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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

DOL Employment and Training Programs Purpose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program directors regarding the definition of a participant and exiter in all U.S. Department of Labor (U.S. DOL) Employment and Training programs that are covered under its common measures policy. These definitions are used to determine how individuals are reported in Federally required program and performance reports, program performance measures and in the Automated Systems Support for Employment and Training (ASSET) System. Legislative/Regulatory References • Training and Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL) 17-05: Common Measures Policy for the Employment and Training Administration's (ETA) Performance Accountability System and Related Performance Issues

Roberta Gassman Secretary; Bill Clingan; Division Administrator; Gary Denis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Property:Incentive/PVComDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentivePVComDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a commercial PV system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex: MN's...

3

Property:Incentive/PVResDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentivePVResDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a residential PV system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex: MD's...

4

Property:Incentive/WindResDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentiveWindResDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a residential wind system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex:...

5

Property:Incentive/WindComDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentiveWindComDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a commercial wind system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex: OR's...

6

Property:Incentive/PVComFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Incentive/PVComFitDolKWh Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/PVComFitDolKWh Property Type String Description Feed-in tariff for commercial systems. The $ amount per kWh generated such that the incentive is disbursed over time based on metered production. 100% of energy generated is exported; none is used on-site. Ex: TVA Green Power Switch $0.15/kWh; We Energies $0.225/kWh Format: $0.225 [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/PVComFitDolKWh" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alliant Energy (Wisconsin Power and Light) - Advanced Renewables Tariff (Wisconsin) + $0.25 + C CPS Energy - Solartricity Producer Program (Texas) + $0.27 +

7

Property:Incentive/PVResFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Incentive/PVResFitDolKWh Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/PVResFitDolKWh Property Type String Description Feed-in Tariff (FIT): The $ amount per kWh generated such that the incentive is disbursed over time based on metered production. 100% of energy generated is exported; none is used on-site. Ex: TVA Green Power Switch $0.15/kWh; We Energies $0.225/kWh Format: $0.225 [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/PVResFitDolKWh" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alliant Energy (Wisconsin Power and Light) - Advanced Renewables Tariff (Wisconsin) + $0.25 + C CPS Energy - Solartricity Producer Program (Texas) + $0.27 +

8

Property:Incentive/PVNPFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Incentive/PVNPFitDolKWh Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/PVNPFitDolKWh Property Type String Description Feed-in tariff for non-profit and/or government systems. The $ amount per kWh generated such that the incentive is disbursed over time based on metered production. 100% of energy generated is exported; none is used on-site. Ex: TVA Green Power Switch $0.15/kWh; We Energies $0.225/kWh Format: $0.225 [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/PVNPFitDolKWh" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alliant Energy (Wisconsin Power and Light) - Advanced Renewables Tariff (Wisconsin) + $0.25 + C CPS Energy - Solartricity Producer Program (Texas) + $0.27 +

9

Malwa Industries Ltd MIL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malwa Industries Ltd MIL Malwa Industries Ltd MIL Jump to: navigation, search Name Malwa Industries Ltd. (MIL) Place Ludhiana, Punjab, India Zip 141 003 Sector Biomass Product Ludhiana based biomass project developers Coordinates 30.89314°, 75.86938° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.89314,"lon":75.86938,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

One User's Report on Sandia Data Objects: Evaluation of the DOL and PMO for use in Future  

SciTech Connect

The Feature Characterization project (FCDMF) has the goal of building tools that can extract and analyze coherent features in a terabyte dataset. We desire to extend our feature characterization library (FClib) to support a wider variety of complex ASCI data, and to support parallel algorithms. An attractive alternative to extending the library's internal data structures is to replace them with an externally provided data object. This report is the summary of a quick exploration of two candidate data objects in use at Sandia National Laboratories: the Data Object Library (DOL) and the Parallel Mesh Object (PMO). It is our hope that this report will provide information for potential users of the data objects, as well as feedback for the objects' developers. The data objects were evaluated as to whether they (1) supported the same capabilities as the current version of FClib, (2) provided additional required capabilities, and (3) were relatively easy to use. Both data objects met the requirements of having the same capabilities as FClib and support for parallel algorithms. However, the DOL has a richer set of data structures that more closely align with the current data structures of FClib and our planned extensions. Specifically, the DOL can support time changing geometry, which is needed to represent features as datasets. Unfortunately, the DOL did not meet our ease of use requirement. The PMO was easier to learn and use, but did not support time-changing geometry. Given the above results, we will extend the FClib API (Application Programming Interface) to handle time-changing geometry. Then we will replace the internal data structures with the DOL, but we will provide the FClib API in addition to the DOL API to support simplified usage.

Wendy S. Koegler

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

MIL-L-87177 and CLT:X-10 Lubricants Improve Electrical Connector Fretting Corrosion Behavior  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a fretting research project using MIL-L-87177 and CLT: X-10 lubricants on Nano-miniature connectors. When they were fretted without lubricant, individual connectors first exceeded our 0.5 ohm failure criteria from 2,341 to 45,238 fretting cycles. With additional fretting, their contact resistance increased to more than 100,000 ohms. Unmodified MIL-L-87177 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to between 430,000 and over 20,000,000 fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 modified by addition of Teflon powder delayed first failure to beyond 5 million fretting cycles. Best results were obtained when Teflon was used and also when both the straight and modified lubricants were poured into and then out of the connector. CLT: X-10 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to beyond 55 million cycles in one test where a failure was actually observed and to beyond 20 million cycles in another that was terminated without failure. CLT: X-10 recovered an unlubricated connector driven deeply into failure, with six failed pins recovering immediately and four more recovering during an additional 420 thousand fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 was not able to recover a connector under similar conditions.

AUKLAND,NEIL R.; HANLON,JAMES T.

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Sustainability: How Far Are We From Thou?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gallons of hydrocarbons as crude oil equivalents My VW Jetta DTI, drives on this amount of energy for 5.2 gallons of oil equivalent, or a 1/10 of a barrel: An average U.S. resident develops 100 W of power per 24-state economy" violates Second Law of Thermodynamics With ever more people striving to live like us

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

13

Oh Fuel Cell, Where Art Thou?  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is helping to lead the effort in bringing inexpensive fuel cell technology to market

Weil, K. Scott

2004-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

Property:Incentive/PVResMaxDol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Type String Description The maximum rebate amount for a residential PV installation. Ex: DE's maximum incentive for residential PV is 31,500. Format: 31,500...

15

Property:Incentive/PVComMaxDol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Type String Description The maximum rebate amount for a commercial PV installation. Ex: DE's maximum incentive for commercial PV is 250,000. Format:...

16

MIL primitives for querying a fragmented world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In query-intensive database application areas, like decision support and data mining, systems that use vertical fragmentation have a significant performance advantage. In order to support relational or object oriented applications on top of such a fragmented ... Keywords: Database systems, Main-memory techniques, Query languages, Query optimization, Vertical fragmentation

Peter A. Boncz; Martin L. Kersten

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

"PART 1: ENERGY/WATER CONSUMPTION AND COST DATA"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost (Thou. )","Facility Gross Square Feet (Thou.)","Gallons per Gross Square Foot" "Buildings & Facilities Subject to Water Goal",,0,0,0,"ERROR" ,,,,,"Percent"...

18

Spring 2009 www.mvs.usace.army.mil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

destinations, and services even to Damascus and Amman had been suspended. One of the world's great railway linked Medina in the south with Damascus in the north, running through Amman and Deraa. At Deraa a branch

US Army Corps of Engineers

19

MilTech, a Department of Defense Partnership Intermediary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... forecast demand. Page 3. 3 M-TACs should partner with EDA TD Clusters that are engaged with sustainable businesses. ...

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... This handbook contains standardized design values and related design information for metallic materials and structural elements used in ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars/Mil. BTUs)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1994-Jan : 01/14 : 2.231 : ...

22

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars/Mil. BTUs)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 1.934: 1.692: 2.502: 2.475: 2.156: 2.319: 2000's: 4.311: 4.053: ...

23

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Insight, Inc ...  

Annual Report; Economic Impact; ... 2013. Month: DOL: Factor: December, '13: 2.1%: 2.0%: November, '13: 1.9%: 1.95%: ... 2012. Month: DOL: Factor: ...

24

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... This handbook contains standardized design values and related design information for metallic materials and structural elements used in ...

25

Henry Hub Gulf Coast Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars/Mil. BTUs)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 10/9/2013: Next Release Date: 10/17/2013: Referring Pages: Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

26

Henry Hub Gulf Coast Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars/Mil. BTUs)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2.75-= No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/9/2013:

27

This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Trona, CA) and to M. Phillips for assistance with access, sampling, and logis- tics at Searles Lake. We

US Army Corps of Engineers

28

Animal Conservation (2003) 6, 183-188 2003 The Zoological Society of London DOl:l0.1017/S1367943003003226 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indonesia to (Beissinger, 2000) and deforestation is the major threat in include East Timor and Irian Jaya

Mooers, Arne

29

Front. Electr. Electron. Eng.' China 2011, 6(3): 412-423 DOl 1O.1007/s11460-011-0164-9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in buildings is the heating, ventilation and air con- ditioning (HVAC) systems. In HVAC systems, chillers with the uncertainty of cooling load. The verifi- cation used a Kalman filter to predict parameters of a gray-box model, Safety and Control System, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China Peter B. LUH Department

Luh, Peter

30

Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nano- particles are typically 1 nm to 10 nm in size with a thou- sand to a million atoms. ... III. Tight-Binding Wave Functions for Quantum Dots ...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

31

Mil-hdbk-817, system development radiation hardness assurance. Technical report, 23 September 1988-29 June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development program for a system with a radiation survivability program is very complex. Careful planning and execution of all phases of the development are necessary from the beginning. When there is a nuclear radiation requirement, Hardness Assurance (HA) must be part of the planning. While this document focuses primarily on activities related to the effects of nuclear radiation on electronic components and materials, a hardness assurance program must include all hostile environments employ balanced hardening concepts at all levels. It is the intent of this document to point out the agencies and aids available to help in constructing the most effective HA program for a given system and its mission. It is intended to provide guidance to both the system development Project Manager at the sponsoring agency and the Project Manager for the prime contractor.

Coppage, F.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

AREA EMCS DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. MIL-HDBK-237C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ACQUISITION PROCESS This handbook is for guidance only. Do not cite this document as a requirement. AMSC N/A

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Lost Children: Addressing the Under – Identification of Trafficked Alien Minors in Los Angeles County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Labor's Office of Inspector General are taskDepartment of Labor, Office of Inspector General (DOL-OIG)

Gilbert Kim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Reliability-based characterization of prefabricated FRP composites for rehabilitation of concrete structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composite Materials Handbook (HDBK-MIL17). (2002). Guidancebased design values (HDBK-MIL17, 2002). Probabilistic Modelnot as deterministic properties (HDBK-MIL17, 2002). The

Jin, Sung-Jun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

DIRECTIVES SYSTEM TRANSMITTAL DATE DISTRIBUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and applied metallography. Familiar with DOE, ALT, FMECA, MIL-HDBK-217, MIL-STD-202, MIL-STD-810, RELEX

US Army Corps of Engineers

36

DOSIMETRY, INSTRUMENTATION AND EXPOSURE CHAMBERS FOR DC MAGNETIC HELD STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. -K. Yen ENGINEERING AND INSTRUMENTATION C. Dols D. NelsonLaboratory DOSIMETRY, INSTRUMENTATION AND EXPOSURE CHAMBERSLBL-9554 DOSIMETRY, INSTRUMENTATION AND EXPOSURE CHAMBERS

Tenforde, T.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

NISTIR 7251 CONTAM User Guide and Program ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 7251 CONTAM User Guide and Program Documentation George N. Walton W. Stuart Dols Page 2. NISTIR 7251 CONTAM ...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

New Challenges in Contamination Control: The Leadership Role of IEST in Shaping Future Research and Practices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

updated.. WG–CC902: MIL-HDBK-406: Contamination Controland Clean Work Stations; MIL-HDBK-407: Contamination Control

Xu, Tengfang; Eudy, Jane; Berndt, Charles

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Environmental Conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Fluid exposure classifications...Fluid Specification Group I fluids JP-4 jet fuel MIL-PRF-5624 JP-5 jet fuel MIL-PRF-5624 JP-8 jet fuel MIL-DTL-83133 Hydraulic fluid MIL-H-5606 MIL-H-83282 Polyalphaolefin (PAO) cooling fluid MIL-C-87252 Engine lubricating oil MIL-PRF-7808 MIL-PRF-23699 Ethylene glycol/urea deicer (Class I)...

40

16me Congrs de Matrise des Risques et de Sret de Fonctionnement -Avignon 6-10 octobre 2008 communication 1Z-2 page METHODE QUANTITATIVE D'EVALUATION DE LA FIABILITE DES SYSTEMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organizationsaswellastheircontractorsto use:MIL-STD-881B. Thisstandardhasbeen superseded by a handbook, MIL-HDBK- 881,dated2January1998. MIL-HDBK-881defines a WBS as: · A product-oriented family tree com- posedofhardware

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of durability of carbon/epoxy composite materials after exposure to elevated temperatures and immersion in seawater for navy vessel applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 14-16(paper No 6). MIL-HDBK-17-1F: composite Materialsout in accordance with MIL-HDBK-1F introduced in following

Hong, SoonKook

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Incorporating psychological influences in probabilistic cost analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press, New York, 1981. MIL-HDBK-881, Handbook Work BreakdownWBS level-3 cost elements [MIL- HDBK-881, 1998]. In general,

Kujawski, Edouard; Alvaro, Mariana; Edwards, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

EWG/ICV Participants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Jeff Kurtz, MITRE, jkurtz@mitre.org. Ron Larson, DARPA, rlarson@darpa. mil. Sharon ... gov. Kevin Mills, DARPA, klmills@darpa.mil. ...

44

DOI: 10.1007/s00339-006-3758-y Appl. Phys. A 86, 275281 (2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational framework Cluster formation has been investigated by means of tight-binding molecular dynamics-empirical #12;276 Applied Physics A ­ Materials Science & Processing tight-binding (TB) model. Assuming a frozen to study systems involving more than a thou- sand atoms, we have switched from TB to model potential

Powles, Rebecca

45

The Buddha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that it yields is the ambrosia fruit of Nirvana, and by this ploughing all sorrow is brought to an end". Than the Brahman poured milk-rice into a golden bowl and handed it to the lord saying: "Eat, 0 Gautama, the milk-rice. Indeed, thou art a hus- 10 bandman...

Yogi, P. G.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Agency datasets monthly list | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as type, mine location, lost days and the degree of injury. DOL MSHA Energy and Utilities 2012-09-12 13:13:27 EmploymentProduction Data Set - Yearly This dataset contains the...

47

MAY 2 7 1927 \\_ UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONWAI', !I.A. Boise IIi,~h Srhool RALt·ll DolGLA~ CoRDON, ll.S.( Pre-Med.) Ashton lftr,h S£1tool Ri£1ts

O'Laughlin, Jay

48

SR0107  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2001 Media Contact: Bill Taylor (803) 725-2889 DOE & DOL Hold Public Meetings For Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program At Flag Ribbon Art Aiken SC (June...

49

Investigating the pathway of asparagine-linked glycoprotein biosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biosynthesis of asparagine-linked glycoproteins, highly conserved throughout all eukaryotes, requires a dolichylpyrophosphate-linked tetradecasaccharide precursor (Dol-PP-GlcNAc2Man9Glc3), from which the tetradecasaccharide ...

O'Reilly, Mary K. (Mary Katherine)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Institution, rev09.12 www.PCS.uah.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, composite level, introduction to Mil-HDBK 17 Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in a technical field

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

51

Introduction to Composites Get the knowledge to advance in Composites.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, composite level, introduction to Mil-HDBK 17 Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in a technical field

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

52

Ris-R-1235(EN) Reliability Databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Standard models of reliability MIL-HDBK-217 MIL-HDBK-217 was the original standard for reliability-wide. The most recent revision of MIL-HDBK- 217 is Revision F Notice 2, which was released in February of 1995. MIL-HDBK-217 includes the ability to perform a 'parts count' analysis or a 'part stress' analysis

53

Specification Section 13100  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Defense (DOD) a. MIL-HDBK-419: Military Handbook - Grounding, Bonding, and Shielding for Electronic

54

Software is Rarely Certified  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MIL-STD-462 Test Methods - electromagnetic emanations (TEMPEST); POSIX - IEEE operating system standard. Conformance Testing. ...

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Reconstituting protein interaction networks using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* Correspondence: jaques.reifman.civ@mail.mil Department of Defense Biotechnology High Performance Computing

56

Victor Giurgiutiu University of South Carolina,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Integrity Pro- gram (ASIP) following the JSSG 2006 [16] and MIL-HDBK-1530 [17] guidelines. Pre Guide JSSG-2006, 30 Oct. 1998, http://www.every spec.com/DoD/DoD+PUBLICATIONS/JSSG-2006_10206/ [17] MIL-HDBK Handbook, 4 Nov. 1996, http://www.every spec.com/MIL-HDBK/MIL-HDBK+(1500+-+1799)/MIL_HDBK_1530_1844/ [18

Giurgiutiu, Victor

57

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Employees Occupational Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the EEOICPA is the responsibility of the Department of Labor (DOL). The DOL is supported in its role by the DOE, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Justice (DOJ). If you would like more information about the benefits available under the EEOICPA, please visit DOL's web page or see the EEOICPA pamphlet.

58

This paper is authored by an employee(s) of the United States Government and is in the public EVOLUTION OF AN INTRODUCTORY COMPUTER SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force Academy USAFA, CO 80840 achamillard@hq.dcma.mil Larry.Merkle@usafa.af.mil ABSTRACT University organization, operating systems, networking, databases, the World Wide Web, and so on. Because the field

Chamillard, Tim

59

Cooling Path Dependent Behavior of a Supersolvus Heat Treated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction. The demand for improved efficiency of aircraft gas turbine engines by .... at the maximum stress of 100 ksi) used a 5 mil x IO mil EDM notch and.

60

RELIABILITY CONSIDERATIONS OF ELECTRONICS COMPONENTS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER MUON AND NEUTRINO DETECTION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardization Handbook, HIL-HDBK-217B, ReliabilityMilitary Standardization Handbook MIL-HDBK-217B-Reliabilitycoefficients are given in MIL-HDBK-217B Handbook for various

Leskovar, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C3, suppl6ment au n09, Tome 48, septembre 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be developed is that such as appears in MIL-HDBK-5 and contains minimum property values statistically derived applications. Alcoa is generating MIL-HDBK-5-typedesign allowables data on production lots in several tempers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

62

NATO UNCLASSIFIED NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Les systemes militaires doivent repondre a des normes tres severes. La norme militaire «Mil-Hdbk-217C Equipment", MIL-HDBK-217C, 1980. 2. Department of Defense of USA, "Military Standard: Definitions of terms

Kieras, David E.

63

October 2001 PUBLISHED BY THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Association Handbook, or MIL-HDBK-263) when working with cards and components. Be sure power is OFF before (refer to EIA-625, ESD Association Handbook, or MIL-HDBK-263) when working with cards and components. 2

Rhoads, James

64

APPLICATION OF ENERGY METHODS TO MODELING FAILURES IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scheme, known as the building block approach in MIL HDBK 17 [8], while figure 4 is a specific set, wind turbine blades, etc. Current Scale Up Approach For Composites Figure 3. MIL HDBK 17 Building Block

65

2000, HCS Research Lab. All Rights Reserved. Reliability Modeling of SCI Ring-Based Topologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Handbook for Reliability Prediction of Electronic Equipment (MIL-HDBK-217F) [23]. These reliabilities-11, March 2000. 22. K. Kibria, Interconnect Systems Solution, http://www.iss-us.com/LincCore.htm 23. MIL-HDBK

George, Alan D.

66

Page 1 of 30 Bergman, Allen, Kammer & Mayes Probabilistic Investigation of Sensitivities of Advanced Test-Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as electronics hardware, documented in reliability manuals such as US MIL-HDBK-217 [8]. However, the mean time. 7-17. 8. US MIL-HDBK-217: Reliability prediction for electronic systems. Available from the National

Allen, Matthew S.

67

Basinwide Integrated Volume Transports in an Eddy-Filled Ocean Ozeanzirkulation und Klimadynamik, Leibniz-Institut fur Meereswissenschaften an der Universitat Kiel, Kiel, Germany, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as electronics hardware, documented in reliability manuals such as US MIL-HDBK-217 [8]. However, the mean time. 7-17. 8. US MIL-HDBK-217: Reliability prediction for electronic systems. Available from the National

Johnson, Helen

68

Army Regulation 2530 Information Management: Publishing and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transitionscan be obtained from field data and/or by using Mil- Hdbk-217 [ll]. The transition rates are usually Department of Defense, Reliability Prediction of Electronic Equip- ment, 1982 Jan. Mil-Hdbk-217D. [12] D. P

US Army Corps of Engineers

69

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Nitrile Gloves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrile Gloves Nitrile Gloves Description Color Finish Chemical Compatibility FNAL Stock Number 5.5 mil thick fingers 5.1 mil at palm 10 long 100% nitrile (non-latex) Powder...

70

Model standards interoperability across domains, the life cycle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Schedule • Cost classification by Work Breakdown Structure – MIL-STD-881 for systems (but hybrid breakdown) – Operations ...

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

61 Table 24. Five Major Bioethanol Producers inBioethanol Gasification Liquid Biofuels Bioethanol Biodiesel mil rural

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

URGSIM  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002557IBMPC00 Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSIM)  http://www.spa.usace.army.mil/urgwom/recent.asp 

73

Design for Safety Neil Storey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, vol. 6, pp. 53­59, 1983. 2. Reliability Prediction of Electronic Equipment, DOD paper MIL-HDBK-217C

Storey, Neil

74

Real-Time Systems Processor Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Army Reverse Engineering Handbook:MIL - HDBK -115(ME) Washington, DC, 1987 [Usse 97] Cary Ussery, Kathy

Johansson, Roger

75

VIBRATION TEST VIBRPT3_S1100C_19APR2K6.doc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modifiche; MIL-HDBK-831 23 April 1999 Preparation of Test Reports (guidance only); UNI ­10653 ­ November

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

76

The effect of applied stresses on the equilibrium moisture content in polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Properties, Department of Defense, MIL-HDBK-17-2E, 1999. [9] Zimmerman RS, Adams DF, Walrath DE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

A Framework for Node-Level Fault Tolerance in Distributed Real-time Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 185, 1124-1131. US Department of Defense. (1995). MIL-HDBK-217: Reliability Prediction of Electronic

Karlsson, Johan

78

Design Time Reliability Analysis of Distributed Fault Tolerance Algorithms Elizabeth Latronico, Philip Koopman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"US military handbook MIL-HDBK-1797," 1997. 26D. McRuer, I. Ashkenas, and D. Graham, Aircraft Dynamics

Koopman, Philip

79

seari.mit.edu 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 Better Early Estimation of Human Systems  

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-Down "Rough Estimate" and SE/PM in WBS MIL-HDBK-881: "the overall planning, directing, and controlling

de Weck, Olivier L.

80

LTR DESCRIPTION DATE (YR-MO-DA) APPROVED A Technical changes to table I. Editorial changes throughout. 91-12-23 M. L. Poelking  

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des composants comme EADS/Thales, Siemens SN29500, MIL- HDBK-217F donnent ces fonctions sous forme d

Berns, Hans-Gerd

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81

Modified SDOF Models for Improved Representation of the Impact Response  

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requires electrolytics #12;Reliability predictor models · MIL-HDBK 217F ­ Last updated in 1995 ­ Does

Feraboli, Paolo

82

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Army Reverse Engineering Handbook:MIL - HDBK -115(ME) Washington, DC, 1987 [Usse 97] Cary Ussery, Kathy

US Army Corps of Engineers

83

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS Accurate three-dimensional stress-strain constitutive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structures design for durability, damage resistance and tolerance. He is chairman of the MIL-HDBK-17 Work

Texas at Arlington, University of

84

Simulative Analysis of Fault-Tolerant Distributed Switching Fabrics for SCI Mushtaq Sarwar Alan D. George  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D Maintainability Prediction (MIL-HDBK-472), U.S. Department of Defense (1966) DoD Military Standard, Procedures

George, Alan D.

85

GENERAL SUPPLY IN THEATERS OF  

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"US military handbook MIL-HDBK-1797," 1997. 26D. McRuer, I. Ashkenas, and D. Graham, Aircraft Dynamics

US Army Corps of Engineers

86

1 Copyright 2010 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME INTERNATIONAL MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CONGRESS & EXPOSITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.everyspec.com/DoD/DoD+PUBLICATIONS/JSSG- 2006_10206/. [12] MIL-HDBK-1530, "Aircraft Structural Integrity Program, General Guidelines for" US Dept. of Defense Military Handbook, 4 Nov. 1996, http://www.everyspec.com/MIL-HDBK/MIL- HDBK+(1500+-+1799)/MIL_HDBK_1530_1844/. [13] Heida, J. H., Konijnenberg, P. and 'tHart, W. G. J., (1995

Giurgiutiu, Victor

87

A hysteretic cohesive-law model of fatigue-crack nucleation S. Serebrinsky *, M. Ortiz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials and ele- ments for aerospace vehicle structures. MIL-HDBK-5H, US Department of Defense, Washington

Serebrinsky, Santiago A.

88

Laboratorio per lo Studio degli Effetti delle Radiazioni sui  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modifiche; MIL-HDBK-831 23 April 1999 Preparation of Test Reports (guidance only); UNI ­10653 ­ November

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

89

Introduction Systems Engineering Fundamentals ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Any supporting calculation shall be made according to MIL-HDBK217. 6.2.2 Mechanical layout The layout

Rhoads, James

90

Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Jan. 1982. MIL-HDBK- 217D. 5] D. Miller, \\Making statistical inferences about soft- ware reliability

Giurgiutiu, Victor

91

41International Journal of Metalcasting/Fall 08 Prediction of Hot tear formation in a  

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Handbooks Operation, Purdue University, p. 12 (1995). 20. Military Handbook, MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials

Beckermann, Christoph

92

Towards a Work Breakdown Structure for Net Centric System of Systems Engineering and  

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.S. Military Handbook MIL-HDBK-1797, 19 December 1997 Nocedal J, and Wright S. (1999). Numerical Optimization

de Weck, Olivier L.

93

Laboratorio per lo Studio degli Effetti delle Radiazioni sui  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

salute dei lavoratori sul luogo di lavoro, e successive modifiche; MIL-HDBK-831 23 Aprii 1999 Preparation

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

94

ENVIRONMENTAL TEST ENVRPT_S1100C-11APR2K6.doc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

miglioramento della sicurezza e della salute dei lavoratori sul luogo di lavoro, e successive modifiche; MIL-HDBK

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

95

University of California, Irvine Department of Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requires electrolytics #12;Reliability predictor models · MIL-HDBK 217F ­ Last updated in 1995 ­ Does

Rose, Michael R.

96

Title of the Seminar An hybrid Monte Carlo and Fuzzy Logic Method for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Reliability Maintenance and Safety ICRMS 2009. Changdu, China (2009) [12] MIL-HDBK-217F. U.S. Department

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

97

(NATIONAL SPHERICAL TORUS EXPERIMENT) STRUCTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/or MIL-HDBK- 5). If a small database exists for a candidate material considered for a design component

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

98

CMU-ITC-91-102 ComputerNetworksand ISDN Systems21 (1991)145-147 145  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implementation Guide, MIL-HDBK-59, Decem- ment of Commerce, National Institute of Standard and ber 20, 1988, p

99

C:\\Documents and Settings\\User\\Documenti\\SERMS\\0-JOB-2009\\094-S3019R\\ENVRPT33-S3019R-9DEC2K8.doc Laboratorio per lo Studio degli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

successive modifiche; MIL-HDBK-831 23 Aprii 1999 Preparation of Test Reports (guidance only); UNI ­10653

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

100

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Certification of a Civil UAS: A Virtual Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1990. Rom Rome Air Development Center, Gri ss AFB, NY 13441 5700. MIL-HDBK-217E, Military Handbook

Fisher, Michael

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101

This article was downloaded by:[University of Colorado Libraries] [University of Colorado Libraries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Defense (2002), Military Handbook - MIL-HDBK-17- 1F: Composite Materials Handbook, Vol. 1. [4

Mohseni, Kamran

102

Involvement of Certification Agencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are also used with other specific meanings, MIL-HDBK- 17 (qualification and certification) or a government

103

12/25/06 EVM Introduction 1 12/25/06 EVM Introduction 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-reviewed journals and internationally acclaimed conferences. He is the chairman of the MIL-HDBK-17 Work Group

Ellingson, Steven W.

104

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON RELIABILITY, VOL. 51, NO. 2, JUNE 2002 199 Analysis of Generalized Phased-Mission System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design, Aug. 1996. 8 MIL-HDBK-17, Handbook on Composite Materials, Rev. 3F, Ch. 7, Durability, Damage

Xing, Liudong

105

Damage Resistance Characteristics of Thick-Core Honeycomb Composite Panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specifications such as MIL-HDBK-1797 exist for the low altitude cases [29], and different types of models

Feraboli, Paolo

106

DETERMINATION OF BASIS VALUES FROM EXPERIMENTAL DATA FOR FABRICS AND COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Germany, 2010 Edition. 16. U. S. Department of Defense. Military Handbook - MIL-HDBK-17-1F: Composite

Barbero, Ever J.

107

Types of Documents and Designations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...handbook, such as the one shown below for MIL-HDBK-1568: Table 2) provides the format and content requirement

108

Department of the Army Pamphlet 2540  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, (MIL-HDBK-340A), United States Air Force," 1999. [3] S. Vanlanduit and P. Guillaume, "An automatic

US Army Corps of Engineers

109

PHARE TDQM Villamosm'enoki szakmodul HU 9305 1330/B 3.2 A megb'izhat'os'ag mint v'eletlen folyamat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Defense military handbook MIL-HDBK-217 [DoD 1992]. This aims to predict the failure rate

Telek, Miklós

110

International Conference on Advanced Robotics ICAR 2005 July 2005, Seattle WA Abstract--Integrating human and robot into a single system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach for composite structures. MIL-HDBK-17 (Rev. F) vol. 3, 2002 [chapter 4]. Fig. 14. Deformation

Rosen, Jacob

111

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Coors and Mil HDBK are manufacturer's published values.) Fig. 5. Split power outputs for top and bottom

112

Laboratorio per lo Studio degli Effetti delle Radiazioni sui  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lavoratori sul luogo di lavoro, e successive modifiche; MIL-HDBK-831 23 April 1999 Preparation of Test

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

113

Mthodologie d'analyse et de dveloppement d'un applicatif de test des fins de diagnostic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ELECTRONIC Reliability design handbook", MIL-HDBK- 338B, 1er octobre 1998. [3] Ministry of Defence (UK

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

114

Putting Engineering into the Enterprise System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brakdown Structure for Software Elements", die in dem MIL-HDBK-171 beschrieben ist. Dabei werden nur die

Bijlsma, Lex

115

Coverage and the Use of Cyclic Redundancy Codes in Ultra-Dependable Systems Michael Paulitsch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(vergelijkbaar aan MIL-HDBK-217). We proberen tot een definitie te komen door `falen van software' te vergelijken

Koopman, Philip

116

Kuhn article  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... example, NVLAP accredits laboratories testing against FIPS 140-1 (cryptographic modules), GOSIP OSI profiles, MIL- STD-462 (Tempest), and ...

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Bridging the gap between gene expression and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.reifman.civ@mail.mil DoD Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute, Telemedicine an

118

Current efforts in standardization of composite materials testing for crashworthiness and energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the material system, and the impact velocity. The recently formed MIL-HDBK-17 Working Group (WG would like to thank the MIL-HDBK-17 Working Group, in particular Karen Jackson (Army Research) for their technical support. The author would also like to acknowledge Larry Ilcewicz (FAA, and chair-at-large of MIL-HDBK

Feraboli, Paolo

119

1. INTRODUCTION. The Integrated Defense Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Life Cycle Management Framework Chart is a training aid for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

follow proper ESD handling procedures (refer to EIA-625, ESD Association Handbook, or MIL-HDBK-263) when, ESD Association Handbook, or MIL-HDBK-263) when working with cards and components. 2.0 Unpacking. Make sure you follow proper ESD handling procedures (refer to EIA-625, ESD Association Handbook, or MIL-HDBK

Rhoads, James

120

Int. J. Vehicle Design, Vol. 44, Nos. 3/4, 2007 247 Copyright 2007 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;248 P. Feraboli, C. Norris and D. McLarty crashworthiness built into it (see MIL-HDBK-17, 2006a by the creation of specific Working Groups, such as the Crashworthiness working group within the MIL-HDBK-17 as intended, as suggested by the MIL-HDBK-17 (2006b). With composite materials, the engineer assigned

Feraboli, Paolo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Knowledge-Based Project Planning Hctor Muoz-Avila1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an Aircraft System to the Fire Control Subsystem and its related elements, adopted from MIL-HDBK-881. Figure 4, J. (1999). Knowledge Management Handbook, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. MIL-HDBK-881. (1993). Work Breakdown Structure. Department of Defense Handbook. MIL-HDBK-881. Muñoz-Avila, H.; McFarlane, D.; Aha; D

Nau, Dana S.

122

COPY -NOT AN ORIGINAL Int. J. Vehicle Design, Vol. 44, Nos. 3/4, 2007 233  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tolerance and vehicle safety certification. He is chairman of the MIL-HDBK-17 Working Group on COPY as reported by MIL-HDBK-17 (2002a,b), but are however very close to the values COPY - NOT AN ORIGINAL #12;COPY components. While a thinner bond line provides a better the mechanical response, see MIL-HDBK-17 (2002a

Feraboli, Paolo

123

Development of a test method for composite materials energy absorption: corrugated specimens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group of the CMH-17 (Composite Materials Handbook, formerly known as MIL-HDBK-17), which comprises Materials Handbook, previously MIL-HDBK-17), and Dr. Larry Ilcewicz (FAA) for his vision on composites., "Energy management working group activities", Proceedings of the 48th MIL-HDBK- 17 Coordination Meeting

Feraboli, Paolo

124

Configuration Management: A Critical Analysis of Applications Using the 8-Step Problem Solving Method L.L. Fletcher, PhD, SIDC, Advanced Space Operations School, Colorado Springs, CO, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

life" (MIL-HDBK-61A, 2001, p. 3-4). The de facto configuration management process of the operational, configuration information needed to manage products and product information effectively" (MIL-HDBK-61A, 2001, p, Military Handbook: Configuration Management Guidance, MIL-HDBK-61A (SE), Washington DC, 2001. Biography

Johnson, Chris

125

210 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON RELIABILITY, VOL. 41, NO. 2, 1992 JUNE The SURE Approach to Reliability Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electronic equipments, known as MIL-HDBK-217 [3] series. It became the de facto industry standard on their research to provide guidelines to update the MIL-HDBK-217. They suggested that the exponential dis issued a mem- orandum that effectively eliminated the use of most defense standards, including the MIL-HDBK

Butler, Ricky W.

126

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PNNL-18896 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Hanford for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and rapidly since 1970. Figure 2 illustrates that, when indexed relative to the U.S. Consumer Price Index (DOL

127

ISSN 1745-9648 Bulgarian Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and most of the rest is brown coal. About 90% of extraction is opencast. Most locally mined coal is used East III 840 Local lignite TPP Maritza-3 120 Local lignite TPP Bobov Dol 630 Local brown coal TPP Varna 1,260 Imported black coal TPP Russe 400 Imported black coal Cogen & autoproducers 1,800 Natural gas

Feigon, Brooke

128

New 3-MCPD (glycidol ester) method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct method for the determination of fatty acid esters of both 3-MCPD and glyci¬dol has been published in the Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society (JAOCS). New 3-MCPD (glycidol ester) method inform Magazine algae algal AOCS biomass bu

129

ECO2N: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the well and at the shale layers. DOl J=1,NY JM=MOD(J-2 , 3 3 . ) .le.3 . dom='shale' Figure 31. Code fragment ofto the heterogeneous sand-shale medium. Table 6. M E S H M A

Pruess, Karsten

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Intelligent Vision Conference, Santa Clara CA, June 28-29, 1999 This paper describes three silicon retina chips which are each  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuously on a 9V battery), have on-chip bias generators, and are all fabricated as MOSIS8 TinyChips (2.2mm, the system costs would be around a dol- lar. THE CHIP ARCHITECTURES I start by describing the architectures

Delbruck, Tobi

131

Stable Parabolic Bundles over Elliptic Surfaces and over Orbifold Riemann Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If q: Y ? ? is an elliptic surface (to be made precise) then the induced map of fundamental groups is an isomorphism if we consider ? as an orbifold, [U], [Dol]. Hence, we obtain a correspondence of flat bundles (by bundles we always mean complex vector bundles). Donaldson showed that each

Christian Gantz; Brian Steer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ogmios 32  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pitfalls, but the factors they cite only under- score the grip English has on the world: cataclysms like nuclear war or climate change or the eventual perfection of a translation machine that would make a common lan- guage unnecessary. Some insist... words like “thou”, “thee”and “thine”are combined with a virtu- oso use of the letter “h”: “ear”becomes “hear”and “her- ring”becomes “erring”. The uninitiated listener is left in a daze as to which century they are in. “I’ve spoken the language all my...

Ostler, Nicholas D M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

1 F. Brissaud, B. Lanternier, D. Charpentier, P. Lyonnet 3me Congrs PENTOM 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

les années 1960 avec la MIL-HDBK- 217 (U.S. DoD, 1995). Ce standard est maintenant bien connu et le même principe que la MIL-HDBK-217 mais qui concernent des systèmes mécaniques comme des vannes'Electricité (UTE), RDF 2003 : Reliability Data Handbook, 2003. United States Department of Defense (DoD), MIL-HDBK

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

Page 1 Vol. 18 No. 7 A Rutgers Cooperative Extension Publication  

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the Eastern seaboard and west to California, destroying an estimated 40 mil- lion trees. A highly destructive............................................. 4 Sunflowers and Other Daisy Family Relatives that Look Like Them

Goodman, Robert M.

135

Technology@TMS: Online Article - Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mil-Handbook-5); Comprehensive data on materials for power and chemical processing plants, from the authoritative ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code  ...

136

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Testing of Nonproliferation Technologies Section (NTS) Engineered Equipment Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina Environmental Testing (MIL-STD 810 Testing)...

137

DNS Policies & Procedures | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNS Policies & Procedures DNS Policies & Procedures DNS Policy Every Federal agency must use only .gov, .mil, or Fed.us domains unless the agency head explicitly determines another...

138

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center -- Background - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures Link provided to Chapter 4: Magnesium Alloys, 0, 780 ...

139

TMS e-News: The monthly electronic newsletter for TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The collection includes interactive versions of reference sources like the Smithsonian Physical Tables, Military Handbook—MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center -- Databases - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures Link provided to Chapter 4: Magnesium Alloys, 0, 958 ...

142

Design Strategy for a Formally Verified Reliable Computing Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Development and Acquisition, OASD- NII, 2004 DoD, DoD Work Breakdown Structure, MIL-HDBK-881, 1993. Do

Butler, Ricky W.

143

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Model Validation of a Bolted Beam Using Spatially Detailed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ scaling effects ­ DOT/FAA AR-03/75. Feb.; 2004. [22] MIL-HDBK-17-3F: vol. 3 ­ Damage resistance

Allen, Matthew S.

144

seari.mit.edu 2008 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 RESEARCH PROFILE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-oriented construct, by tailoring MIL-HDBK 881A and ANSI/EIA 632 Six Functions: 1. Systems Engineering 2. Software

de Weck, Olivier L.

145

FIRE Structural Design Criteria 4/13/01 Revision 0 Page No. i  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry standards (such as ASME, AISC and/or MIL-HDBK-5). If a small database exists for a candidate

146

DESCRIPTION: DC/DC converter 20050 SW 112th Ave. Tualatin, Oregon 97062 phonephone 503.612.2300 faxfax 503.612.2382  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weight 40 grams (1.41) (ounces) MTBF MIL-HDBK-217F 580k hours operating temperature regular models - see

Berns, Hans-Gerd

147

W. JUD READY, PH.D. 2132 BROOKVIEW DRIVE, N.W.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the joining of composites, and some of the data and testing methods have been estab- lished in MIL-HDBK-17

Bennett, Gisele

148

Low-Cost Single-Phase Powered Induction Machine Drive for Residential Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-usage. Reliability was estimated via MTBF as calculated per MIL-HDBK-217 for each sub-system as well as the complete

Chapman, Patrick

149

UNIVERSITE D'ANGERS Anne 2005 ESTIMATION DES LOIS DE FIABILITE EN MECANIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], [EIREDA, 1998], [MIL-HDBK-217 F, 1995] etc.) A partir des retours garanties. Cette méthode permet d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

150

p Wide Temperature performance at full 2 Watt load, 40C to 85C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Newport Components NMH SERIES Isolated 2W Dual Output DC-DC Converters 1 Calculated using MIL-HDBK-217F

Wedeward, Kevin

151

HANKS TO THEIR LARGE capacity and low price, electro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to MIL-HDBK 217F standard [4], we pres- ent (Fig. 2) the failures distribution of each power compo- nent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

Institut National Ecole doctorale IAEM Lorraine Polytechnique de Lorraine Dpartement de Formation Doctorale en Automatique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................... .............. 94 4.3.4.2 Exemple de données de base extraites du MIL-HDBK-217 ........... .............. 96 4

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

153

1TRUETIME, INC. 2835 DUKE COURT SANTA ROSA, CA 95407 WEB www.truetime.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIL-HDBK-217E). OPERATING TEMPERATURE: 0°C to +50°C. STORAGE TEMPERATURE: -17°C to +85°C. HUMIDITY

Berns, Hans-Gerd

154

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center -- Background - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures Link provided to Chapter 4: Magnesium Alloys, 0, 793 ...

155

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center Text Topic - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Print this topic. Topic Title WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures ...

156

Group Code.: SL-PO/RG/cb EDMS No.: 311284  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, formulas, and database of MIL-HDBK-217. Average VP Oncore GT/UT Oncore temperature (ºC) MTBF (hours) MTBF

McDonald, Kirk

157

Risktech} Proceedings: International Conference on Risk Technology & Management Risk in Secure and Dependable System: a Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-by-wire system for heavy duty trucks is derived using MIL-HDBK-217 standard. The computer node consists of a 32

158

Integrated development of CFRP structures for a topless high performance vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by MIL HDBK 881 #12;12/25/06 EVM Introduction 43 12/25/06 EVM Introduction 43 EVM Resources · Books

Feraboli, Paolo

159

Technische Universitt Mnchen Fakultt fr Informatik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be estimated using =QL(C1T+C2E). This formula is defined by the MIL-HDBK-217 Standard [28] to estimate

Cengarle, María Victoria

160

Magnesium: Digital Resource Center -- Databases - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCE: MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures Link provided to Chapter 4: Magnesium Alloys, 0, 1005 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Open Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Other requests for this document shall be referred to DARPA DSO. Page 2. 1.Need to Maintain Legacy Systems longer ... Page 13. www.darpa.mil 13 ...

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

Project: Systems Engineering for Smart Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [2] Systems-2020 Study, Final Report, Booz Allen Hamilton, 16 August 2010. Available at http://www.acq.osd.mil/ se/docs ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Kleen Guard Gloves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kleen Guard Gloves Kleen Guard Gloves Description Color Finish Uses FNAL Stock Number Excellent dexterity and grip Thin-mil feel for tactical sensitivity Abrasion and tear...

164

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Rubber Gloves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rubber Gloves Rubber Gloves Description Color Finish Chemical Compatibility FNAL Stock Number 16 mil thick 11 long Highest permeation resistance to gas and water vapor of any gas...

165

August 2007 BWXTymes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the design, fabrication, testing and installation of an integrated trolley and manipulator system to house and control a nine mil- lion electron volt X-ray unit. Extensive...

166

Microsoft Word - 07 Texas Water Plan.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water plan updated every 5 years * Corps reps attend monthly regional meetings * TWAA (Texas Water Allocation Assessment) * www.swf.usace.army.mil ("(at bottom) Additional Related...

167

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Model Kcmil Thousand Circular Mils kV kilovolts MW Megawatt NESC National Electrical Safety Code NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory O&M Operations and Maintenance...

168

Former Worker Program - Joint Outreach Task Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Group Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) The Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) includes representatives from HSS, Department of Labor (DOL), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Offices of the Ombudsman for DOL and NIOSH, and the DOE-funded FWP projects. The JOTG was established in 2009 under the premise that agencies/programs with common goals can work together by combining resources and coordinating outreach efforts. Each involved agency has a different mission, but the missions are complementary. By working together, the agencies are better able to serve the DOE workforce. The JOTG focuses on educating the former workers on the programs and resources available to them. The JOTG has created a monthly calendar of community events to facilitate interagency and community involvement in these events.

169

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 19130 of 28,560 results. 21 - 19130 of 28,560 results. Download Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Pamela Martin Application from Northern Pass Transmission to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/application-presidential-permit-oe-docket-no-pp-371-northern-pass-transmission-commen-4 Page Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program The Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) includes representatives from HSS, Department of Labor (DOL), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Offices of the Ombudsman for DOL and NIOSH, and the DOE-funded FWP projects. http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/worker/former-worker-medical/joint-outreach-task-group-former-workers

170

United States Government Department of Ena  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOL F 1325.8 DOL F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) United States Government Department of Ena memorandum DATE: January 22, 2003 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-09 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02PT033) SUBJECT: Review of the Department's Administration of Financial Instruments TO: Director/Chief Financial Officer, Office of Management, Budget, and Evaluation, ME-1 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our review of the Department of Energy's (Department) administration of financial instruments. The review was initiated in September 2002 and fieldwork was conducted through December 2002 at Department Headquarters, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report.

171

Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program The Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) includes representatives from HSS, Department of Labor (DOL), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Offices of the Ombudsman for DOL and NIOSH, and the DOE-funded FWP projects. The JOTG was established in 2009 under the premise that agencies/programs with common goals can work together by combining resources and coordinating outreach efforts. Each involved agency has a different mission, but the missions are complementary. By working together, the agencies are better able to serve the DOE workforce. The JOTG focuses on educating the former workers on the programs and resources available to them.

172

Contact Us | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contact Us Contact Us Contact Us EEOICPA Program The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) administers the EEOICPA Program. For information on how to submit an EEOICPA claim, please go to: U.S. Department of Labor, Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation DOE's role is to provide requested record information to DOL. Individuals may request their own EEOICPA record information by submitting a Privacy Act request through the DOE Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Office. Requests are to be submitted in writing to: Chief Freedom of Information Act Officer U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Records requests for other individuals can be submitted through a FOIA request through the DOE Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Office in

173

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a solid-state lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were substituted for the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires and evaluated for relative light quantity and performance. The demonstration results show energy savings of 52% from the initial conversion of HPS to the LED product. These savings were increased to 88% by using occupancy sensor controls that were ultimately set to reduce power to 10% of high state operation after a time delay of 2.5 minutes. Because of the relatively high cost of the LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit and new construction scenarios, respectively. Staff at DOL Headquarters reported high satisfaction with the operation of the LED product.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

TURBULENT HEAT TRANSPORT IN TWO-AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL TEMPERATURE FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lP DOl .OYPS( 301 .SE ~(lSI. SNS( 301, lDXEPUI151,l)XPWU(SEwll)-J.S*IOxEPCII+DXPWC[11 SNS I U -J.J SNSIZJ-JYPS'21+0.5I YV(J+l) J I DYPS(J) Y(J) SNS(J) YV(J) J-l II X(I-l) XU (I)

Samaraweera, D.S.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Performance oriented packaging report for M6 electric blasting cap. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This POP report is for the M6 Electric Blasting Cap which is packaged 180/ Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted. Performance Oriented Packaging, POP, M6 Electric Blasting Cap, Mil-B-2427 wood box.

Sniezek, F.M.

1992-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

Performance oriented packaging report for fuse, blasting, time, M700. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This POP report is for the Fuse, Blasting, Time, M700 which is packaged 4000 feet/ Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted on a similar packaging which is used as an analogy for this item....Performance oriented packaging, POP, Fuse, Blasting, Time, M700, Mil-B-2427 Wood box.

Sniezek, F.M.

1992-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Performance oriented packaging report for M7 non-electric blasting cap. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This POP report is for the M7 Non-Electric Blasting Cap which is packaged 480/Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted. Performance Oriented Packaging, POP, M7 Non-Electric Blasting Cap, Mil-B-2427 Wood box.

Sniezek, F.M.

1992-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Performance oriented packaging report for ignitor, time blasting fuse, weatherproof: M60. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This POP report is for the Time Blasting Fuse, Weatherproof: M60 which is packaged 300/ Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted.... Performance oriented packaging, POP, Time blasting fuse, Weatherproof: M60 Mil-B-2427 wood box.

Sniezek, F.

1992-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

MAUI HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CENTER 550 Lipoa Parkway, Kihei-Maui, HI 96753  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAUI HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CENTER i 550 Lipoa Parkway, Kihei-Maui, HI 96753 (808) 879-5077 · Fax: (808) 879-5018 E-mail: info@mhpcc.hpc.mil URL: www.mhpcc.hpc.mil MAUI HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING This is the fourteenth annual edition of Maui High Performance Computing Center's (MHPCC) Application Briefs which

Olsen, Stephen L.

180

APPENDIX C1 Foreign Per Diem Rates -Effective October 1, 2011 Country Location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$45 BOLIVIA TARIJA 1-Jan 31-Dec $49 BOLIVIA [OTHER] 1-Jan 31-Dec $38 BOSNIA- HERZEGOVINA MIL BASES IN SARAJEVO 1-Jan 31-Dec $81 BOSNIA- HERZEGOVINA MIL BASES NOT IN SARAJEVO 1-Jan 31-Dec $81 BOSNIA- HERZEGOVINA SARAJEVO 1-Jan 31-Dec $81 BOSNIA- HERZEGOVINA [OTHER] 1-Jan 31-Dec $81 BOTSWANA FRANCISTOWN 1-Jan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Modelling Framework to Assess Maintenance Policy Performance in Electrical Production Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and pragmatic approach, proposed in (MIL-HDBK-217F, 1995) suggests to multiply the base value of the component reliability. Hagen, Germany: LiLoLe-Verlag GmbH. 11. MIL-HDBK-217F. (1995). DoD, U.S. 12. Saassouh, B

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

182

i'^"<^F i* Not CE certified for the EW * Universal Input Range 90-264VAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling Natural Convection Switching Frequency 50~70KHz Typical MTBF MIL-HDBK-217F, GB, at25t/115VAC 200K~70KHz Typical MTBF MIL-HDBK-217F, GB, at25°C/115VAC 200K hrs min. Altitude 2000m Dimensions 4.331x1.969x

Kleinfeld, David

183

One of the key factors preventing the widespread adoption of composites in primary crash structures is the absence of specialized test methods for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook, formerly known as MIL-HDBK-17), which comprises representatives from the aerospace and automotive- HDBK-17), and Dr. Larry Ilcewicz (FAA) for his vision on composites safety and certification", Proceedings of the 48th MIL-HDBK-17 Coordination Meeting - Crashworthiness Working Group, Charlotte, NC, Mar

Feraboli, Paolo

184

Elastomer shelf life  

SciTech Connect

The shelf life of elastomeric products used in the Nuclear Industry is typically based on military standards (MIL-HDBK-695C (1) or MIL- STD-1523A (2)). Recently, data became available on naturally aged O-rings that were over 30 years old. An evaluation of this data is presented to demonstrate the conservatism of current guidelines.

Boyum, B.M.; Rhoads, J.E.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Design Guidance for Bolted Connections in Structures of Pultruded Shapes: Gaps in Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-years of work, in the design recommendations given in Part 3 of the MIL-17-HDBK [16]. To achieve the highest.eurocodes.co.uk/ 30/04/09. 16. MIL-HDBK-17-3F, Composite Materials Handbook, Volume 3. Polymer Matrix Composites

Mottram, Toby

186

1 INTRODUCTION Evaluating safety instrumented systems [SIS] reliabil-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consists of predictive models. The first related standard is the MIL-HDBK- 217. It appeared in 1960 Quantitative Risk Analy- sis. New-York: Wiley-AIChE Department of Defence of USA [DoD of USA] 1991. MIL- HDBK

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

187

550 Lipoa Parkway, Kihei-Maui, HI 96753 (808) 879-5077 Fax: (808) 879-5018  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@mhpcc.hpc.mil URL: www.mhpcc.hpc.mil MAUI HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CENTER The views and conclusions contained.S. Government, the University of Hawaii, or the Maui High Performance Computing Center. An Air Force Research This is the thirteenth annual edition of Maui High Performance Computing Center's (MHPCC) Application Briefs which

Olsen, Stephen L.

188

550 Lipoa Parkway, Kihei-Maui, HI 96753 (808) 879-5077 Fax: (808) 879-5018  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@mhpcc.hpc.mil URL: www.mhpcc.hpc.mil MAUI HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CENTER The views and conclusions contained.S. Government, the University of Hawaii, or the Maui High Performance Computing Center. An Air Force Research) APPLICATION BRIEFS 2004 MAUI HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CENTER #12;ii WELCOME This is the tenth annual edition

Carter, Emily A.

189

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

· Texas and Louisiana (including Federal offshore production) continued to account for the majority of natural gas produced in the United States with 5 States accounting for nearly 80 percent of mar- keted production. The remaining 20 percent of production flows from 27 States. · The national average natural gas wellhead price was $4.02 per thousand cubic feet in 2001, which was 7 percent higher than in 2000. In 2001, Cali- fornia had the highest price in the Lower 48 States at $6.93 per thousand cubic feet, while Nebraska had the lowest average wellhead price at $2.16 per thou- sand cubic feet. · After adjustment for inflation, prices in 2001 were the highest since 1984 when they reached $4.07 per thousand cubic feet in 2001 dollars. The highest wellhead price occurred in 1983 when it was $4.11 per thousand cubic feet. 3 ______________________ 3 Prices were converted to constant dollars

190

REVIEW OF HEAVY LEPTON PRODUCTION IN e+e- ANNIHILATION* Martin L. Per1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEAVY LEPTON PRODUCTION IN e+e- ANNIHILATION* HEAVY LEPTON PRODUCTION IN e+e- ANNIHILATION* Martin L. Per1 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 ABSTRACT * The existing data on e f p r , eixT, p xi:, and related events produced in e'e- annihilation are reviewed. All data are consistent with the exist- ence of a new charged lepton, T *, of m a s s 1.9 * . 1 GeV/c2. (Invited talk presented at the 1977 International Symposium on Lepton and Photon Interactions at High Energies, Hambrug, Cfirmany, August 25-31 , 1977.) *Work supported by the Department of Energy. NOTICE-- rpon.wred by the United States Government. Netther the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, Subcontractors, or thou employees. makes

191

'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I- i. I- i. : ' . .a \ ' .. .,a. : - . . . . ' -. a ' . ,i ..' - 3/q, f k/A e _ ' ,!,Y.' .' .. yy,.. ' ; ,' 8 8 A GLINO~C~~~ nada of df&ntlirr& oparations at Metsl'Hydrides, Ino*, 0 2. J. Zlc33ur, ~J>llcntlonq Bract ,' , . . . .\ Dh B, 5, \Yo' rs, ?i?,T),, 33diod Eirectcr L " ', ' ' &y' ,' ,' l .l,CT;IT' TY nr?zxT - ~%SIx? J.22~. 8 !X J.IY. I.& ( -.. . /&x,f.- 11 3Y . - _, \. ., ' . ._' .: . -' ;yT;, ' \. 5 ., . ..: :' .<, ..;.- ".~' .,' ,..",..-. i.., ,;.. ,-": ,; ~ . : _ ' 1.' . I ., ..-' . ;. ' . ;,. i - .:- -' . - . . .' . D- -. iklZ ~3 >!rr Eisonbud visitch Dr. &thou, Dlrestor of the Ketiorhg t .?wm.rr;~ Ifra 1gjk-I kb3ratix-y ct Cixinnnti, &io iid' ooxultod with him on cothods of .. _ _' a.nnIyni~ fc~'baryll',urr, aosts of analgaia, dss?p,cmi 1quut of Ia-

192

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2004 3, 2004 Calendar Thursday, September 23 2:30 p.m. Theoretical Physics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: K. Agashe, Johns Hopkins University Title: B-Factory Signals for a Warped Extra Dimension 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4:00 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - 1 West Speaker: M. Huening, Fermilab Title: Polarized Electron Beams from an RF-Gun: Problems and Prospects Friday, September 24 3:30 p.m. Wine & Cheese - 2nd Flr X-Over 4:00 p.m. Joint Experimental Theoretical Physics Seminar - 1 West Speakers: S. Holmes and S. Mishra, Fermilab Title: Linear Collider R&D: Fermilab Plans 8:00 p.m. Fermilab Film Series - Auditorium Title: O Brother, Where Art Thou? Tickets: $4.00 Cafeteria Thursday, September 23 Minnesota Wild Rice with Chicken

193

Exploitation De Donnes De Retours D'exprience Multi-Industriels Pour La  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Comparaison MIL-HDBK-217F Les comparaisons des résultats au niveau équipement entre le retour d'expérience observé et les prévisions de MTBF réalisées avec la MIL- HDBK-217F donnent en moyenne un rapport supérieur corrections pour compenser l'obsolescence du handbook. La MIL-HDBK-217F est donc très pessimiste et ne peut en

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

DESCRIPTION: point of load converter 20050 SW 112th Ave. Tualatin, Oregon 97062 phonephone 503.612.2300 faxfax 503.612.2382  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recueil RDF 93), la spécification militaire américaine MIL-HDBK 217F, le modèle de prédiction Telcordia MIL-HDBK 217F le taux de défaillance constant d'un composant (partie II de la figure 1-4) s'écrit : 0 partir des spécifications militaires américaine MIL-HDBK 217F. 1.3.2.1.1 Calcul pour un condensateur Les

Berns, Hans-Gerd

195

2012 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Message from the Secretary Fueling our Nation's economy by making the most of America's natural gas and oil resources continues to be an important part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security and a clean energy economy. The Department continues its work toward safe and responsible · development of fossil fuels, while giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised. The EPACT Section 999 program (including the NETL Complementary Research program) coordinates with DOE's ongoing natural gas research and development program within Fossil Energy. The natural gas program is the locus of the Department of Energy's (DOE) natural gas R&D work and is focused on a collaborative interagency effort with the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of the Interior. A federal R&D plan is being developed for this collaboration, focusing on high priority recommendations of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee to safely and prudently develop the Nation's unconventional sale gas and tight oil resources. Each agency will focus on specific core research competencies. In the 2012 Annual Plan, and in light of the interagency collaborative work being carried out in DOE's natural gas R&D program onshore, we will focus on supporting the implementation of the priority collaborative research and development initiative. Offshore, we will deepen the collaboration and coordination with the DOl Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement. A number of initiatives, analyses, and recommendations underpin the 2012 Annual Plan. These include coordination with the high priority work being carried out by DOE, EPA, and DOl related to recommendations from the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board regarding shale gas production, insights from our work with the DOl's Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee, recommendations from the DOE Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee and recommendations

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The accuracy of miniature bead thermistors in the measurement of upper air temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A laboratory study was made of the errors of miniature bead thermistors of 5, 10, and 15 mils nominal diameter when used for the measurement of atmospheric temperature. Although the study was primarily concerned with the ...

Thompson, Donald C. (Donald Charles), 1933-

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Operations Support INTERNATIONAL ARMS CONTROL AND NONPROLIFERATION AGREEMENTS, AND THE DOD FOREIGN CLEARANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the e-Publishing website at www.e-Publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: AF/A3/5

Maj Gen Johnny A. Weida

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

COMPLIANCE WITH, INTERNATIONAL ARMS ?ONTROL AND NONPROLIFERATION AGREEMENTS COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the e-Publishing website at www.e-Publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: AF/A5XP

Maj Gen Richard T. Devereaux; This Instruction Implements Afpd; International Arms Control

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Reliability of Wedge Wire Bonds Subjected to Ultrasonic Welding ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the effect of the ultrasonic welding lid attachment process on the reliability and mechanical strength of 1.0 and 1.5 mil gold wedge wire ...

200

Arnold Schwarzenegger FINAL REPORT FOR ENERGY-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................69 Figure 29. Ten mil vapor retarder installation below sand buffer, slab 39, and air conditioning (HVAC) #12;15 o Houses are too tight for natural ventilation to be effective

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Tenth Biennial OMVPE Workshop--Workshop Paper Publication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

4555 Overlook Ave. SW Washington, DC 20375. Phone: (202) 767-3098. E-mail: gaskill@ccsalpha4.nrl.navy.mil. Dr. Mike Tischler, Proceedings Co-Chair ATMI

202

SPECIFICATION FOR A RF SHIELDED ENCLOSURE 1. Scope -This specification covers the general requirements for the design, construction,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and signal lines. c. High frequency waveguide "pipes" for fiber optic feedthrus. d. Electrical wiring Resistance or Conductance of Moderately Conductive Materials MIL-HDBK-1250 Department of Defense Handbook

Groppi, Christopher

203

Comparison of Subcritical Adhesion Test Methods: The Shaft ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the specimen, first the un-cured model epoxy was coated on to the quartz substrate. A 50 µm (2 mil) thick piece of Kapton-E film (no PSA) was then ...

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

NexSat: Previewing NPOESS/VIIRS Imagery Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's (NPOESS) Integrated Program Office (IPO), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed “NexSat” (www.nrlmry.navy.mil/nexsat_pages/nexsat_home.html)...

Steven D. Miller; Jeffrey D. Hawkins; John Kent; F. Joseph Turk; Thomas F. Lee; Arunas P. Kuciauskas; Kim Richardson; Robert Wade; Carl Hoffman

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MIL-HDBK-5H: Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle ... Electric Power Research Institute, 2003, 0, 956, Lynette Karabin, 2/9/2007 6:35 AM

206

Logistics NUCLEAR WEAPONS-RELATED MATERIEL MANAGEMENT COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the e-Publishing website at www.e-Publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: AF/A4LW

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Group Code.: SL-PO/RG/cb EDMS No.: 315101  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection ALL 120 ¢J GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS MTBF Io=100%of Io.max;Ta=25 ¢J per MIL-HDBK- 217F ALL 1.5 M

McDonald, Kirk

208

Safety NUCLEAR WEAPON SYSTEM SAFETYSTUDIES, OPERATIONAL SAFETY REVIEWS, AND SAFETY RULES COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the e-Publishing website at www.e-publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Maintenance NUCLEAR WEAPONS MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: This publication is available for downloading from the e-Publishing website at www.e-publishing.af.mil/ RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: AF/A4LW

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Maintenance NUCLEAR WEAPONS MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publications and forms are available on the e-publishing website at www.e-publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Category Class Count Prior ANL Whitelist Upstream Routers w 36 1 ISU DNS servers ESNet Google l 754 0.75 Yahoo Search .edu,.gov,.mil d 1, 289 0.5 Emerging Threats b 2, 603...

212

Certified by: AF/A3O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available on the e-Publishing website at www.e-publishing.af.mil for downloading or ordering. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: AF/A10-O

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

CM_FP_DY_PP CTA BETA 2 IR V8 Feb 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Available at http://www.iso.org/iso/home/store.htm ... of OCV for the other coordinate systems shown in OSI as examples, see http://earth- info.nga.mil ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

1999 EMC: Publication of Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 1999 ... E-mail seaforml@ml.wpafb.af.mil, Peter Moran University of Wisconsin Department of ... Lincoln, NE 68588-0511. Telephone (402) 472-0294

215

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | N-Dex Nitrile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N-Dex Nitrile N-Dex Nitrile Gloves Description Color Finish Chemical Compatibility FNAL Stock Number 4 mil thick, 9.5" long 100% nitrile (non-latex) Lightly powdered for easy...

216

The Universal Guru--The Lord of Sukhasan (with Introductory)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LORD OF SlJKHASAN lGuru Rinpoche's (Padmasambhava) contribution to Sikkim) -Satpurananda Avadhuto "In what way has perfect wisdom being set up so that one should not take hold of the state of all-knowledge. nor settle dO\\\\l1 in it?" Subhuti asked... according to the Lepchas derived from SlIhlln meaning new/happy/noble home mdicating the PrecIous Gum's new spiritual cult According to other scholars. Sikklln has been derived from Sukhim or ,\\'lIkhashanml1 the seat of the Great Enjoyer none other than...

Avadhuta, Satpurananda

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Isotopic identification of leakage gas from underground storage reservoirs. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois State Geological Survey reports that in areas where bacteriogenic methane occurs in the near-surface groundwater, isotopic analysis of methane reliably distinguishes this gas from gas that has leaked from underground storage reservoirs. Bacteriogenic methane generally has an isotopic-carbon composition of -64 to -90 per mil, whereas the pipeline and reservoir gases analyzed thus far have all had isotopic-carbon compositions in the range of -40 to -46 per mil.

Coleman, D.D.; Meents, W.F.; Liu, C.L.; Keogh, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Federal Agencies Economics & Social Analysis Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation U.S. Department of State http://www.state.gov/g/oes/ocns/ North Pacific Federal Agencies Economic://alaska.fws.gov/ District 17, U.S. Coast Guard http://www.uscg.mil/D17/ State Agencies Alaska Department of Fish & Game http://www.adfg.state://www.fws.gov/pacific/ District 14, U.S. Coast Guard http://www.uscg.mil/d14/ State Agencies Hawaii Department of Land & Natural

220

Extrusion of metal oxide superconducting wire, tube or ribbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extruding a superconducting metal oxide composition YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x provides a wire (tube or ribbon) having a cohesive mass and a degree of flexibility together with enhanced electrical properties. Wire diameters in the range of 6-85 mils have been produced with smaller wires on the order of 10 mils in diameter exhibiting enhanced flexibility for forming braided, or multistrand, configurations for greater current carrying capacity. The composition for extrusion contains a polymeric binder to provide a cohesive mass to bind the particles together during the extrusion process with the binder subsequently removed at lower temperatures during sintering. The composition for extrusion further includes a deflocculent, an organic plasticizer and a solvent which also are subsequently removed during sintering. Electrically conductive tubing with an inner diameter of 52 mil and an outer diameter of 87-355 mil has also been produced. Flat ribbons have been produced in the range of 10-125 mil thick by 100-500 mil wide. The superconducting wire, tube or ribbon may include an outer ceramic insulating sheath co-extruded with the wire, tubing or ribbon.

Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Extrusion of metal oxide superconducting wire, tube or ribbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for extruding a superconducting metal oxide composition YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} provides a wire (tube or ribbon) having a cohesive mass and a degree of flexibility together with enhanced electrical properties. Wire diameters in the range of 6--85 mils have been produced with smaller wires on the order of 10 mils in diameter exhibiting enhanced flexibility for forming braided, or multistrand, configurations for greater current carrying capacity. The composition for extrusion contains a polymeric binder to provide a cohesive mass to bind the particles together during the extrusion process with the binder subsequently removed at lower temperatures during sintering. The composition for extrusion further includes a deflocculent, an organic plasticizer and a solvent which also are subsequently removed during sintering. Electrically conductive tubing with an inner diameter of 52 mil and an outer diameter of 87--335 mil has also been produced. Flat ribbons have been produced in the range of 10--125 mil thick by 100--500 mil wide. The superconducting wire, tube or ribbon may include an outer ceramic insulating sheath co-extruded with the wire, tubing or ribbon.

Dusek, J.T.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Workers' Spotlight, November/December 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Al Tseu, former US Paratrooper, speaks with visitors Al Tseu, former US Paratrooper, speaks with visitors to the National Atomic Testing Museum celebrating the National Day of Remembrance I I I s s s s s s u u u e e e 1 1 1 0 0 0 N N N o o o v v v e e e m m m b b b e e e r r r / / / D D D e e e c c c e e e m m m b b b e e e r r r 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 3 3 Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : Director's Note 1 Remembrance 1 Staff 2 Beryllium 2 Trivia 2 SERT 3 FWP Milestone 4 Calendar 5 A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR By Greg Lewis I had the pleasure of attending and presenting at the recent Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) meetings in Livermore and Berkeley, California. Representatives from the Department of Labor (DOL), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the DOL Ombudsman, and the Worker Health Protection

223

Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet Construction | Superconducting Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Strand Superconductor Windings Single Strand Superconductor Windings Initial direct wind quad coils were constructed using 13 mil diameter single strand wire. This wire provides the smallest coil patterns possible, with quad coils wound easily onto .75 inch (19mm) diameter support tubes. The 13mil diameter superconductor gives the smallest coils possible, the penalty being higher inductance and smaller transfer function, but allowing lower operational currents. long model magnet Figure 1 shows the first one foot long model magnet constructed using the 11 axis ultrasonic wiring machine with 13 mil superconducting wire, the same wire previously used for the 472 RHIC Corrector packages. Existing stock materials were used in the construction, and the coil pattern was not optimized for harmonics, but to put as many coil turns onto the tube as

224

Army Guidance for UESCs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of 11 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil 071400AUG2008 ARMY STRONG Army Policy Guidance for Utility Energy Services Contracts presented at The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 5 MAY 2009 by Randy Smidt Headquarters Dept of Army, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management 2 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil 071400AUG2008 ARMY STRONG Overview of Army UESC Program & Draft Policy Guidance * Army UESC Program * Draft Policy Guidance o Organizations, responsibilities & relationships o Procedures o Management & Execution o Resource Requirements o Reporting Requirements o Case Studies 3 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil

225

Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

902 Federal Register 902 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 15 / Monday, January 25, 2010 / Notices including Comments Resolution Matrixes (CRMs) and track changed documents, will be posted at: http:// www.losangeles.af.mil/library/ factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=9364. Please send all CRM comments to Vimal Gopal by 5 February 2010. DATES: 12 February 2010: IS-GPS-200E. 8 a.m.-12 p.m. (Pacific Time). Dial-In Information: Phone: 1-800- FON-SAIC (1-800-366-7242). Code: 4511074. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Vimal Gopal, vimal.gopal.ctr@losangeles.af.mil, 1- 310-909-7294 or Captain Neal Roach, neal.roach@losangeles.af.mil, 1-310- 653-3771. Bao-Anh Trinh, Air Force Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 2010-1273 Filed 1-22-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 5001-05-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

226

Double absorber plate. Final technical report, October 1, 1977-November 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An air collector is described that avoids the high air side pressure drops and the use of inlet and outlet header ducts to connect collectors in parallel. The precontract collector design is shown. The major novelty of the collector rests in having two absorber plates which heat a relatively broad air passage. The current collector utilizes a 4 mil fiberglass reinforced plastic sheet (Kalwall) outer glazing, a 1 mil fluorocarbon (Teflon) inner anticonvection layer/inner glazing, a partially blackened (50%) absorbing 4 mil fiberglass reinforced plastic sheet (Kalwall) and a flat black aluminum inner absorber backed by a 1 1/2 inch thickness of fiberglass insulation. Performance testing of the collector is reported. (MHR)

Berman, E.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Investigating The Use Of Ultrasound For Evaluating Aging Wiring Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews our initial efforts to investigate the use of ultrasound to evaluate wire insulation. Our initial model was a solid conductor with heat shrink tubing applied. In this model, various wave modes were identified. Subsequently, several aviation classes of wires (MIL-W81381, MIL-W-22759/34, and MIL-W-22759/87) were measured. The wires represented polyimide and ethylene-tetraflouroethylene insulations, and combinations of polyimide and flouropolymer plastics. Wire gages of 12, 16, and 20 AWG sizes were measured. Finally, samples of these wires were subjected to high temperatures for short periods of time to cause the insulation to degrade. Subsequent measurements indicated easily detectable changes.

Eric I. Madaras; Robert F. Anastasi

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Nitrates/Nitrites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion rates of iron-base alloys in eutectic molten salt mixtures...Stainless steel μm/yr mils/yr μm/yr mils/yr NaNO 3 -NaCl-Na 2 SO 4 (86.3,8.4,5.3 mol%, respectively) 15 0.6 1 0.03 KNO 3 -KCl (94.6 mol%, respectively) 23 0.9 7.5 0.3 LiCl-KCl (58.42 mol%, respectively) 63 2.5 20 0.8...

229

Reliability determination of aluminium electrolytic capacitors by the mean of various methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

statistical results. We can quote for example the following reports: MILL HDBK 217F [1] Rdf 93, Rdf 2000 [2, 3 Temperature Mission profile MIL-HDBK-217 FN2 X X X X X RDF 93 X X X X X Telcordia X X X X X 299 B Part Stress X X X X X HRD5 X X X RDF 2000 X X X X X 0.01 0.1 1 10 Mil HDBK-217F Telcordia 299B Parts stress HRD5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

230

Constant-amplitude fatigue-life data for notched and unnotched annealed ti-6al-4v sheet. Final report, January 1983-September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three lots of annealed Ti-6A1-4V sheet material in thicknesses of 0.063, 0.070, and 0.078 inch, supplied by two manufacturers, were tested to develop fatigue life curves for MIL-HDBK-5. Notched (Kt=3.0) and unnotched configurations of longitudinal and transverse specimens were tested at R ratios of +0.5, +0.1, and -0.5. Fatigue-life data are presented in both tabular and graphical forms. Results are presented in both tabular and graphical forms. Results were forwarded to the Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio, for analysis, reduction, and inclusion in MIL-HDBK-5.

Rhode, T.M.; Ertel, P.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for Naval ships. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corp., and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. In addition, these new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships.

Verderber, R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Snow Flakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flakes Flakes Nature Bulletin No. 48 January 12, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation SNOW FLAKES "Hast thou entered into the treasures of the snow?" So, according to Moses, God challenged Job to answer. Have YOU ? Some day examine the snow crystals that fall upon your coat sleeve. Use a magnifying glass. Do not touch or breathe upon them, for then they will disappear into a smudge of scattered fragments or a droplet of mist. Each one is a gem of delicate, lace-like symmetry, each one hexagonal and each one perfect, yet each one of a different intricate design. W. A. Bentley, of Jericho, Vermont, made micro-photographs of 4800 snow crystals, no two of which are alike. If they fall from high, very cold clouds, they are tiny and either six- sided columns or three-sided plates. If they fall from low, comparatively warm clouds then they are larger -- perhaps as much as one-half inch in diameter -- and several are apt to be combined into one big flake. The individual crystal will be either a six-pointed star, or a solid hexagon with six identical inlaid designs, or a combination of the two.

233

Eh:2,' %9'j-& : : _.i  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Eh:2,' %9'j-& : : _.i. Eh:2,' %9'j-& : : _.i. Gn Februnrp 23, 1951 the subject test naa run redueiafi three 3-M J,$/l60-D pickled arnrSm alpha mlled rods to 3/4&D at roan tmqmatwe with a +HP (Torrington size 6) eager and two piece die. ihendons and Fmkeull hurdnem of the bare before and after reduction are taulatei on the attaohed abart, to,*hmr r&h the dim~~Icne after (ijJilT~~8txakhtti-ng at..Qntkoff3t+el Capany*, flkrdnass readlngymiw @ken on-a-hand fued flat akthe center of the bur In eaah Cal.. ;_, ". ". : - -81l the bras PRT~ h6.i f& riO* 3,492 818 paSSed .&%%~ht thou* pnd Lleuuured 3.2 !dlaHJvelml~~ The dies were rdxwsaad ad sZter the srcmd $&+a the tma appaxred, dth rou& measurslPent* to be 0.h he .other two were then gmee~ rap through, turned end the other + emaged. The

234

EEOICP_Handbook_FINAL_July_15_2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) U.S. Department of Energy Outreach & Awareness Series ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT A Basic Overview of the This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to assist former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees to become familiar with and utilize the services and benefits authorized under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA). There are several Federal entities that support implementation of EEOICPA. Each of these entities serves a critical and unique role in this process. Briefly, the Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP)

235

Search...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Search... Search... 11/08/2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES From: John Berry Director Subject: Model Strategies for Recruitment and Hiring of People with Disabilities as Required Under Executive Order 13548 On July 26, 2010, President Obama issued Executive Order (EO) 13548, which directs Executive departments and agencies to improve their efforts to employ Federal workers with disabilities and targeted disabilities through increased recruitment, hiring, and retention of these individuals. OPM, in consultation with the White House, the Department of Labor (DOL), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), has developed, as required by the EO, model recruitment and hiring strategies for agencies to use to increase their employment of people with

236

Clause XXX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL DAVIS BACON ACT (DBA) CLAUSES AS APPROVED BY FINAL DAVIS BACON ACT (DBA) CLAUSES AS APPROVED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (DOL) FOR USE IN FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS OTHER THAN WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AND LOAN PROGRAMS November 6, 2009 Clause XXX. Davis Bacon Act and Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. Definitions: For purposes of this clause, Clause XXX, Davis Bacon Act and Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, the following definitions are applicable: (1) "Award" means any grant, cooperative agreement or technology investment agreement made with Recovery Act funds by the Department of Energy (DOE) to a Recipient. Such Award must require compliance with the labor standards clauses and wage rate requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act (DBA) for work

237

OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

64 64 Prolect Information Project Titre: Optimization Project Area #2 I Date: I 612412013 DOl!Code: I Contractor Code: I Project lead: Sha~Nonnan Project overview The purpose of this project Is lo replace oorroded steel lines from 35 weDs with a 2· polypipe, bring the wells 1. Brief project desclipllon (Include back on production, route the production from 24 of them into T-3-34 Test Manifold I, and lnslal a line from anything that could impact the T-3-34 Test Manifold lo T-2-34 Production Manifold for shipment, picking up 11 additional weNs. This will enVJronmentj lnetease production approximately 30 barrels of oil per day (BOPO) and will have a 40 day payout at $80/bbl oil price. In addition, three tanks al well sites will be taken out of selVioe and the need lo truck that oil lo the

238

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program July 2009 A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to assist former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees to become familiar with and utilize the services and benefits authorized under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOIPCA). There are several Federal entities that support implementation of EEOICPA. Each of these entities serves a critical and unique role in this process. Briefly, the Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Workers'

239

OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Rf..V I 3 Rf..V I Project Information Project Title: Optimization Project Area# 1 Date: 712212013 DOl!Code: Project Lead: Sharyl Norman Project Overview 1. Brief project description [include anything that could mpact the environment] 2. Legal location 3. Duration of the project 4. Major equipment to be used Contractor Code: The purpose of this project is to replace corroded steel lines from 35 wells with a 2" poly pipe, bring the wells back on production, route the production from 24 of them into T-3-34 Test Manifold I, and install a line from T-:>34 Test Manifold to T-2-34 Production Manifold for shipment, picking up 11 additional wells. This will increase production approximately 30 barrels of oil per day (BOPD) and will have a 40 day payout at $80/bbl

240

SR 2001 News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SR 2001 News Releases SR 2001 News Releases Department of Energy Extends Contract at SRS - R-01-002 Savannah River Site's Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Observance - SR-01-01 DOE Announces Availability of Draft SEIS on Salt Processing Alternatives - SR-01-02 Media Availability For WIPP Shipment - SR-01-03 Savannah River Site Sends First Shipment Of Transuranic Waste To WIPP - SR-01-04 DOE Announces Availability Of Draft RFP On Salt Waste Processing Facility - SR-01-05 DOE Announces Wackenhut Services, Inc. - SR-01-06 DOE & DOL Hold Public Meeting For Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act - SR-01-07 DOE Announces Plans For Offsite Treatment & Disposal Of SRS Waste - SR-01-08 DOE Announces Availability Of Final Supplemental EIS And Identifies Preferred Salt Processing Alternative - SR-01-09

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

check list for those with one abnormal BeLPT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHECK LIST FOR THOSE WHO HAVE HAD, OR WHO IN THE FUTURE CHECK LIST FOR THOSE WHO HAVE HAD, OR WHO IN THE FUTURE HAVE, ONE ABNORMAL BeLPT _____ Fill out the EE-1 and EE-3 and include a copy of any abnormal BeLPT results that you have; review the EE-7 form. _____ Make a copy of the completed forms (one to keep for yourself). _____ Take the original copy of your forms (or mail them) to your nearest EEOICPA Resource Center. If you have already filed these forms, please do not fill them out again, just skip to the next item, below. _____ After you are accepted into the DOL program, choose a clinical center where you want to have your medical examinations. Circle the center you choose. _____ Call the clinical center where you want your medical examinations to be performed. ["I have an abnormal beryllium blood test and I need to get

242

Workers Compensation Program (OWCP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Compensation Program (OWCP) Workers Compensation Program (OWCP) Workers Compensation Program (OWCP) QUICK GUIDE FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES WHEN INJURED ON THE JOB The Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer is responsible for managing the Headquarters Federal Employees Workers' Compensation Program, a program to assist and compensate Federal workers injured on the job. This office answers questions, maintain forms and files, and serves as the liaison between this agency and the Office of Workers' Compensation Program (OWCP), U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) the agency responsible for administering the program. OWCP provides compensation benefits to civilian employees for disability due to personal injury sustained while in the performance of duty or to employment related disease. Benefits cannot be paid if the injury is

243

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

merican families, communities, merican families, communities, and businesses all depend on reli- able and affordable energy for their health, safety, and liveli- hood. Energy is a critical compo- nent of nearly everything that affects our daily lives, from transportation to commu- nication, from food production to medical services, and from air conditioning to heat- ing. Americans expect these services to en- hance our lives, and are keenly aware that each additional, unanticipated energy ex- pense is a decrease in funds available for other needs. Impacts of High Energy Prices on the Daily Lives of Americans Many American families and businesses have already felt the strain of rising prices and unreliable energy supplies. Every time energy prices rise, American families have fewer dol- lars available to meet their needs. Low-income

244

OSHA: Standards and Recordkeeping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OSHA: Standards & OSHA: Standards & Record keeping Frances E. Humphrey, CRNP, COHN-5/CM DOE Headquarters January 17, 2002 .. DOL Organizational Chart History of OSHA +11/14n8: Lead Standard Published * 5/23/80: Medical & Exposure Records Standard Finalized * 7/2/82: Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP) Created +11/25/83: HazCom Standard Promulgated * 9/1/89: Lockout/Tagout Standard Issued OSHA Mission Statement * "The mission of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is to save lives, prevent injuries and protect the health of America's workers" {OSHA, 2001) History of OSHA +12/29nO: President Nixon signed Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 * 5129n1: First Standards Adopted * 1/17n2: OSHA Training Institute Established * Nov-Dec 1972: First State Plans Approved

245

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 1, 2010 February 1, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION "" ( "· FROM: DANIEL B. PONE~ SUBJECT: Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers The Department embraces its responsibility for and commitment to the health and well- being of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current and former workers, both Federal and contractor employees. Two key programs that advance DO E's commitment to its former and current workers are the Department of Labor (DOL) managed Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. In the context of support to EEOICP, DOE's role is to work on behalf of the program claimants to make sure that all available worker and

246

UNITED STATES OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Washington, DC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November November 8, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: JOHN BERRY \ (\ .~ .. (t"t-..~ DIRECTOR \~Ii" \"'b' ~ U Subject:ModelStrategiesfor RQitment andHiringof PeoplewithDisabilitiesas Required UnderExecutiveOrder 13548 On July 26,2010, President Obama issued Executive Order (EO) 13548, which directs Executive departments and agencies (agencies) to improve their efforts to employ Federal workers with disabilities and targeted disabilities through increased recruitment, hiring, and retention of these individuals. OPM, in consultation with the White House, the Department of Labor (DOL), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), has developed, as required by the EO, model recruitment and hiring strategies for agencies to use to increase their employment of people with disabilities.

247

The Office of Health, Safety and Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Home Outreach Event Calendar for DOE Nuclear Weapons Workers Covered Facilities Database Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness Health and Safety HSS Logo Find Facilities The Department has created the Facility List Database to provide public access to summaries of information collected on the facilities listed in the Federal Register. The summary for each facility includes the following information: Facility Name Also Known As State Location Time Period Facility Type (Atomic Weapons Employer/Beryllium Vendor/Department of Energy) Facility Description The information in the database can be accessed in four different ways: View Covered Facilities by Facility Name Display the record for a specific covered facility. Please note that the facilities in this database represent coverage for Part B and E and that not all facilities provide coverage under both parts. For more information on benefits and coverage, contact a DOL resource center.

248

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers February 1, 2010 Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers The Department embraces its responsibility for and commitment to the health and well-being of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current and former workers, both Federal and contractor employees. Two key programs that advance DO E's commitment to its former and current workers are the Department of Labor (DOL) managed Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) and the Former Worker Medical Screening

249

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Labor and the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the U.S. Department of Labor the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Energy January 21, 2011 Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Energy This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Labor (DOL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICPA). EEOICPA provides for timely, uniform, and adequate compensation of covered employees and, where applicable, survivors of employees suffering from

250

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The The following six sections, one for each energy source and total energy, provide: descriptions of all the data series that are entered into SEDS; the formulas applied in SEDS for creating additional data series; and notes on special circumstances for any series. Appendix A is an alphabetical listing of the variable names and formulas used in consumption estimation; Appendix B lists the conversion factors used to convert physical units into British thermal units and cites the sources for those factors; Appendix C provides the state-level resident pop- ulation data used in per capita calculations; Appendix D presents the real gross domestic product by state used to calculate total energy per real dol- lar of economic output; Appendix E provides metric and other physical conversion factors for measures used in energy analyses; and Appendix F summarizes changes made since the last complete

251

I F E B R U A R  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F F E B R U A R Y 1 9 9 8 GRANDE RONDE BASIN ENDEMIC SPRING CHINOOK SA L M 0 N S-U P P L E M E N TAT I O N P R 0 G RA M Preliminary Environmental Assessment Dol$%- 3018 DOE/EA-1173 DISCLAIMER T h i s report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its usc would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spe- cific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufac- turer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, m

252

Former Worker Program - Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) In February 2005, DOE expanded the beryllium screening program to include former employees of defunct DOE beryllium vendors who were employed with these companies while they performed work for DOE. This change was made to ensure that workers who no longer have an employer to turn to for beryllium disease testing could receive this important screening. DOE will offer these individuals a blood test at no cost to check for beryllium sensitization. DOE will pay for both the costs of drawing the blood and the analysis of the blood. If a screened individual receives an abnormal test for beryllium sensitization, they can receive medical monitoring for beryllium disease through DOL's EEOICP.

253

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Section Section 1. Documentation Guide This section describes the data identification codes in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). The following six sections, one for each energy source and total energy, provide: descriptions of all the data series that are entered into SEDS; the formulas applied in SEDS for creating additional data series; and notes on special circumstances for any series. Appendix A is an alphabetical listing of the variable names and formulas used in consumption estimation; Appendix B lists the conversion factors used to convert physical units into British thermal units and cites the sources for those factors; Appendix C provides the state-level resident pop- ulation data used in per capita calculations; Appendix D presents the real gross domestic product by state used to calculate total energy per real dol- lar of economic output; Appendix E provides metric and other

254

Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LABOR LABOR AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY I. INTRODUCTION This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Labor (DO L) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICPA). EEOICPA provides for timely, uniform, and adequate compensation of covered employees and, where applicable, survivors of employees suffering from illnesses incurred by the employees in the performance of duty. DOL and DOE will make every effort to ensure that activities conducted under this MOU, as well as those conducted through other mechanisms, are coordinated. non-

255

International Services, Human Resources, Brookhaven National Laboratory,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helpful Abbreviations Helpful Abbreviations AAO-Administrative Appeals Office (formerly the Administrative Appeals Unit (AAU)) ADIT-Alien Documentation, Identification and Telecommunications system AEDPA-Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 ALC-Alien Labor Certification AOS-Adjustment of Status ARC-Alien Registration Card or Permanent Resident Card BALCA-Board of Alien Labor Certification Appeals BCA-Bureau of Consular Affairs BIA-Board of Immigration Appeals CBP-U.S. Customs and Border Protection CCA-Child Citizenship Act CFR - Code of Federal Regulations CO-Certifying Officer (of DOL) COS-Change of Status CPT-Curricular Practical Training CR-Conditional Resident D&R-Detention and Removal DAO-District Adjudication Officer DED-Deferred Enforced Departure DHS-Department of Homeland Security

256

Army Energy Security Considerations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMY Energy Security ARMY Energy Security Considerations Don Juhasz, PE, CEM HQDA, OACSIM, DAIM-FDF Telephone: (703)-601-0374 E-mail: don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil FUEL CELL OPPORTUNITIES 26 April 2007 1 of 10 Don Juhasz DAIM-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) / don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 Army Energy * * * * FOREIGN OIL 2 of 10 Don Juhasz DAIM-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) / don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 World Energy Situation OIL & GAS LIQUIDS 38% Rise in NTV Fuel Use 35% of DoD utilities 21% of Fed government 11% of installations' budget US ARMY IS DEPENDENT ON 1 ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ In ¾ 3 of 10 Don Juhasz DAIM-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) / don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 Challenges To Managing The Future World population growing: 6.5 B in 2006, 2030 estimate 7.9 B

257

Proving Correctness of the Basic TESLA Multicast Stream Authentication Protocol with TAME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proving Correctness of the Basic TESLA Multicast Stream Authentication Protocol with TAME Presented, Washington, DC 20375 E-mail: archer@itd.nrl.navy.mil The TESLA multicast stream authentication protocol just been revealed. While an informal argument for the correctness of TESLA has been published

258

COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available for downloading or ordering on the e-Publishing web site at www.e-publishing.af.mil. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: SAF/PAY Certified by: SAF/PAY

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NOBOB-A (AssessmeNt): 2001-2005 Collaborators: NOAA-GLERL, Univ. of Mich., Univ. of Windsor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vessels house large numbers of live or viable (eggs, cysts) organisms, a portion of which are both / Wednesday, August 31, 2005, pp 51831-51836; see also http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/mso/ nobob.htm). A similar of ballast water added in the Great Lakes can include organisms that were in the unpumpable residual ballast

260

30 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2004 by Massoud Amin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of customers every few weeks or months, while larger outages occur every two to nine years and affect mil for reliable and disturbance-free electricity. The massive power outages in the United States, Canada, United-scale conglomerate. Over the last decade and during the next few years, the electric enter- prise will undergo

Amin, S. Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Power systems and requirements for integration of smart structures into aircraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the requisite electrical power, usually in the 50 to 100 kW range for a modern tactical aircraft, and a lower and results ­ highlighting wind tunnel power measurements from shape memory alloy and piezoelectric ultrasonic specification of MIL-STD-7041 . The upper loop in the diagram provides emergency power through an air turbine

Lindner, Douglas K.

262

DISTRIBUTED COGNITIVE MAC FOR ENERGY-CONSTRAINED OPPORTUNISTIC SPECTRUM ACCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTED COGNITIVE MAC FOR ENERGY-CONSTRAINED OPPORTUNISTIC SPECTRUM ACCESS Yunxia Chen, Qing@arl.army.mil ABSTRACT We address the design of distributed cognitive medium ac- cess control (MAC) protocols for opportunistic spectrum access (OSA) under an energy constraint on the secondary users. The objective

Islam, M. Saif

263

Ice Storms in the St. Lawrence Valley Region Kathleen F. Jones January 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of millions of people. The ice that accreted on trees and wires damaged electrical transmission be obtained from these photos. The analysis in this report relies on historical weather data and ice accretion://www.erdc.usace.army.mil CRREL and Simple ice accretion models incorpo- rate a physical model of the process of ice accre- tion

264

Wireless Tomography, Part I: A Novel Approach to Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless Tomography, Part I: A Novel Approach to Remote Sensing R. C. Qiu, M. C. Wicks, L. Li, Z. Browning.12@us.af.mil Abstract--Wireless tomography, a novel approach to remote sensing, is proposed--radio frequency tomography, remote sensing, cognitive radar, cognitive radio. I. INTRODUCTION The ever increasing

Qiu, Robert Caiming

265

NEVADA BUREAU OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SPECIAL PUBLICATION MI-1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory System, Accession Summary Report T0701789, 2007. [14] B. Stager, A. Ruegamer, Tonopah Test Ranges a herd of 250 were found dead in the northwestern Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) in southern collected in February 2008 at the Nevada Testing and Training Range. Units in per mil (%). Sample d15 N NO3

Tingley, Joseph V.

266

Office of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of wastes from abandoned uranium mines in the western United States. Between the 1940s and 1990s, thousands.......................................21 Figure 3. Density of Western Uranium Mines Using the MAS/MILS Database Portion of the Uranium of uranium mines operated in the United States, mostly in the western continental U.S., leaving a legacy

267

Annual Performance Report -2011 Water Use Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,802,005Total Water Produced and Purchased (TP) ­ Annual Volume Distribution System Leakage Summary: Note the reporting period listed above, WSU total water produced was 465.8 million gallons which is 106.5 million, service meters recorded 123.3 MilGal of water usage, which accounts for 26.5% of water produced

Collins, Gary S.

268

InsideIllinoisJune 5, 2008 Vol. 27, No. 21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$1.2 million for lighting upgrades; $2 mil- lion for a wind turbine project and $825 Assessment, a student assessment approved in 2006 that is being phased in over four years to address deferred, bioengi- neering, ultrafast and single molecule spec- troscopy, and novel materials synthesis. engineering

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

269

Electronic reliability estimation: how reliable are the results?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of Safety Critical Systems requires the compliance to several safety standards and regulations. Since, most of the times, human life is at stake, it is crucial to fully understand the behaviour of the system being developed in order to ... Keywords: MIL-Hdbk-217F, MTTF, estimation, reliability

Nuno Silva; Rui Lopes

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Predictive Analysis of Mission Critical Systems Dependability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the analysis of dependability and predictive reliability. The proposed methodology is based on hierarchical models and the generally acclaimed standard MIL-HDBK 217F. The equipment is a real component of the railway interlocking ... Keywords: dependebility computation, FMEA/FMECA, railway signalling equipment, predictive analysis, hierarchical model, SHAMAP

Martin Danhel, Hana Kubátová, Radek Dobiá?

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Classification of Cabo Frio (Brazil) three-dimensional ocean features using single-slice acoustic observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classification of Cabo Frio (Brazil) three-dimensional ocean features using single-slice acoustic-000 Arraial do Cabo, RJ, Brazil, {lcalado, ana.claudia}@ieapm.mar.mil.br Acoustic tomography is now a well for an instantaneous sound speed field constructed from dynamical predictions for Cabo Frio, Brazil. The results show

Jesus, Sérgio M.

272

Operations NUCLEAR WEAPONS ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT RESPONSE COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESSIBILITY: Publications and forms are available for downloading or ordering on the e-Publishing website at www.e-Publishing.af.mil RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication OPR: HQ A7/CX Certified by: HQ USAF/A7C

Major General Timothy A. Byers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ACCESSIBILITY: Acquisition JOINT AIR FORCE-NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION (AF-NNSA) NUCLEAR WEAPONS LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICATION IS MANDATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication is available for downloading or ordering on the e-publishing website at: www.e-publishing.af.mil. RELEASABILITY: There are no releasability restrictions on this publication. OPR: AF/A3/5N-R Certified by: AF/A3/5N

Dr Billy Mullins

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

275

The National Marine Fisheries Service Habitat Conservation Efforts in Louisiana, 1980 Through 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of all remaining coastal wetlands in the United States. Louisiana waters contributed about 15 tively estimated to exceed $600 mil lion (Bertrand, 1984). Louisiana coastal wetlands converted to open). Wetland losses in Louisiana are caused by a variety of factors. In a com prehensive evaluation, Turner

276

Federal Agencies Economics & Social Analysis Division Office of Science & Technology, NOAA Fisheries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of State www.state.gov/g/oes/ocns/ North Pacific Federal Agencies Economic & Social Sciences Research State Agencies Alaska Department of Fish & Game www.adfg.state.ak.us Councils & Commissions North://www.uscg.mil/D13/ State Agencies California Department of Fish & Game www.dfg.ca.gov Oregon Department of Fish

277

The Software Engineering Capstone: Structure and Tradeoffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Covington,Kentucky,USA. ACM 1-58113-473-8/02/0002. Kim A. Braun Department of Computer Science U.S. Air Science U.S. Air Force Academy, CO 80840 703-428-0528 achamillard @hq.dcma.mil Abstract One of the largest how we have tailored the software engineering capstone sequence at the U.S. Air Force Academy

Chamillard, Tim

278

Using Lab Practicato Evaluate Programming Ability A.T. Chamillard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Air Force Academy, CO 80840 703-767-6338 achamillard~hq.dcma.mil Jay K. Joiner Stone Analytics, Inc implementation of the approach. All students attending the U.S. Air Force Academy are required to take to use these skills to solve problems using © 2001 Association for Computing Machinery. ACM acknowledges

Chamillard, Tim

279

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. X, NO. X, XXXX 2010 1 Cross-layer Routing and Dynamic Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Matyjas and M. Medley are with the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, RIGF, Rome, NY 13441, USA. e-mail: {john.matyjas,michael.medley}@rl.af.mil. 1This material is based upon work supported by the US Air Force. of ACM Intl. Conf. on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems (MSWiM) 2009. hoc

Melodia, Tommaso

280

e-Reimbursement Travel Checklist Please refer to Accounting Services Travel and Expenses website for in-depth policies and procedures: http://www.bussvc.wisc.edu/acct/TEWeb/index.html.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Business Purpose" is being utilized. Default location is the primary DESTINATION and not the traveler://www.defensetravel.dod.mil/perdiem/perdiemrates.html. Attach original itemized lodging receipt with $0.00 balance. Hotel can only be considered "conference hotel" if it is an actual conference site and proof of such must be provided if lodging claim exceeds

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

lthough some national figures show that the number of women  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

point out. That theory appears to be borne out by a review of the areas in which women enroll in biodiesel characterization and reactor design; and students from the Vander- bilt Biodiesel Initiative government the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste for one mil- lion

Bordenstein, Seth

282

Can America's ash trees be saved?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and portions of the south- eastern US could supply bio-refineries with the raw materials needed to manu an enhanced source of biofuels." Poplar's rapid growth and its rela- tively compact genome size of 480 mil for biofuel pro- duction. "Under optimal conditions, poplars can add a dozen feet of growth each year

283

Air Proportional Counter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple wire counter utilizing air at atmospheric pressure as the ionizing medium and having a window of a nylon sheet of less than 0.5 mil thickness coated with graphite. The window is permeable to alpha particles so that the counter is well adapted to surveying sources of alpha radiation.

Simpson, J.A. Jr.

1950-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Government Documents Interest Group (GDIG) Free Science Information from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sources. Can also select the specific sources to search. Entering a query in "Full Record" will search;Advanced Search Multiple terms Example: A search on hurricane katrina will return results on both://stinet.dtic.mil/help/index.html#thesaurus Search in Fields Descriptor and Identifier (Key Word is DE & ID). IAC Subject Terms (IAS) Personal

Nair, Sankar

285

Gaussian multiple instance learning approach for mapping the slums of the world using very high resolution imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a computationally efficient algorithm based on multiple instance learning for mapping informal settlements (slums) using very high-resolution remote sensing imagery. From remote sensing perspective, informal settlements share ... Keywords: mil, remote sensing, spatial data mining

Ranga Raju Vatsavai

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy B. Bayanov, Yu. Belchenko, V. Belov, V. Davydenko, A. Donin, A. Dranichnikov, A. Ivanov,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF LOW-ENERGY NEUTRONS IN SOLAR FLARES AND THE IMPORTANCE OF THEIR DETECTION IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE R 20375, USA; murphy@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil 2 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel ABSTRACT Neutron detectors on spacecraft in the inner heliosphere can observe the low-energy (

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

287

Rulison Open  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Control number -R-57 has been assigned t o t h i s report i n the Rulison Open his repon has been r e p i r d d d e c d y from the best mil.blc mpy. Available from the Sixvice; U....

288

US-PAKISTAN STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US-PAKISTAN STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP A Track-Two Dialogue for Long-Term Security Cooperation FIFTH WORKSHOP REPORT #12;#12;US-Pakistan Strategic Partnership A Track-Two Dialogue for Long-Term Security-6201 ASCOinfo@dtra.mil #12;US-Pakistan Strategic Dialogue, Fifth Iteration 5 Table of Contents Table of Contents

289

Investigating the Use of Ultrasonic Guided Waves for Aging Wire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging wiring has become a critical issue to DoD, NASA, FAA, and Industry. The problem is that insulation on environmentally aged wire becomes brittle and cracks. This exposes the underlying conductive wire to the potential for short circuits and fire. The difficulty is that techniques to monitor aging wire problems focus on applying electrical sensing techniques that are not very sensitive to the wire insulation. Thus, the development of methods to quantify and monitor aging wire insulation is highly warranted. Measurement of wire insulation stiffness by ultrasonic guided waves is being examined. Initial laboratory tests were performed on a simple model consisting of a solid cylinder and then a solid cylinder with a polymer coating. Experimental measurements showed that the lowest order axisymmetric mode may be sensitive to stiffness changes in the wire insulation. To test this theory, mil-spec wire samples MIL-W-81381, MIL-W-22759/34, and MIL-W-22759/87 (typically found in aircraft) were heat-damaged in an oven, in a range of heating conditions. The samples were 12, 16, and 20 gauge and the heat-damage introduced material changes in the wire-insulation that made the originally flexible insulation brittle and darker in color. Axisymmetric mode phasevelocity increased for the samples that were exposed to heat for longer duration. For example, the phase velocity in the 20-gauge MIL-W-22759/34 wire changed from a baseline value of 2790m/s to 3280m/s and 3530m/s for one-hour exposures to 349 C and 399 C, respectively. Although the heat-damage conditions are not the same as environmental aging, we believe that with further development and refinements, the ultrasonic guided waves can be used to inspect wire-insulation for detrimental environmental aging conditions.

Insulation Assessment Robert; Robert F. Anastasi A; Eric I. Madaras B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Investigating the Use of Ultrasonic Guided Waves for Aging Wire Insulation Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging wiring has become a critical issue to DoD, NASA, FAA, and Industry. The problem is that insulation on environmentally aged wire becomes brittle and cracks. This exposes the underlying conductive wire to the potential for short circuits and fire. The difficulty is that techniques to monitor aging wire problems focus on applying electrical sensing techniques that are not very sensitive to the wire insulation. Thus, the development of methods to quantify and monitor aging wire insulation is highly warranted. Measurement of wire insulation stiffness by ultrasonic guided waves is being examined. Initial laboratory tests were performed on a simple model consisting of a solid cylinder and then a solid cylinder with a polymer coating. Experimental measurements showed that the lowest order axisymmetric mode may be sensitive to stiffness changes in the wire insulation. To test this theory, mil-spec wire samples MIL-W-81381, MIL-W-22759/34, and MIL-W-22759/87 (typically found in aircraft) were heat-damaged in an oven, in a range of heating conditions. The samples were 12, 16, and 20 gauge and the heat-damage introduced material changes in the wire-insulation that made the originally flexible insulation brittle and darker in color. Axisymmetric mode phasevelocity increased for the samples that were exposed to heat for longer duration. For example, the phase velocity in the 20-gauge MIL-W-22759/34 wire changed from a baseline value of 2790m/s to 3280m/s and 3530m/s for one-hour exposures to 349 C and 399 C, respectively. Although the heat-damage conditions are not the same as environmental aging, we believe that with further development and refinements, the ultrasonic guided waves can be used to inspect wire-insulation for detrimental environmental aging conditions.

Robert F. Anastasi; Eric I. Madaras

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge Philip R. Columbus Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management Headquarters, Department of the Army 180900ZMay2012 1 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Overview * The purpose of this project was to demonstrate that a thermoplastic composite I-beam bridge could be constructed to accommodate a M-1 battle tank. * This effort determined the engineering and construction of such a structure was possible and be cost competitive to a wood timber bridge * The materials are virtually maintenance-free and not subject to degradation from moisture, rot, insects and weather. 180900ZMay2012 2 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Background

292

Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to Production of Radioisotope Power Systems (DOE/EIS-0373) (11/16/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39 39 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 220 / Tuesday, November 16, 2004 / Notices RETENTION AND DISPOSAL: Records are destroyed when three years old. SYSTEM MANAGER(S) AND ADDRESS: The commanding officer of the activity in question. Official mailing addresses are published in the Standard Navy Distribution List available at http://neds.daps.dla.mil/sndl.htm. NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE: Individuals seeking to determine whether this system of records contains information about themselves should address written inquiries to the commanding officer of the naval activity where currently employed. Official mailing addresses are published in the Standard Navy Distribution List available at http://neds.daps.dla.mil/ sndl.htm. RECORD ACCESS PROCEDURES: Individuals seeking access to records

293

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge Philip R. Columbus Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management Headquarters, Department of the Army 180900ZMay2012 1 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Overview * The purpose of this project was to demonstrate that a thermoplastic composite I-beam bridge could be constructed to accommodate a M-1 battle tank. * This effort determined the engineering and construction of such a structure was possible and be cost competitive to a wood timber bridge * The materials are virtually maintenance-free and not subject to degradation from moisture, rot, insects and weather. 180900ZMay2012 2 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Background

294

FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THE ARGONNE ADVANCED RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The core design and the fuel element concept for the high-flux Argonne Advanced Research Reactor are presented. The core is cooled and moderated by light water and utilizes beryllium as a reflector. The fuel element assembly is rhomboidal in cross section and consists of 27 plates fastened together at their edges by dovetailed locking keys, and at each end by end fittings. Each fuel plate is 40 mils thick and contains a uniform dispersion of highly enriched UO/ sub 2/ particles, up to a maximum of 37 wt%, in a matrix of sintered stainless steel powder. A 5 mil thick stainless steel cladding is metallurgically bonded to each side of the fueled matrix. (N.W.R.)

Adolph, N.R.; Silberstein, M.S.; Weinstein, A.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

FINAL REPORT FOR THE EROSION AND CORROSION ANALYSIS OF WASTE TRANSFER PRIMARY PIPELINE SECTIONS FROM 241-SY TANK FARM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three sections of primary transfer pipeline removed from the 241-SY Tank Farm in Hanford's 200 West area, labeled as SN-285, SN-286, and SN-278, were analyzed for the presence and amount of corrosion and erosion on the inside surface of the transfer pipe. All three sections of pipe, ranging in length between 6 and 8 in., were received at the 222-S Laboratory still in the pipe-in-pipe assembly. The annular spaces were filled with urethane foam injected into the pipes for as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) purposes. The 3-in. primary transfer pipes were first separated from the outer encasement, 6-in. pipes. The pipes were cut into small sections, or coupons, based upon the results of a non-destructive pipe wall thickness measurement which used an ultrasonic transducer. Following removal of the foam, the coupons were subjected to a series of analytical methods utilizing both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to obtain erosion and corrosion information. The ultrasonic transducer analysis of the SN-285 primary pipe did not show any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for the 3-in. schedule 40 pipe of 216 mils. A coupon was cut from the thinnest area on the pipe, and analysis of the inside surface, which was in contact with the tank waste, revealed a continuous layer of corrosion ~ 100 11m (4 mils) thick under a semi-continuous layer of tank waste residue ~ 20 11m (1 mil) thick. This residue layer was composed of an amorphous phase rich in chromium, magnesium, calcium, and chlorine. Small pits were detected throughout the inside pipe surface with depths up to ~ 50 11m (2 mils). Similarly, the SN-286 primary pipe did not show, by the ultrasonic transducer measurements, any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for this pipe. Analysis of the coupon cut from the pipe section showed the presence of a tank waste layer containing sodium aluminate and phases rich in iron, calcium, and chromium. This layer was removed by a cleaning process that left a pipe surface continuous in iron oxide/hydroxide (corrosion) with pockets of aluminum oxide, possibly gibbsite. The corrosion layer was ~ 50 11m (2 mil) thick over non-continuous pits less than ~ 50 11m deep (2 mils). Small particles of aluminum oxide were also detected under the corrosion layer. The ultrasonic transducer analysis of SN-278, like the previous primary pipes, did not reveal any noticeable thinning of the pipe wall. Analysis of the coupon cut from the pipe showed that the inside surface had a layer of tank waste residue that was partially detached from the pipe wall. This layer was easily scraped from the surface and was composed of two separate layers. The underlying layer was ~ 350 11m (14 mils) thick and composed of a cementation of small aluminum oxide (probably gibbsite) particles. A thinner layer on top of the aluminum oxide layer was rich in carbon and chlorine. Scattered pitting was observed on the inside pipe surface with one pit as deep as 200 11m (8 mils).

PAGE JS; WYRWAS RB; COOKE GA

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

THE ZIRFLEX PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

tive dissolution of zirconium or Zircaloy fuel cladding. The process involves the dissolution of the cladding material in solutions of ammonium fluoride alone or in mixture with amonium nitrate. Mixtures of amonium fluoride and amonium nitrate are preferred since they result in very little evolution of hydrogen during the is that these solutions attack austenitic stainless steels only slowly, in sharp contrast to the media (e.g., hydrofluoric acid or hydrofluoric-nitric acid mixtures) generng 6 M NH/sub 4/F, the rate of pentration of Zircaloy-2 is nearly 100 mils/hr, while that of typical austentic stainless steels is only about 0.5 mil/month. (auth)

Swanson, J.L.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Final Report For The Erosion And Corrosion Analysis Of Waste Transfer Primary Pipeline Sections From 241-SY Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect

Three sections of primary transfer pipeline removed from the 241-SY Tank Farm in Hanford's 200 West area, labeled as SN-285, SN-286, and SN-278, were analyzed for the presence and amount of corrosion and erosion on the inside surface of the transfer pipe. All three sections of pipe, ranging in length between 6 and 8 in., were received at the 222-S Laboratory still in the pipe-in-pipe assembly. The annular spaces were filled with urethane foam injected into the pipes for as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) purposes. The 3-in. primary transfer pipes were first separated from the outer encasement, 6-in. pipes. The pipes were cut into small sections, or coupons, based upon the results of a non-destructive pipe wall thickness measurement which used an ultrasonic transducer. Following removal of the foam, the coupons were subjected to a series of analytical methods utilizing both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to obtain erosion and corrosion information. The ultrasonic transducer analysis of the SN-285 primary pipe did not show any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for the 3-in. schedule 40 pipe of 216 mils. A coupon was cut from the thinnest area on the pipe, and analysis of the inside surface, which was in contact with the tank waste, revealed a continuous layer of corrosion ~ 100 11m (4 mils) thick under a semi-continuous layer of tank waste residue ~ 20 11m (1 mil) thick. This residue layer was composed of an amorphous phase rich in chromium, magnesium, calcium, and chlorine. Small pits were detected throughout the inside pipe surface with depths up to ~ 50 11m (2 mils). Similarly, the SN-286 primary pipe did not show, by the ultrasonic transducer measurements, any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for this pipe. Analysis of the coupon cut from the pipe section showed the presence of a tank waste layer containing sodium aluminate and phases rich in iron, calcium, and chromium. This layer was removed by a cleaning process that left a pipe surface continuous in iron oxide/hydroxide (corrosion) with pockets of aluminum oxide, possibly gibbsite. The corrosion layer was ~ 50 11m (2 mil) thick over non-continuous pits less than ~ 50 11m deep (2 mils). Small particles of aluminum oxide were also detected under the corrosion layer. The ultrasonic transducer analysis of SN-278, like the previous primary pipes, did not reveal any noticeable thinning of the pipe wall. Analysis of the coupon cut from the pipe showed that the inside surface had a layer of tank waste residue that was partially detached from the pipe wall. This layer was easily scraped from the surface and was composed of two separate layers. The underlying layer was ~ 350 11m (14 mils) thick and composed of a cementation of small aluminum oxide (probably gibbsite) particles. A thinner layer on top of the aluminum oxide layer was rich in carbon and chlorine. Scattered pitting was observed on the inside pipe surface with one pit as deep as 200 11m (8 mils).

Page, J. S.; Wyrwas, R. B.; Cooke, G. A.

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

SELECTION OF CORE DESIGN NO. 1 FOR TYPE 5 REPLACEMENT CORES IN SM-1 AND SM- 1A  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear and thermal analyses were performed to determine the characteristics of the Type 5 core in the SM-1 and SM-1A reactor plants as a function of geometry and composition. The following nuclear properties were investigated: core energy release, maximum midlife reactivity, average fuel burnup fraction, B-10 reactivity coefficient, and power distribution. Thermal parameter surveys determined the effects of channel thickness and power distribution upon the DNBR, nominal and hot channel thermal performance, and fuel plate thermal stress. From the nuclear and thermal analyses, a Type 5 core reference design was selected with fuel plates of 70-mil plate thick ness, 7-mil clad thickness, and 38 wt % UO/sub 2/ in the matrix, having initial core loading o4 108 Kg U/syup 235 and 260 gm B/sup 10/. (auth)

Davidson, S.L.; Paluszkiewicz, S.

1962-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

US Navy mobility fuels: Worldwide survey and analysis of both commercial and Navy fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Quality and worldwide availability of distillate fuels have become increasing concerns to the U.S. Department of Defense. In response to these concerns, the David Taylor Research Center (DTRC) has conducted a worldwide survey of such fuels through a contract with the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER). Representative fuels were collected at both Navy and commercial ports around the world through a NIPER subcontract to ABS Worldwide Technical Services (ABSTECH). The collected fuels were Naval Distillate Fuel (MIL-F-16884H, NATO F-76), Marine Gas Oil (MGO), Heavy Marine Gas Oil (HMGO), and Marine Diesel Fuel (MDF) for the Navy; Automotive/Truck Diesel for the Army; and Aviation Turbine Fuel (MIL-T-5624L, NATO JP-5) for the Naval Air Propulsion Center. The Navy F-76 fuel samples were characterized at NIPER by 44 different fuel property analyses.

Woodward, P.W.; Shay, J.Y.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for naval ships. Final report. Revision  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corporation and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. These new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships. An addendum to the original study describes the assessment of the performance of the advanced ballast system with a new F-17 fluorescent lamp. The results indicate the system performs reliably and shows increased efficacy. This new lamp/ballast system reduces the harmonic content to within Navy limits, and improves the power factor, resulting in a 50% reduction in line current.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Dumm, C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optimization of a dual acting, magnetically driven, linear actuator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study the geometry of a dual acting, magnetically driven, linear motion actuator will be optimized. This will be accomplished by modeling the system through a set of differential equations to be solved in Matlab. An ANSYS finite element program will be used to model the thermal response of the electrical coils so a maximum temperature can be found. These simulations will be part of a Matlab optimization routine. This routine will optimize the actuator's geometry by minimizing a cost function comprised of the floater displacement, the actuator weight, and the maximum coil temperature. Different simulations will be run, each with a unique set of operating parameters. These tests will be analyzed and an optimal configuration will be found. Once complete, a different approach in meeting the design objectives of a stroke length of at least 10 mils, a low maximum coil temperature and a low actuator weight, will be taken. Instead of optimizing the geometry, the rubber pads that are found between the ECOREs and the floater will be replaced by a classical PID type controller. The effects that this PID controller has on the actuator response in reference to the design objectives will be noted and discussed. During the geometrical optimization, an optimal configuration was found that increases the stroke length of the actuator from approximately 1.01 mils to 2.24 mils. However, by implementing a PID control scheme and keeping the rubber pads, with a stiffness of 2854 lb/in, in the system, this stroke length can be increased to 30 mils. It is recommended that the geometry be changed to geometry found in iteration 53 of optimization trial 4 in conjunction with a PID control scheme. This best satisfies the design objectives.

Willerton, Justin Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Korea Institute of Energy Research Seong-Ryong Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.9 % of total amount of imports Energy imports ( vs total imports) Oil Imports ((Mil bbl) 0.1 Bil USD 1,217 1 material Geo thermal Heat pump (Korea) (EU) RenewableNew Renewable EnergyNew Heat source · 3 New energy, 8 Renewable energy · Heat Pump is NOT included. '02 '05'04 '06 '90 '02 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 Primary Energy 93

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

303

Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

1992-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

Volume 6, Number 2 June 2009 Cost Of Living: How Does Morgantown Compare In The First Quarter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 -13.9 Unemployment Rate (%) 4.6 4.3 4.3 4.9 4.2 3.9 4.0 7.1 Residential Const. Contracts ($ mil. AR) 1 of Business and Economic Research percent above national average. The price of electricity, natural gas of 2008 to the first quarter of 2009, which translates in to a rate of growth of 1.9 percent. As Figure 1

Mohaghegh, Shahab

305

Tiragem: 17800 Pas: Portugal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Branco Área: 28,32 x 15,09 cm² Corte: 1 de 1ID: 44313523 19-10-2012 | ARAN A Toyota e Galp concluíram os Toyota, e que, juntamente com os dados subme- tidos pelos restantes países que integraram este teste kg. AP�S 210 MIL KM Toyota e Galp concluem testes ao Prius Plug-in Os testes arrancaram em maio de

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

306

Tiragem: 14985 Pas: Portugal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.mota@economico.pt A Toyota Caetano estima ven- der 40 unidades do modelo Prius Plug-in no primeiro ano de comercialização em passado, para um total de 110 mil carros. Ainda assim, o novo Prius Plug-in, o mais recente ele- mento da que o Prius, pioneiro da tecnologia híbrida, tem já um caminho de 15 anos na indústria automó- vel

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

307

Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire  

SciTech Connect

A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

Brandon, Eldon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Frederick M. (Albuquerque, NM); Reichenbach, Marvin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Dendrite Arm Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Casting processes Cooling rate Dendrite arm spacing °C/s °F/s μm mils Plaster, investment 1 1.80 100â??1000 3.94â??39.4 Green sand, shell 10 18.0 50â??500 1.97â??19.7 Permanent mold 100 180.0 30â??70 1.18â??2.76 Die 1000 1800 5â??15 0.20â??0.59...

309

Reliability Assessment of SMART Reactor Protection System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Component failure rates and integrated system reliability of the SMART reactor protection system were analyzed. The analysis tool of the study was the RELEX 7 computer program developed by Relex Software Corporation. The RELEX software is a PC based computer program which includes the part stress analysis models and the RBD analysis model to calculate component and system reliability. The component failure rate data for the study was selected from the MIL-HDBK-217F. (authors)

Won Young, Yun; Choong Heui, Jeong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, P. O. Box 114, Yusong Post Office, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seong Hun, Kim; Sang Yong, Lee [Sam Chang Enterprise Co. LTD, 974-1, Goyen-ri, Woongchon-myon, Ulju-gun, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Destructive Examination of Tube R31C66 From the Ginna Nuclear Plant Steam Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like some other PWR steam generators, the Ginna plant has experienced loss of steam pressure for several years. Deposits of up to 8 mils thick have been found and may explain the steam pressure loss. In addition, destructive and nondestructive examinations found a through-wall crack in the roll transition of a hot leg tube removed from this plant as well as shallow intergranular attack (IGA) in the tubesheet crevice region.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Assessment of present state-of-the-art sawing technology of large diameter ingots for solar sheet material. Final report, September 1, 1977-February 28, 1978  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to assess the present state-of-the-art sawing technology of large diameter silicon ingots (3'' and 4'' diameter) for solar sheet materials. During this program, work has progressed in: (1) slicing of the ingots with the multiblade slurry (MBS) saw, the multiwire slurry (MWS) saw and the I.D. saw, (2) characterization of the sliced wafers, and (3) analysis of add-on slicing cost based on SAMICS. Multiblade slurry slicing resulted in mechanical wafer yields of 95% for the 3'' diameter ingot and 84% for the 4'' diameter ingot (using a 230 blade package to cut 6'' ingot in length). A slicing test with the I.D. saw was performed to obtain mechanical yield versus both wafer thickness and cut rate, and the result showed a good yield (above 95%) down to 7 to 8 mils of wafer thickness for the 3'' wafers and 11 to 12 mils for the 4'' wafers if the cut rates were reduced to 1'' per minute. An ingot of 3'' in diameter and 3'' in length was sliced with a multiwire slurry saw to obtain wafer yield of about 97%; 163 wires were used, and wafer thickness and kerf width were 10 to 11 mils and 8 mils, respectively. Thickness, taper, bow, and roughness (RMS) were measured to characterize the sliced wafers. Four in. wafers sliced wih the multiblade slurry saw showed larger thickness variation (wafer to wafer) and more taper than 3'' wafers. Wafers sliced with the I.D. saw indicated that taper, bow, and roughness increased as the cut rate increased. Comparison showed the wafers cut with the I.D. saw (sliced below 3'' per minute of cut rate) and the multiwire slurry saw have much smaller values and variations than those cut with the multiblade slurry saw, indicating the need for less removal of silicon before solar cell formation.

Yoo, H.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF REPLACEMENT CORES FOR SM AND PM TYPE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

An economic analysis is presented for the fabrication of replacement cores for SM and PM type reactors, including analysis of various core types and core fabrication technologies. The analysis indicates that major savings are possible by utilizing Type 3 cores (40-mil plates, 25 wt% UO/sub 2/, welded assembly) in all SM and PM type reactors, and that significant savings are possible by multiple core procurement and reprocessing, and relaxation of cobalt and tantalum requirements in Type 347 stainless steel. (auth)

Wilder, A.S.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Interim evaluation of nickel plate on aluminum-jacketed fuel elements  

SciTech Connect

Nickel plating on the coolant contacting surfaces of aluminum-jacketed fuel elements is highly attractive for increasing resistance. Potential benefits include a highly corrosion-resistant coating for severe localized conditions, reduction of mechanical damage to fuel element jackets, improved fuel element alignment (by reducing friction between fuel element and process tube ribs) and probably lower overfall surface temperatures to reduction in corrosion product film with improved corrosion resistance, neutron economy might also be realized. For example, substitution of a 0.5 mil thick nickel plate for 15-mils thickness of aluminum jacket would result in no reactivity loss and permit a concomitant increase in uranium volume, or in coolant flow annulus. Attendant problems include providing an adherent continuous plate of uniform thickness and possibly contamination of reactor effluent by radio-nickel-cobalt, and phosphorous and it was found that gross sloughing of the nickel plate had occurred. Development and testing work was carried out to determine the cause and a solution to the Greece problem. Studies were limited to the behavior of chemically-deposited nickel because of the unique capability of the process to deposit a coating of uniform thickness in the 0.1 - 0.2 mils thick range, regardless of the geometry of the plated piece. Based on ex- reactor tests, a readily applicable method for significantly improving plate adherence has been developed, as summarized in this report.

Jacky, G.F.

1960-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Application of an empirical method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer of 1995, ultrasonic wall thickness data were collected for 100 steel cylinders containing depleted uranium (DU) hexafluoride located at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The cylinders were selected for measurement to assess the condition of the more vulnerable portion of the cylinder inventory at PGDP. The purpose of this report is to apply the method used in Lyon to estimate the effects of corrosion for larger unsampled populations as a function of time. The scope of this report is limited and is not intended to represent the final analyses of available data. Future efforts will include continuing analyses of available data to investigate defensible deviations from the conservative assumptions made to date. For each cylinder population considered, two basic types of analyses were conducted: (1) estimates were made of the number of cylinders as a function of time that will have a minimum wall thickness of either 0 mils (1 mil = 0.00 1 in.) or 250 mils and (2) the current minimum wall thickness distributions across cylinders were estimated for each cylinder population considered. Additional analyses were also performed investigating comparisons of the results for F and G yards with the results presented in Lyon (1995).

Lyon, B.F.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Scaling Up Reinforcement Learning without Sacrificing Optimality by Constraining Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this dissertation is to understand how algorithms can efficiently learn to solve new tasks based on previous experience, instead of being explicitly programmed with a solution for each task that we want it to solve. Here a task is a series of decisions, such as a robot vacuum deciding which room to clean next or an intelligent car deciding to stop at a traffic light. In such a case, state-of-the-art learning algorithms are difficult to employ in practice because they often make thou- sands of mistakes before reliably solving a task. However, humans learn solutions to novel tasks, often making fewer mistakes, which suggests that efficient learning algorithms may exist. One advantage that humans have over state- of-the-art learning algorithms is that, while learning a new task, humans can apply knowledge gained from previously solved tasks. The central hypothesis investigated by this dissertation is that learning algorithms can solve new tasks more efficiently when they take into consideration knowledge learned from solving previous tasks. Al- though this hypothesis may appear to be obviously true, what knowledge to use and how to apply that knowledge to new tasks is a challenging, open research problem. I investigate this hypothesis in three ways. First, I developed a new learning algorithm that is able to use prior knowledge to constrain the exploration space. Second, I extended a powerful theoretical framework in machine learning, called Probably Approximately Correct, so that I can formally compare the efficiency of algorithms that solve only a single task to algorithms that consider knowledge from previously solved tasks. With this framework, I found sufficient conditions for using knowledge from previous tasks to improve efficiency of learning to solve new tasks and also identified conditions where transferring knowledge may impede learning. I present situations where transfer learning can be used to intelligently constrain the exploration space so that optimality loss can be minimized. Finally, I tested the efficiency of my algorithms in various experimental domains. These theoretical and empirical results provide support for my central hypothesis. The theory and experiments of this dissertation provide a deeper understanding of what makes a learning algorithm efficient so that it can be widely used in practice. Finally, these results also contribute the general goal of creating autonomous machines that can be reliably employed to solve complex tasks.

Mann, Timothy 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders--2007 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) is stored in over 62,000 containment cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. Over 4,800 of the cylinders at Portsmouth were recently moved there from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The cylinders range in age up to 56 years and come in various models, but most are 48-inch diameter 'thin-wall'(312.5 mil) and 'thick-wall' (625 mil) cylinders and 30-inch diameter '30A' (including '30B') cylinders with 1/2-inch (500 mil) walls. Most of the cylinders are carbon steel, and they are subject to corrosion. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) manages the cylinders to maintain them and the DUF{sub 6} they contain. Cylinder management requirements are specified in the System Requirements Document (LMES 1997a), and the activities to fulfill them are specified in the System Engineering Management Plan (LMES 1997b). This report documents activities that address DUF{sub 6} cylinder management requirements involving measuring and forecasting cylinder wall thicknesses. As part of these activities, ultrasonic thickness (UT) measurements are made on samples of cylinders. For each sampled cylinder, multiple measurements are made in an attempt to find, approximately, the minimum wall thickness. Some cylinders have a skirt, which is an extension of the cylinder wall to protect the head (end) and valve. The head/skirt interface crevice is thought to be particularly vulnerable to corrosion, and for some skirted cylinders, in addition to the main body UT measurements, a separate suite of measurements is also made at the head/skirt interface. The main-body and head/skirt minimum thickness data are used to fit models relating minimum thickness to cylinder age, nominal thicknesses, and cylinder functional groups defined in terms of plant site, storage yard, top or bottom row storage positions, etc. These models are then used to compute projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various minimum wall thickness criteria. The minimum wall thickness criteria are as follows. For thin-wall cylinders: 0 (breach), 62.5, and 250 mils. For thick-wall cylinders: 0, 62.5, and 500 mils. For 30A cylinders: 0, 62.5, and 100 mils. Each of these criteria triplets are based respectively on (1) loss of DUF{sub 6} (breaching), (2) safe handling and stacking operations, and (3) ANSI N14.1 standards for off-site transport and contents transfer. This report complements and extends previous editions of the cylinder corrosion report by Lyon (1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000), by Schmoyer and Lyon (2001, 2002, 2003), and by Schmoyer (2004). These reports are based on UT data collected in FY03 and before. In this report UT data collected after FY03 but before FY07 is combined with the earlier data, and all of the UT data is inventoried chronologically and by the various functional groups. The UT data is then used to fit models of maximum pit depth and minimum wall thickness, statistical outliers are investigated, and the fitted models are used to extrapolate minimum thickness estimates into the future and in turn to compute projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various thickness criteria. A model evaluation is performed comparing UT measurements made after FY05 with model-fitted projections based only on data collected in FY05 and before. As in previous reports, the projections depend on the treatment of outliers.

Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Adsorption and Separation of Light Gases on an Amino-Functionalized Metal–Organic Framework: An Adsorption and In Situ XRD Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) metal-organic framework was studied for its use in the separation of CO{sub 2} from CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} mixtures. Isotherms of methane, ethane, propane, hydrogen, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} were measured. The atypical shape of these isotherms is attributed to the breathing properties of the material, in which a transition from a very narrow pore form to a narrow pore form and from a narrow pore form to a large pore form occurs, depending on the total pressure and the nature of the adsorbate, as demonstrated by in-situ XRD patterns measured during adsorption. Apart from CO{sub 2}, all tested gases interacted weakly with the adsorbent. As a result, they are excluded from adsorption in the narrow pore form of the material at low pressure. CO{sub 2} interacted much more strongly and was adsorbed in significant amounts at low pressure. This gives the material excellent properties to separate CO{sub 2} from other gases. The separation of CO{sub 2} from methane, nitrogen, hydrogen, or a combination of these gases has been demonstrated by breakthrough experiments using pellets of NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al). The effect of total pressure (1-30 bar), gas composition, temperature (303-403 K) and contact time has been examined. In all cases, CO{sub 2} was selectively adsorbed, whereas methane, nitrogen, and hydrogen nearly did not adsorb at all. Regeneration of the adsorbent by thermal treatment, inert purge gas stripping, and pressure swing has been demonstrated. The NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) pellets retained their selectivity and capacity for more than two years.

Couck S.; Stavitski E.; Gobehiya, E.; Kirschhock, C.E.A.; Serra-Crespo, P.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Martinez Joaristi, A.; Gascon, J.; Kapteijn, F.; Baron, G. V.; Denayer J.F.M.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microsoft PowerPoint - Microbial Genome and Metagenome Analysis Case Study (NERSC Workshop - May 7-8, 2009).ppt [Compatibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome & Genome & Metagenome Analysis: Computational Challenges Natalia N. Ivanova * Nikos C. Kyrpides * Victor M. Markowitz ** * Genome Biology Program, Joint Genome Institute ** Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Microbial genome & metagenome analysis General aims Understand microbial life Apply to agriculture, bioremediation, biofuels, human health Specific aims include Specific aims include Predict biochemistry & physiology of organisms based on genome sequence Explain known biochemical & physiological properties Metabolic reconstruction * Ivanova & Lykidis (2009) Metabolic reconstruction. Encyclopedia of Microbiology, Elsevier: 607-621. 2 Genome sequence data size Now ~1,400 microbial genomes = 5.5 mil genes ~ 100 metagenomes samples

319

THE POWER OUTPUT AND EFFICIENCY OF THERMIONIC CONVERTERS CONNECTED IN SERIES AND PARALLEL CIRCUITS--PART I  

SciTech Connect

Optimum and off-optimum performance is experimentally obtained for one of the 10 mil spaced, 7 cm/sup 2/ emitter area, cylindrical geometry thermionic converters to be used in the series and parallel connected thermionic converter experiment. The results are presented as graphs of output voltage vs power input, and power output vs power input. The current is the major parameter in both cases. The data in these forms are used to compute the power output of twin converter circults having unequal power inputs. The optimum load conditions for operation are then determined. The results are valuable in guiding thermionic power plant design. (auth)

Holland, J.W.

1962-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

HRP-EVALUATION OF HEAT REMOVAL METHODS FOR CONTROLLING TEMPERATURES OF AN ORR SLURRY BOMB  

SciTech Connect

Two methods were evaluated for removal of 1 to 5 kilowatts from a 1-in.- diam. by 10 in. long bomb to be (W-7405-eng-261. 8O(ph OTS); 70(mf OTS). maintained at 250 to 300 deg C. Conductance control, varying the composition of a helium--air mixture in a 8 mil annulus to give a controlled conduction heat transfer resistance, gave a simple, smooth, flexible control method. Use of water sprayed into air gave the required range of heat fluxes, but sometimes gave uncontrollable instabilities due to progressive vapor binding. (auth)

Holmes, J.M.

1958-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E. [ITT Exelis Mission Systems, Colorado Springs, CO

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than .04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station which includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 fig.

Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

DETECTOR FOR RADIOACTIVE HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

A device of the Geiger-Mueller type is designed for detecting radioactive hydrogen in the presence of other radioactive substances. The device comprises an envelope with thin (1 to 5 mil thick) Ni or Pd windows at the ends, an anode and a cathode spaced apart in the envelope, and a counting gas within the envelope. In operation, the suspect atmosphere is blown against one of the windows, whereby only the hydrogen diffuses into the envelope for counting. Means is provided for heating the windows to the desired temperatures. (D.L.C.)

Christianson, C.; Gilman, M.; Maggio, R.C.

1963-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

Reliability analysis for LEB ring magnet power system in SSC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LEB ring magnet power system contains six subsystems, supervisory control, power supplies, regulation, DC bus, resonant cells, and fault sensing network. The system availability of the total LEB RMPS is required to be 0.999. The work in this paper is to allocate the overall LEB RMPS reliability requirement into reliability requirements for each of the subsystems and lower-tier items. The Feasibility-of-Objective technique combining with engineering experience is the key for the allocation. MIL-HDBK-217F is used to derate SCR components. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Smedley, K.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

3003, Alclad 30031.2Mn-0.12Cu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 42   Standard specifications for alloy 3003...seamless 4065 SB210 B 210 WW-T-700/2 4067 � � � Condenser � SB234 B 234 � Condenser with integral fins � � B 404 � Welded � � B 313 � � � B 547 � Pipe: seamless � � B 241 MIL-P-25995 Gas and oil transmission � � B 345 � Rivet wire and rod � � B 316 QQ-A-430 Forgings � SB247 B 247 � Foil 4010 � �...

327

Search for correlations between solar flares and decay rate of radioactive nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deacay rate of three different radioactive sources 40K, 137Cs and natTh has been measured with NaI and Ge detectors. Data have been analyzed to search for possible variations in coincidence with the two strongest solar flares of the years 2011 and 2012. No significant deviations from standard expectation have been observed, with a few 10-4 sensitivity. As a consequence, we could not find any effect like that recently reported by Jenkins and Fischbach: a few per mil decrease in the decay rate of 54Mn during solar flares in December 2006.

E. Bellotti; C. Broggini; G. Di Carlo; M. Laubenstein; R. Menegazzo

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

328

Window for radiation detectors and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved x- and gamma-radiation and particle transparent window for the environment-controlling enclosure of various types of radiation and particle detectors is provided by a special graphite foil of a thickness of from about 0.1 to 1 mil. The graphite must have very parallel hexagonal planes with a mosaic spread no greater than 5$sup 0$ to have the necessary strength in thin sections to support one atmosphere or more of pressure. Such graphite is formed by hot- pressing and annealing pyrolytically deposited graphite and thereafter stripping off layers of sufficient thickness to form the window.

Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ogle, J.C.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

JOHN DAVIS: Acura steers their crossover fortunes onto a new road with the coupe-like ZDX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas - Metro Buses Natural Gas - Metro Buses 1 JOHN DAVIS: Tratándose de reducir emisiones de vehículos y no depender del petróleo extranjero, el gas natural comprimido sirve como fuente de energía doméstica y limpia, pero el GNC tuvo que luchar para ganar espacio en el mercado privado de autos de pasajeros. JOHN DAVIS: Por otra parte, el combustible limpio ha ganado terreno en flotillas municipales. Ciudades grandes y pequeñas están cambiando a GNC, y están probando que para muchas flotillas, el gas natural es la solución natural. JOHN DAVIS: Comparado con las casi 190 mil gasolineras en EE.UU., hay menos de mil estaciones de GNC y no todas están abiertas al público. Así que a excepción de recargar en casa, el GNC aún no es una opción para la mayoría de conductores en

330

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Properties of Cool Roofing Materials (1) Asphalt Shingles Shasta White 0.26 0.91 Generic White 0.25 0.91 Generic Grey 0.22 0.91 Light Brown 0.19 0.91 Medium Brown 0.12 0.91 Generic Black 0.05 0.91 White Coatings White Coating (1 coat, 8 mil) 0.80 0.91 White Coating (2 coats, 20 mil) 0.85 0.91 Aluminum Coatings Aluminum 0.61 0.25 Fibered on Black 0.40 0.56 Membranes Gray EPDM (4) 0.23 0.87 White EPDM (4) 0.69 0.87 T-EPDM (4) 0.81 0.92 Light Gravel on Built-Up Roof 0.34 0.90 Metal Roof New, Bare Galvanized Steel 0.61 0.04 Tiles Red Clay 0.33 0.90 White Concrete 0.73 0.90 Fiber Cement, Pewter Gray 0.25 0.90 Note(s): Source(s): Solar Reflectance (2) Infrared Emittance (3) 1) A good cool-roofing material has high solar reflectance and high infrared emittance. 2) Solar Relectance is the percentage of incident solar

331

ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF A SECTION OF THE NS SAVANNAH PRIMARY PIPING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A section of NS Savannah primary pipe and part of a primary system gate valve were examined ultrasonically to determine whether a fluctuating flow of low- temperature makeup water entering through a nozzle in the valve hsnd damaged the components during service. Examination was prompted by failure of a Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor (VBWR) recirculating pipe in which makeup water was introduced under conditions similar to those in the Savannah. The ultrasonic equipment was calibrated on spare components. The calibration standards, 11-mil- deep chisel marks in the pipe and 25-mil-deep marks in the valve, were more stringent than those used to calibrate equipment for inspection of components at the time of manufacture. The inspections of components conducted aboard ship are therefore thought to be more exacting than those performed on the original equipment. Ultrasonic inspections of the failed VBWR pipe completely defined the areas of defective material that led to the failure. The VBWR results, together with experience gained by Babcock & Wilcox, indicate that the inspections of Savannah's components were both applicable andd definitive. Since no indications of discontinuities were found in the valve or the pipe, both components are considered to be sound and unaffected by service. (auth)

Johnson, C.R.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Electrical Currents and Adhesion of Edge-Delete Regions of EVA-to-Glass Module Packaging: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Electrical conductivity pathways from the grounded frame to the cell area in a PV module are reviewed here. Electrical conductivity pathways from the grounded frame to the cell area in a PV module are reviewed here. Measurements are made on 4 inch x 8 inch soda lime (SL) glass substrates with contact patterns defined using 3-mil and 10-mil diameter bead-blast removal of the SnO{sub 2} coating to study the dominant path, which is the EVA/glass interface. The remaining SnO{sub 2} contact strips are separated by what would simulate the module edge delete regions. EVA encapsulated bead-blast surface resistances are 8 x 10{sup 15} ohm/sq compared to 8 x 10{sup 12} ohm/sq for native SL glass surfaces. Adhesion strengths to bead-blast surfaces are 25 to 30 lbs/in. Stress test results on these interfaces after removal from damp heat suggest corrosion of the glass at the glass-EVA interface.

McMahon, T. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Corrosion monitoring in the UF{sub 6} cylinder yards at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site: FY 1994 report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at the U.S. Department of Energy`s K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been stored in large steel cylinders that have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover UF{sub 6} cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, TOW sensors, and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors, and thermocouples. Long-term (16-year) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to be intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed, and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described.

Rao, M. [Midwest Technical Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adamski, R.; Broders, J.; Ellis, A.; Freels, D.; Kelley, D.; Phillips, B. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

High-aspect-ratio silicon-cell metallization technical status report. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two features of the silicon concentrator solar cell are addressed which affect output at high concentration levels. The first is the development of narrow but high electroplated grid lines with improved conductivity. The object is a reduction in cell series resistance without increase in shadowing. This goal is accomplished by electroplating through a thick photo resist mask to produce lines .7 mil wide by .7 mil high. Advance pulse plating techniques are combined with pure silver plating baths to produce a deposit conductivity equal to the bulk silver conductivity (a 1.5 to 2 X improvement over conventional silver plating). The second feature is a double diffused selectively textured front surface. This development employs a deep diffusion in the silicon under the grid lines. Only the non grid line open area is selectively texture etched removing the deep junction. This open textured area is then given a second shallow diffusion for optimum cell efficiency. This selective procedure maintains the original highly polished wafer surface under the grid lines so that high resolution narrow grid lines are possible. The double diffusion protects the junction from metal diffusion while enabling the optimum shallow junction in the illuminated regions. Combining these two features has produced a large area concentrator cells (8 cm/sup 2/) with peak efficiency above 16% and exhibiting a broad peak efficiency extending from 50 to 175 suns above 15%.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Concurrent studies of enhanced heat transfer and materials for ocean thermal exchangers. Progress report, July 1, 1975--July 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To demonstrate the enhancement of heat transfer in OTEC exchangers by means of fine, axial flutes on the heat transfer surfaces, experiments have been performed on single internally or externally fluted tubes of 1-inch diameter. Internal flutes provide water-side enhancement of both heat transfer and friction to about the same extent. At moderate water velocities heat transfer coefficients and friction factors are greater than those of the comparable smooth tube by a multiplying factor about equal to the fluted-to-smooth surface area ratio. Area ratios from 1.0 to 1.5 have been tested using two styles of flutes. Flute heights have ranged from 3 to 35 mils, tube lengths from 2 to 8 ft. Heat transfer experiments have been performed on Freon-11 moving in a thin layer under gravity down the outer surface of a smooth tube and of a tube having 26-mil external, axial flutes. Test lengths have averaged 4-/sup 1///sub 2/ ft. Enhancement of the local coefficient by 3 to 5 times has been observed during both evaporation and condensation. The effectiveness of the flutes is greatest in the range of laminar-turbulent transition.

Rothfus, R.R.

1976-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Cathodic Protection of the Yaquina Bay Bridge  

SciTech Connect

The Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport, Oregon, was designed by Conde B. McCullough and built in 1936. The 3,223-foot (982 m) structure is a combination of concrete arch approach spans and a steel through arch over the shipping channel. Cathodic protection is used to prevent corrosion damage to the concrete arches. The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) installed a carbon anode coating (DAC-85) on two of the north approach spans in 1985. This anode was operated at a current density of 6.6 mA/m2(0.6 mA/ft2). No failure of the conductive anode was observed in 1990, five years after application, or in 2000, 15 years after application. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 20 mils (0.5 mm) thick were applied to half the south approach spans beginning in 1990. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 15 mils (0.4 mm) thick were applied to the remaining spans in 1996. These anodes were operated at a current density of 2.2 mA/m2(0.2 mA/ft2). In 1999, four zones on the approach spans were included in a two-year field trial of humectants to improve zinc anode performance. The humectants LiNO3 and LiBr were applied to two zones; the two adjacent zones were left untreated as controls. The humectants substantially reduced circuit resistance compared to the controls.

Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Laylor, H.M.; Cryer, C.B.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Potential for erosion corrosion of SRS high level waste tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SRS high-level radioactive waste tanks will not experience erosion corrosion to any significant degree during slurry pump operations. Erosion corrosion in carbon steel structures at reported pump discharge velocities is dominated by electrochemical (corrosion) processes. Interruption of those processes, as by the addition of corrosion inhibitors, sharply reduces the rate of metal loss from erosion corrosion. The well-inhibited SRS waste tanks have a near-zero general corrosion rate, and therefore will be essentially immune to erosion corrosion. The experimental data on carbon steel erosion corrosion most relevant to SRS operations was obtained at the Hanford Site on simulated Purex waste. A metal loss rate of 2.4 mils per year was measured at a temperature of 102 C and a slurry velocity comparable to calculated SRS slurry velocities on ground specimens of the same carbon steel used in SRS waste tanks. Based on these data and the much lower expected temperatures, the metal loss rate of SRS tanks under waste removal and processing conditions should be insignificant, i.e. less than 1 mil per year.

Zapp, P.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Standard Test Method for Mechanical Hydrogen Embrittlement Evaluation of Plating/Coating Processes and Service Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes mechanical test methods and defines acceptance criteria for coating and plating processes that can cause hydrogen embrittlement in steels. Subsequent exposure to chemicals encountered in service environments, such as fluids, cleaning treatments or maintenance chemicals that come in contact with the plated/coated or bare surface of the steel, can also be evaluated. 1.2 This test method is not intended to measure the relative susceptibility of different steels. The relative susceptibility of different materials to hydrogen embrittlement may be determined in accordance with Test Method F1459 and Test Method F1624. 1.3 This test method specifies the use of air melted AISI E4340 steel per SAE AMS-S-5000 (formerly MIL-S-5000) heat treated to 260 – 280 ksi (pounds per square inch x 1000) as the baseline. This combination of alloy and heat treat level has been used for many years and a large database has been accumulated in the aerospace industry on its specific response to exposure...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Plastic packaging and burn-in effects on ionizing dose response in CMOS microcircuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are reported from an investigation of the effects of packaging and burn-in on the post-irradiation performance of National Semiconductor 54AC02 Quad 2-input NOR gates. The test population was drawn from a single wafer fabricated in the National process qualified under Mil-Prf-38535 to an ionizing radiation hardness of 100 krads(Si). The test sample was divided between plastic and ceramic packages. Additionally, half of the plastic samples and half of the two ceramic samples received a 168 hour/125 C burn-in. Two irradiation schemes were used. The first followed Mil-Std-883 Method 1019.4 (dose rate = 50 rads(Si)/s). The second used a low dose rate (0.1 rads(Si)/s). AC, DC, transfer function and functional behavior were monitored throughout the tests. Significant differences among the package types and burn-in variations were noted with the plastic, burned-in components demonstrating enhanced degradation. They show the worst post-irradiation parameter values as well as very broad post-irradiation parameter distributions. Degradation is highly dependent upon dose rate and anneal conditions. Two different radiation induced leakage paths have been identified, and their characteristics have been correlated to variations in high dose rate and low dose rate circuit performance. Caution is recommended for system developers to ensure that radiation hardness characterization is performed for the same package/burn-in configuration to be used in the system.

Clark, S.D.; Bings, J.P. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, IN (United States). Crane Div.; Maher, M.C.; Williams, M.K.; Alexander, D.R.; Pease, R.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Safety evaluation for packaging CPC metal boxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides authorization for the use of Container Products Corporation (CPC) metal boxes, as described in this document, for the interarea shipment of radioactive contaminated equipment and debris for storage in the Central Waste Complex (CWC) or T Plant located in the 200 West Area. Authorization is granted until November 30, 1995. The CPC boxes included in this SEP were originally procured as US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A Type A boxes. A review of the documentation provided by the manufacturer revealed the documentation did not adequately demonstrate compliance to the 4 ft drop test requirement of 49 CFR 173.465(c). Preparation of a SEP is necessary to document the equivalent safety of the onsite shipment in lieu of meeting DOT packaging requirements until adequate documentation is received. The equivalent safety of the shipment is based on the fact that the radioactive contents consist of contaminated equipment and debris which are not dispersible. Each piece is wrapped in two layers of no less than 4 mil plastic prior to being placed in the box which has an additional 10 mil liner. Pointed objects and sharp edges are padded to prevent puncture of the plastic liner and wrapping.

Romano, T.

1995-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Formation damage studies of lubricants used with drill-in fluids systems on horizontal open-hole wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of lubricants in formation damage. Two types of lubricants were tested along with two types of drill-in fluids. The DIF's tested included a sized-calcium carbonate (SCC) and a sized-salt (SS). Also a set of variables including drill solids content (2%-6%), hydrochloric acid concentration (2%-10%), and temperature (110°F-160°F) were changed during the testing procedure. A matrix design was used to determine the behavior in regain permeability and break through time depending on the different variables in the testing, and two devices were used to measure responses, Conoco cell and ceramic disc cell respectively. Results have shown that regain permeability and break through time responses are not affected in a greater degree when lubricants (Idlube or Mil-Lube) are added to the DIF systems (SS and SCC). When comparing results between lubricants, Idlube gives a higher regain permeability percentage and faster break through time at higher concentrations than Mil-Lube in both DIF systems. Overall, sized calcium carbonate seems to be a better DIF system than Sized salt for these types of experiments, being much more efficient in reducing break through times than in increasing regain permeability.

Gutierrez, Fernando A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ATR LEU Monothlic and Dispersed with 10B Loading Minimization Design – Neutronics Performance Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), currently operating in the United States, is used for material testing at very high neutron fluxes. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting HEU driven reactor cores to low-enriched uranium (LEU) cores. The present work investigates the optimized LEU Monolithic and Dispersed fuel with 10B loading minimization design and evaluates the subsequent neutronics operating effects of these optimized fuel designs. The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was used to optimize the 235U and minimize the 10B loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profiles between the HEU and LEU cores were minimized. The fuel depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K eff versus effective full power days (EFPD) in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the optimized LEU Monolithic and Dispersed fuel cases demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPD plot is similar to the ATR reference HEU case study. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, the proposed LEU Monolithic (U-10Mo) core conversion case with nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and 235U enrichment of 19.7 wt% is used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness. The proposed LEU fuel meat varies from 0.203 mm (8.0 mil) to 0.254 mm (10.0 mil) at the inner four fuel plates (1-4) and outer four fuel plates (16-19). In addition, an optimized LEU dispersed (U7Mo) case with all the fuel meat thickness of 0.635 mm (25 mil) was also proposed. Then, for both Monolithic and dispersed cases, a burnable absorber – 10B, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the higher to average ratio of the inner/outer heat flux more effectively. The final minimized 10B loading for LEU case studies will have 0.635 g in the LEU fuel meat at the inner 2 fuel plates (1-2) and outer 2 fuel plates (18-19), which can achieve peak to average ratios similar to those for the ATR reference HEU case study. The investigation of this paper shows the optimized LEU Monolithic (U-10Mo) and Dispersed (U7Mo) cases can all meet the LEU conversion objectives.

G. S. Chang

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Microsoft Word - 07 Texas Water Plan.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Plan Water Plan * www.twdb.state.tx.us * 2007 State Water Plan adopted 14 November 2006 * Summaries of the 16 Regional Water Planning Groups * State water plan updated every 5 years * Corps reps attend monthly regional meetings * TWAA (Texas Water Allocation Assessment) * www.swf.usace.army.mil ("(at bottom) Additional Related Material", "Texas Water Allocation Assessment Reports" In Fiscal Year 2001, initial funds were appropriated by Congress for the Corps of Engineers to assist the State of Texas in determining if existing water could be better allocated to support more balanced water use to meet future needs. This overall study effort was designated as the Texas Water Allocation Assessment, and a wide array of studies have been initiated under this authority. The studies initiated as

344

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAP Program Guidance CAP Program Guidance In 2002, the Department of Energy signed an interagency agreement with the Department of Defense's Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP) program to provide assistive/adaptive technology free of charge to DOE employees with disabilities. The following information regarding CAP is being provided to assist federal employees, managers and on- site disability coordinators with the CAP application process. For more information, visit the CAP website at www.tricare.mil/cap/ or contact CAP's DOE point of contact: Suzanne K. Piper Accommodations Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Room 4E-084 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0733 (202) 586-8515 Voice (202) 586-9375 Fax Suzanne.Piper@hq.doe.gov

345

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions-Transportation and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions-Transportation and Contractual Claim Decisions 1996 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve a carrier's dispute over whether it is liable for transit loss or damage. They also include all kinds of quasi-contractual disputes which are settled under Section 3702 of title 31 of the United States Code. Tags {military,contractors,claims,transportation,damage} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V34 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4476 Public Access Level public

346

Glossary API Gravity: An  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 60 60 131 5 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on fin- ished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure for crude oil and petroleum products equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Bulk Sales: Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual

347

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline (Finished) A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories.

348

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions-Transportation and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions-Transportation and Contractual Claim Decisions 1999 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve a carrier's dispute over whether it is liable for transit loss or damage. They also include all kinds of quasi-contractual disputes which are settled under Section 3702 of title 31 of the United States Code. Tags {military,contractors,claims,transportation,damage} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V37 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4479 Public Access Level public

349

July 28, 2010, AFIRM as a model for technology - focused federal funding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RCCC RCCC 1 Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine AFIRM as a model for technology-focused federal funding Prepared by Joachim Kohn, PhD Board of Governors Professor Director (PI), AFIRM-RCCC RCCC 2 AFIRM: Our Mission Marine 1st Sgt. Kasal was wounded in Fallujah, 2004. Courtesy of www.ourmilitary.mil * To develop a comprehensive program in support of the wounded service member, including - Research and development of new therapies and regenerative products - Coordination of innovative clinical trials RCCC What is the AFIRM? * Two consortia working together with the US Army Institute of Surgical Research - 230 scientists at 27 Universities * 114 senior investigators -30% of which are clinicians * 46 graduate students * 70 post-docs * Total 5 yr funding of >$250M

350

Environmental Impact Statement for Siting, Construction and Operation of the National Spallation Neutron Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62 62 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 143 / Friday, July 25, 1997 / Notices Internet address: http:\www.nawcwpns.navy.mil/∼pmeis. Navy will set up several information stations at these scoping meetings; each information station will be staffed by a Navy representative who will be available to answer questions from meeting attendees. In addition, Navy representatives will give a brief presentation about current NAWCWPNS activities on the Point Mugu Sea Range followed by a description of the proposed action and alternatives (including the No-Action alternative). Members of the public may offer verbal or written comments at the scoping meetings, or subsequent to the meetings by mail, by facsimile, or by toll-free telephone at (888) 217-9045. Verbal comments will be limited to three

351

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPA and Federal Hydropower APPA and Federal Hydropower Will Coffman Senior Government Relations Representative American Public Power Association Atlanta, Georgia Oct. 20, 2013 Overview * APPA, the American Public Power Association (APPA): trade association for the more than 2,000 community-owned, not-for- profit electric utilities providing service to 47 mil Americans in 49 states. Many of our members purchase power from Corps projects - Approx. 1,200 public power systems and rural electric cooperatives in 33 states. * We, along with NRECA, advocate for federal hydro customers in Congress and with the Administration Areas of Advocacy 1. Congress - Provide background on PMA customer issues to Committees of jurisdiction * Senate: Energy and Natural Resources * House: Natural Resources

352

Microsoft PowerPoint - Junior_ONR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mi Mi it S i I tit ti (MSI ) Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs): Bridging the Gap between Federal g g p Agencies and MSIs Dr. Anthony Junior, Program Manager Naval Historically Black Colleges and University/Minority Institutions Program Office of Naval Research 874 North Randolph Street, Arlington, VA 22203 anthony.junior@navy.mil AVJ HBCU/MI SP Concepts V2 Agenda * The Requirement The Requirement * The Strategic Plan * HBCU/MI Full Engagement Model HBCU/MI Full Engagement Model * STEM Research Pipeline * HBCU/MI Accredited Engineering Schools * HBCU/MI Accredited Engineering Schools 2 10 USC 2362 Objective: Enhance defense-related research and education at HBCU/MIs to assist the Department in education at HBCU/MIs to assist the Department in defense-related research, development, testing, and

353

US Army Corps of Engineers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville FUPWG Oct 20-21, 2010 Margaret Simmons U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Huntsville Center (256) 895-1101 Margaret.p.simmons@usace.army.mil Disclaimer: The views expressed in this presentation are those of the author and do not represent the views of the Army or the Army Corps of Engineers. US Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville * DEMOLISHED BUILDINGS - Contract provides that adjustments can be made for changes in building usage and building occupancy - but doesn't contain the process to make the adjustment - Building is demolished so NO ENERGY is being consumed - however this is not due to the ESPC project - Should the contractor be given credit? Contracts allows for adjustment so yes. However, since building is gone, contractor

354

Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals Published Decisions - 2011 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals Published Decisions - 2011 Dataset Summary Description post-award contract disputes between government contractors and the Department of Defense, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and other entities with whom the ASBCA has entered into agreements to provide services. Tags {"contract dispute","defense contractor; contract appeal"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 12/01/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email Catherine.Stanton@ASBCA.MIL Unique Identifier DOD-5473 Public Access Level public

355

Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals Published Decisions - 2005 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05 05 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals Published Decisions - 2005 Dataset Summary Description post-award contract disputes between government contractors and the Department of Defense, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and other entities with whom the ASBCA has entered into agreements to provide services. Tags {"contract dispute","defense contractor; contract appeal"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/07/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email Catherine.Stanton@ASBCA.MIL Unique Identifier DOD-4439

356

Supplemental Record of Decision for Interim Management of Nuclear Materials, DOE/EIS-0220 (7/10/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 132 / Wednesday, July 10, 2002 / Notices ADDRESSES: Written objections are to be filed with Coastal Systems Station, Dahlgren Div, NSWC, 6703 W. Hwy 98, Code XP01L, Panama City, FL 32407- 7001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Harvey A. Gilbert, Counsel, Coastal Systems Station, 6703 W. Hwy 98, Code XP01L, Panama City, FL 32407-7001, telephone (850) 234-4646, fax (850) 235-5497, or E-Mail at gilbertha@ncsc.navy.mil. Authority: 35 U.S.C. 207, 37 CFR Part 404. Dated: June 25, 2002. R.E. Vincent II, Lieutenant Commander, Judge Advocate General's Corps, U.S. Navy, Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 02-17254 Filed 7-9-02; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3810-FF-P DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive

357

H O  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O O I - * , TWl rrporl «lf pnpmd u u iccouni of work fponiortd by fbc Unfad Suirs Gomuncnl. KtHka U» Unllii s u m nor Ih. Vaiui SHIM Atomic EnotT Comminjon, oar cur or tncir cnptoynf. nor Mr of ihtk caatrutott, ubcoRtmuirB, or tlwk cmptorra. milMsuir w n a f r . «prM§orimp&cd.of iMnmauy _ { l i . UBl Ibbililr or raponiiMlitr ror Ui. n e o n , , cum- *** pUUuu or tmfol«B or W larornutloa. ippiniia. proaoct or procac rfiKlowd. or rtprucnu Out iu use would not fafrinf* pririirly owned rifntr. FAR INFRARED SPECTROMETRY OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION Contents Abstract iii I. Introduction 1 A. Theory of the Background Radiation 2 1. Big Bang Theory 2 2. Primeval Perturbations 3 3. Later Perturbations 5 4. Recent Perturbations 5 B. Observations 6 1. Long Wavelength Direct Observations 7

358

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 60 60 1315 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the com- pound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Interme- diate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 de- grees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specifica- tion D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure for crude oil and petroleum products equivalent to 42 U.S. gal- lons. Bulk Sales: Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual

359

DATE: TO: FROM:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1,2008 1 1,2008 Procurement Directors Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, MA-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBTECT: Past Performance Data SIJMMARY: Beginning October 01,2008, all contractor past performance data shall be submitted through the Department of Defense (DoD) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) at htt~://www.c~ars.csd.disa.mil/cr>arsmain.htm. Thus, the Department will no longer use the National Institute of Health (NIH) Contractor Performance System (CPS). To ensure all Contracting Officers understand how to use this new system, Web Cast Training has been scheduled for the following dates and times: October 8- 1:30-430 including construction and A/E training during the last hour November 6- 1:30-4:30 including construction and A/E training during the last hour

360

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2006 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/29/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4471 Public Access Level public

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

February 28, 2006, Department letter reporting completion of NNSA portion of Commitment 23 in the 2004-1 implementation plan, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations, which requires the development of site office action plans to improve the consistency and reliability of work planning and work control at the activity level, including the incorporation of Integrated Safety Management core functions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Washington, DC 20585 Washington, DC 20585 February 28, 2006 OFFICE O F THE ADMINISTRATOR The Honorable A. J. Eggenberger Ch a i rm an Defensc Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW., Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20004-2901 Dear Mr. Chairman: On Julie 10, 2005, Secretary Bodnian submitted the Department's Iiizplenzentution Plun to Itizpt-ove Oversight qf'Nucleur Operutions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2004- I , Oversight qf Complex, High-Hrrzurd Nucleur Openrtiotzs. Section 5.3 of the Implementation Plan (IP) addresses Revitalizing Integruted SU/i-'ty Munagernent Implementution, and Subsection 5.3.2 addresses Work Plunning mil Work Control ut the Activity Level. Commitment 23 of the 1P requires development of site office action plans to improve the consistency and reliability of work

362

ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 1992.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POLICY ACT OF 1992 POLICY ACT OF 1992 SEC. 301. DEFINITIONS. Source (http://energy.nfesc.navy.mil/law_us/92epact/hr776toc.htm) For purposes of this title, title IV, and title V (unless otherwise specified)- (1) the term "Administrator" means the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency; (2) the term "alternative fuel" means methanol, denatured ethanol, and other alcohols; mixtures containing 5 percent or more (or such other percentage, but not less than 70 percent, as determined by the Secretary, by rule, to provide for requirements relating to cold start, safety, or vehicle functions) by volume of ethanol, denatured ethanol, and other alcohols with gasoline or other fuels; natural gas; liquefied petroleum gas; hydrogen; coal-derived liquid fuels; fuels (other than alcohol) derived from biological materials;

363

PJM Interconnection Interview on Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Vol. 9, No. 5 - December 5, 2007 Vol. 9, No. 5 - December 5, 2007 PJM on wind Wind power is growing rapidly in the United States and in Pennsylvania where 8 wind farms that total 259 megawatts now operate. Those wind farms already generate enough power for about 80,000 homes. Another 4,714 megawatts are in various stages of development within Pennsylvania, which would create enough power for an additional 1.4 mil- lion homes. Just in the Keystone state, wind power is creating thousands of jobs. Across the nation, wind power provides hundreds of millions of dollars of tax payments and rental fees to land- owners, and displaces more and more electricity that would otherwise be made by burning coal, oil, or natural gas. Wind farms create zero air pollution; require no destructive

364

Agency Points of Contact for Tribal Consultation Agency Point of Contact Email and Phone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Points of Contact for Tribal Consultation Points of Contact for Tribal Consultation Agency Point of Contact Email and Phone Department of the Interior Sarah Harris Chief of Staff to the Assist Secretary - Indian Affairs Tribalconsultation@bia.gov (202) 208-7163 Department of Justice Tracy Toulou Director, Office of Tribal Justice OTJ@usdoj.gov (202) 514-8812 Department of State Reta Lewis Special Representative for Global Intergovernmental Affairs tribalconsultation@state.gov (202) 647-7710 Department of the Treasury Alexander Gelber Deputy Assistant Secretary alexander.gelber@treasury.gov (202) 622-1513 Department of Defense Serena Bellew Acting Senior Advisor and Liaison for Native American Affairs Serena.bellew@osd.mil

365

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2011 September 13, 2011 Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 mil- lion gallons of groundwater at the site. "It's great to know the amount of treated groundwater is increasing. We are meeting our goals, which means we are protecting the Columbia River," said Bill Barrett, CH2M HILL director of pump and treat operations and maintenance. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work to expand Hanford's capacity for treating contami- nated groundwater led to the 2011 record amount. The Recovery Act funded the installation of more

366

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Military Personnel Claim Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2010 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2010 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V33 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4475

367

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions-Transportation and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation and Transportation and Contractual Claim Decisions 1997 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions-Transportation and Contractual Claim Decisions 1997 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve a carrier's dispute over whether it is liable for transit loss or damage. They also include all kinds of quasi-contractual disputes which are settled under Section 3702 of title 31 of the United States Code. Tags {military,contractors,claims,transportation,damage} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V35 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil

368

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security Clearance Decisions-2002 Dataset Summary Description adjudication of security clearance cases for contractor personnel Tags {"security clearance","national security","defense industry","defense contractor"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/09/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4451 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/ Data Download URL http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/2002

369

Microsoft Word - Request_for_Information_Final[1].docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Request for Information "R&D aimed at Green House Gas (GHG) emissions reductions and cost competitiveness of Mil-Spec jet fuel production using Coal-to-Liquid (CTL) fuels technologies" Issue Date: August 30, 2013 Program Area: Office of Fossil Energy (FE); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); U.S. Air Force; U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Purpose: The purpose of this request for information (RFI) is to seek information on new and innovative technologies and concepts for coal-to-liquid (CTL) fuels. It is the intent of the DOE FE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), wherein the Areas

370

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Product Prices by Sales Type Petroleum Product Prices by Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline (Finished) A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories.

371

Glossary API Gravity: An  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 60 1315 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on fin- ished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure for crude oil and petroleum products equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Bulk Sales: Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual

372

Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Federal Register 5 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 8 / Friday, January 11, 2008 / Notices Security measures require that persons interested in attending the meeting must pre-register with us before 2 p.m., January 25, 2008. We cannot guarantee access for requests received after that time. To pre-register, please contact Ellen Cummings by telephone or send an e-mail to estuary.restoration@usace.army.mil. When leaving a voice mail message or sending an e-mail please provide the name of the individual attending, the company or agency represented, and a telephone number, in case there are any questions. The public should enter on the ''G'' Street side of the GAO building. All attendees are required to show photo identification and must be escorted to the meeting room by Corps

373

DOE/EIS-0284: Notice of Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement for Implementation of the Low-Emission Boiler System (LEBS) Proof-of-Concept System (02/29/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Federal Register 1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 41 / Friday, February 29, 2008 / Notices Written requests should contain the member's full name and signature of the requester. RECORD ACCESS PROCEDURES: Individuals seeking access to information about themselves contained in this system of records should address written inquiries to their commanding officer. Official mailing addresses are published in the Standard Navy Distribution List that is available at http://doni.daps.dla.mil/sndl.aspx. Written requests should contain the member's full name and signature of the requester. CONTESTING RECORD PROCEDURES: The Navy's rules for contesting contents and appealing initial agency determinations are published in Secretary of the Navy Instruction 5211.5; 32 CFR part 701; or may be

374

Microsoft Word - SPP_Success_Story_Hill_AFB_FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hill Air Force Base Hill Air Force Base 1820 Midpark Road, Suite C, Knoxville, TN 37921 75 CES/CEEE, 7302 Wardleigh Road, Bldg 15, Hill AFB, UT 84056-5223 Business: Energy Services Company (ESCO) Business: United States Air Force Joseph T. Price Kent Nomura, Deputy, Maintenance Engineering Phone: (865) 330-7216 / Fax: (865) 330-7217 Phone: (801) 777-7268 / (801) 777-5946 Email: jprice@ameresco.com Email: kent.nomura@hill.af.mil Hill Air Force and Ameresco Landfill Gas Generator Energy Project is the First of its Kind for the Department of Defense and the State of Utah. Project Scope Hill Air Force Base and Ameresco teamed up to create a generating facility which is powered by landfill gasses. The landfill gas extracted from the Davis County Landfill is used to fuel two 1400kW generators. These produce

375

CLASS DEVIATION FINDINGS AND DETERMINATION Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement at Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 9.406-3(f)(1) and 9.407-3(e)(1) Findings 1. On March 23,2010, the FAR Council published a final rule in the Federal Register (75FR 14058), which amended FAR 9.4 to implement section 872 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for FISCAL Year 2009. Section 872 requires the establishment of a data system containing specific information on the integrity and performance of covered Federal agency contractors and grantees. The data system created for this purpose is entitled Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS), and it can be located at www.ppirs.gov and www.cpars.csd.disa.mil.

376

Navy Geothermal Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navy Geothermal Program Navy Geothermal Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Navy Geothermal Program Office Name Navy Geothermal Program Office Address 429 East Bowen Road Place China Lake, CA Zip 93555 Year founded 1978 Phone number (760) 939-2700 Website https://portal.navfac.navy.mil References Navy Facilities Engineering Command Website[1] Navy Geothermal Program is an organization based in China Lake, CA. The Navy Geothermal Program Office (GPO) is the Department of Defense's lead organization for the exploration, development, and management of geothermal resources on military controlled land, worldwide. The Department of Defense (DOD) established the GPO in 1978, and designated the Navy as the lead agency for geothermal exploration and development on military lands.

377

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security Clearance Decisions-2006 Dataset Summary Description adjudication of security clearance cases for contractor personnel Tags {"security clearance","national security","defense industry","defense contractor"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/13/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4455 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/ Data Download URL http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/2006

378

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

379

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midway Substation 230-kV Upgrades Midway Substation 230-kV Upgrades El Paso County, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to modify components within the Midway Substation 230-kilovolt (kV) yard to accommodate upgrades being performed by Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. Western's proposed modifications would occur entirely within the fenced perimeter of the substation located in Township 17S, Range 65W, Section 20 of El Paso County, Colorado. Western would re-conductor the main and transfer strain buses with I ,272 kcmil (thousands of circular mils) Aluminum Conductor Steel Supported (ACSS) at the Midway Substation. The duplex I ,590 kcmil All Aluminum Conductor (AAC) jumpers on each bay in the substation would be installed. The

380

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 21  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work now two-thirds of the way complete at Hanford's tank farms, the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is engaged in essential projects that will reduce the risk posed to the environment by more than 53 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 un- derground tanks. The waste is left over from decades of Cold War plutonium production. ORP and its prime contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), have spent $209 million of $326 mil- lion from the Recovery Act to upgrade tank farm infrastruc- ture, extend the life of critical operating nuclear facilities and prepare the waste for delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) now under construction at Hanford. "The upgrades to tank farm infrastructure allow us to more ef-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security Clearance Decisions-2003 Dataset Summary Description adjudication of security clearance cases for contractor personnel Tags {"security clearance","national security","defense industry","defense contractor"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/10/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4452 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/ Data Download URL http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/2003

382

Microsoft Word - CPARS Web Based Training Modules  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2010 1 March 2010 1 There are 5 web based training modules for Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS), Architect-Engineer Contract Administration Support Systems (ACASS), and Construction Contractor Appraisal Support System (CCASS). This on-line web based training is an interactive online classroom for the delivery of live training. There is no investment in software required. Web based training classes and the schedule for CPARS, ACASS, and CCASS classes are at http://www.cpars.csd.disa.mil/allapps/cpartrng/webtrain/webtrain_all.htm. The modules are as follows: 1 - ACASS/CCASS Overview (2 hours) (1 Continuous Learning Point) This training will give the student an overview of the policies and regulations governing ACASS/CCASS, the ACASS/CCASS Workflow, and ACASS/CCASS Application

383

Department of Energy Continuous Learning Points for the Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Web Based Training Classes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2010 1 May 2010 1 There are 6 web based training modules for Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS), Architect-Engineer Contract Administration Support Systems (ACASS), Construction Contractor Appraisal Support System (CCASS) and Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS). This on-line web based training is an interactive online classroom for the delivery of live training. There is no investment in software required. Web based training classes and the schedule for CPARS, ACASS, and CCASS classes are at http://www.cpars.csd.disa.mil/allapps/cpartrng/webtrain/webtrain_all.htm. The modules are as follows: 1 - ACASS/CCASS Overview (2 hours) (2 Continuous Learning Points) This training will give the student an overview of the policies and regulations governing

384

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes ox- ygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are re- ported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel

385

Fuel Cell Portable Power Workshop Attendees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Workshop Power Workshop January 15-17, 2002 Attendees NAME E-MAIL Anthony Androsky, US Fuel Cell Council androsky@usfcc.com Larry Blair, U.S. Department of Energy larry.blair@ee.doe.gov Adam Briggs, Millennium Cell, Inc. briggs@millenniumcell.com Linnea Brush, Darnell.com, Inc. linnea@darnell.com Richard Canepa, Donaldson Co. Inc. canepa@mail.donaldson.com Deryn Chu, U.S. Army Research Laboratory dchu@arl.army.mil Erin Cready, SENTECH, Inc. ecready@sentech.org Mark Daugherty, DCH Technology/Enable Fuel Cell mdaugherty@enablefuelcell.com Ken Davis, Motorola Labs ken.davis@motorola.com Patrick Davis, DOE, EE-32 patrick.davis@ee.doe.gov Gregory Dolan, Methanol Institute gdolan@methanol.org Nancy Dunlop, MTI MicroFuel Cells Inc. ndunlop@mechtech.com

386

Federal Acquisition Regulation; Federal Acquisition Circular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Federal Acquisition Circular (FAC) 2005-40 Federal Register /Vol. 75, No. 55 /Tuesday, March 23, 2010 /page 14059 A summary for the FAR rule follows. Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS) (FAR case 2008-027) Effective Date: April 22, 2010. This final rule amends the FAR to implement section 872 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009. Section 872 requires the establishment of a data system, Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS), containing specific information on the integrity and performance of covered Federal agency contractors and grantees. FAPIIS is available for use in award decisions at www.ppirs.gov. Government input to FAPIIS is accomplished at www.cpars.csd.disa.mil.

387

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

API API Gravity: An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it may be calculated in terms of the following formula: Degrees API sp gr F o = - 1415 60 1315 . . . @ . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data

388

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security Clearance Decisions-2008 Dataset Summary Description adjudication of security clearance cases for contractor personnel Tags {"security clearance","national security","defense industry","defense contractor"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/15/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4457 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/ Data Download URL http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/2008

389

Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

454 Federal Register 454 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 170 / Thursday, September 1, 2011 / Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: General questions concerning the proposed action and the DEIS can be directed to: Hannah Hadley, Study Environmental Coordinator (see ADDRESSES) or Daniel Johnson, Project Manager, Seattle District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, P.O. 3755, Seattle, WA 98124-3755, ATTN: CENWS-EN- CM-CJ; telephone (206) 764-3423; fax (206) 764-4470; or e-mail Daniel.E.Johnson@usace.army.mil. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The NOI to prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Skagit River General Investigation Study (previously advertised as the Skagit River Flood Damage Reduction Study), Skagit County, Washington was published in the July 29, 2011 Federal Register (76

390

ANL-FF-262i  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

, v-W&, , v-W&, ANL-FF-262i This document consists of 1 page, No.>f 7 copies. SeriesA. -,-- 22 February 1952 TO; B. Blumenthal Metallurgy From: H, Luetzow Metallurgy Re: HIGH PURITY CRANIUM TO BE ROLLID TO FOIL M r, E. Creutz of the Carnegie Institute of Technology has requested ten square inches of uranium foil 0.1 mil to 1 nil thick., The possibility of pro- ducing foil of this thickness from our foundry's graphite-melted uranium is remote because of the metalIs high carbon content. High purity metal isto be considered a possible solution of many of the difficulties experienced in producing foil from relatively high carbon uranium. Therefore, a sample of high purity uranium of sufficient size for the project outlined above is requested. CLASSIFICATION CPNCELLED

391

H. J. Moe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Considerations in the Operation Radiological Considerations in the Operation of the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) April 10, 1998 H. J. Moe 1. General The Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) is a facility that uses the existing APS linac to accelerate electrons up to an energy of 700 MeV. These electrons are transported through the PAR into a portion of the booster synchrotron and on into the LEUTL main enclosure (MIL 97). Figure 1 shows the layout of the LEUTL building, which consists of an earth-bermed concrete enclosure and an end-station building. The concrete enclosure houses the electron beamline, test undulator, and beam dump. This facility is about 51 m long and 3.66 m wide. Technical compo- nents and diagnostics for characterizing the undulator light are found in the end station. This building has about 111 m 2 of floor space. This note deals with the radiological considerations

392

Microsoft PowerPoint - corps_budget_development_process1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-1 6-1 Management of Hydropower O&M US Army Corps of Engineers® Budget Development & Funding Budget Development & Funding 376-2 Management of Hydropower O&M US Army Corps of Engineers® Presentation Objectives Presentation Objectives At the end of this presentation you will be able to * Discuss the annual budget process for Civil Works funding, including hydropower O&M * Understand the various roles of multiple agencies in developing the annual hydropower O&M budget * Understand performance-based budgeting 376-3 Management of Hydropower O&M US Army Corps of Engineers® Budget Development Guidance Budget Development Guidance * Engineer Circular (EC) 11-2-187 (http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/functions/cw/ cecwb/) provides guidance for development and submission to OMB of

393

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IN-County-St. Joseph IN-County-St. Joseph Location: County St. Joseph IN American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop long-term strategic energy principles and 2) replace leaking HVAC system dampers in the County-City Building; replace leaking and defective steam traps throughout the County-City Building network; replace two diesel generators with a new natural gas generator for the County-City Building; and install white Energy Star approved thermal plastic roof membrane over the existing roofing system on the Courthouse (1896); repair main roofing system on the 5th floor of the County City Building; and install new polyisocyanurate insulation and black 60 mil. EPDM (ethylene propylene diene terpolymer) membrane over

394

United States Coast Guard | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coast Guard Coast Guard Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Coast Guard Name United States Coast Guard Address 2100 2nd ST SW Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20598 Phone number 202-372-4411 Website http://www.uscg.mil/default.as Coordinates 38.8645267°, -77.013525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8645267,"lon":-77.013525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

Using Non-Government Domain Names | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Non-Government Domain Names Using Non-Government Domain Names Using Non-Government Domain Names There may be occasion where it is necessary to utilize a non-government domain. The OMB Policies for Federal Agency Public Websites states: Your agency must use only .gov, .mil, or Fed.us domains unless the agency head explicitly determines another domain is necessary for the proper performance of an agency function. This requirement recognizes the proper performance of agency functions includes an obligation for clear and unambiguous public notification of the agency's involvement in or sponsorship of its information dissemination products including public websites. It also recognizes in certain limited circumstances other domains may be necessary for the proper performance of an agency function.

396

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Energy Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAVY NAVY Energy Goals 31 May 2013 CAPT Kerry Gilpin, USN Director, 1GW Task Force Marines checking door-to-door in New Orleans, September 2005 SECNAV Energy Goals Increase Alternative Energy Sources Ashore Sail the "Great Green Fleet" Reduce Non-tactical Petroleum Use Energy Efficient Acquisitions Increase Alternative Energy Department-wide It's about the Mission Gunnery Control Console, USS ANZIO (CG 68) What's the next mission? SH-60F helicopter from USS RONALD REAGAN (CVN 76) surveys tsunami damage, 21 March 2011 1GW of renewable energy: enough to power 250,000 homes or a city the size of Orlando, FL http://www.secnav.navy.mil/eie/ Pages/Energy.aspx Naval Station Sasebo, Japan

397

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY 3M COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOMESTIC AND DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE- EE0003837, W(A)-2011-057, CH-1633 The Petitioner, 3M Company (3M) was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled , "Polymeric Multilayer Infrared Reflecting Film Development". The pu rpose of the agreement is to develop a polymeric multilayer infrared reflecting film that is essentially clear and colorless in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectra (visible light transmission of about 89%) while reflecting 90-95% of the infrared energy in the 850 nm to 1830 nm specified spectra. The film will have a nominal thickness of 3 mils, be polymeric in nature (contains no metals, metal oxides, or other material types) and be essentially clear in appearance.

398

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 60 60 131 5 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the com- pound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Interme- diate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 de- grees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specifica- tion D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure for crude oil and petroleum products equivalent to 42 U.S. gal- lons. Bulk Sales: Wholesale sales of gasoline

399

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2009 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V32 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4474 Public Access Level public

400

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

366 Federal Register 366 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 114 / Wednesday, June 13, 2012 / Notices MD 20762, matthew.zuber@pentagon.af.mil Henry Williams Jr., Acting Air Force Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 2012-14043 Filed 6-12-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 5001-05-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Proposed Subsequent Arrangement AGENCY: Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, Department of Energy. ACTION: Proposed subsequent arrangement. SUMMARY: This notice is being issued under the authority of section 131a.of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. The Department is providing notice of a proposed subsequent arrangement under the Agreement for Cooperation Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Japan Concerning Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy and the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Merger states and final states of black hole coalescences: a numerical-relativity-assisted effective-one-body approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study to what extent the effective-one-body description of the dynamical state of a nonspinning, coalescing binary black hole (considered either at merger, or after ringdown) agrees with numerical relativity results. This comparison uses estimates of the integrated losses of energy and angular momentum during ringdown, inferred from recent numerical-relativity data. We find that the values, predicted by the effective-one-body formalism, of the energy and angular momentum of the system agree at the per mil level with their numerical-relativity counterparts, both at merger and in the final state. This gives a new confirmation of the ability of effective-one-body theory to accurately describe the dynamics of binary black holes even in the strong-gravitational-field regime. Our work also provides predictions (and analytical fits) for the final mass and the final spin of coalescing black holes for all mass ratios

Thibault Damour; Alessandro Nagar; Loic Villain

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility. Interim final report, 7 November 1986-31 October 1989  

SciTech Connect

Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

Gage, M.L.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Neutronics and Thermal Hydraulics Study for Using a Low-Enriched Uranium Core in the Advanced Test Reactor -- 2008 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis was performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff versus effective full power days (EFPDs) between the HEU and the LEU cores. The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was used to optimize the U 235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profiles between the HEU and LEU cores were minimized. The depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar to the ATR reference HEU case study. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, the proposed LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt% is used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness from 0.191 mm (7.0 mil) to 0.330 mm (13.0 mil) at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19). A 0.8g of Boron-10, a burnable absorber, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the peak to average ratio of the inner/outer heat flux more effectively. Because the B-10 (n,a) reaction will produce Helium-4 (He-4), which might degrade the LEU foil type fuel performance, an alternative absorber option is proposed. The proposed LEU case study will have 6.918 g of Cadmium (Cd) mixed with the LEU at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19) as a burnable absorber to achieve peak to average ratios similar to those for the ATR reference HEU case study.

G. S. Chang; M. A. Lillo; R. G. Ambrosek

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

MCO Customer Handbook PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK TO OUR CUSTOMERS: Acknowledgement MCO Customer Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We hope the Mapping Customer Operations (MCO) Customer Assistance Handbook fits your needs as a handy reference tool to obtain the best possible support from DLA. We have made every effort to ensure the information contained is accurate and current; however we appreciate any and all corrections as well as your feedback. The MCO Customer Handbook is also available at our web site www.dscr.dla.mil/rmf. From there, follow the link to “Customer Assistance Handbook.” We would like to recognize the many contributors and supporters of this handbook, each of whom played an integral role in developing and maintaining this resource. We are grateful and hope their efforts provide you the best insight into the mapping supply chain process. Thank you!

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Process for electrically interconnecting electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb--Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb--Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Colella, Nicolas J. (Livermore, CA); Williams, Kenneth A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Solar cell array interconnects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Method of producing novel silicon carbide articles. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

Milewski, J.V.

1982-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method of producing silicon carbide articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

Milewski, John V. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume II. Gas generation studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report contains the data generated from evaluating the adequacy of venting/filtering devices for maintaining safe hydrogen levels in plutonium contaminated waste drums. Additional studies reported in this volume include gas generation rates, selected waste form monitoring, and evaluation of hydrogen migration from sealed 90-mil rigid polyethylene drum liners containing /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes. All wastes used in the studies were newly-generated, and the waste drums were under controlled, experimental conditions. Studies using /sup 239/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Rocky Flats Plant. Studies using /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gas generation and migration studies involving recently generated /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste for the TRU Waste Sampling Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of the multicontractor TRU Waste Sampling Program. Radiolytically generated gases were vented through a filtering device to determine its effectiveness in maintaining hydrogen concentrations within acceptably safe levels. In the second part of the study measurements were made to determine the ability of these gases, particularly hydrogen, to migrate through a sealed rigid polyethylene drum liner. Void volumes in these drums were found to be generally in excess of 90%. The carbon composite filter was found to satisfactorily vent hydrogen up to moderately high levels of alpha activity in the waste substrate. The sealed 90-mil liner was found to inhibit, but not prevent, the migration of hydrogen and other radiolytically generated gases.

Zerwekh, A.; Warren, J.L.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

FAST OXIDE BREEDER-REACTOR. PART I. PARAMETRIC STUDY OF 300(e) MW REACTOR CORE  

SciTech Connect

Physics scoping studies of a 300-Mw(e) PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/-fueled fast- breeder reactor are reported. Physics design parameters that effect fuel costs, full conservation, and reactor safety were evaluated for use in the selection of parameters for a reference design. The total breeding ratio varied from 1.1 to 1.5 in the range of parameters corsidered. Plutonium core loading ranged from 500 to 1500 kg. Doubling time was found to be reduced by high-density fuel and low steel content. A compromise figure on fuel-rod range of sizes (about 100 mils) yields a 5 operating reactivity and a small, negative sodium temperature coefficient. (J.R.D.)

Greebler, P.; Aline, P.; Sueoka, J.

1959-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Voltage holding considerations for direct-collection units  

SciTech Connect

Results have been obtained from initial experiments designed to study high-voltage breakdown under conditions of importance to the design of direct- collection units. A coaxial configuration was used to mock-up critical fields near grid wires. With appropriate heat conditioning, fields as high as 9.6 x 10/ sup 5/ V/cm were maintained at the surface of a 7-mil-diam tungsten wire. This represents an enhanced field of ~10/sup 8/V/cm at whisker'' sites. Breakdown criteria are proposed for three regimes; initial, field-emission, and ultimate, which differ by the amount of prior conditioning applied to the wire. Additional considerations of importance to direct collectors such as the effect of thermionic emission and ion bombardment are discussed. (auth)

Miley, G.H.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Solar cell array interconnects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Colella, Nicolas J. (Livermore, CA); Williams, Kenneth A. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Weak reactions with light nuclei - 6He beta-decay as a test case for the nuclear weak current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a microscopic calculation of the 6He beta-decay into the ground state of 6Li. To this end we use the impulse approximation to describe the nuclear weak current. The ground state wave functions are obtained from the solution of the nuclear 6-body problem. The nucleonnucleon interaction is described via the J-matrix inverse scattering potential (JISP), and the nuclear problem is solved using the hyperspherical-harmonics approach. This approach results in numerical accuracy of about 2 per mil in the transition matrix element. Bearing in mind that the contribution of meson-exchange currents to the transition matrix element is about 5%, these results pave the way for accurate estimation of their effect.

Doron Gazit; Sergey Vaintraub; Nir Barnea

2009-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

416

Monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines manufacturing monolithic amorphous silicon modules on a continuous polymer substrate. Module production costs can be reduced by increasing module performance, expanding production, and improving and modifying production processes. Material costs can be reduced by developing processes that use a 1-mil polyimide substrate and multilayers of low-cost material for the front encapsulant. Research to speed up a-Si and ZnO deposition rates is needed to improve throughputs. To keep throughput rates compatible with depositions, multibeam fiber optic delivery systems for laser scribing can be used. However, mechanical scribing systems promise even higher throughputs. Tandem cells and production experience can increase device efficiency and stability. Two alternative manufacturing processes are described: (1) wet etching and sheet handling and (2) wet etching and roll-to-roll fabrication.

Grimmer, D.P. (Iowa Thin Film Technologies, Inc., Ames, IA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ASTM: The American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel (petroleum): A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass Waste:

418

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

measur- measur- ing scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it may be calculated in terms of the following formula: Deg API sp gr degF degF = - 1415 60 60 1315 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on fin- ished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric

419

Notices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

39 Federal Register 39 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 28 / Friday, February 10, 2012 / Notices Thursday, March 1, 2012 from 1:45 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in front of the full Committee. Number of oral presentations to be made will depend on the number of requests received from members of the public. DATES: March 1, 2011, 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: 801 North Saint Asaph Street Alexandria, Virginia 22314. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Robert Bowling or DACOWITS Staff at 4000 Defense Pentagon, Room 2C548A, Washington, DC 20301-4000. Email: Robert.bowling@osd.mil. Telephone: (703) 697-2122. Fax (703) 614-6233. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Meeting Agenda Thursday, March 1, 2012, 8:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m. -Welcome, introductions, and announcements. -Briefing-Sexual Harassment Prevention Programs.

420

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions-Transportation and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions-Transportation and Contractual Claim Decisions 1998 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve a carrier's dispute over whether it is liable for transit loss or damage. They also include all kinds of quasi-contractual disputes which are settled under Section 3702 of title 31 of the United States Code. Tags {military,contractors,claims,transportation,damage} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V36 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4478 Public Access Level public

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421

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Industrial Security Clearance Decisions-2010 Dataset Summary Description adjudication of security clearance cases for contractor personnel Tags {"security clearance","national security","defense industry","defense contractor"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/17/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4459 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/ Data Download URL http://www.dod.gov/dodgc/doha/industrial/2010

422

First Name Last Name Title Company Email David Alman Director-Material Performance Division National Energy Technology Laboratory david.alman@netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Collaborative National Conference - June 10, 2013 - Attendees Technologies Collaborative National Conference - June 10, 2013 - Attendees First Name Last Name Title Company Email David Alman Director-Material Performance Division National Energy Technology Laboratory david.alman@netl.doe.gov Tim Avampato Program Manager Eaton timjavampato@eaton.com Sharon Beermann-Curtin Program Officer Office of Naval Research sharon.beermanncurti@navy.mil Seth Blumsack Associate Professor Pennsylvania State University sab51@psu.edu Phil Bolin Chief Engineer Power Systems Group Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc. phil.bolin@meppi.com Dushan Boroyevich Professor. Co-Director Virginia Tech - CPES mhawthor@vt.edu Steve Bossart Senior Analyst National Energy Technology Laboratory steven.bossart@netl.doe.gov Gary Bowers Commercial-Industrial Director S&C Electric Company gary.bowers@sandc.com

423

The U.S. Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP): The Future of Manned, Wheeled Tactical Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle The U.S. Army's Vehicle Vehicle The U.S. Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP): Intelligence Program (AVIP): The Future of Manned, Wheeled The Future of Manned, Wheeled Tactical Vehicles Tactical Vehicles H. E. (Bill) Knéé Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Blvd. Knoxville, Tennessee 37932 USA Phone: (865) 946-1300 Fax: (865) 946-1314 E-mail: kneehe@ornl.gov David J. Gorsich U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command AMSTA-TR-N, Warren, Michigan 49397-5000 USA Phone: (810) 574-7413 Fax: (810) 574-6996 E-mail: GorsichD@tacom.army.mil IV2001 IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium Tokyo, Japan http://www.ornl.gov/ORNLReview/v33_3_00/features.htm 1. Propulsion, Vehicle and Power Systems 2. Information and Decision Support Systems 3. Materials, Structures, and Mechanical Systems

424

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_NUWC.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Evaluation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells in Extreme Conditions and Evaluation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells in Extreme Conditions Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport Louis G. Carreiro and A. Alan Burke E-mail: Adrian.Burke@navy.mil Phone: 401-832-6675 The objective of this work is to conduct independent testing and evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems being developed within the DOE's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program under "extreme" conditions - pure oxygen on the cathode side. The Naval Undersea Warfare Center is developing SOFC-based power sources for unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs) that must operate in an air free environment. Oxygen-blown coal gasifiers could be designed to provide pure oxygen feed to the SOFC power plant block. Understanding SOFC performance under these extreme conditions

425

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 DATE: June 28, 2011 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director, Policy Division Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) SUMMARY: To ensure that you are using the most recent version of the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR), use one of the electronic versions at one of the following websites: DOE Procurement - http://management.energy.gov/DEAR.htm; Electronic Code of Federal Regulations - http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text- idx?c=ecfr&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title48/48tab_02.tpl; or Hill Air Force Base - http://farsite.hill.af.mil/vfdoea.htm. These website versions are up-to-date through the Final Rule for Subchapters A, B,

426

U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportunities for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen - Facility Locations and Hydrogen Storage/Delivery Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportunities for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Facility Locations and Hydrogen Storage/Delivery Logistics Nicholas M. Josefik 217-373-4436 N-josefik@cecer.army.mil www.dodfuelcell.com Franklin H. Holcomb Project Leader, Fuel Cell Team 27 OCT 08 Distributed Generation H 2 Generation & Storage Material Handling H2 Vehicles 2 US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center Presentation Outline * DoD Energy Use * Federal Facilities Goals and Requirements * Federal Vehicles and Fuel Goals * Opportunities & Conclusions 3 US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center Where Does the Energy Go? * Tactical and Combat Vehicles (Jets,

427

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

od~ od~ Project Information Project Title: South Composting Facility Pit Date: 1/10/2011 DOE Code: 6730.020.0000 Contractor Code: 8067-788 Project Lead: Tony Bowler Project Overview The purpose of the project is to build a working reserve pit for storage of produced fluids during RMOTC reclamation work. The pit will be approximately 30' wide by 1 00' long by 12' deep. The pit will be lined with 1. Brief project description [include 20 mil polyprolene and bermed to allow 2' of freeboard to address the potential for offsite migration. The pit anything that could impact the will be covered with Nylon mesh to prevent wildlife incursion. A perimeter fence and a locking gate will be environment) installed to deter wildlife and unauthorized human access. The project will involve removing 6" -8" of top soil

428

Photovoltaic manufacturing technology monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrates: Final technical report, July 5, 1995--December 31, 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iowa Thin Film Technologies is completing a three-phase program that has increased throughput and decreased costs in nearly all aspects of its thin-film photovoltaic manufacturing process. The overall manufacturing costs have been reduced by 61 percent through implementation of the improvements developed under this program. Development of the ability to use a 1-mil substrate, rather than the standard 2-mil substrate, results in a 50 percent cost-saving for this material. Process development on a single-pass amorphous silicon deposition system has resulted in a 37 percent throughput improvement. A wide range of process and machine improvements have been implemented on the transparent conducting oxide deposition system. These include detailed parameter optimization of deposition temperatures, process gas flows, carrier gas flows, and web speeds. An overall process throughput improvement of 275 percent was achieved based on this work. The new alignment technique was developed for the laser scriber and printer systems, which improved registration accuracy from 100 microns to 10 microns. The new technique also reduced alignment time for these registration systems significantly. This resulted in a throughput increase of 75 percent on the scriber and 600 percent on the printer. Automated techniques were designed and implemented for the module assembly processes. These include automated busbar attachment, roll-based lamination, and automated die cutting of finished modules. These processes were previously done by hand labor. Throughput improvements ranged from 200 percent to 1200 percent, relative to hand labor rates. A wide range of potential encapsulation materials were evaluated for suitability in a roll lamination process and for cost-effectiveness. A combination material was found that has a cost that is only 10 percent of the standard EVA/Tefzel cost and is suitable for medium-lifetime applications. The 20-year lifetime applications still require the more expensive material.

Jeffrey, F.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

CAVITATION DAMAGE MEASUREMENTS IN MERCURY BY RADIOTRACER ANALYSIS. Technical Report No. 10  

SciTech Connect

The development of a method of continuous measurement of the wear of metal specimens submitted to a constant cavitation field by using radiotracer techniques was attempted. Samples of type 302 stainless steel and type 1010 carbon steel were irradiated in a nuclear reactor and then placed in a cavitating venturi in a closed-loop mercury facility. It was discovered that due to the arrangement of the centrifugal pump, the radioactive particles of steel separate at once and tend to be trapped on the liquid surface of the pump sump. By dismantling this sump, about 6% of the measured weight loss of the carbon steel specimens was recovered. This radioactive material was collected and filtered, which allowed a classification by size with the following results: 68.95% of the material was retained on a 53 micron filter, 30.75% was retained on a 10 micron filter, and 0.307% was retained on a 2 micron filter. These results were obtained by comparison of the activity of the debris with the activity of a standard sample prepared from the original irradiated specimen. Differential curves obtained for the different size debris indicate that the constituents do not vary with particle size. On the assumption that the particles are spheres, it was found that the size distribution of the debris recovered was as follows: 6000 particles with a diameter of 53 microns, 14,750 with an average diameter of 30 microns, and 18,400 with an average diameter of 6 microns. Very few particles exceed a diameter of 80 microns (3.15 mils) and very few have a dimension of less than 6 microns (.236 mils). (auth)

Smith, W.; Nieto, J.M.; Hammitt, F.G.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

Lykins, M.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

STUDIES OF METAL-WATER REACTIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES: I. THE CONDENSER DISCHARGE EXPERIMENT: PRELIMINARY RESULTS WITH ZIRCONIUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The condenser-discharge method of conducting molten metal- water reactions at high temperatures was refined. Two methods to measure energy input to specimen wires and, therefore, to compute initial metal temperatures were developed. Calculated metal temperatures were estimated to be accurate to within 100 deg C. Two reaction cells were designed, one for operation at atmospheric pressure with water at room temperature, and the other for operation at high pressure and with water at elevated temperature. Means were developed to determine the surface area of metal exposed to reaction and to determine the total extent of reaction. Pressure transducers were used to record the rate of reactions. The zirconium- water reaction was studied with initial metal temperatures from 1100 to 4000 deg C with 30 and 60-mil wires in room-temperature water. Initial pressures in these runs were the vapor pressures of water at room temperature (20-30 mm). Runs were made with 60-mil wires in water heated to 200 deg C (225 psi). Results in room-temperature water indicated that the reaction became explosive at an initial metal temperature of 2600 deg C. Below this temperature, 20% or less reaction occurred. At higher water temperatures, reaction ranged from 40 to 70%. Runs in heated water showed markedly greater reaction, reaching 50% for fully melted metal at the melting point (1840 deg C). Results suggested that the rates of both solid-state processes and the diffusion of water vapor through the hydrogen blanket surrounding reacting particles must be considered. (auth)

Baker, L. Jr.; Warchal, R.L.; Vogel, R.C.; Kilpatrick, M.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

CORROSION ASSOCIATED WITH FLUORINATION IN THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

: : 9 7 7 8 6 9 : = 7 9 9used during the fluorination of fused-salt fuels and subsequent associated operations in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fluoride Volatility Process was evaluated. Corrosive attack is reported as mils per month based on molten salt residence time or mils per hour based on fluorine exposure time. Two fluorinators were used in the VPP to carry out the fluorination reactions. These vessels, Mark I and Mark II, were fabricated into right cylinders, approx 4 1/2 ft in height, from the same heat of L (low carbon nickel. The first vessel contained equimolar NaF- ZrF/sub 4/ or NaF-ZrF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ (48-48-4 mole%) for approx 1250 hr at 600 to 725 deg C. Over a period of 61 hr, 57,500 standard liters of F/sub 2/ were sparged into the slats. This constituted a F/sub 2/:U mole ratio of 3:1 beyond theoretical requirements. The Mark II fluorinator contained fluoride salts of approxi-mately the same compositions plus small additions of PuF/sub 4/ during three runs. The salts were kept molten at 540 to 730 deg C for approx 1950 hr and about sixty 500 standard liters of F/sub 2/ were sparged into the Mark II melts in 92 hr. Both fluorinators sustained large corrosion losses consisting of extensive wall thinning, severe interior inter- granular attack, and a moderate exterior oxidation attack. Maximum deterioration on the Mark I vessel occurred in the middle vapor region at a calculated rate of 1.2 mils/hr, based on fluorine sparge time, or 46 mils/month, based on time of exposure to molten salts. The second vessel showed maximum attack in the salt-containing region at similarly calculated rates of 1.1 mils/hr and 60 mils/month. Some evidence was found to indicate that the intergranular attack may have resulted from sulfur in the systems. Bulk metal losses from the vessel's walls were believed to be the result of cyclic losses of NiF/sub 2/ ""protective'' films. The shift in maximum corrosion attack geometry in the two fluorinators is believed to have resulted from differences in operating conditions. The Mark II vessel experienced higher temperatures, longer fluorine exposure times, and uranium residence times in its salt baths. Specimens removed from the wall of the first fluorinator showed a variation in aversge ASTM grain-size number of 5 or 6 to >1, the largest grains being found in the middle vapor region. The second vessel had a more uniform grain-size pattern, average ASTM grain-size numbers varying from 3 to 5 to 2 to 4. The variations in grain sizes are believed to have resulted from variable heating rates during initial usage. Examinations of bench-scale reactors, where simulated fluorination environments were provided to study process variables and corrosion, showed that A nickel had the highest degree of corrosion resistance as a fluorinator materiai of construction when compared with Inconel and INOR-8. Intergranular penetration and subsequent sloughing of whole grains seemed to be the predominant mode of corrosive attack on the Inconel vessel. At the higher test temperatures, 600 deg C, INOR-8 miniature fluorinators showed large bulk metal losses plus selective losses of chromium, molybdenum, and iron from the exposed alloy surfaces. Evidence of a marked reduction in attack on nickel and INOR-8 was found during lower temperature studies at 450 to 525 deg C. Scouting corrosion tests were performed in the VPP's fluorinators using rod, sheet, or wire specimens of commercial and developmental alloys. These tests were subjected to serious limitations due to the lack of control over operating conditions and thus considerable variation in the corrosion of L nickel control specimens resulted. Those nickel-rich alloys containing iron and cobalt showed some superiority in corrosion resistsnce when com- pared with L nickel specimens. Nickel-rich alloys containing molybdenum additions showed variable behavior in the fluorination environment. Additional experimental nickelbase alloy corrosion specimens, containing magnesium,

Litman, A.P.; Goldman, A.E.

1961-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thoughts on VCD-145 Detector Calibration  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, Don Smith requested that the EG&G Detector Group in North Las Vegas provide a summary of calibrated sensitivities for the VCD-145 detector. The &sired information was provided in a memorandum from Sam Egdorf (Reference 1). A memo from Brent Davis issued a week later described the effect on VCD-145 detector sensitivity that resulted from changing the thickness of the stainless steel entrance window (Reference 2). This memo is intended first to effectively archive those two references, and second to record thoughts about the significance of their contents. Reference 1 lists a total of 118 calibrated values for 80 different VCD-145 detectors, from 1977 to 1980. With only four exceptions, all of the serial numbers from V004 to V087 were included. The earlier calibrations were for detectors with 1-mil entrance windows, and the later ones were for detectors with 2-mil entrance windows. Three of the earlier units were calibrated at both thicknesses by temporarily placing an extra 1-mil sheet of stainless steel across the window. Altogether six different collimator diameters were used, from 60 mm to 95 mm. Some units were calibrated for more than one collimator diameter, and 14 were at some point designated as backup detectors for a second event. Reference 2 describes the effect of window thickness on calibrated sensitivity. Quoting that reference: ''To demonstrate that the sensitivity decrease is solely a function of the window thickness, a standard VCD-145 detector with a 0.001-inch thick window was calibrated with the {sup 60}Co source. Then without changing detector or geometry, a 0.001 -inch thick stainless steel foil (same material as that of the window) was placed directly in front of the detector window, effectively making a 0.002-inch thick entrance window. The detector was again calibrated. This technique was repeated until the detector had an entrance window equivalent to 0.010-inches thick.'' There are multiple reasons to suspect that the accuracy of the sensitivity reported for a vacuum Compton detector is uncertain by one-half percent or so. Differences in collimated diameter, variations in window thickness, and unknown errors in the calibration procedures all seem to have some small uncertainty. If one looks at the situation from another angle, this can be considered good news--because there are no indications of uncertainties at the one percent level. Having studied the data from References 1 and 2 in depth, it is my opinion that an experimenter can be confident that the calibrated sensitivity reported for a vacuum Compton detector is accurate to one percent or better. This may not be the smallest error in a reaction history measurement, and it may not be negligible, but realistically it is not often a concern. The uncertainty in knowledge of energy transmission through several mean free paths of attenuating material will almost certainly be several times larger than the uncertainty in detector sensitivity. It is believed that there is a trend for the VCD-145 sensitivity to decrease as the collimator diameter is reduced. Since this likely aggravates the problem of the negative precursor, it is recommended that when detector time response is important, the detector should only be used with a collimator that is close to the largest allowed.

Morgan, W V

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

Comparison of HEU and LEU Fuel Neutron Spectrum for ATR Fuel Element and ATR Flux-Trap Positions  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the high total core power and high neutron flux, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. An optimized low-enriched uranium (LEU) (U-10Mo) core conversion case, which can meet the project requirements, has been selected. However, LEU contains a significant quantity of high density U-238 (80.3 wt.%), which will harden the neutron spectrum in the core region. Based on the reference ATR HEU and the optimized LEU full core plate-by-plate (PBP) models, the present work investigates and compares the neutron spectra differences in the fuel element (FE), Northeast flux trap (NEFT), Southeast flux trap (SEFT), and East flux trap (EFT) positions. A detailed PBP MCNP ATR core model was developed and validated for fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. The current ATR core with HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0wt.% was used as the reference model. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, an optimized LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and the U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt.% was used to calculate the impact of the neutron spectrum in FE and FT positions. MCNP-calculated results show that the neutron spectrum in the LEU FE is slightly harder than in the HEU FE, as expected. However, when neutrons transport through water coolant and beryllium (Be), the neutrons are thermalized to an equilibrium neutron spectrum as a function of water volume fraction in the investigated FT positions. As a result, the neutron spectrum differences of the HEU and LEU in the NEFT, SEFT, and EFT are negligible. To demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the Updated Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) safety requirements, additional studies will be necessary to evaluate and compare safety parameters such as void reactivity and Doppler coefficients, control components worth (outer shim control cylinders, safety rods and regulating rod), and shutdown margins between the HEU and LEU cores.

G. S. Chang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Canyon dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative to the FB-Line scrap recovery dissolver was desired for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) residues from the plutonium reduction process due to the potential generation of hydrogen gas concentrations above the lower flammability limit. To address this concern, a flowsheet was developed for the F-Canyon dissolvers. The dissolvers are continually purged with nominally 33 SCFM of air; therefore the generation of flammable gas concentrations should not be a concern. Following removal of crucible fragments, small batches of the remaining sand fines or slag chunks containing less than approximately 350 grams of plutonium can be dissolved using the center insert in each of the four annular dissolver ports to address nuclear criticality safety concerns. Complete dissolution of the sand fines and slag chunks was achieved in laboratory experiments by heating between 75 and 85 degrees Celsius in a 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M (hydrogen) fluoride solution. Under these conditions, the sand and slag samples dissolved between 1 and 3 hours. Complete dissolution of plutonium and calcium fluorides in the slag required adjusting the dissolver solution to 7.5 wt% aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN). Once ANN was added to a dissolver solution, further dissolution of any plutonium oxide (PuO2) in successive charges was not practical due to complexation of the fluoride by aluminum. During the laboratory experiments, well mixed solutions were necessary to achieve rapid dissolution rates. When agitation was not provided, sand fines dissolved very slowly. Measurement of the hydrogen gas generation rate during dissolution of slag samples was used to estimate the amount of metal in the chunks. Depending upon the yield of the reduction, the values ranged between approximately 1 (good yield) and 20% (poor yield). Aging of the slag will reduce the potential for hydrogen generation as calcium metal oxidizes over time. The potential for excessive corrosion in the dissolvers was evaluated using experimental data reported in the literature. Corrosion data at the exact flowsheet conditions were not available; however, the corrosion rate for 304L stainless steel (wrought material) corrosion coupons in 10M nitric acid/0.01M hydrofluoric acid at 95 degrees Celsius was reported as 21 mils per year. If the fluoride in the dissolver is complexed with aluminum, the corrosion rate will decrease to approximately 5 mils per year.

Rudisill, T.S.; Gray, J.H.; Karraker, D.G.; Chandler, G.T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

PLUTONIUM-URANIUM EXTRACTION (PUREX) FACILITY ALARACT DEMONSTRATION FOR FILTER HOUSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an As Low As Reasonably Achievable Control Technology (ALARACT) demonstration for evaluating corrosion on the I-beam supporting filter housing No.9 for the 291-A-l emission unit of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The PUREX facility is currently in surveillance and maintenance mode. During a State of Washington, Department of Health (WDOH) 291-A-l emission unit inspection, a small amount of corrosion was observed at the base of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter housing. A series of internal and external inspections identified the source of the corrosion material as oxidation of a small section of one of the carbon steel I-beams that provides support to the stainless steel filter housing. The inspections confirmed the corrosion is isolated to one I-beam support location and does not represent any compromise of the structural support or filter housing integrity. Further testing and inspections of the support beam corrosion and its cause were conducted but did not determine the cause. No definitive evidence was found to support any degradation of the housing. Although no degradation of the housing was found, a conservative approach will be implemented. The following actions will be taken: (1) The current operating filter housing No.9 will be removed from service. (2) The only remaining available filter housings (No.1, No.2, and No.3) will be placed in service. These filter housings have new HEPA filters fitted with stainless steel frames and faceguards which were installed in the spring of 2007. (3) Filter housings No.5 and No.10 will be put on standby as backups. To document the assessment of the unit, a draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing was prepared, and informally provided to WDOH on August 7, 2008. A follow up WDOH response to the draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing questioned whether deteriorated galvanized filter faceguards discovered during an internal filter housing inspection met American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) AG-l or Military Specification (MIL) 51068 standards. The filter system was designed and installed prior to the issuance of AG-l, February 1986; however, MIL 51068 did require galvanized faceguards. The faceguards are not necessary for filtration or structural purposes; it is concluded that the system is in compliance with the intent of the applicable standard. Appendix B provides supporting information to address this issue.

LEBARON GJ

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

United States Naval Surface Warfare Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Surface Warfare Center Naval Surface Warfare Center Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Address Carderock, 9500 MacArthur Boulevard West Place Bethesda, Maryland Zip 20817 Sector Hydro Phone number (301) 227-1574 Website http://www.dt.navy.mil/hyd/fac Coordinates 38.9782231°, -77.1973878° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9782231,"lon":-77.1973878,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

438

United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Address Coastal & Hydraulics Laboratory, 3909 Halls Ferry Road Place Vicksburg, Mississippi Zip 39180 Sector Hydro Phone number (601) 634-2288 Website http://chl.erdc.usace.army.mil Coordinates 32.3019199°, -90.8733522° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3019199,"lon":-90.8733522,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Treasury, Postal Approp's Act (11/19/95) PL 104-52  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

96 Appropriations Chronology (Draft) 96 Appropriations Chronology (Draft) CR (9/30/95) went through 11/13 PL 104-31 MilCon Approp's Act (10/3/95) PL 104-32 Agriculture Approp's Act (10/21/95) PL 104-37 Energy/Water Approp's Act (11/13/95) PL 104-46 Transportation Approp's Act (11/15/95) PL 104-50 Treasury, Postal Approp's Act (11/19/95) PL 104-52 Legislative Approp's Act (11/19/95) PL 104-53 CR (11/19/95) 11/14 through 11/20 PL 104-54 CR (11/20/95) through 12/15 PL 104-56 Defense Approp's Act (12/1/95) PL 104-61 Approp's for AFDC, VA, DC (12/22/95) PL 104-69 CR for DC (1/4/96) through 1/25 PL 104-90 Various Approp's (1/6/96) PL 104-92 CR (1/6/96) through 1/26 PL 104-94 Various Approp's (1/26/96) PL 104-99

440

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residual Fuel Imports by State Residual Fuel Imports by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Imports Receipts of crude oil and petroleum products into the 50 States and the District of Columbia from foreign countries, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and other U.S. possessions and territories. Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts Geographic aggregations of the 50 States and the District of Columbia into five districts by the Petroleum Administration for Defense in 1950. These districts were originally defined during World War II for purposes of administering oil allocation. Description and maps of PAD Districts and Refining Districts. Residual Fuel Oil A general classification for the heavier oils, known as No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils, that remain after the distillate fuel oils and lighter hydrocarbons are distilled away in refinery operations. It conforms to ASTM Specifications D396 and D975 and Federal Specification VV-F-815C. No. 5, a residual fuel oil of medium viscosity, is also known as Navy Special and is defined in Military Specification MIL-F-859E, including Amendment 2 (NATO Symbol F-770). It is used in steam-powered vessels in government service and inshore powerplants. No. 6 fuel oil includes Bunker C fuel oil and is used for the production of electric power, space heating, vessel bunkering, and various industrial purposes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.E-06 1.E-06 1.E-05 1.E-04 1.E-03 1.E-02 1.E-01 1.E+00 1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-06 1.E-05 1.E-04 1.E-03 Oxygen Diffusivity (cm 2 /sec) Corrosion Rate (mils/year) Type I Tanks Type II Tanks 0.0E+00 2.0E+03 4.0E+03 6.0E+03 8.0E+03 1.0E+04 1.2E+04 1.4E+04 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 [Cl - ] (ppm) Time for Initiation (years) Type I Tanks Type II Tanks Carbonation is the process through which pore water pH reduces dramatically due to the conversion of the calcium hydroxide to calcium carbonate through reaction with carbon dioxide. For conservative estimation of the vault life, a diffusion coefficient of 1 x 10 -4 cm 2 /s was used. Assuming that the diffusion coefficient remains constant, carbonation is not expected to be an issue in the Type I and Type II tanks within 50,000 years if the diffusion coefficient remains below 1 x 10

442

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prime Supplier Sales Volume Prime Supplier Sales Volume Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Finished Aviation Gasoline A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

443

TITLE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

p p a * T A olistii. ..ow ... Unlted States awernment 00))#~Tmsnt of Energy - - memorandum D*=APR 0 2 1987 muym NE-23 A m OR W C I : Revised Guidelines f o r Resldual R a d ~ o a c t i v e M a t e r i a l a t N S R A P and R e m t e SRIP S l t e s Ahrends, OR Kluk, OP-124 Nelson, WSSPd Schrelber , SSDPD Welty, EH-23 G I l b e r t , MIL Berven, ORHL Berger, ORAL! Young, Aerospace Attached I s a revjsed copy o f thc Department's Guidelines f o r n s l d u a l r a d l o a c t f v e material. This versfon o f the doculnent has been revised t o i n c l u d e comnents from EH and t o address the h o t spot and s u p p l m n t a l . I i m l t/except{ons procedures out1 i n e d during t h e July 1906 workshop and subsequent working group meetings. EH intends t o include these guidelines i n d r a f t DOE Order 5480.x~. R a d i a t i o n P r o t e c t i o n o f t h e Publlc and

444

X:\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma00.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

calculated in terms of the following formula: calculated in terms of the following formula: Deg API sp gr degF degF = - 141 5 60 60 131 5 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on fin- ished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure for crude oil and petroleum products equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons.

445

Regional  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 AÇORIANO ORIENTAL SEGUNDA-FEIRA, 5 DE MARÇO DE 2012 PUB Da Graciosa para a Índia graças à estação atmosférica Carlos está atualmente a trabalhar na estação atmosférica móvel instalada na Índia, a dois mil metros de altitude Estar no lugar certo na hora cer- ta pode mudar radicalmente a vida de uma pessoa. Foi isso que aconteceu ao graciosense Carlos Sousa, de 41 anos, que começou por ser trabalhador daconstrução civil antes de emigrar para os Es- tados Unidos da América. No regresso à sua ilha, foi ain- Começou na construção e foi emigrante nos EUA. Hoje trabalha com equipamento de ponta no estudo do clima RUI JORGE CABRAL rcabral@acorianooriental.pt da gerente de um restaurante e, graças aum encontro improvável, é hoje técnico das Estações de Me- dição da Radiação Atmosférica que os americanos têm espalha- das pelo mundo para estudar as alterações

446

History of Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

línea del tiempo de la física de partículas línea del tiempo de la física de partículas Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Por más de dos mil años la gente ha pensado acerca de las partículas fundamentales, con las que está hecha toda la materia; empezando con un desarrollo gradual de la teoría atómica para continuar luego con una comprensión más profunda del átomo cuántico, hasta llegar a la reciente teoría del Modelo Standard. Lo invitamos a explorar esta historia de la física de partículas, con su visión enfocada hacia los científicos y los pensadores que ayudaron a dar forma a este campo de la física. Las cuatro secciones están dispuestas cronológicamente. Usted puede usar el índice para encontrar mayor información sobre una persona específica o sobre un evento en particular.

447

EIS-0023-FEIS-Tables-1979.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TABLE TABLE 1-1 Quantifiable Environmental Impacts and Cost .4 Ztemti.e 1 Cont*nued Tmk Pam @eRltti Occupational Radiation Exposures Based on SRP Experience, .an-re@ 360 OffSite Pop.latio" Dose risk, mm-red 1,400 Offsite Population DOS. Risk, man-remc 24,000 Offsite Population Dose Risk, .an-re& 2,300 Non-nuclear Accidental Fatalities frm Construction and operations 17.1 BudgetaryCost, mil lions of 1980 dO1lar,e 510 3,800 2>700 2,400 650 220 340 650 340 340 6.5 6.6 6.2 3,600 3,750 3,610 a. Campaign totals for .11 workers b. Cmseq.mces times probabilities, sumed over all events and integrated f.. 300 years. . . Assming tanks are abandoned after 100 years, according to proposed EPA criterion. d. Integrated for 10,000 year,. .. Includes capital and operating cost* TABLE 1.2 Sumary of DiFficu lt-to-Q.antifyFactors Relative DeEree of Action ... q.ir.d by F.c.re Generations

448

Microsoft Word - ITSI award doc 06-D0008 conformed to P00001.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CODE CODE (Hour) PAGE(S) until 04:00 PM local time 12 Oct 2005 X A X B X C D E X X G F X H david.villarreal@langley.af.mil RATING PAGE OF PAGES 7. ISSUED BY (Date) 29-Sep-2006 IMPORTANT - Award will be made on this Form, or on Standard Form 26, or by other authorized official written notice. Previous Edition is Unusable 33-134 STANDARD FORM 33 (REV. 9-97) Prescribed by GSA FAR (48 CFR) 53.214(c) HELEN VAUGHN 1 87 (If other than Item 7) 15A. NAME 16. NAME AND TITLE OF PERSON AUTHORIZED TO AND ADDRESS SIGN OFFER (Type or print) OF OFFEROR AMENDMENT NO. DATE 15B. TELEPHONE NO (Include area code) 17. SIGNATURE 303-858-0965 15C. CHECK IF REMITTANCE ADDRESS IS DIFFERENT FROM ABOVE - ENTER SUCH ADDRESS IN SCHEDULE. 18. OFFER DATE INNOVATIVE TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS, INC. JOHN ENGLAND DBA: ITSI 2730 SHADELANDS DR #100

449

DOE Handbook on Leave and Absence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IC K IC K L E A ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE Handbook on Leave and Absence A Tool for Human Resource Staffs, Payroll Staffs, and Time and Attendance Clerks U.S. Department of Energy Director of Human Resources Management Revised June 2001 V E C O UR T L E AV E F ML A F U NE R A L L E AV E C O MP E NS ATO R Y T IME O F F LW O P C R E DIT HO U R S A NNUA L L E AV E DO NO R L E AV E A DVA NC E D S IC K L E AV E T IME O F F AWA R D MIL ITA R Y L E AV E DO NAT E D L E AV E 9 Common Types of Absences Administrative Dismissals Coverage: Events beyond the control of management or employees, such as hazardous weather or civil disturbances; situations requiring an office to close, such as inadequate heat or air conditioning or loss of essential services, e.g., an electrical

450

Phase 2 of the automated array assembly task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Final report, 1 April 1979-31 March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several specific processing steps, as part of a total process sequence for manufacturing silicon solar cells, were studied during this contract. Ion implantation has been identified as the Motorola preferred process step for impurity doping. Unanalyzed beam ion implantation has been shown to have major cost advantages over analyzed beam implantation. Further, high quality cells have been fabricated using a high current unanalyzed beam. Mechanically masked plasma patterning of silicon nitride has been shown to be capable of forming fine lines on silicon surfaces with spacings between mask and substrate as great as 250 ..mu..m (10 mils). Extensive work was performed on advances in plated metallization. The need for the thick electroless palladium layer has been eliminated. Further, copper has been successfully utilized as a conductor layer, utilizing nickel as a barrier to copper diffusion into the silicon. Plasma etching of silicon for texturing and saw damage removal has been shown technically feasible, but not cost-effective compared to wet chemical etching techniques.

Coleman, M.G.; Pryor, R.A.; Sparks, T.G.; Legge, R.M.; Saltzman, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

QCD and low-x physics at a Large Hadron electron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) is a proposed facility which will exploit the new world of energy and intensity offered by the LHC for electron-proton scattering, through the addition of a new electron accelerator. This contribution, which is derived from the draft CERN-ECFA-NuPECC Conceptual Design report (due for release in 2012), addresses the expected impact of the LHeC precision and extended kinematic range for low Bjorken-x and diffractive physics, and detailed simulation studies and prospects for high precision QCD and electroweak fits. Numerous observables which are sensitive to the expected low-x saturation of the parton densities are explored. These include the inclusive electron-proton scattering cross section and the related structure functions $F_2$ and $F_L$, as well as exclusive processes such as deeply-virtual Compton scattering and quasi-elastic heavy vector meson production and diffractive virtual photon dissociation. With a hundred times the luminosity that was achieved at HERA, salient expectations for the LHeC include the complete determination of all light and heavy quark parton distributions for the first time, the high precision extraction of the gluon density, the determination of the strong coupling constant to per-mil accuracy and the precision study of the running of the electroweak mixing angle.

Paul Laycock

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

452

METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

Frazer, J.W.

1962-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

453

Heat exchanger-ingot casting/slicing process. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Eighth quarterly progress report, July 1, 1977--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graded crucibles have been developed which are dense enough to avoid penetration of the molten silicon and weak enough to fracture during the cool-down cycle. These crucibles have been used to cast crack-free silicon ingots up to 3.3 kg. Significant progress has been made in the crystallinity of the samples cast. Solar cells made from one of the ingots have yielded over 9% conversion efficiency. The source of silicon carbide in the cast silicon has been identified, both theoretically and experimentally, to be associated with the use of graphite retainers in contact with the crucible. Both 45 ..mu..m and 30 ..mu..m diamonds can be used for efficient slicing of silicon. Wafers sliced with 45 ..mu..m diamond plated wire show a surface roughness of +-0.5 ..mu..m and extent of damage of 3 ..mu..m. In an effort to avoid diamond pullout from impregnated wire it was found that a layer of 0.3 mil thick plating is sufficient to encapsulate the diamonds. A projected cost analysis has shown that the add-on cost of casting and slicing of silicon is $11.57 per square meter.

Schmid, F.; Khattak, C.P.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

AREA SESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. This standard is approved for use by all Departments and Agencies of the Department of Defense (DoD). 2. This issue of MIL-STD-130 provides further clarification and increased insight and guidance for the implementation of machine-readable information (MRI) processes for item identification marking and facilitating automatic data capture. Based solely on non-Government standards, MRI provides a valuable tool for life-cycle asset management from acquisition through manufacture to logistics and final disposition. However, the application of free text information item identification marking is still necessary for many end users of the identified item. Finding the most effective use of both marking protocols, either singly or in combination, is the prime responsibility of the acquiring activity. 3. This standard provides the criteria by which product designers develop specific item identification marking requirements. Product designers must include in product definition data the specific requirements as to marking content, size, location, and application process. Simply stating in the product definition data that the marking be in accordance with this standard is not sufficient for initial manufacture and subsequent production of replenishment spare items.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Silicon heat pipes for cooling electronics  

SciTech Connect

The increasing power density of integrated circuits (ICs) is creating the need for improvements in systems for transferring heat away from the chip. In earlier investigations, diamond films were used to conduct heat from ICs and spread the energy across a heat sink. The authors` investigation has indicated that a 635 {mu}m (25 mil) thick silicon substrate with embedded heat pipes could perform this task better than a diamond film. From their study, it appears that the development of a heat-pipe heat-spreading system is both technically and commercially feasible. The major challenge for this heat-spreading system is to develop an effective wick structure to transport liquid to the heated area beneath the chip. This paper discusses the crucial design parameters for this heat-pipe system, such as the required wick properties, the material compatibility issues, and the thermal characteristics of the system. The paper also provides results from some recent experimental activities at Sandia to develop these heat-pipe heat spreader systems.

Adkins, D.R.; Shen, D.S.; Palmer, D.W.; Tuck, M.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

TEST PLAN AND PROCEDURE FOR THE EXAMINATION OF TANK 241-AY-101 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

WYRWAS RB; PAGE JS; COOKE GS

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Fluid-Structure Interaction Modeling of High-Aspect Ratio Nuclear Fuel Plates Using COMSOL  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Lab is in the research stage of converting its fuel from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium. Due to different physical properties of the new fuel and changes to the internal fuel plate design, the current safety basis must be re-evaluated through rigorous computational analyses. One of the areas being explored is the fluid-structure interaction phenomenon due to the interaction of thin fuel plates (50 mils thickness) and the cooling fluid (water). Detailed computational fluid dynamics and fluid-structure interaction simulations have only recently become feasible due to improved numerical algorithms and advancements in computing technology. For many reasons including the already built-in fluid-structure interaction module, COMSOL has been chosen for this complex problem. COMSOL's ability to solve multiphysics problems using a fully-coupled and implicit solution algorithm is crucial in obtaining a stable and accurate solution. Our initial findings show that COMSOL can accurately model such problems due to its ability to closely couple the fluid dynamics and the structural dynamics problems.

Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL] ORNL; Ekici, Kivanc [ORNL] ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Corrosion Evaluation of Stellite Alloys 12 and 712  

SciTech Connect

The High Level Waste Division requested the Materials Technology Section (MTS) to evaluate the use of Waukesha Metal 88 (WM88) and Stellite alloys 12 (S12) and 712 (S712) as materials of construction for slurry pumps. As candidate materials, WM88 was chosen for the tilt pad column bearings and S12 and S712 were selected for the impeller bearings. The Stellite alloys are cobalt-based alloys typically used for their resistance to both corrosion and wear. WM88 is noted for resistance to galling and seizing. These materials, however, had not been evaluated for use in high level radioactive waste, which have a high pH. A series of electrochemical corrosion tests were performed in support of this evaluation to determine the general corrosion rate and corrosion characteristics of these alloys. The tests were conducted at room temperature in simulated three waste tank environments. For WM88, the test solution was inhibited water, which is commonly used in the tank farm. For S12 and S712, the test solutions were a simulated Tank 8 waste solution and a 3 M sodium hydroxide solution. The general corrosion rates of all alloys in these solutions were less than 0.1 mils per year (mpy). The alloys displayed passive behavior in these solutions due to the protective nature of their oxides.

Mickalonis, J.I.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Activation measurements of high energy deuterons in the plasma focus device  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear activation techniques were used to measure the fluence of high energy deuterons in a plasma focus device having a stored energy of 75 kilojoules at 18 kV. The $sup 12$C(d,n)$sup 13$N (330 keV threshold) and $sup 27$Al(d,p)$sup 28$Al reactions were used to provide both an absolute number of high energy deuterons and an average energy, evaluated from the $sup 13$N/$sup 28$Al ratio calculated for various energies by Young. Previous measurements indicated more than 10$sup 15$ deuterons could be accelerated to energies above 330 keV in the low pressure mode of operation, with a highly anisotropic distribution. Present measurements show that more than 10$sup 12$ deuterons achieve energies greater than 5 MeV on some high intensity shots in the low pressure mode. The presence of multi-MeV deuterons in the plasma focus device was substantiated by measuring activation as a function of depth in 1 mil Al foils, and by measurements of neutron energy using time-of-flight. (auth)

Gullickson, R.L.; Sahlin, H.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The future of components for high reliability military and space applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Military specified, ceramic packaged and radiation hardened components will disappear before the end of the century. The only long-term sustainable alternative may well be to use plastic packaged Commercial Components. The material in this report comes from the Defense Logistics Agency sponsored Plastic Package Availability Program and from an AT and T field reliability study. It summarizes Case Studies from companies which have been building and fielding highly reliable commercial and DOD military systems using plastic commercial components. Findings are, that when properly selected commercial components are operated within the true limitations of their design and packaging, they are as reliable as today`s Mil Spec components. Further, they offer cost, space and weight savings, shared manufacturing and field test experience with industry, and access to the most modern technology. Also reported are potential problems that may be encountered when using commercial components, their long term storage and use reliability characteristics, recommended design processes and supplier selection practices, commercial best business practices, and a semiconductor manufacturer`s view of the military`s switch to commercial plastic microcircuits.

Hanlon, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Component Information and Management Dept.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Aging Wire Insulation Assessment by Phase Spectrum Examination of Ultrasonic Guided Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wire integrity has become an area of concern to the aerospace community including DoD, NASA, FAA, and Industry. Over time and changing environmental conditions, wire insulation can become brittle and crack. The cracks expose the wire conductor and can be a source of equipment failure, short circuits, smoke, and fire. The technique of using the ultrasonic phase spectrum to extract material properties of the insulation is being examined. Ultrasonic guided waves will propagate in both the wire conductor and insulation. Assuming the condition of the conductor remains constant then the stiffness of the insulator can be determined by measuring the ultrasonic guided wave velocity. In the phase spectrum method the guided wave velocity is obtained by transforming the time base waveform to the frequency domain and taking the phase difference between two waveforms. The result can then be correlated with a database, derived by numerical model calculations, to extract material properties of the wire insulator. Initial laboratory tests were performed on a simple model consisting of a solid cylinder and then a solid cylinder with a polymer coating. For each sample the flexural mode waveform was identified. That waveform was then transformed to the frequency domain and a phase spectrum was calculated from a pair of waveforms. Experimental results on the simple model compared well to numerical calculations. Further tests were conducted on aircraft or mil-spec wire samples, to see if changes in wire insulation stiffness can be extracted using the phase spectrum technique.

Robert F. Anastasi; Eric I. Madaras

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

A Expansão da Agricultura Intensiva e Pecuária na Amazônia Brasileira  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61 a 81. 61 a 81. 1 A Expansão da Agricultura Intensiva e Pecuária na Amazônia Brasileira Robert Walker, 1 Ruth DeFries, 2 Maria Del Carmem Vera-Diaz, 3 Yosio Shimabukuro, 4 e Adriano Venturieri 5 A agropecuária na Amazônia tem, frequentemente, provocado controvérsia em função do imenso valor ecológico do meio ambiente da região. Isso ocorreu, primeiramente, com a pecuária e atualmente com o crescimento acelerado da soja, uso de tratores e criação de gado. Essas atividades têm ocupado terras que, por milênios, sustentaram somente florestas úmidas fechadas, ecossistemas naturais e povos indígenas dispersos. O presente capítulo focaliza a porção brasileira da Bacia Amazônica e trata da expansão da agropecuária nesta região, partindo da premissa de que uma efetiva política de desenvolvimento

463

Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective  

SciTech Connect

A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay; primary and secondary geo-synthetics (60 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); a two foot soil protective cover; tertiary geo-synthetics (80 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); and a final two foot soil protective cover. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (UDEQ/DSHW) oversees the construction process and reviews the documentation after the construction is complete. If all aspects of the construction process are met, the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board approves the landfill cell for disposal. It is the role of the regulator to ensure to the stakeholders that the landfill cell has been constructed in accordance with the State-issued permit and that the cell is protective of human health and the environment. A final determination may require conflict resolution between the agency and the facility. (authors)

Lukes, G.C.; Willoughby, O.H. [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Div. of Solid and Hazardous Waste (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Surface water processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral (Delta)14C record  

SciTech Connect

To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow we have generated a 115-year bi-monthly coral-based radiocarbon time-series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15{per_thousand}). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric {sup 14}C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60{per_thousand} and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high Austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant {sup 14}C peak in 1955 due to bomb {sup 14}C water advected into this region in the form of CaCO{sub 3} particles (this implies that the particles were advected intact and then become entrapped in the coral skeleton--is this what we really mean? Wouldn't even fine particles settle out over the inferred transit time from Bikini to MAK?) or water particles with dissolved labeled CO{sub 2} produced during fallout from the Castle tests in 1954.

Fallon, S J; Guilderson, T P

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

465

Transfer of Air Force technical procurement bid set data to small businesses, using CALS and EDI. Summary report. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the Air Force CALS Test Network (AFCTN) Test Report Transfer of Air Force Technical Procurement Bid Set Data to Small Businesses, Using CALS and EDI (AFCTN Test Report 94-034, UCRL-ID-118619). It represents a synthesis of the results, conclusions, and recommendations, as well as a more concise presentation of the issues and strategies as viewed from AFCTN`s perspective. This report documents a test transfer of three Air Force technical procurement bid sets to one large and twelve small businesses, using the Department of Defense (DoD) Continuous Acquisition and Life-cycle Support (CALS) and ANSI ASC X12 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The main goal of the test was to evaluate the effectiveness of using CALS technical data within the context of the DoD`s EDI-based standard approach to electronic commerce in procurement, with particular emphasis on receipt and use of the data by small contractors. Air Force procurement data was provided by the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base; the manufacturing participants were selected from among McClellan`s {open_quote}Blue Ribbon{close_quote} contractors, located throughout the United States. The test was sponsored by the Air Force CALS Test Network, headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The test successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of including CALS MIL-R-28002 (Raster) engineering data in an EDI Specification/Technical Information transaction set (ANSI ASC X12 841) when issuing electronic requests for quotation to small businesses. In many cases, the data was complete enough for the contractor participant to feel comfortable generating a quote.

NONE

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Transfer of Air Force technical procurement bid set data to small businesses, using CALS and EDI: Test report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a test transfer of three Air Force technical procurement bid sets to one large and twelve small businesses, using the Department of Defense (DoD) Continuous Acquisition and Life-cycle Support (CALS) and ANSI ASC X12 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The main goal of the test was to evaluate the effectiveness of using CALS technical data within the context of the DoD`s EDI-based standard approach to electronic commerce in procurement, with particular emphasis on receipt and use of the data by small contractors. Air Force procurement data was provided by the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base; the manufacturing participants were selected from among McClellan`s ``Blue Ribbon`` contractors, located throughout the US. The test was sponsored by the Air Force CALS Test Network, headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The test successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of including CALS MIL-R-28002 (Raster) engineering data in an EDI Specification/Technical Information transaction set (ANSI ASC X12 841) when issuing electronic requests for quotation to small businesses. In many cases, the data was complete enough for the contractor participant to feel comfortable generating a quote. Lessons learned from the test are being fed back to the CALS and EDI standards organizations, and to future implementors of CALS-EDI based acquisition or contracting systems, which require the transfer of technical information, such as engineering data, manufacturing process data, quality test data, and other product or process data, in the form of a CALS or other digital datafile.

NONE

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transporation System licensed hardware second certification test series and package shock mount system test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a summary of two separate drop test a e performed in support of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System (RTGTS). The first portion of this paper presents the second series of drop testing required to demonstrate that the RTG package design meets the requirements of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, ``Part 71`` (10 CFR 71). Results of the first test series, performed in July 1994, demonstrated that some design changes were necessary. The package design was modified to improve test performance and the design changes were incorporated into the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The second full-size certification test article (CTA-2) incorporated the modified design and was tested at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. With the successful completion of the test series, and pending DOE Office of Facility Safety Analysis approval of the SARP, a certificate of compliance will be issued for the RTG package allowing its use. The second portion of this paper presents the design and testing of the RTG Package Mount System. The RTG package mount was designed to protect the RTG from excessive vibration during transport, provide shock protection during on/off loading, and provide a mechanism for moving the RTG package with a forklift. Military Standard (MIL-STD) 810E, Transit Drop Procedure (DOE 1989), was used to verify that the shock limiting system limited accelerations in excess of 15 G`s at frequencies below 150 Hz. Results of the package mount drop tests indicate that an impact force of 15 G`s was not exceeded in any test from a free drop height of 457 mm (18 in.).

Ferrell, P.C.; Moody, D.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Reactant gas composition for fuel cell potential control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell (10) system in which a nitrogen (N.sub.2) gas is used on the anode section (11) and a nitrogen/oxygen (N.sub.2 /O.sub.2) gaseous mix is used on the cathode section (12) to maintain the cathode at an acceptable voltage potential during adverse conditions occurring particularly during off-power conditions, for example, during power plant shutdown, start-up and hot holds. During power plant shutdown, the cathode section is purged with a gaseous mixture of, for example, one-half percent (0.5%) oxygen (O.sub.2) and ninety-nine and a half percent (99.5%) nitrogen (N.sub.2) supplied from an ejector (21) bleeding in air (24/28) into a high pressure stream (27) of nitrogen (N.sub.2) as the primary or majority gas. Thereafter the fuel gas in the fuel processor (31) and the anode section (11) is purged with nitrogen gas to prevent nickel (Ni) carbonyl from forming from the shift catalyst. A switched dummy electrical load (30) is used to bring the cathode potential down rapidly during the start of the purges. The 0.5%/99.5% O.sub.2 /N.sub.2 mixture maintains the cathode potential between 0.3 and 0.7 volts, and this is sufficient to maintain the cathode potential at 0.3 volts for the case of H.sub.2 diffusing to the cathode through a 2 mil thick electrolyte filled matrix and below 0.8 volts for no diffusion at open circuit conditions. The same high pressure gas source (20) is used via a "T" juncture ("T") to purge the anode section and its associated fuel processor (31).

Bushnell, Calvin L. (Glastonbury, CT); Davis, Christopher L. (Tolland, CT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Use of Hysol US0009 polyurethane encapsulant in battery cables  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of Hysol US0009 polyurethane as an encapsulant for the battery cable used on the MC1605B. The Hysol resin was selected for the application because it was reacted with a non-carcinogenic curing agent and because it exhibited superior mechanical, electrical, and hydrolytic properties over a wide temperature range. The Hysol encapsulant was evaluated to determine if it was superior to the EN-7 elastomer as a sealant against electrolyte migration to the interior of the cable. Environmental tests reported here showed the Hysol was marginal when no preseal was employed but was 100 percent effective when a bird-cage seal was used inside the EMR hardware. The EN-7 encapsulant, on the other hand, was effective only when seals were employed both inside the EMR hardware and at the lug terminations. Without the two preseals, the EN-7 compound was always unsatisfactory. Twenty development battery cables fabricated with Hysol under production operations were tested after alternate immersion in battery electrolyte and after exposures to temperature shock and the MIL-STD 202 environment. Presealed cables successfully survived these exposures and retained their initial DC resistance, insulation resistance, and high potential properties with only minor changes. The environmental tests conducted with these assemblies probably represented five or more years of in-field service. Comparative peel tests demonstrated that the Hysol/neoprene insert bond was twice (5.2 versus 2.8 kg/cm) that of the EN-7 polyurethane. Hysol US0009 has a potential for encapsulation of other WR components and assemblies in which the EN-7 resin has exhibited thermal shortcomings. 7 figures, 10 tables.

Voida, G.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Optimization of a CNG series hybrid concept vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) has favorable characteristics as a vehicular fuel, in terms of fuel economy as well as emissions. Using CNG as a fuel in a series hybrid vehicle has the potential of resulting in very high fuel economy (between 26 and 30 km/liter, 60 to 70 mpg) and very low emissions (substantially lower than Federal Tier II or CARB ULEV). This paper uses a vehicle evaluation code and an optimizer to find a set of vehicle parameters that result in optimum vehicle fuel economy. The vehicle evaluation code used in this analysis estimates vehicle power performance, including engine efficiency and power, generator efficiency, energy storage device efficiency and state-of-charge, and motor and transmission efficiencies. Eight vehicle parameters are selected as free variables for the optimization. The optimum vehicle must also meet two perfect requirements: accelerate to 97 km/h in less than 10 s, and climb an infinitely long hill with a 6% slope at 97 km/h with a 272 kg (600 lb.) payload. The optimizer used in this work was originally developed in the magnetic fusion energy program, and has been used to optimize complex systems, such as magnetic and inertial fusion devices, neutron sources, and mil guns. The optimizer consists of two parts: an optimization package for minimizing non-linear functions of many variables subject to several non-linear equality and/or inequality constraints and a programmable shell that allows interactive configuration and execution of the optimizer. The results of the analysis indicate that the CNG series hybrid vehicle has a high efficiency and low emissions. These results emphasize the advantages of CNG as a near-term alternative fuel for vehicles.

Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.; Flowers, D.L.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

471

D0 Silicon Strip Detector Upgrade Project SVX Sequencer Controller Board  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sequencer Controller boards are 9U by 340mm circuit boards that will reside in slot 1 of each of eight Sequencer crates in the D0 detector platform. The primary purpose is to control the Sequencers during data acquisition based on trigger information from the D0 Trigger Framework. Functions and features are as follows: (1) Receives the Serial Command Link (SCL) from the D0 Trigger System and controls the operation of the Sequencers by forming a custom serial control link (NRZ/Clock) which is distributed individually to each Sequencer via the 11 Backplane; (2) Controllable delays adjust NRZ control link phasing to compensate for the various cable-length delays between the Sequencers and SVX chips, delay control is common for slots 2-11, and for slots 12-21 of the crate; (3) Each NRZ control link is phase controlled so that commands reach each Sequencer in a given half-crate simultaneously, i.e., the link is compensated for backplane propagation delays; (4) External communication via MIL-STD-1553; (5) Stand-alone operation via 1553 trigger commands in absence of an SCL link; (6) 1553-writeable register for triggering a laser, etc. followed by an acquisition cycle; (7) TTL front panel input to trigger an acquisition cycle, e.g. from a scintillator; (8) Synch Trig, Veto, Busy and Preamp Reset TTL outputs on front panel LEMOs; (9) On-board 53.104 MHz oscillator for stand-alone operation; (10) 1553 or SCL-triggerable Cal-inject cycle; (11) Front-panel inputs to accept NRZ/Clock link from the VRB Controller; (12) Front panel displays and LEDs show the board status at a glance; and (13) In-system programmable EPLDs are programmed via Altera's 'Byteblaster'.

Utes, M.; /Fermilab

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

To study of different level of nitrogen manure and density on yield and yield component of variety of K.S.C 704 in dry region of sistan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Out of three grain of the world, Corn is one of the best, About 7 to 10 thousand years ago in south of Mexico corn become domesticated. In the year 1995 culfivation of corn in the world was 130 mil/ha, and to Total production of the world of corn is 507 M/Tons. Average yield of corn in the year 1995 Among Producer countries was 7.78 To 7.60 t/ha in fance and united state was state was 2.36 To 2.20 t/ha, but in Brazil and Mexico Production of corn was different. With this regards, special manner has been arranged for the suitable cultivation or suitable density plants in one heactar on cultivation variety of K.S.C 704 corn. Also suitable level of Nitrogen manure, this Protect in climatic condition of Sistan region done, sith complete block design with 3 replication. Experiment has been selected as split plot, the main plot with 4 different concentration level such as (200-250-3500 and 350 Kg/ha) and sub plot density with 3 different level such as 111000,83000 and 66000 plan/ha respectively. From stage growth up to harvesting of corn in this reache having Data for each treat. ment, After harvesting Analysis of variance and companion of Average of each treatment has been done by DunKan method. Results has been shown, Measurment of characteristics (yield component) seed yield effected different density level of manure, with increasing of manure weight of one thousand seed yield and also in high density showed high significant differente amoung each other. These are with suitable climatic condition of sistan region if enough water will be available ed using Amount of 350 ks/ha Nitrogen manure and with density 111000 plants/ha we can product suitable seed yield Biological yield.

Dahmardeh, M.; Forghani, F.; Khammari, E. [Department of Agronomy, Plant breeding and genetic, Faculty of Agricutlure, Zabol University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

STUDIES OF METAL-WATER REACTIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES. III. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THE ZIRCONIUM-WATER REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Further studies of the Zr-water reaction by the condenser-discharge method are reported. The reaction was studied with initial metal temperatures from 1100 to 4000 deg C with 30- and 60-mil wires in water from room temperature to 315 deg C (1500-psi vapor pressure). Runs in heated water showed markedly greater reactions. This was explained in terms of a 2-step reaction scheme in which the reaction rate is initially controlled by the rate of gaseous diffusion of water vapor toward the hot metal particles and of hydrogen, generated by reaction, away from the particles. At a later time, the reaction becomes controlled by the parabolic rate law, resulting in rapid cooling of the particles. A mathematical model of the reaction of molten metal spheres with water was proposed. Explosive reactions were found to occur with particles smaller than about 1 mm in heated water and 0.5 mm in room-temperature water. The explosive reactions were caused by the ability of the evolving H/sub 2/ to propel the particles through water at high speed. The high-speed motion was detected on motion picture film and had the effect of removing the gaseous diffusion barrier (increasing the Nusselt number), resulting in very rapid reaction. Computed results compared favorably with experimental results obtained by the condenser- discharge experiment and with the results of previous investigators. Computations indicated that the extent and rate of reaction depended on the particle diameter and the water temperature, and were relatively independent of the metal temperature so long as the metal was fully melted. This makes it possible to estimate the extent of Zr-water reaction that would occur during a reactor accident in which the particle sizes of the residue could be estimated. Comparisons were made with the results of meltdown experiments in TREAT, and applications to reactor hazards analysis were discussed. (auth)

Baker, L. Jr.; Just, L.C.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

[An improved, more reliable and more marketable version of the Automatic Metering System  

SciTech Connect

Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc. (TRI/Austin) was tasked by Letco International to evaluate its Automatic Metering System (AMS), a proportional controller for heat tracing cable. The original objectives were focused primarily on the reliability of the AMS controller. However, from the time of the original TRI/Austin proposal, the AMS device evolved beyond the prototype level into an established market product with sufficient operational experience and data that product reliability evaluation was not a significant test objective. The goals of this effort have been to determine the relative energy usage of the AMS proportional control compared to existing thermostatic control in a realistic freeze protection installation (low temperature test), to perform an accelerated life test for self limiting heat tracing cables to determine the service life impact of AMS control vs. thermostat control, and to perform a reliability analysis of the AMS device according to the 1986 edition of MIL-HDBK-217E [1] specifications. TRI/Austin designed and constructed a test set-up for conducting the low temperature test and the accelerated life test. A conceptual diagram of the test hardware is shown in Figure 1. The control computer was programmed to monitor and collect data from both tests in parallel, using the relay box and control circuitry fabricated at TRI/Austin. Test data and control commands were transmitted to and from the computer via standard parallel and serial interfaces. The AMS controller and relay box switched the power to the test cables, the commercial freezer, and the ALT chamber.

Patas, J.E.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Synthesis and characterization of some reduced zirconium halides  

SciTech Connect

High temperature equilibrium experiments have revealed several new zirconium subhalides as well as nonstoichiometry among the better-known trihalides. Product characterization by standard gravimetric and electron microprobe analyses was allied with x-ray powder and single crystal work. Accurate lattice parameters for phases of known cell type were determined from high precision x-ray powder data obtained by Guinier methods with Si powder as an internal standard. Up to 50 g batches of ZrCl and the hitherto unreported ZrBr have been prepared stoichiometrically from ZrX/sub 4/ and thin (3 to 4 mils) Zr turnings. Virtually 100% yields of >99.5% pure ZrCl/sub 3/ and ZrBr/sub 3/ were subsequently made by reacting well-ground mixtures of ZrX/sub 4/ with the very soft graphitic monohalides. Since ZrI does not exist, ZrI/sub 3/ was prepared from ZrI/sub 4/ and ZrI/sub 1/./sub 8/, the most reduced iodide phase. New compounds in the Zr--Cl and Zr--Br systems were prepared either by isopiestic equilibration of ZrX and ZrX/sub 3/ and/or via transport in a thermal gradient. A single crystal structure determination has shown the ZrCl/sub 2/./sub 5/ phase to be the first Group IVB M/sub 6/ cluster compound. It crystallizes in space group Ia3d with Z = 16 and is isostructural with Ta/sub 6/Cl/sub 15/.

Daake, R.L.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Materials technology for coal-conversion processes. Progress report, July-September 1980  

SciTech Connect

Failure analysis of the refractory lining of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center slagging gasifier revealed that sodium hydroxide had reacted with the refractory, causing a large volume change and consequent spallation. Laboratory studies on pressure coupling of acoustic waveguides to pressure boundaries for long-term erosive wear measurements show that the use of annealed copper foil (0.25-0.76 mm (10-30 mil) thick) with a contact pressure of 50-70 MPa (7-10 ksi) can yield satisfactory coupling in the presence of thermal cycling. High-temperature corrosion studies have been initiated to investigate effects of deposits such as CaO and CaSO/sub 4/ on corrosion rates of Fe-2-1/4Cr-1Mo and Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels. Erosion studies at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were conducted on 1015 carbon steel, 304 and 310 stainless steel, Incoloy 800, and Stellite 6B. Impact particles were 150-..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with impact angles of 16-81/sup 0/. Weight-loss measurements are in good agreement with prior work. Materials studies for instrumentation included studies of thermowells at the U-Gas plant run by IGT. Analysis of a product gas line from Bi-Gas indicates that failure was caused by caustic- or oxygen-assisted stress-corrosion cracking. A product gas line expansion joint from U-gas was also examined; at present, chloride-induced pitting seems to have been the cause of this failure, which was initiated at the inner surface.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Conductor fatigue life research. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective of this Phase II work was to experimentally evaluate the long-term effectiveness of amplitude reductions in arresting the aeolian fatigue deterioration of minimally damaged ACSR conductors supported in standard short-radius suspension clamps. The aeolian vibration was simulated by mechanical means in a controlled laboratory situation and the reduction in vibration amplitudes was a simulation of the addition of amplitude limiting devices (dampers). Conductors were vibrated at high amplitudes until a predetermined number of strand breaks occurred, after which the vibration was continued at reduced amplitudes. The Phase II research expanded the number of cycles of vibration and amplitude reduction values for the conductors used in the Phase I effort. The results indicated that the amplitude reductions arrested long-term fatigue strand breaks in every case tested. Additionally, the maximum fatigue damage arrestment amplitude was expanded and evaluated to be 20 mils at the 3-1/2 inch location for Drake ACSR conductor. Electric utilities can utilize the results of this EPRI project in assessing the fatigue life of minimally damaged transmission lines and in evaluating techniques for mitigating fatigue damage. A secondary objective of the Phase II effort was to develop aeolian vibration Load-N curves (dynamic bending stress versus number of cycles of vibration curves) for some ACSR conductors based on Ontario-Hydro recorder and wind data. The wind data generated Load-N curves developed appear to be too conservative. The modified worst-case Ontario-Hydro recorder Load-N curve developed is recommended as a design guideline curve for aeolian fatigue troubled lines in Georgia. The development and use of Load-N curves in conjunction with S-N curves are required for rational aeolian fatigue design of overhead conductors, and for estimating line fatigue lives.

Ramey, G.E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Radiation effects in space: The Clementine I mission  

SciTech Connect

The space radiation environment for the CLEMENTINE I mission was investigated using a new calculational model, CHIME, which includes the effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), anomalous component (AC) species and solar energetic particle (SEP) events and their variations as a function of time. Unlike most previous radiation environment models, CHIME is based upon physical theory and is {open_quotes}calibrated{close_quotes} with energetic particle measurements made over the last two decades. Thus, CHIME provides an advance in the accuracy of estimating the interplanetary radiation environment. Using this model we have calculated particle energy spectra, fluences and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra for all three major components of the CLEMENTINE I mission during 1994: (1) the spacecraft in lunar orbit, (2) the spacecraft during asteroid flyby, and (3) the interstate adapter USA in Earth orbit. Our investigations indicate that during 1994 the level of solar modulation, which dominates the variation in the GCR and AC flux as a function of time, will be decreasing toward solar minimum levels. Consequently the GCR and AC flux will be increasing during Y, the year and, potentially, will rise to levels seen during previous solar minimums. The estimated radiation environment also indicates that the AC will dominate the energetic particle spectra for energies below 30-50 MeV/nucleon, while the GCR have a peak flux at {approximately}300 MeV/nucleon and maintain a relatively high flux level up to >1000 MeV/nucleon. The AC significantly enhances the integrated flux for LET in the range 1 to 10 MeV/(mg/cm{sup 2}), but due to the steep energy spectra of the AC a relatively small amount of material ({approximately}50 mils of Al) can effectively shield against this component. The GCR are seen to be highly penetrating and require massive amounts of shielding before there is any appreciable decrease in the LET flux.

Guzik, T.G.; Clayton, E.; Wefel, J.P.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

480

Effects of Sand on the Components and Performance of Electric Submersible Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing world demand for oil has pushed oil companies to extract it from the ocean at extreme depths. With the increase in depth comes an increase in operation costs, especially the deep-sea equipment changeover cost. To be able to push the oil to the ocean surface, Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) are commonly used as artificial lift. The changeover cost of these pumps in deep-water has been estimated to sometimes be as much as forty times the cost of a new pump. One common reason for the failure of ESPs is the erosion and abrasion created by the fine sands that seep through the gravel pack mesh in the well hole. These fine sand particles are most destructive to the bearings and bushings due to their capability to enter the clearances lubricated by the pumped fluid. Over time, the sustained abrasion and erosion in the different components of the ESP will affect the performance of the pump and could lead to its damage. This work describes the design, construction and evaluation of an erosion test rig built at the facilities of the Turbomachinery Laboratory in Texas A&M University. The test rig is capable of introducing 100 mesh (6 mil) sand into the flow loop, measure its concentration and separate it at the exit with minimal water loss. The pump under study is a Baker Hughes 10.25" WJE1000. The performance of the pump is described by measuring the head, flow rate, power and efficiency. The pump is equipped with accelerometers to detect the casing vibration as well as proximity probes in five locations along the pump to detect the internal vibrations of the shaft near the bearings as well as impeller radial movement. The baseline data, to be used for comparison with the worn out pump, has been shown and recommendations for the study method and operation of the rig are given.

Carvajal Diaz, Nicolas 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mil thou dol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Rapid tooling by electron-beam vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) of tooling metal, onto a shaped substrate to produce a replica of the substrate surface, offers the potential for significant cost savings over present methods of injection mold manufacturing. These savings are realized by the high deposition rate and the corresponding short manufacturing times provided by the EBPVD process. However, on route to realizing these gains, there are process technical issues which need to be resolved. Mold surfaces typically contain relatively high aspect ratio details that must be replicated to dimensional tolerances within +/- 2 mils. The deposited mold material must also provide high surface hardness and high fracture toughness. Good quality grain structure can be obtained in deposited Al 10-wt% Cu mold material when the substrate and corresponding deposit are at high process temperature. However, the resulting mold is subject to distortion during cooldown due to differential temperatures and shrinkage rates. Thermally controlled cooldown and the use of crushable substrate materials reduce these distortions, but not to the required levels of tolerance. Deposition of the Al-Cu at lower temperature produces columnar, poorly joined grains which result in a brittle and weakened mold material. When Al 10-wt% Cu metal vapor is deposited across high aspect ratio step features on the substrate surface, a grain growth defect can form in the step-shadowed regions of the deposited material, alongside the step feature. The step coverage defect consists of entrained voids which persist at intermediate deposition temperatures and produce a weakened mold. This final 1997 LDRD report investigates causes of this step coverage defect and offers methods for their control and elimination.

Meier, T. C., LLNL

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

482

Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume I. Identification of the processes.  

SciTech Connect

This document contains preconceptual design data on 11 processes for the solidification and isolation of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HLLW). The processes are: in-can glass melting (ICGM) process, joule-heated glass melting (JHGM) process, glass-ceramic (GC) process, marbles-in-lead (MIL) matrix process, supercalcine pellets-in-metal (SCPIM) matrix process, pyrolytic-carbon coated pellets-in-metal (PCCPIM) matrix process, supercalcine hot-isostatic-pressing (SCHIP) process, SYNROC hot-isostatic-pressing (SYNROC HIP) process, titanate process, concrete process, and cermet process. For the purposes of this study, it was assumed that each of the solidification processes is capable of handling similar amounts of HLLW generated in a production-sized fuel reprocessing plant. It was also assumed that each of the processes would be enclosed in a shielded canyon or cells within a waste facility located at the fuel reprocessing plant. Finally, it was assumed that all of the processes would be subject to the same set of regulations, codes and standards. Each of the solidification processes converts waste into forms that may be acceptable for geological disposal. Each process begins with the receipt of HLLW from the fuel reprocessing plant. In this study, it was assumed that the original composition of the HLLW would be the same for each process. The process ends when the different waste forms are enclosed in canisters or containers that are acceptable for interim storage. Overviews of each of the 11 processes and the bases used for their identification are presented in the first part of this report. Each process, including its equipment and its requirements, is covered in more detail in Appendices A through K. Pertinent information on the current state of the art and the research and development required for the implementation of each process are also noted in the appendices.

Treat, R.L.; Nesbitt, J.F.; Blair, H.T.; Carter, J.G.; Gorton, P.S.; Partain, W.L.; Timmerman, C.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) that operate under reduced relative humidity (RH) conditions remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the fuel cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted of using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. In the traditional approach to polyelectrolytes for proton exchange membranes (PEM), all the required properties are “packaged” in one macromolecule. The properties of interest include proton conductivity, mechanical properties, durability, and water/gas transport. This is the case, for example, for perfluorosulfonic acid-containing (PFSA) membranes. However, the cost of these materials is high, largely due to the complexity and the number of steps involved in their synthesis. In addition, they suffer other shortcomings such as mediocre mechanical properties and insufficient durability for some applications. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® PVDF provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix (Kynar® is a registered trademark of Arkema Inc.). It exhibits outstanding chemical resistance in highly oxidative and acidic environments. In work with a prior grant, a membrane known as M41 was developed by Arkema. M41 had many of the properties needed for a high performance PEM, but had a significant deficiency in conductivity at low RH. In the first phase of this work, the processing parameters of M41 were explored as a means to increase its proton conductivity. Optimizing the processing of M41 was found to increase its proton conductivity by almost an order of magnitude at 50% RH. Characterization of the membrane morphology with Karren More at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed that the membrane morphology was complex. This technology platform was dubbed M43 and was used as a baseline in the majority of the work on the project. Although its performance was superior to M41, M43 still showed proton conductivity an order of magnitude lower than that of a PFSA membrane at 50% RH. The MEA performance of M43 could be increased by reducing the thickness from 1 to 0.6 mils. However, the performance of the thinner M43 still did not match that of a PFSA membrane.

Chris Roger; David Mountz; Wensheng He; Tao Zhang

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

484

CONTAINMENT EVALUATION OF PU-METAL TRANSPORT USING MULTIPLE BARRIERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology was developed previously by SRNL to show that Al-SNF with cladding breaches can be directly transported in standard casks and maintained within the allowable release rates. This novel approach may be extended to other nuclear material systems. Utilizing an adaptation to the methodology, a containment analysis has been performed for the scenario of non-routine transfer of a damaged 9975 package containing plutonium metal from K-area monitored storage to F-area on the Savannah River Site. A multiple barrier system with each barrier having a defined leakage rate of less than 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at Standard Temperature and Pressure was analyzed to determine the number of barriers needed to transport the package under normal transportation conditions to meet transportation requirements for containment. The barrier system was analyzed parametrically to achieve a composite system that met the federal requirements for the maximum permissible release rate. The multiple barrier system acts to retard the release of radioactivity. That is, a build-up in the radioactivity release rate occurs with time. For example, a system with three barriers (e.g., sealed plastic barrier) with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for a total time of up to approximately 10 days with a release rate within the permissible rate. Additional number of barriers, or volume of the barriers, or both, would extend to this period of time. For example, a system with seven barriers with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for up to 100 days. Plastic bags are one type of barrier used in movement of radioactive materials and capable of achieving a leak rate of 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at STP. Low-density polyethylene bags can withstand high temperature (up to 180 C); a barrier thickness of 10 mils should be suitable for the barrier system.

Vinson, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

485

Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of advanced nanocrystalline coating systems and development of diffusion barrier interlayer coatings. Among the diffusion interlayer coatings evaluated, the TiN interlayer coating was found to be the optimum one. This report describes the research conducted under the Task 3 workscope.

David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

486

DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy) for an inhibited waste to a range of 5 to 23.4 mpy, depending on sludge chemistry. F-area-based effluents were, in general, more corrosive. Effective corrosion control measures included evaporation, hydroxide additions and mixing with supernates containing a representative supernate chemistry (5 M hydroxide and 1.5 M nitrite). Corrosion rates with these measures were generally 0.2 mpy. The A537 carbon steel was found to be susceptible to pitting when the corrosion control measure involved mixing the ECC effluent with a supernate chemistry having minimal inhibitor concentrations (0.5 M hydroxide and 0.3 M nitrite). Corrosion rates in this case were near 1 mpy.

Mickalonis, J.

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

487

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, UNIT OPERATIONS SECTION MONTHLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 1959  

SciTech Connect

A gamma scintillation spectrometer was used to measure diffusivity of uranyl nitrate in water during preliminary capillary experiments. During Fluorox run FBR-22, 90.4% of the theoretical amount of UF/sub 6/ formed was collected in cold traps and chemical traps. Toroid tests of flame calcined mixed Th-U oxide showed low corrosion rates, small changes in particle size and a low solubilization of uranium, while denitration of uranyl nitrate in a fluidized bed resulted in particle growth with uniform layers of uranium oxide. A half-time of 30 min for uranium anion exchange was measured in differential bed studies of uranium sorption on Dowex 21K. The Darex Reference flowsheet operation resulted in chloride removal to less than 50 ppm in solvent extraction feed from APPR head- end treatment. Unirradiated prototype Consolidated Edison pins were dejacketed with 6 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ with uranium losses to the dejacketing solution of approximately 0.2%. An optimum procedure was developed for clarifying large batches of solvent extraction feed by sand bed filtration. Sheared sections of stainless steel clad UO/sub 2/ were completely leached in onehalf the time required for equal lengths of stainless tubes containing uncrushed pellets. Abrasive disc wheel to metal removal ratios were measured at cutting rates from 10 to 60 in./min. Dissolution of Zircaloy-2 dummy fuel elements in an INOR-8 dissolver with the NaF-LiF salt system resulted in vessel wall corrosion rates of 1-2 mils/run (approximately 8 hr of HF exposure). At a heat generation rate of 60 Btu/hr/gal of solid wastes, the maximum temperature rise in a 0.75 ft radius infinite cylinder (k = 0.1 Btu/hr sq ft ction prod- F) was 1270 ction prod- F in soil, 1150 ction prod- F in rock, and 1020 ction prod- F in salt. (For preceding period see CF-59-1-74.) (auth)

Bresee, J.C.; Haas, P.A.; Watson, C.D.; Whatley, M.E.; Horton, R.W.

1959-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

488

Investigation of solar cells based on Cu/sub 2/O. Final progress report May 1, 1979 to April 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigations conducted over a 12-month period concerning Cu/sub 2/O as a material for low-cost solar cells are reported. Emphasis was placed on (1) Cu/sub 2/O substrate fabrication and characterization; (2) studies of Cu/sub 2/O cell photocurrent; (3) Cu/sub 2/O solar cell studies. Large grain polycrystalline Cu/sub 2/O substrates were fabricated by first oxidizing copper discs at 1050/sup 0/C, and then polishing both sides to obtain 20 mil thick wafers. Optical constants were measured with ellipsometry and investigations of material microstructure were conducted. Photocurrent studies have included measurements of the internal photoresponse of Cu-Cu/sub 2/O Schottky barriers, and computer aided analyses to optimize the structure of such cells in order to achieve maximum photocurrent. As a result, a photocurrent of 8.52 mA/cm/sup 2/ has been demonstrated with a SiO(900 A)/Cu(90 A)/Cu/sub 2/O cell structure. Solar cell studies have concentrated on Cu-Cu/sub 2/O MIS structures. Improved Cu/sub 2/O surface preparation procedures were developed. Depth concentration profiles taken with Auger spectroscopy indicate that the copper-to-oxygen atomic ratio is essentially two, after one or two monolayers are removed. An AM1 efficiency of 1.76% was obtained with a Cu-Cu/sub 2/O cell. I-V analyses indicate that two current mechanisms are involved. A low voltage current component was identified as a thermally activated tunneling process, while a higher voltage mechanism is explained by a MIS model. The interfacial region is possibly a CuBr layer. The high voltage current component is characterized by n approx. = 1.15 and J/sub o/ approx. = 2 x 10/sup -9/ A/cm/sup 2/. Efforts are underway to eliminate the tunneling component and improve cell I-V characteristics by optimizing the MIS structure.

Olsen, L.C.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and injector development, multiple concepts including high thermal resistance thermal barrier coatings (TBC), oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC), and monolithic ceramics were evaluated before down-selection to the most promising candidate materials for field evaluation. Preliminary, component and sub-scale testing was conducted to determine material properties and demonstrate proof-of-concept. Full-scale rig and engine testing was used to validated engine performance prior to field evaluation at a Qualcomm Inc. cogeneration site located in San Diego, California. To ensure that the CFCC liners with the EBC proposed under this program would meet the target life, field evaluations of ceramic matrix composite liners in Centaur{reg_sign} 50 gas turbine engines, which had previously been conducted under the DOE sponsored Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program (DE-AC02-92CE40960), was continued under this program at commercial end-user sites under Program Subtask 1A - Extended CFCC Materials Durability Testing. The goal of these field demonstrations was to demonstrate significant component life, with milestones of 20,000 and 30,000 hours. Solar personnel monitor the condition of the liners at the field demonstration sites through periodic borescope inspections and emissions measurements. This program was highly successful at evaluating advanced materials and down-selecting promising solutions for use in gas turbine combustions systems. The addition of the advanced materials technology has enabled the predicted life of the Mercury 50 combustion system to reach 30,000 hours, which is Solar's typical time before overhaul for production engines. In particular, a 40 mil thick advanced Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system was selected over various other TBC systems, ODS liners and CFCC liners for the 4,000-hour field evaluation under the program. This advanced TBC is now production bill-of-material at various thicknesses up to 40 mils for all of Solar's advanced backside-cooled combustor liners (Centaur 50, Taurus 60,

Price, Jeffrey

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

A human factors approach towards the design of a new glovebox glove for Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Present day glovebox gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are underdeveloped and ergonomically inaccurate. This problem results in numerous sprain and strain injuries every year for employees who perform glovebox work. In addition to injuries, using the current glovebox glove design also contributes to breaches and contamination. The current glove used today at LANL has several problems: (1) The length of the fingers is incorrect, (2) the web spacing between the fingers is nonexistent, (3) the angles between each digit on the finger are incorrect, (4) the thumb is placed inaccurately, and (5) the length of the hand is incorrect. These problems present a need to correct the current glove design to decrease the risk of injuries, breaches, and contamination. Anthropometrics were researched to help find the best range of hand measurements to fix the current glove design. Anthropometrics is the measure of the human physical variation. Anthropometrics for this study were gathered from the American National Survey (ANSUR) data that was conducted by the U.S Army in 1988. The current glovebox glove uses anthropometrics from the 95th to 105th percentile range which is too large so the new gloves are going to implement data from a smaller range of percentile groups. The 105th percentile range represents measurements that exceed the human population but are needed to fit certain circumstance such as wearing several under gloves within the glovebox gloves. Anthropometrics used in this study include: 105th percentile measurements for joint circumference which was unchanged because the room for under gloves plus ease of hand insertion and extraction is needed, 80th percentile measurements for crotch length to allow workers to reach the web spacing in the glove, 20th percentile measurements for finger length to allow workers to reach the end of the glove, standard 10.5cm hand breadth to allow more room to accommodate under gloves, 45 degrees abduction angle for the thumb for better positioning, 45 degrees extension angle for the thumb for better positioning, and various angles for the other fingers to allow a more relaxed and natural fit. 3D modeling was used to implement the anthropometric data listed above onto an existing scanned solid model of a human hand. SolidWorks 2010 3-D modeling package was utilized to manipulate the hand model to represent the anthropometric data researched. The anthropometrics and modifications were reviewed by the University of New Mexico Department of Orthopedics hand surgeons. After all modifications and reviews were completed the model was printed out using stereolithography. The printed out model of the hand was used as a mold to create a prototype glovebox glove. The new mold was taken to Piercan USA to produce a 20mil Polyurethane/Hypalon glovebox glove. The Minnesota Dexterity test and Purdue Pegboard test were used to measure the dexterity of the prototype glovebox glove against a current 15 mil Hypalon LANL glovebox glove. Using the data from the tests a student t test was used to determine if there was a significant difference between the current hypalon glove results and the new prototype glove results. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly lower mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Minnesota Dexterity test. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly higher mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Purdue Pegboard test. A p value method was also performed to confirm the results of the student t test. A survey was also given to glovebox workers to determine if they preferred the new design. The best reaction from glovebox workers was the new thumb position, 73.2% of the sample population agreed with the new thumb position. Developing a new glovebox glove will improve the ergonomics of the hand for work performed, decrease exposure time, decreasing risk of breaching, increasing productivity, reducing injuries, and improving work performance. In the future the new glovebox

Oka, Jude M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

491

TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than in the PUREX/oxalic acid environment. (3) The corrosion rates for PUREX/8 wt.% oxalic acid were greater than or equal to those observed for the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid. No localized corrosion was observed in the tests with the 8 wt.% oxalic acid. Testing with HM/8 wt.% oxalic acid simulant was not performed. Thus, a comparison with the results with 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid, where the corrosion rate was 88 mpy and localized corrosion was observed at 75 C, cannot be made. (4) The corrosion rates in 1 and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid solutions were temperature dependent: (a) At 50 C, the corrosion rates ranged between 90 to 140 mpy over the 30 day test period. The corrosion rates were higher under stagnant conditions. (b) At 75 C, the initial corrosion rates were as high as 300 mpy during the first day of exposure. The corrosion rates increased with agitation. However, once the passive ferrous oxalate film formed, the corrosion rate decreased dramatically to less than 20 mpy over the 30 day test period. This rate was independent of agitation. (5) Electrochemical testing indicated that for oxalic acid/sludge simulant mixtures the cathodic reaction has transport controlled reaction kinetics. The literature suggests that the dissolution of the sludge produces a di-oxalatoferrate ion that is reduced at the cathodic sites. The cathodic reaction does not appear to involve hydrogen evolution. On the other hand, electrochemical tests demonstrated that the cathodic reaction for corrosion of carbon steel in pure oxalic acid involves hydrogen evolution. (6) Agitation of the oxalic acid/sludge simulant mixtures typically resulted in a higher corrosion rates for both acid concentrations. The transport of the ferrous ion away from the metal surface results in a less protective ferrous oxalate film. (7) A mercury containing species along with aluminum, silicon and iron oxides was observed on the interior of the pits formed in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant at 75 C. The pitting rates in the agitated and non-agitated solution were 2 mils/day and 1 mil/day, respectively. A mechanism

Wiersma, B.

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

492

Analysis of failed and nickel-coated 3093 beam clamp components at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company (BJC), are undertaking a major effort to clean up the former gaseous diffusion facility (K-25) located in Oak Ridge, TN. The decontamination and decommissioning activities require systematic removal of contaminated equipment and machinery followed by demolition of the buildings. As part of the cleanup activities, a beam clamp, used for horizontal life lines (HLLs) for fall protection, was discovered to be fractured during routine inspection. The beam clamp (yoke and D-ring) was a component in the HLL system purchased from Reliance Industries LLC. Specifically, the U-shaped stainless steel yoke of the beam clamp failed in a brittle mode at under less than 10% of the rated design capacity of 14,500 lb. The beam clamp had been in service for approximately 16 months. Bechtel Jacobs approached Argonne National Laboratory to assist in identifying the root cause of the failure of the beam clamp. The objectives of this study were to (1) review the prior reports and documents on the subject, (2) understand the possible failure mechanism(s) that resulted in the failed beam clamp components, (3) recommend approaches to mitigate the failure mechanism(s), and (4) evaluate the modified beam clamp assemblies. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis and chemical analysis of the corrosion products on the failed yoke and white residue on an in-service yoke indicated the presence of zinc, sulfur, and calcium. Analysis of rainwater in the complex, as conducted by BJC, indicated the presence of sulfur and calcium. It was concluded that, as a result of galvanic corrosion, zinc from the galvanized components of the beam clamp assembly (D-ring) migrated to the corroded region in the presence of the rainwater. Under mechanical stress, the corrosion process would have accelerated, resulting in the catastrophic failure of the yoke. As suggested by Bechtel Jacobs personnel, hydrogen embrittlement as a consequence of corrosion was also explored as a failure mechanism. Corroded and failed yoke samples had hydrogen concentrations of 20-60 ppm. However, the hydrogen content reduced to 4-11 ppm (similar to baseline as-received yoke samples) when the corrosion products were polished off. The hydrogen content in the scraped off corrosion product powders was >7000 ppm. These results indicate that hydrogen is primarily present in the corrosion products and not in the underlying steel. Rockwell hardness values on the corroded yoke and D-rings were R{sub c} {approx} 41-46. It was recommended to the beam clamp manufacturer that the beam clamp components be annealed to reduce the hardness values so that they are less susceptible to brittle failure. Upon annealing, hardness values of the beam clamp components reduced to R{sub c} {approx} 25. Several strategies were recommended and put in place to mitigate failure of the beam clamp components: (a) maintain hardness levels of both yokes and D-rings at R{sub c} < 35, (b) coat the yoke and D-rings with a dual coating of nickel (with 10% phosphorus) to delay corrosion and aluminum to prevent galvanic corrosion since it is more anodic to zinc, and (c) optimize coating thicknesses for nickel and aluminum while maintaining the physical integrity of the coatings. Evaluation of the Al- and Ni-coated yoke and D-ring specimens indicated they appear to have met the recommendations. Average hardness values of the dual-coated yokes were R{sub c} {approx} 25-35. Hardness values of dual-coated D-ring were R{sub c} {approx} 32. Measured average coating thicknesses for the aluminum and nickel coatings for yoke samples were 22 {micro}m (0.9 mils) and 80 {micro}m (3 mils), respectively. The D-rings also showed similar coating thicknesses. Microscopic examination showed that the aluminum coating was well bonded to the underlying nickel coating. Some observed damage was believed to be an artifact of the cutting-and-polishing steps during sample preparation for microscopy.

Singh, D.; Pappacena, K.; Gaviria, J.; Burtsteva, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

493

Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and injector development, multiple concepts including high thermal resistance thermal barrier coatings (TBC), oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC), and monolithic ceramics were evaluated before down-selection to the most promising candidate materials for field evaluation. Preliminary, component and sub-scale testing was conducted to determine material properties and demonstrate proof-of-concept. Full-scale rig and engine testing was used to validated engine performance prior to field evaluation at a Qualcomm Inc. cogeneration site located in San Diego, California. To ensure that the CFCC liners with the EBC proposed under this program would meet the target life, field evaluations of ceramic matrix composite liners in Centaur{reg_sign} 50 gas turbine engines, which had previously been conducted under the DOE sponsored Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program (DE-AC02-92CE40960), was continued under this program at commercial end-user sites under Program Subtask 1A - Extended CFCC Materials Durability Testing. The goal of these field demonstrations was to demonstrate significant component life, with milestones of 20,000 and 30,000 hours. Solar personnel monitor the condition of the liners at the field demonstration sites through periodic borescope inspections and emissions measurements. This program was highly successful at evaluating advanced materials and down-selecting promising solutions for use in gas turbine combustions systems. The addition of the advanced materials technology has enabled the predicted life of the Mercury 50 combustion system to reach 30,000 hours, which is Solar's typical time before overhaul for production engines. In particular, a 40 mil thick advanced Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system was selected over various other TBC systems, ODS liners and CFCC liners for the 4,000-hour field evaluation under the program. This advanced TBC is now production bill-of-material at various thicknesses up to 40 mils for all of Solar's advanced backside-cooled combustor liners (Centaur 50, Taurus 60, Mars 100, Taurus 70,

Price, Jeffrey

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

494

A STRUCTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF FLAWS DETECTED DURING ULTRASONIC EXAMINATION OF TANK 15  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic (UT) inspection of Tank 15 was conducted between April and July 2007 in accordance with the Tank 15 UT inspection plan. This was a planned re-inspection of this tank, the previous one was performed in 2002. Ten cracks were characterized in the previous examination. The re-inspection was performed to verify the present models and understanding for stress corrosion cracking. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack <25% through wall' in 2002, was clearly shown not to be a crack. Additionally, examination of a new area immediately adjacent to other cracks along a vertical weld revealed three new cracks. It is not known when these new cracks formed as they could very well have been present in 2002 as well. Therefore, a total of twelve cracks were evaluated during the re-examination. A critical review of the information describing stress corrosion crack behavior for the SRS waste tanks, as well as a summary review of the service history of Tank 15, was performed. Each crack was then evaluated for service exposure history, consistency of the crack behavior with the current understanding of stress corrosion cracking, and present and future impact to the structural integrity of the tank. Crack instability calculations were performed on each crack for a bounding waste removal loading condition in Tank 15. In all cases, the crack behavior was determined to be consistent with the previous understanding of stress corrosion cracking in the SRS waste tank environment. The length of the cracks was limited due to the short-range nature of the residual stresses near seam, repair and attachment welds. Of the twelve cracks, nine were located in the vapor space above the sludge layer, including the three new cracks. Comparison of the crack lengths measured in 2002 and 2007 revealed that crack growth had occurred in four of the six previously measured vapor space cracks. However, the growth remained within the residual stress zone. None of the three cracks beneath the sludge showed evidence of growth. The impact of the cracks that grew on the future service of Tank 15 was also assessed. Tank 15 is expected to undergo closure activities including sludge waste removal. A bounding loading condition for waste removal of the sludge at the bottom of Tank 15 was considered for this analysis. The analysis showed that the combination of hydrostatic, seismic, pump and weld residual stresses are not expected to drive any of the cracks identified during the Tank 15 UT inspection to instability. Wall thickness mapping for general thinning and pitting was also performed. No significant wall thinning was observed. The average wall thickness values were well above nominal. Two isolated pit-like indications were observed. Both were approximately 30 mils deep. However, the remaining wall thickness was still greater than nominal specified for the original construction plate material. It was recommended that a third examination of selected cracks in Tank 15 be performed in 2014. This examination would provide information to determine whether any additional detectable degradation is occurring in Tank 15 and to supplement the basis for characterization of conditions that are non-aggressive to tank corrosion damage. The in-service inspection program is re-evaluated on a three year periodicity. The Type I and II tanks are not active receipt tanks at present, and are therefore not a part of the In-Service Inspection Program for the Type III Tanks [1]. Changes to the mission for Tank 15 and other Type I and II tanks may be considered by the In-Service Inspection Review Committee (ISIRC) and the program adjusted accordingly.

Wiersma, B; James Elder, J

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

495

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin for the shallower perforated interval. Hydrate formation in the upper part of the wellbore was a problem. To circumvent this problem, about 10 barrels of diesel were pumped into the top of the well after each flow to displace the brine down to a level in the well where the temperature was too high for hydrates to form. Calculations of saturation index indicated that calcium carbonate scale would also form in the well if the pressure was drawn down too far. Thus all the flow tests were performed at low flow rates to preclude formation of scale in the wellbore. Scale inhibitor was injected into the surface flow lines to control possible scale formation in the surface equipment. Corrosion inhibitor was also injected, and coupon monitoring indicated a corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Abundance, Distribution and Estimated Consumption (kg fish) of Piscivorous Birds Along the Yakima River, Washington State; Implications for Fisheries Management, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is divided into two chapters. The abstract for chapter one is--Understanding of the abundance and spatial and temporal distributions of piscivorous birds and their potential consumption of fish is an increasingly important aspect of fisheries management. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance and distribution and estimated the maximum consumption (kg biomass) of fish-eating birds along the length of the Yakima River in Washington State. Sixteen different species were observed during the 4-yr study, but only half of those were observed during all years. Abundance and estimated consumption of fish within the upper and middle sections of the river were dominated by common mergansers (Mergus merganser) which are known to breed in those reaches. Common mergansers accounted for 78 to 94% of the estimated total fish take for the upper river or approximately 28,383 {+-} 1,041 kg over the 4 yrs. A greater diversity of avian piscivores occurred in the lower river and potential impacts to fish populations was more evenly distributed among the species. In 1999-2000, great blue herons potentially accounted for 29 and 36% of the fish consumed, whereas in 2001-2002 American white pelicans accounted for 53 and 55%. We estimated that approximately 75,878 {+-} 6,616 kg of fish were consumed by piscivorous birds in the lower sections of the river during the study. Bird assemblages differed spatially along the river with a greater abundance of colonial nesting species within the lower sections of the river, especially during spring and the nesting season. The abundance of avian piscivores and consumption estimates are discussed within the context of salmonid supplementation efforts on the river and juvenile out-migration. The abstract for chapter two is--Consumption of fish by piscivorous birds may be a significant constraint on efforts to enhance salmonid populations within tributaries to the Columbia River in Washington State. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance of fish-eating birds, primarily ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and California (L. californicus) gulls and monitored their behavior at two man-made structures within the Yakima River in eastern Washington: Horn Rapids Dam, a low-head irrigation dam, and the return pipe for the Chandler Juvenile Fish Handling Facility. Earlier observations of congregations of gulls at these structures suggested an increased likelihood of predation of out-migrating juvenile salmonids. We estimated the number of fish consumed and examined the relationship between river flow and gull numbers and fish taken. Numbers of gulls at the structures varied daily between their arrival in Late March-early April and departure in late June (mean ({+-}SE) - Horn Rapids: 11.7 ({+-}2.0), Chandler: 20.1 ({+-}1.5) ). During the 4-yr study, numbers at Horn Rapids peaked dramatically during the last 2 weeks in May (between 132.9 ({+-}4.2) to 36.6 ({+-}2.2) gulls/day) and appeared to the associated with the release of > 1-mil hatchery juvenile fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) above the 2 study sites. A comparable peak in gull abundance was not observed at Chandler. Diurnal patterns of gull abundance also varied among years and sites. The relationship between foraging efficiency and gull numbers was not consistent among years or sites. Gull numbers were not correlated with river flow when year was considered. However, variations in flow among years appeared to be associated with average gull numbers at each site, but trends were not consistent between sites. Low seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Chandler, whereas high seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Horn Rapids. Assuming all fish taken were salmonids, we estimate gulls consumed between 0.1-10.3 % of the juvenile salmonids passing or being released from the Chandler Juvenile Fish Monitoring Facility located above the two structures. Staggered releases of hatchery fish, nocturnal releases of fish entrained in the Chandler facility, changes in the orientation of the outflow from the f

Major, III, Walter; Grassley, James M.; Ryding, Kristen E. (University of Washington, Quantitive Ecology Program, Seattle, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

PROGRESS RELATING TO CIVILIAN APPLICATIONS DURING DECEMBER, 1958  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal-conductivity measurements were completed from 100 to 600 deg C on UO/sub 2/ specimens. An investigation of the creep properties of annealed and of 15% coldworked Zircaloy-2 in the 290 to 400 deg C temperature range is being conducted. Research to develop a method of sink-float density measurements to identify factors affecting irradiation-induced volume changes in graphite was continued. An increase in the U content of Al-U alloys is desirable as a means of increasing the fuel loading of reactors utilizing these fuels. The development of the radiometric method for the analysis of Mg in cement was completed. A study of the solidification of U castings in cylindrical graphite molds is being conducted. Experimental work was continued to reduce the amount of additive oxide (La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO, and Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/) required to achieve stabilization of uranium oxides. Additional H/sub 2/-adsorption isotherms were obtained for the Zr-25 wt.% U alloy. An irradiation surveillance program is being conducted to determine the effect of fast neutrons on the mechanical properties of type 347 stainless steel. The study concerned with the properties of Nb-U alloys was continued. A program is being conducted to investigate methods for improving the irradiation behavior and corrosion properties of Th -U alloys. An investigation is being made of cermet fuel materials consisting of from 60 to 90 vol. % of U0/sub 2/, UN, or UC dispersed in stainless steel. Gas-pressure bonding of Mo- and Nb-clad fuel elements is reported. A study to evaluate the irradiation resistance of dispersion fuel elements consisting of UC or UN fuel dispersed in a stainless steel matrix clad with stainless steel is reported. Fatigue studies of Inconel and INOR-8 are reported. A study of the constitution of U-Nb alloys is being conducted. Fundamental studies are being made of the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of N/sub 2/ with Nb. The examination and evaluation of six 1.5-inch-diameter fueled (U0/sub 2/) graphite spheres after irradiation is reported. Localized attack on Ti steam tubes exposed to Darex dissolver solutions appears to be connected with defective areas in the tubes. Heat treatment of Ni-o-nel for 0.5 hr at 1850 deg F with an air quench following welding has produced the most resistance to Thorex solutions of any treatmert studied. The conditions prevailing during dissolution of Type 304 stainless steel in boiling 6 M H/sub 2/ SO/sub 4/ give corrosion rates in the range of 2 to 3 mils per month for Ni-o-nel specimens exposed to the vapor. Scouting experiments have shown the Zirflex decladding solution to be excessively corrosive to Type 347 and Carpenter 20 Cb stainless steels and Ni-o-nel. Raising the temperature from 650 to 700 deg C practically doubles the corrosiveness of the equimolar NaF-ZrF/sub 4/ salt. The evaluation of UC as a fuel for the SRE is proceeding. The amount of fission product Xe/sup 133/ released from UC as a function of time and temperature of post-irradiation heating was determined. The results of measurements of fission- gas release from Th-11 wt. % U specimers are reported. The effects of radiation and corrosion by the organic moderator on certain structural materials planned for use in the Organic Moderated Reactor are being studied. Properties of arc- melted Ta and Ta-W alloys are presented. A flat-plate Zircaloy-2-clad fuel element containing compartmented U0/sub 2 fuel is being considered for Core 2 of the PWR. The postirradiation examination of two stainless steel-clad U0/sub 2/ specimens for the Maritime Gas-Cooled Reactor program is continuing. Experiments leading to the development of a BeO--U0/sub 2/ fuel element were begun. (For preceding period see BMI-1304.) (W.L.H.)

Dayton, R.W.; Tipton, C.R. Jr.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z