black holes were likely planted in dwarf galaxies at redshifts z>10, through the collapse of massive or supermassive stars. The minimum seed mass can be identified observationally through the detection of gravitational waves from black hole binaries by Advanced LIGO or LISA. Aside from shaping their host galaxies, quasar outflows filled the intergalactic medium with magnetic fields and heavy elements. Beyond the reach of these outflows, the brightest quasars at z>6 have ionized exceedingly large volumes of gas (tens of comoving Mpc) prior to global reionization, and must have suppressed the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in these volumes before the same occurred through the rest of the universe.

  13. Perturbative String Thermodynamics near Black Hole Horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Mertens; Henri Verschelde; Valentin I. Zakharov

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work JHEP 1403 (2014) 086. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of $\\alpha'$-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large $k$ limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in $g_s$) to compute thermodynamical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  14. Investigating Dark Energy with Black Hole Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini-Houghton; Adam Kelleher

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The accelerated expansion of the universe is ascribed to the existence of dark energy. Black holes accretion of dark energy induces a mass change proportional to the energy density and pressure of the background dark energy fluid. The time scale during which the mass of black holes changes considerably is too long relative to the age of the universe, thus beyond detection possibilities. We propose to take advantage of the modified black hole masses for exploring the equation of state $w[z]$ of dark energy, by investigating the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries on a dark energy background. Deriving the signatures of dark energy accretion on the evolution of binaries, we find that dark energy imprints on the emitted gravitational radiation and on the changes in the orbital radius of the binary can be within detection limits for certain supermassive black hole binaries. In this talk I describe how binaries can provide a useful tool in obtaining complementary information on the nature of dark energy, based on the work done with A.Kelleher.

  15. Black Holes with Flavors of Quantum Hair?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali

    2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that black holes can posses a long-range quantum hair of super-massive tensor fields, which can be detected by Aharonov-Bohm tabletop interference experiments, in which a quantum-hairy black hole, or a remnant particle, passes through the loop of a magnetic solenoid. The long distance effect does not decouple for an arbitrarily high mass of the hair-providing field. Because Kaluza-Klein and String theories contain infinite number of massive tensor fields, we study black holes with quantum Kaluza-Klein hair. We show that in five dimensions such a black hole can be interpreted as a string of `combed' generalized magnetic monopoles, with their fluxes confined along it. For the compactification on a translation-invariant circle, this substructure uncovers hidden flux conservation and quantization of the monopole charges, which constrain the quantum hair of the resulting four-dimensional black hole. For the spin-2 quantum hair this result is somewhat unexpected, since the constituent `magnetic' charges have no `electric' counterparts. Nevertheless, the information about their quantization is encoded in singularity.

  16. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  17. Black Hole Chromosphere at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If the scale of quantum gravity is near a TeV, black holes will be copiously produced at the LHC. In this work we study the main properties of the light descendants of these black holes. We show that the emitted partons are closely spaced outside the horizon, and hence they do not fragment into hadrons in vacuum but more likely into a kind of quark-gluon plasma. Consequently, the thermal emission occurs far from the horizon, at a temperature characteristic of the QCD scale. We analyze the energy spectrum of the particles emerging from the "chromosphere", and find that the hard hadronic jets are almost entirely suppressed. They are replaced by an isotropic distribution of soft photons and hadrons, with hundreds of particles in the GeV range. This provides a new distinctive signature for black hole events at LHC.

  18. Hole interactions with molecular vibrations on DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Omerzu; M. Licer; T. Mertelj; V. V. Kabanov; D. Mihailovic

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the interactions between holes and molecular vibrations on dry DNA using photoinduced infrared absorption spectroscopy. Laser photoexcited (PE) holes are found to have a room-temperature lifetime in excess of 1 ms, clearly indicating the presence of localization. However, from a quantitative model analysis of the frequency shifts of vibrational modes caused by the PE holes, we find the holevibrational coupling constant to be relatively small, 0.2. This interaction leads to a change in the conformational energy of 0.015 eV, which is too small to cause selftrapping at room temperature. We conclude that, at least in the dry (A) form, DNA is best understood in terms of a double chain of coupled quantum dots arising from the pseudo-random chain sequence of base pairs, in which Anderson localization prevents the formation of a metallic state.

  19. Neutrino Majorana Mass from Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Uehara

    2002-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the neutrino Majorana mass in TeV-scale gravity models. The black hole violates all non-gauged symmetries and can become the origin of lepton number violating processes. The fluctuation of higher-dimensional spacetime can result in the production of a black hole, which emits 2 neutrinos. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, this process is equivalent to the free propagation of a neutrino with the insertion of the black hole. From this fact, we derive the neutrino Majorana mass. The result is completely consistent with the recently observed evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay. And the obtained neutrino Majorana mass satisfies the constraint from the density of the neutrino dark matter, which affects the cosmic structure formation. Furthermore, we can explain the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by the Z-burst scenario with it.

  20. Particle-hole symmetry parameters for nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Bentley

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two parameters, nu and zeta, motivated by particle-hole symmetry are introduced. These parameters are determined using the number of proton (or neutron) particles and holes counted from neighboring shell closures. The new parameters can be used to evaluate particle-hole and proton-neutron symmetries of adopted B(E2) values, which indicate that both symmetries are approximate for A>100. The combined symmetries motivate empirical fits of binding energies and the energy ratio E(4_1^+)/E(2_1^+). A global binding energy fit consisting of a traditional liquid droplet and one new shell term, comprised of a function of nu and zeta, reproduces the experimental binding energies of 2353 nuclei with an r.m.s. standard deviation of 1.55 MeV.

  1. Turbodrilling in the hot-hole environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, P.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, geothermal and other types of hot-hole drilling have presented what seemed to be insurmountable barriers to efficient and extended use of downhole drilling motors, particularly those containing elastomeric bearing or motor components. Typical temperatures of 350 to 700/sup 0/F (177 to 371/sup 0/C) damage the elastomers and create other operating problems, reducing the life of the motors and their ability to drill efficiently. Recent innovations in turbodrill design have opened heretofore unrealized potentials and have allowed, for the first time, extended downhole drilling time in hot-hole conditions. The unique feature of this turbodrill is the lack of any elastomers or other temperature-sensitive materials. Its capabilities are matched closely to the requirements of drilling in elevated-temperature environments. The bearing assembly can withstand conditions encountered in typical geothermal formations and provides the performance necessary to stay in the hole. The result is increased rate of penetration (ROP) and more economical drilling.

  2. Structure of the Spherical Black Hole Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bonanno; S. Droz; W. Israel; S. M. Morsink

    1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal structure of a charged spherical black hole is still a topic of debate. In a nonrotating but aspherical gravitational collapse to form a spherical charged black hole, the backscattered gravitational wave tails enter the black hole and are blueshifted at the Cauchy horizon. This has a catastrophic effect if combined with an outflux crossing the Cauchy horizon: a singularity develops at the Cauchy horizon and the effective mass inflates. Recently a numerical study of a massless scalar field in the \\RN background suggested that a spacelike singularity may form before the Cauchy horizon forms. We will show that there exists an approximate analytic solution of the scalar field equations which allows the mass inflation singularity at the Cauchy horizon to exist. In particular, we see no evidence that the Cauchy horizon is preceded by a spacelike singularity.

  3. Gravitational energy of rotating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Maluf; E. F. Martins; A. Kneip

    1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity the energy density of asymptotically flat gravitational fields can be naturaly defined as a scalar density restricted to a three-dimensional spacelike hypersurface $\\Sigma$. Integration over the whole $\\Sigma$ yields the standard ADM energy. After establishing the reference space with zero gravitational energy we obtain the expression of the localized energy for a Kerr black hole. The expression of the energy inside a surface of constant radius can be explicitly calculated in the limit of small $a$, the specific angular momentum. Such expression turns out to be exactly the same as the one obtained by means of the method preposed recently by Brown and York. We also calculate the energy contained within the outer horizon of the black hole for {\\it any} value of $a$. The result is practically indistinguishable from $E=2M_{ir}$, where $M_{ir}$ is the irreducible mass of the black hole.

  4. Protected Areas Stacy Philpott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas Natural preservation Research No No #12;II. National Parks Ecosystem protection

  5. Service Entry Delivery Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Catheter Lab Boiler House Main Entry Short Street ChapelStreet Vehicle Exit 23. Gray Street Car ParkingService Entry Waste Handling Area Delivery Area Admissions Entrance Inquiries Desk Cafeteria Coffee in July 2000 Vehicle Entry Emergency Main Entrance TOKOGARAHRAILWAYSTATION LEGEND Areas under construction

  6. Vacuum polarization for lukewarm black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Winstanley; Phil M. Young

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the renormalized expectation value of the square of a quantum scalar field on a Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter black hole in which the temperatures of the event and cosmological horizons are equal (`lukewarm' black hole). Our numerical calculations for a thermal state at the same temperature as the two horizons indicate that this renormalized expectation value is regular on both the event and cosmological horizons. We are able to show analytically, using an approximation for the field modes near the horizons, that this is indeed the case.

  7. Vacuum polarization for lukewarm black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winstanley, Elizabeth; Young, Phil M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the renormalized expectation value of the square of a quantum scalar field on a Reissner-Nordstroem-de Sitter black hole in which the temperatures of the event and cosmological horizons are equal ('lukewarm' black hole). Our numerical calculations for a thermal state at the same temperature as the two horizons indicate that this renormalized expectation value is regular on both the event and cosmological horizons. We are able to show analytically, using an approximation for the field modes near the horizons, that this is indeed the case.

  8. Tachyon Perturbation on Two Dimensional Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aniket Basu

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the black hole geometry in the presence of tachyonic perturbations, and solve for the form of allowed tachyonic hair in the presence of back reaction, and for the form of the metric under the assumption that only the metric is perturbed but not the dilaton. We evaluate the Kretschmann scalar and argue that the horizon becomes singular in the presence of tachyons, implying that the black hole has turned into a naked singularity. A form of the allowed tachyon potential emerges as a requirement of self-consistency of our solution.

  9. Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

  10. Einstein-Yang-Mills-Lorentz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose A. R. Cembranos; Jorge Gigante Valcarcel

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Different black hole solutions of the coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills equations are well known from long time. They have attracted much attention from mathematicians and physicists from their discovery. In this work, we analyze black holes associated with the gauge Lorentz group. In particular, we study solutions which identify the gauge connection with the spin connection. This ansatz allows to find exact solutions to the complete system of equations. By using this procedure, we show the equivalence between the Yang-Mills-Lorentz model in curved space-time and a particular set of extended gravitational theories.

  11. Chaotic Information Processing by Extremal Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axenides, Minos; Nicolis, Stam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review an explicit regularization of the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence, that preserves all isometries of bulk and boundary degrees of freedom. This scheme is useful to characterize the space of the unitary evolution operators that describe the dynamics of the microstates of extremal black holes in four spacetime dimensions. Using techniques from algebraic number theory to evaluate the transition amplitudes, we remark that the regularization scheme expresses the fast quantum computation capability of black holes as well as its chaotic nature.

  12. Dynamics of galaxy cores and supermassive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work on the dynamical evolution of galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes is reviewed. Topics include galaxy structural properties; collisionless and collisional equilibria; loss-cone dynamics; and dynamics of binary and multiple supermassive black holes.

  13. Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronhole...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronhole pairs in CsI. Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronhole pairs in CsI. Abstract: A Monte Carlo...

  14. Evaluation of Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hole with drill cuttings. The second test, on November 2, 1978, utilized a nitrogen-foam-water mixture to clean residual particles from bottom hole, following which nitrogen was...

  15. A Note on Black Hole Temperature and Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose intuitive derivations of the Hawking temperature and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of a Schwarzschild black hole.

  16. Can the fluctuations of a black hole be treated thermodynamically?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyantyn Ropotenko

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the temperature of a typical Schwarzschild black hole is very low, some doubts are raised about whether the fluctuations of the black hole can be treated thermodynamically. It is shown that this is not the case: the thermodynamic fluctuations of a black hole are considerably larger than the corresponding quantum fluctuations. Moreover the ratio of the mean square thermodynamic fluctuation to the corresponding quantum fluctuation can be interpreted as a number of the effective constituents of a black hole.

  17. Black holes in Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghodsi, Ahmad; Yekta, Davood Mahdavian [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 1436, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we find different types of black holes for the Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity. Our solutions include (un)charged warped (anti-)de Sitter black holes for four and six derivative expanded action. We also look at the black holes in unexpanded Born-Infeld action. In each case we calculate the entropy, angular momentum and mass of the black holes. We also find the central charges for the conformal field theory duals.

  18. Is the firewall consistent? Gedanken experiments on black hole complementarity and firewall proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Yeom, Dong-han, E-mail: dongil.j.hwang@gmail.com, E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com [Center for Quantum Spacetime, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we discuss the black hole complementarity and the firewall proposal at length. Black hole complementarity is inevitable if we assume the following five things: unitarity, entropy-area formula, existence of an information observer, semi-classical quantum field theory for an asymptotic observer, and the general relativity for an in-falling observer. However, large N rescaling and the AMPS argument show that black hole complementarity is inconsistent. To salvage the basic philosophy of the black hole complementarity, AMPS introduced a firewall around the horizon. According to large N rescaling, the firewall should be located close to the apparent horizon. We investigate the consistency of the firewall with the two critical conditions: the firewall should be near the time-like apparent horizon and it should not affect the future infinity. Concerning this, we have introduced a gravitational collapse with a false vacuum lump which can generate a spacetime structure with disconnected apparent horizons. This reveals a situation that there is a firewall outside of the event horizon, while the apparent horizon is absent. Therefore, the firewall, if it exists, not only does modify the general relativity for an in-falling observer, but also modify the semi-classical quantum field theory for an asymptotic observer.

  19. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  20. Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument JONATHAN BAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    1 Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument JONATHAN BAIN Department of Humanities and Social@duke.poly.edu word count: 5498 #12;2 word count: 5498 Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument ABSTRACT. Einstein. In particular, I suggest that a gauge-invariant interpretation of Einstein algebras that avoids the hole

  1. MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westervelt, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R. M. Westervelt, J. C.MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R. M. Westervelt, J. C.OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R M Westervelt, J C Culbertson

  2. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive $\\geq30\\Msun$, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos in the mass range $10^{6}-10^{10}\\Ms$. Such early black holes, at redshifts z$\\gtsim10$, could be the seed black holes for the many supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If they exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime signal for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation of black holes in the center of high redshift dark matter halos and explore implications of initial natal kick velocities conjectured by some formation models. The central concentration of early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they are born even with moderate kicks of tens of km/s. The modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the lower mass black holes as compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N--body simulations we quantify the role of natal kicks of black holes formed from massive metal free stars on their merger rates with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies. Our results also apply to black holes ejected by the gravitational slingshot mechanism.

  3. On Space-Time Singularities, Holes, and Extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    On Space-Time Singularities, Holes, and Extensions John Byron Manchak*y Here, we clarify the relationship among three space-time conditions of interest: geodesic completeness, hole. In what follows, we consider three space-time conditions of interest: geodesic completeness, hole

  4. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  5. Imaging with the GLAST Large Area Telescope J. Chiang JSM, 1 August 2007 1 Imaging Using the GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    ) -- jets from accreting supermassive (> 108 M ) black holes Gamma-ray bursts -- stellar explosions with the GLAST Large Area Telescope J. Chiang JSM, 1 August 2007 3 ' & $ % The Gamma-ray Large Area Space years anticipated All-sky survey of the gamma-ray sky, with opportunities for pointed observations

  6. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  7. Limits on New Physics from Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford Cheung; Stefan Leichenauer

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes emit high energy particles which induce a finite density potential for any scalar field $\\phi$ coupling to the emitted quanta. Due to energetic considerations, $\\phi$ evolves locally to minimize the effective masses of the outgoing states. In theories where $\\phi$ resides at a metastable minimum, this effect can drive $\\phi$ over its potential barrier and classically catalyze the decay of the vacuum. Because this is not a tunneling process, the decay rate is not exponentially suppressed and a single black hole in our past light cone may be sufficient to activate the decay. Moreover, decaying black holes radiate at ever higher temperatures, so they eventually probe the full spectrum of particles coupling to $\\phi$. We present a detailed analysis of vacuum decay catalyzed by a single particle, as well as by a black hole. The former is possible provided large couplings or a weak potential barrier. In contrast, the latter occurs much more easily and places new stringent limits on theories with hierarchical spectra. Finally, we comment on how these constraints apply to the standard model and its extensions, e.g. metastable supersymmetry breaking.

  8. Black hole formation in the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive black holes with up to a $\\rm 10^{9}~M_{\\odot}$ dwell in the centers of present-day galaxies, and their presence has been confirmed at z $\\geq$ 6. Their formation at such early epochs is still an enigma. Different pathways have been suggested to assemble supermassive black holes in the first billion years after the Big Bang. Direct collapse has emerged as a highly plausible scenario to form black holes as it provides seed masses of $\\rm 10^{5}-10^{6}~M_{\\odot}$. Gravitational collapse in atomic cooling haloes with virial temperatures T$_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$~K may lead to the formation of massive seed black holes in the presence of an intense background UV flux. Turbulence plays a central role in regulating accretion and transporting angular momentum. We present here the highest resolution cosmological large-eddy simulations to date which track the evolution of high-density regions on scales of $0.25$~AU beyond the formation of the first peak, and study the impact of subgrid-scale turbulence. The pe...

  9. Vector particles tunneling from BTZ black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge-Rui Chen; Shiwei Zhou; Yong-Chang Huang

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate vector particles' Hawking radiation from a BTZ black hole. By applying the WKB approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi Ansatz to the Proca equation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. The expected Hawking temperature is recovered.

  10. Brief review on higher spin black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Perez; David Tempo; Ricardo Troncoso

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some relevant results in the context of higher spin black holes in three-dimensional spacetimes, focusing on their asymptotic behaviour and thermodynamic properties. For simplicity, we mainly discuss the case of gravity nonminimally coupled to spin-3 fields, being nonperturbatively described by a Chern-Simons theory of two independent sl(3,R) gauge fields. Since the analysis is particularly transparent in the Hamiltonian formalism, we provide a concise discussion of their basic aspects in this context; and as a warming up exercise, we briefly analyze the asymptotic behaviour of pure gravity, as well as the BTZ black hole and its thermodynamics, exclusively in terms of gauge fields. The discussion is then extended to the case of black holes endowed with higher spin fields, briefly signaling the agreements and discrepancies found through different approaches. We conclude explaining how the puzzles become resolved once the fall off of the fields is precisely specified and extended to include chemical potentials, in a way that it is compatible with the asymptotic symmetries. Hence, the global charges become completely identified in an unambiguous way, so that different sets of asymptotic conditions turn out to contain inequivalent classes of black hole solutions being characterized by a different set of global charges.

  11. Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    surface to purify air, employing existing technology in a new way. It is the brainchild of artistFEATURE Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish Björk FEATURE Academics & Industry: ResearchIScOvER mAGAZInE discover@sheffield.ac.uk Research and Innovation Services University of Sheffield New

  12. The river model of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton; Jason P. Lisle

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an under-appreciated way to conceptualize stationary black holes, which we call the river model. The river model is mathematically sound, yet simple enough that the basic picture can be understood by non-experts. %that can by understood by non-experts. In the river model, space itself flows like a river through a flat background, while objects move through the river according to the rules of special relativity. In a spherical black hole, the river of space falls into the black hole at the Newtonian escape velocity, hitting the speed of light at the horizon. Inside the horizon, the river flows inward faster than light, carrying everything with it. We show that the river model works also for rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes, though with a surprising twist. As in the spherical case, the river of space can be regarded as moving through a flat background. However, the river does not spiral inward, as one might have anticipated, but rather falls inward with no azimuthal swirl at all. Instead, the river has at each point not only a velocity but also a rotation, or twist. That is, the river has a Lorentz structure, characterized by six numbers (velocity and rotation), not just three (velocity). As an object moves through the river, it changes its velocity and rotation in response to tidal changes in the velocity and twist of the river along its path. An explicit expression is given for the river field, a six-component bivector field that encodes the velocity and twist of the river at each point, and that encapsulates all the properties of a stationary rotating black hole.

  13. Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

  14. Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    ..............................................................................................................19 Bruce Hoagland, Oklahoma Biological Survey and the University of Oklahoma Forest Management Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook E-952 Oklahoma Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma Conservation Commission Management Handbook #12

  15. L AREA WASTEWATER STORAGE DRUM EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vormelker, P; Cynthia Foreman, C; Zane Nelson, Z; David Hathcock, D; Dennis Vinson, D

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the determination of the cause of pressurization that led to bulging deformation of a 55 gallon wastewater drum stored in L-Area. Drum samples were sent to SRNL for evaluation. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

  16. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls.

  17. Improved methods for simulating nearly extremal binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark A. Scheel; Matthew Giesler; Daniel A. Hemberger; Geoffrey Lovelace; Kevin Kuper; Michael Boyle; Bela Szilagyi; Lawrence E. Kidder

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical black holes could be nearly extremal (that is, rotating nearly as fast as possible); therefore, nearly extremal black holes could be among the binaries that current and future gravitational-wave observatories will detect. Predicting the gravitational waves emitted by merging black holes requires numerical-relativity simulations, but these simulations are especially challenging when one or both holes have mass $m$ and spin $S$ exceeding the Bowen-York limit of $S/m^2=0.93$. We present improved methods that enable us to simulate merging, nearly extremal black holes more robustly and more efficiently. We use these methods to simulate an unequal-mass, precessing binary black hole coalescence, where the larger black hole has $S/m^2=0.99$. We also use these methods to simulate a non-precessing binary black hole coalescence, where both black holes have $S/m^2=0.994$, nearly reaching the Novikov-Thorne upper bound for holes spun up by thin accretion disks. We demonstrate numerical convergence and estimate the numerical errors of the waveforms; we compare numerical waveforms from our simulations with post-Newtonian and effective-one-body waveforms; we compare the evolution of the black-hole masses and spins with analytic predictions; and we explore the effect of increasing spin magnitude on the orbital dynamics (the so-called "orbital hangup" effect).

  18. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  19. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  20. Predictability in Quantum Gravity and Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A possible resolution of the information loss paradox for black holes is proposed in which a phase transition occurs when the temperature of an evaporating black hole equals a critical value, $T_c$, and Lorentz invariance and diffeomorphism invariance are spontaneously broken. This allows a generalization of Schr\\"odinger's equation for the quantum mechanical density matrix, such that a pure state can evolve into a mixed state, because in the symmetry broken phase the conservation of energy-momentum is spontaneously violated. TCP invariance is also spontaneously broken together with time reversal invariance, allowing the existence of white holes, which are black holes moving backwards in time. Domain walls would form which separate the black holes and white holes (anti-black holes) in the broken symmetry regime, and the system could evolve into equilibrium producing a balance of information loss and gain.

  1. Results of temperature gradient and heat flow in Santiam Pass Area, Oregon, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.L.; Gardner, M.C.; Koenig, J.B.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) There is a weakly defined thermal anomaly within the area examined by temperature-gradient holes in the Santiam Pass area. This is a relict anomaly showing differences in permeability between the High Cascades and Western Cascades areas, more than a fundamental difference in shallow crustal temperatures. (2) The anomaly as defined by the 60 F isotherms at 400 feet follows a north-south trend immediately westward of the Cascade axis in the boundary region. It is clear that all holes spudded into High Cascades rocks result in isothermal and reversal gradients. Holes spudded in Western Cascades rocks result in positive gradients. (3) Cold groundwater flow influences and masks temperature gradients in the High Cascades to a depth of at least 700 feet, especially eastward from the major north-south trending faults. Pleistocene and Holocene rocks are very permeable aquifers. (4) Shallow gradient drilling in the lowlands westward of the faults provides more interpretable information than shallow drilling in the cold-water recharge zones. Topographic and climatological effects can be filtered out of the temperature gradient results. (5) The thermal anomaly seems to have 2 centers: one in the Belknap-Foley area, and one northward in the Sand Mountain area. The anomalies may or may not be connected along a north-south trend. (6) A geothermal effect is seen in holes downslope of the Western-High Cascade boundary. Mixing with cold waters is a powerful influence on temperature gradient data. (7) The temperature-gradient program has not yet examined and defined the geothermal resources potential of the area eastward of the Western Cascades-High Cascades boundary. Holes to 1500-2000 feet in depth are required to penetrate the high permeability-cold groundwater regime. (8) Drilling conditions are unfavorable. There are very few accessible level drill sites. Seasonal access problems and environmental restrictions together with frequent lost circulation results in very high costs per foot drilled.

  2. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Mesozoic granite granodiorite Aurora Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region MW Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot...

  3. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive >30 Msun, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos. We expect primordial stars to form in halos in the mass range 10^6-10^10 Msun. Some of these early black holes, formed at redshifts z>10, could be the seed black hole for a significant fraction of the supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If the black hole descendants of the primordial stars exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime candidate for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation and evolution of dark matter halos in LambdaCDM universe. We seed high-redshift dark matter halos with early black holes, and explore the merger history of the host halos and the implications of black hole's kick velocities arising from their coalescence. The central concentration of low mass early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they experience even moderate kicks of tens of km/s. Even such modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the low mass black holes that were ejected, compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates with central supermassive black holes in the largest halos may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N-body simulations, we quantify the role of kicks on the merger rates of black holes formed from massive metal free stars with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies.

  4. Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas on Large Wafer Xiaogan graphene islands from a graphite and then uses transfer printing to place the islands from the stamp from the printed graphene. The transistors show a hole and electron mobility of 3735 and 795 cm2/V

  5. Dynamics of stellar black holes in young star clusters with different metallicities - II. Black hole-black hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunetto Marco Ziosi; Michela Mapelli; Marica Branchesi; Giuseppe Tormen

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the formation and dynamical evolution of black hole-black hole (BH-BH) binaries in young star clusters (YSCs), by means of N-body simulations. The simulations include metallicity-dependent recipes for stellar evolution and stellar winds, and have been run for three different metallicities (Z = 0.01, 0.1 and 1 Zsun). Following recent theoretical models of wind mass-loss and core-collapse supernovae, we assume that the mass of the stellar remnants depends on the metallicity of the progenitor stars. We find that BH-BH binaries form efficiently because of dynamical exchanges: in our simulations, we find about 10 times more BH-BH binaries than double neutron star binaries. The simulated BH-BH binaries form earlier in metal-poor YSCs, which host more massive black holes (BHs) than in metal-rich YSCs. The simulated BH-BH binaries have very large chirp masses (up to 80 Msun), because the BH mass is assumed to depend on metallicity, and because BHs can grow in mass due to the merger with stars. The simulated BH-BH binaries span a wide range of orbital periods (10^-3-10^7 yr), and only a small fraction of them (0.3 per cent) is expected to merge within a Hubble time. We discuss the estimated merger rate from our simulations and the implications for Advanced VIRGO and LIGO.

  6. Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

  7. Tools Developed to Prepare and Stabilize Reactor Spent Fuel for Retrieval from Tile Holes - 12251

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horne, Michael; Clough, Malcolm [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel from the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) nuclear reactors is stored in the waste management areas on site. This fuel is contained within carbon steel spent fuel cans that are stored inside vertical carbon steel lined concrete pipes in the ground known as tile holes. The fuel cans have been stored in the tile holes for greater than 30 years. Some of the fuel cans have experienced corrosion which may have affected their structural integrity as well as the potential to form hydrogen gas. In addition to these potential hazards, there was a need to clean contaminated surfaces inside of and around the exposed upper surface of the tile holes. As part of the site waste management remediation plan spent fuel will be retrieved from degraded tile holes, dried, and relocated to a new purpose built above ground storage facility. There have been a number of tools that are required to be developed to ensure spent fuel cans are in a safe condition prior to retrieval and re-location. A series of special purpose tools have been designed and constructed to stabilize the contents of the tile holes, to determine the integrity of the fuel containers and to decontaminate inside and around the tile holes. Described herein are the methods and types of tools used. Tools that have been presented here have been used, or will be used in the near future, in the waste management areas of the CRL Site in preparation for storage of spent fuel in a new above ground facility. The stabilization tools have been demonstrated on mock-up facilities prior to successful use in the field to remove hydrogen gas and uranium hydrides from the fuel cans. A lifting tool has been developed and used successfully in the field to confirm the integrity of the fuel cans for future relocation. A tool using a commercial dry ice blaster has been developed and is ready to start mock-up trials and is scheduled to be used in the field during the summer of 2012. (authors)

  8. Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

  9. Gravitational radiation from dynamical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective energy tensor for gravitational radiation is identified for uniformly expanding flows of the Hawking mass-energy. It appears in an energy conservation law expressing the change in mass due to the energy densities of matter and gravitational radiation, with respect to a Killing-like vector encoding a preferred flow of time outside a black hole. In a spin-coefficient formulation, the components of the effective energy tensor can be understood as the energy densities of ingoing and outgoing, transverse and longitudinal gravitational radiation. By anchoring the flow to the trapping horizon of a black hole in a given sequence of spatial hypersurfaces, there is a locally unique flow and a measure of gravitational radiation in the strong-field regime.

  10. Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Krll

    2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

  11. Geometric description of BTZ black holes thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernando Quevedo; Alberto Sanchez

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the properties of the space of thermodynamic equilibrium states of the Ba\\~nados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole in (2+1)-gravity. We use the formalism of geometrothermodynamics to introduce in the space of equilibrium states a $2-$dimensional thermodynamic metric whose curvature is non-vanishing, indicating the presence of thermodynamic interaction, and free of singularities, indicating the absence of phase transitions. Similar results are obtained for generalizations of the BTZ black hole which include a Chern-Simons term and a dilatonic field. Small logarithmic corrections of the entropy turn out to be represented by small corrections of the thermodynamic curvature, reinforcing the idea that thermodynamic curvature is a measure of thermodynamic interaction.

  12. The hydraulic jump as a white hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the white hole. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

  13. Formation and Evolution of Galactic Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The main requirements for fueling an active galactic nucleus and to form massive black holes are reviewed. Low-luminosity AGN can be fueled easily from the local star clusters, near the nucleus, and the various stellar processes are described. Above a certain luminosity (and therefore accretion rate) large-scale gas flows from galactic scales are required. These can be driven by gravity torques of non-axisymmetric perturbations, such as bars, spirals, galaxy interactions. Observational evidence that these mechanisms are in action is found for high enough luminosities. It is very frequent that starbursts are also triggered through the same mechanisms, and the dense nuclear star clusters formed provide fuel for the AGN over a longer time-scale. Secular internal evolution and more violent evolution through interactions and mergers contribute to grow both a massive black hole and a bulge, and this could explain the observed proportionality relation between the mass of these two components.

  14. Slant hole completion test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, R.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

  15. Phase Structure of Higher Spin Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chowdhury; Arunabha Saha

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the study of the phase structure of higher spin black holes carried out in arXiv$:1210.0284$ using the "canonical formalism". In particular we study the low as well as high temperature regimes. We show that the Hawking-Page transition takes place in the low temperature regime. The thermodynamically favoured phase changes from conical surplus to black holes and then again to conical surplus as we increase temperature. We then show that in the high temperature regime the diagonal embedding gives the appropriate description. We also give a map between the parameters of the theory near the IR and UV fixed points. This makes the "good" solutions near one end map to the "bad" solutions near the other end and vice versa.

  16. Charged Cylindrical Black Holes in Conformal Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson Levi Said; Joseph Sultana; Kristian Zarb Adami

    2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering cylindrical topology we present the static solution for a charged black hole in conformal gravity. We show that unlike the general relativistic case there are two different solutions, both including a factor that when set to zero recovers the familiar static charged black string solution in Einstein's theory. This factor gives rise to a linear term in the potential that also features in the neutral case and may have significant ramifications for particle trajectories.

  17. Comparing quantum black holes and naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Singh

    2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    There are models of gravitational collapse in classical general relativity which admit the formation of naked singularities as well as black holes. These include fluid models as well as models with scalar fields as matter. Even if fluid models were to be regarded as unphysical in their matter content, the remaining class of models (based on scalar fields) generically admit the formation of visible regions of finite but arbitrarily high curvature. Hence it is of interest to ask, from the point of view of astrophysics, as to what a stellar collapse leading to a naked singularity (or to a visible region of very high curvature) will look like, to a far away observer. The emission of energy during such a process may be divided into three phases - (i) the classical phase, during which matter and gravity can both be treated according to the laws of classical physics, (ii) the semiclassical phase, when gravity is treated classically but matter behaves as a quantum field, and (iii) the quantum gravitational phase. In this review, we first give a summary of the status of naked singularities in classical relativity, and then report some recent results comparing the semiclassical phase of black holes with the semiclassical phase of spherical collapse leading to a naked singularity. In particular, we ask how the quantum particle creation during the collapse leading to a naked singularity compares with the Hawking radiation from a star collapsing to form a black hole. It turns out that there is a fundamental difference between the two cases. A spherical naked star emits only about one Planck energy during its semiclassical phase, and the further evolution can only be determined by the laws of quantum gravity. This contrasts with the semiclassical evaporation of a black hole.

  18. Noncommutative Inspired Black Holes in Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent string theory motivated paper, Nicolini, Smailagic and Spallucci (NSS) presented an interesting model for a noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like black hole solution in 4-dimensions. The essential effect of having noncommutative co-ordinates in this approach is to smear out matter distributions on a scale associated with the turn-on of noncommutativity which was taken to be near the 4-d Planck mass. In particular, NSS assumed that this smearing was essentially Gaussian. This energy scale is sufficiently large that in 4-d such effects may remain invisible indefinitely. Extra dimensional models which attempt to address the gauge hierarchy problem, however, allow for the possibility that the effective fundamental scale may not be far from {approx} 1 TeV, an energy regime that will soon be probed by experiments at both the LHC and ILC. In this paper we generalize the NSS model to the case where flat, toroidally compactified extra dimensions are accessible at the TeV-scale and examine the resulting modifications in black hole properties due to the existence of noncommutativity. We show that while many of the noncommutativity-induced black hole features found in 4-d by NSS persist, in some cases there can be significant modifications due the presence of extra dimensions. We also demonstrate that the essential features of this approach are not particularly sensitive to the Gaussian nature of the smearing assumed by NSS.

  19. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  20. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  1. Slim Holes At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,New York: Energy Resources

  2. Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,New York: Energy Resources2003)

  3. Slim Holes At Salt Wells Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,New York: Energy

  4. Slim Holes At Salton Sea Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,New York: EnergyInformation

  5. Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Slim Holes At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Slim Holes At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Ross,

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  11. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy)Energy

  15. Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)

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  16. Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy)Energy| Open Energy|

  17. Thermal Gradient Holes At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy)Energy| Open

  18. Thermal Gradient Holes At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Purtymun, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy)Energy| OpenAl., 1974)

  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Thermal Gradient Holes At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy)Energy|

  1. Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) | Open

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  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year openEnergy Information lieu of

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Quane, Et Al., 2000) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) | Open

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  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

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  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) |

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  9. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Arnold, Et Al.,

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  10. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff & Bowers,

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  11. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff, Et Al.,

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  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey, Et

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  13. Thermal Gradient Holes At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

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  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

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  15. Thermal Gradient Holes At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Held &

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  16. Thermal Gradient Holes At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S. Geothermal

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  17. Thermal Gradient Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

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  18. Thermal Gradient Holes At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al., 2003) | Open

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  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)

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  20. Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

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  1. Thermal Gradient Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

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  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al.,

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  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year openEnergy2003)Energy|2008) |

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year openEnergy2003)Energy|2008) || Open

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year openEnergy2003)Energy|2008) ||

  6. Core Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers

  7. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1986)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open Energy Information

  8. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Gardner, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open Energy

  9. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987) | Open

  10. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Geothermal Area (EERE, 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands,EnergyHot-Dry-RockAl., 1993)

  11. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Geothermal Area (Erkan, Et Al., 2007) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands,EnergyHot-Dry-RockAl., 1993)Open

  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Geothermal Area (Holdmann, Et Al., 2006) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands,EnergyHot-Dry-RockAl.,Open

  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands,EnergyHot-Dry-RockAl.,OpenOpen

  15. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC

  16. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski, 2006) Jump

  17. Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski, 2006)| Open

  18. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski, 2006)|

  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski, 2006)|Al.,

  20. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Edmunds & W.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski,1977) | Open

  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick & Jayne,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski,1977) |

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski,1977)

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski,1977)Al.,

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information Szybinski,1977)Al.,Open

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy Information

  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergy InformationOpen Energy

  8. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Benoit, 1984) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|Information Dobson,Field

  9. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lachenbruch, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|Information

  10. Core Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Core Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands

  12. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Fawcett, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands2007) | Open Energy Information

  13. Physics Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrust Areas Physics Thrust Areas

  14. Environmental investigations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, McCracken County, Kentucky: Volume 1 -- Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the results of four studies into environmental and cultural resources on and near the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) located in Western Kentucky in McCracken County, approximately 10 miles west of Paducah, KY. The area investigated includes the PGDP facility proper, additional area owned by DOE under use permit to the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), area owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky that is administered by the WKWMA, area owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Metropolis Lake State Nature preserve and some privately held land. DOE requested the assistance and support of the US Army Engineer District, Nashville (CEORN) in conducting various environmental investigations of the area. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) provided technical support to the CEORN for environmental investigations of (1) wetland resources, (2) threatened or endangered species and habitats, and (3) cultural resources. A floodplain investigation was conducted by CEORN.

  15. Wellfield installation and investigations, Creston Study Area, Eastern Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paschis, J.A.; Kunkel, J.R.; Koenig, R.A.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the design and implementation of field testing used to characterize the Roza Member basalt aquifer of the Wanapum Formation of the Columbia River Basalt Group. A research wellfield was implemented and tests conducted to lithologically classify subsurface conditions underlying an 800- by 1400-foot area located in the northwest quarter of Section 16, T.25N, R.34E, six miles south of the town of Creston in Lincoln County, Washington. The relatively high-yielding aquifers of the Roza Member basalt are separated by claystone aquitards and are hydrologically interrupted by at least two different subsurface hydrologic structures. Water-level data were used to determine the regional and local hydraulic gradient. Wellbore slug tests and passive (nonpumping) tracer tests permitted calculation of equivalent hydraulic apertures and effective porosities for the Roza basalt flow top and flow interiors. Analysis of data from pumping tests permitted calculation of transmissivities and storage coefficients for the Roza basalt. Measurements of water level are continuing, and additional tracer tests have been conducted both in the wellfield proper and in the larger study area. Applicable wellfield aquifer analyses along with model studies will provide guidelines for use in evaluating proposed sites for disposing of high-level nuclear waste in saturated fractured geologic media. 36 refs., 72 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  17. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 396: Area 20 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 396, Area 20 Spill Sites, is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 396 is listed in Appendix II of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 and consists of the following four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 20 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 20-25-01, Oil Spills (2); CAS 20-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 20-25-03, Oil Spill; CAS 20-99-08, Spill. Closure activities for CAU 396 were conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 396.

  18. Corrective action investigation plan for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Landfill Complex, CAU No. 424, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. The CAU 424 is comprised of eight individual landfill sites that are located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound. Due to the unregulated disposal activities commonly associated with early landfill operations, an investigation will be conducted at each CAS to complete the following tasks: identify the presence and nature of possible contaminant migration from the landfills; determine the vertical and lateral extent of possible contaminant migration; ascertain the potential impact to human health and the environment; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action strategies for each CAS.

  19. A solar powered distillation plant and pump station for use in ocean side desert areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dearien, J.A.; Priebe, S.J.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are thousands of miles of ocean shoreline which could sustain a productive human existence if sufficient fresh water were available for human consumption and for irrigation of crops. While solar stills can be built to produce fresh water at or close to sea level, raising water to a height sufficient to irrigate crops, even with minimum water usage crops, requires a significant amount of energy. This paper describes a ``no-external power`` process by which seawater can be purified and raised to a height above sea level sufficient to carry on a productive living in certain areas of the world. This device, the Solar Evaporation and Pumping System (SEAPS) is described as to function and areas of use.

  20. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.