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1

Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Abstract: Transition state searches have been...

2

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

Cameron, Maria Kourkina

3

Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

Reverse Time Migration for Extended Obstacles: Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new single frequency reverse time migration (RTM) algorithm for imaging extended targets using electromagnetic waves. The imaging functional is defined as the imaginary part of the cross-correlation of the Green function for Helmholtz equation and the back-propagated electromagnetic field. The resolution of our RTM method for both penetrable and non-penetrable extended targets is studied by virtue of Helmholtz-Kirchhoff identity for the time-harmonic Maxwell equation. The analysis implies that our imaging functional is always positive and thus may have better stability properties. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the powerful imaging quality and confirm our theoretical results.

Junqing Chen; Zhiming Chen; Guanghui Huang

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Reverse Time Migration for Extended Obstacles: Acoustic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the resolution of the single frequency reverse time migration (RTM) method for extended targets without the assumption of the validation of geometric optics approximation. The resolution analysis, which applies in both penetrable and non-penetrable obstacles with sound soft or impedance boundary condition on the boundary of the obstacle, implies that the imaginary part of the cross-correlation imaging functional is always positive and thus may have better stability properties. Numerical experiments are included to illustrate the powerful imaging quality and to confirm our resolution results.

Junqing Chen; Zhiming Chen; Guanghui Huang

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

Relationships among oil density, gross composition, and thermal maturity indicators in northeastern Williston basin oils and their significance for expulsion thresholds and migration pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil density ({degree}API), gross composition, and biological market thermal maturity variations in northeastern Williston basin have stratigraphic and geographic significance controlled by migration pathways and source rock composition as it affects hydrocarbon generation and expulsion characteristics. When the depth and density of oil pools is compared to relationships predicted using the correlation between source rock thermal maturity and oil density, several different migration pathways can be inferred. Winnipegosis source oils indicate four paths. Most small pinnacle reef pools are sourced locally, but larger coalesced reefs contain oils migrated long distances through the Lower Member Winnipegosis Formation. Among oils that have migrated past Prairie salts, both locally sourced oils, like those on the flank of the Hummingbird Trough, and more mature, longer migrated oils in Saskatchewan Group reservoirs can be identified. Bakken oils have the longest migration pathways, controlled primarily by a lowstand shoreline sandstone on the eastern side of the basin. Lodgepole-sourced oils dominate Madison Group plays. Northwest of Steelman field, oil density increases primarily due to thermal maturity differences but also because of increasing biodegradation and water-washing that affect the western edge of the play trend. Along the margin of the Hummingbird Trough are a number of deep, medium-gravity pools whose oil compositions are entirely attributable to low thermal maturity and local migration pathways.

Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R.; Brooks, P.W. (Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

3D Weak-Dispersion Reverse-Time Migration with a StereoModeling Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The finite difference method has been widely used in seismic modeling and reverse time migration. However, it generally has two issues: large computational cost and numerical dispersion. Recently, a nearly-analytic discrete ...

Li, Jingshuang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY); Boulanger, Albert (New York, NY); Bagdonas, Edward P. (Brookline, MA); Xu, Liqing (New Milford, NJ); He, Wei (New Milford, NJ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Seismic velocity estimation and time to depth conversion of time-migrated images Maria Cameron, University of California at Berkeley, Sergey Fomel, University of Texas at Austin, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic velocity estimation and time to depth conversion of time-migrated images Maria Cameron migrated seismic images and show that the Dix velocities estimated from time migration velocities are the true seismic velocities divided by the ge- ometrical spreading of image rays. We pose an inverse

Sethian, James A.

11

Fast Seismic Modeling and Reverse Time Migration on a GPU Cluster R. Abdelkhalek1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Seismic Modeling and Reverse Time Migration on a GPU Cluster R. Abdelkhalek1 , H. Calandra1 equation in an oil exploration industrial context aims at speeding up seismic modeling and Reverse Time application over a sequential code running on general purpose CPU. KEYWORDS: Seismic modeling, Finite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A. Sethian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. We derive a relation between the true seismic velocities and the routinely

Sethian, James A.

13

Unraveling the Timing of Fluid Migration and Trap Formation in the Brooks Range Foothills: A Key to Discovering Hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring fractures can play a key role in the evolution and producibility of a hydrocarbon accumulation. Understanding the evolution of fractures in the Brooks Range/Colville basin system of northern Alaska is critical to developing a better working model of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. This study addressed this problem by collecting detailed and regional data on fracture distribution and character, structural geometry, temperature, the timing of deformation along the Brooks Range rangefront and adjacent parts of the Colville basin, and the in situ stress distribution within the Colville basin. This new and existing data then were used to develop a model of how fractures evolved in northern Alaska, both spatially and temporally. The results of the study indicate that fractures formed episodically throughout the evolution of northern Alaska, due to a variety of mechanisms. Four distinct fracture sets were observed. The earliest fractures formed in deep parts of the Colville basin and in the underlying Ellesmerian sequence rocks as these rocks experienced compression associated with the growing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The orientation of these deep basin fractures was controlled by the maximum in situ horizontal stress in the basin at the time of their formation, which was perpendicular to the active Brooks Range thrust front. This orientation stayed consistently NS-striking for most of the early history of the Brooks Range and Colville basin, but changed to NW-striking with the development of the northeastern Brooks Range during the early Tertiary. Subsequent incorporation of these rocks into the fold-and-thrust belt resulted in overprinting of these deep basin fractures by fractures caused by thrusting and related folding. The youngest fractures developed as rocks were uplifted and exposed. While this general order of fracturing remains consistent across the Brooks Range and adjacent Colville basin, the absolute age at any one location varies. Fracturing started in the southwest deep in the stratigraphic section during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, moving northeastward and upsection as the Colville basin filled from the west. Active fracturing is occurring today in the northeastern parts of the Colville basin, north of the northeastern Brooks thrust front. Across northern Alaska, the early deep basin fractures were probably synchronous with hydrocarbon generation. Initially, these early fractures would have been good migration pathways, but would have been destroyed where subsequently overridden by the advancing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. However, at these locations younger fracture sets related to folding and thrusting could have enhanced reservoir permeability and/or served as vertical migration pathways to overlying structural traps.

Catherine L. Hanks

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Method for migrating seismic data by using ray tracing in determining two way travel times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for depth migrating ray traces before stacking comprising the steps of: receiving raw seismic data signals representing acoustic waves generated by a plurality of sources and detected by a plurality of receivers, each of said sources and said receivers having a surface position; generating a set of one way travel times for each surface position to all image points; storing said one way travel times; identifying a set of one way travel times from one source surface position to each of said image points; identifying a second set of one way travel times from one receiver surface position to each of said image points; calculating a two way travel time set to said image points by summing said set of one way travel times for said one source surface position and said second set of one way travel times for said one receiver surface position to each of said image points; mapping a seismic trace associated with a source and receiver combination represented by said two way travel time set; and displaying said map of said seismic trace associated with said source and receiver combination.

Wang, Sheinshion; Sinton, J.B.; Hanson, D.W.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Unbiased computation of transition times by pathway recombination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many systems, the time scales of the microscopic dynamics and macroscopic dynamics of interest are separated by many orders of magnitude. Examples abound, for instance, nucleation, protein folding, and chemical reactions. For these systems, direct simulation of phase space trajectories does not efficiently determine most physical quantities of interest. The past decade has seen the advent of methods circumventing brute force simulation. For most dynamical quantities, these methods all share the drawback of systematical errors. We present a novel method for generating ensembles of phase space trajectories. By sampling small pieces of these trajectories in different phase space domains and piecing them together in a smart way using equilibrium properties, we obtain physical quantities such as transition times. This method does not have any systematical error and is very efficient; the computational effort to calculate the first passage time across a free energy barrier does not increase with the height of the barrier. The strength of the method is shown in the Ising model. Accurate measurements of nucleation times span almost ten orders of magnitude and reveal corrections to classical nucleation theory.

Kuipers, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Utrecht 3584 CE (Netherlands); Barkema, G. T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Utrecht 3584 CE (Netherlands); Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden 2333 CA (Netherlands)

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms for the transport of hydrocarbons from the source rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures have been proposed, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes it is imperative to use the ...

Panahi, Hamed; Renard, Francois; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Malthe-Sřrenssen, Anders; Meakin, Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Timing is everything : along the fossil fuel transition pathway.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you'll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. Therefore, our research question is,To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?' Existing models do not include full regulatory constraints due to their often complex, and inflexible approaches to solve foroptimal' engineering instead ofrobust' and multidisciplinary solutions. This project outlines the theory and then develops an applied software tool to model the laboratory-to-market transition using the traditional technology readiness level (TRL) framework, but develops subsequent and a novel regulatory readiness level (RRL) and market readiness level (MRL). This tool uses the ideally-suited system dynamics framework to incorporate feedbacks and time delays. Future energy-economic-environment models, regardless of their programming platform, may adapt this software model component framework ormodule' to further vet the likelihood of new or innovative technology moving through the laboratory, regulatory and market space. The prototype analytical framework and tool, called the Technology, Regulatory and Market Readiness Level simulation model (TRMsim) illustrates the interaction between technology research, application, policy and market dynamics as they relate to a new or innovative technology moving from the theoretical stage to full market deployment. The initial results that illustrate the model's capabilities indicate for a hypothetical technology, that increasing the key driver behind each of the TRL, RRL and MRL components individually decreases the time required for the technology to progress through each component by 63, 68 and 64%, respectively. Therefore, under the current working assumptions, to decrease the time it may take for a technology to move from the conceptual stage to full scale market adoption one might consider expending additional effort to secure regulatory approval and reducing the uncertainty of the technology's demand in the marketplace.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A 4D Synchrotron X-Ray-Tomography Study of the Formation of Hydrocarbon- Migration Pathways in Heated Organic-Rich Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interest in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low-permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing, and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms have been proposed for the transport of hydrocarbons from the rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes, it is imperative to use the latest technological advances. In this study, it is shown how insights into hydrocarbon migration in source rocks can be obtained by using sequential high-resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. Three-dimensional images of several immature "shale" samples were constructed at resolutions close to 5 um. This is sufficient to resolve the source-rock structure down to the grain level, but very-fine-grained silt particles, clay particles, and colloids cannot be resolved. Samples used in this investigation came from the R-8 unit in the upper part of the Green River shale, which is organic rich, varved, lacustrine marl formed in Eocene Lake Uinta, USA. One Green River shale sample was heated in situ up to 400 degrees C as X-ray-tomography images were recorded. The other samples were scanned before and after heating at 400 degrees C. During the heating phase, the organic matter was decomposed, and gas was released. Gas expulsion from the low-permeability shales was coupled with formation of microcracks. The main technical difficulty was numerical extraction of microcracks that have apertures in the 5- to 30-um range (with 5 um being the resolution limit) from a large 3D volume of X-ray attenuation data. The main goal of the work presented here is to develop a methodology to process these 3D data and image the cracks. This methodology is based on several levels of spatial filtering and automatic recognition of connected domains. Supportive petrographic and thermogravimetric data were an important complement to this study. An investigation of the strain field using 2D image correlation analyses was also performed. As one application of the 4D (space + time) microtomography and the developed workflow, we show that fluid generation was accompanied by crack formation. Under different conditions, in the subsurface, this might provide paths for primary migration.

Hamed Panahi; Paul Meakin; Francois Renard; Maya Kobchenko; Julien Scheibert; Adriano Mazzini; Bjorn Jamtveit; Anders Malthe-Sorenssen; Dag Kristian Dysthe

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Inhibition of fatty acid synthase suppresses U-2 OS cell invasion and migration via downregulating the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We investigate the relationship between FASN and HER2 or p-HER2 by IHC in OS tissues. •We construct FASN-specific RNAi plasmid. •Inhibiting FASN down-regulates HER2/PI3K/AKT cell signaling in U-2 OS. •Inhibiting FASN blocks U-2 OS cell invasion and migration. -- Abstract: FASN plays an important role in the malignant phenotype of various tumors. Our previous studies show that inhibition FASN could induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in human osteosarcoma (OS) cell in vivo and vitro. The aim in this study was to investigate the effect of inhibition FASN on the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT axis and invasion and migration of OS cell. The expression of FASN, HER2 and p-HER2(Y1248) proteins was detected by immunohistochemistry in OS tissues from 24 patients with pulmonary metastatic disease, and the relationship between FASN and p-HER2 as well as HER2 was investigated. The results showed that there was a positive correlation between FASN and HER2 as well as p-HER2 protein expression. The U-2 OS cells were transfected with either the FASN specific RNAi plasmid or the negative control RNAi plasmid. FASN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. Western blot assays was performed to examine the protein expression of FASN, HER2, p-HER2(Y1248), PI3K, Akt and p-Akt (Ser473). Migration and invasion of cells were investigated by wound healing and transwell invasion assays. The results showed that the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was suppressed by inhibiting FASN. Meanwhile, the U-2OS cells migration and invasion were also impaired by inhibiting the activity of FASN/HER2/PI3K/AKT. Our results indicated that inhibition of FASN suppresses OS cell invasion and migration via down-regulation of the “HER2/PI3K/AKT” axis in vitro. FASN blocker may be a new therapeutic strategy in OS management.

Wang, Tao Fang; Wang, Heng [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)] [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China); Peng, Ai Fen [Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jiangxi (China)] [Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jiangxi (China); Luo, Qing Feng [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi (China)] [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi (China); Liu, Zhi Li, E-mail: zgm7977@163.com [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China); Zhou, Rong Ping [Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)] [Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China); Gao, Song; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Wen Zhao [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)] [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

20

Planet migration in self-gravitating disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and migration of the planet at the same time so that theG. W. 1978, Moon and Planets, 18, 5 Fukagawa, M. , Hayashi,Planet migration in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs

Meru, Farzana; Baruteau, Clement

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scenarios of new vehicle technology deployment serve various purposes; some will seek to establish plausibility. This report proposes two reality checks for scenarios: (1) implications of manufacturing constraints on timing of vehicle deployment and (2) investment decisions required to bring new vehicle technologies to market. An estimated timeline of 12 to more than 22 years from initial market introduction to saturation is supported by historical examples and based on the product development process. Researchers also consider the series of investment decisions to develop and build the vehicles and their associated fueling infrastructure. A proposed decision tree analysis structure could be used to systematically examine investors' decisions and the potential outcomes, including consideration of cash flow and return on investment. This method requires data or assumptions about capital cost, variable cost, revenue, timing, and probability of success/failure, and would result in a detailed consideration of the value proposition of large investments and long lead times. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Plotkin, S.; Stephens, T.; McManus, W.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The C. elegans heterochronic pathway controls the timing of NAB/EGR-mediated terminal differentiation and the onset of adulthood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most animals pass through a series of juvenile stages on their way from embryo to adult. These stages represent periods of time in which stage-specific developmental processes occur. At the end of development, the organism ...

Harris, David T. (David Taylor)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration through up-regulating PGC-1{alpha} expression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dexamethasone has been shown to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, which is required for preventing restenosis. However, the mechanism underlying effect of dexamethasone remains unknown. We have previously demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) can inhibit VSMC migration and proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PGC-1{alpha} in dexamethasone-reduced VSMC migration and explored the possible mechanism. We first examined PGC-1{alpha} expression in cultured rat aortic VSMCs. The results revealed that incubation of VSMCs with dexamethasone could significantly elevate PGC-1{alpha} mRNA expression. In contrast, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) decreased PGC-1{alpha} expression while stimulating VSMC migration. Mechanistic study showed that suppression of PGC-1{alpha} by small interfering RNA strongly abrogated the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VSMC migration, whereas overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} had the opposite effect. Furthermore, an analysis of MAPK signal pathways showed that dexamethasone inhibited ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in VSMCs. Overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} decreased both basal and PDGF-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but it had no effect on ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activation by a PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 abolished the suppressive effects of PGC-1{alpha} on p38 MAPK phosphorylation and VSMC migration. These effects of PGC-1{alpha} were enhanced by a PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone. Collectively, our data indicated for the first time that one of the anti-migrated mechanisms of dexamethasone is due to the induction of PGC-1{alpha} expression. PGC-1{alpha} suppresses PDGF-induced VSMC migration through PPAR{gamma} coactivation and, consequently, p38 MAPK inhibition.

Xu, Wei [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China) [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Guo, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yongxian [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zen, Ke, E-mail: kzen@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yu, Bo, E-mail: yubodr@163.com [Department of cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin 150081 (China)] [Department of cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhang, Chen-Yu, E-mail: cyzhang@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Enhanced migration of seismic data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The so-called enhanced migration which uses diffraction tomography as the repair tool for correction of amplitudes (reflection coefficients) of migrated sections is discussed. As with any linearized procedure, diffraction tomography requires knowledge of the initial model. It is suggested that the initial model is taken as the migrated image. It will be demonstrated that diffraction tomography applied to the data residuals improves the amplitudes of the migrated images. Migration is redefined as the reconstruction of the wavefront sets of distributions (reflection interfaces), and the inversion process as tomographic correction of migrated images.

Carrion, P.M. (PPPG/UFBA, Instituto de Geociencias, Rua Gaetano Moura 123, Federacao, 40.210 Salvador, Bahia (BR))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Migration Year Book  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 1 #12;Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 NIDS NCCR North-South #12;Book Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Publishers Nepal Institute of Development Studies (NIDS) G.P.O. Box: 7647, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: nids@mail.com.np Web: www.nids.org.np National Centre of Competence in Research

Richner, Heinz

26

International migration within Latin America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International migration within Latin America ·Mostly labor circulation flows ·Industrial and urban;Example of International migration: Mexicans to US ·1920s revolution and post- revolution chaos in Mexico

Lopez-Carr, David

27

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan, Sw China)| OpenTheOfAnd Eruption At

29

Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortalBRDFTunable Thermal Link8 Ali

30

Oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sirte Basin is an asymmetrical cratonic basin, situated in the north-central part of Libya. It covers an area of over 350,000km{sup 2} and is one of the most prolific oil-producing basins in the world. Sirte Basin is divided into large NW-SE trending sub-parallel platforms and troughs bounded by deep seated syndepositional normal faults. A very unique combination of thick sediments with rich source rocks in the troughs vs. thinner sediments with prolific reservoir rocks on the platforms accounts for the productivity of the basin. Analysis of oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin will certainly help to discover the remaining reserves, and this can only be achieved if the important parameter of structural configuration of the basin at the time of oil migration is known. The present paper is an attempt to analyse the time of oil migration, to define the structural picture of the 4 Basin during the time of migration and to delineate the most probable connecting routes between the hydrocarbon kitchens and the oil fields.

Roohi, M.; Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for carbon dioxide geologic sequestration protecting the sources of potable water.

Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Caged phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins : probes to dissect the role of phosphorylation in complex signaling pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein phosphorylation is a central regulatory mechanism in signal transduction pathways and cellular migration. Current genetic strategies for the study of phosphorylation, including gene knockout and point mutation, are ...

Vogel, Elizabeth Maura

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Type I planet migration in nearly laminar disks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the migration of low-mass planets ({<=}30 M{sub {circle_plus}}) in nearly laminar disks (viscosity parameter {alpha} < 10{sup -3}) over timescales of several thousand orbit periods. We consider disk masses of 1, 2, and 5 times the minimum mass solar nebula, disk thickness parameters of H/r = 0.035 and 0.05, and a variety of {alpha} values and planet masses. Disk self-gravity is fully included. Previous analytic work has suggested that Type I planet migration can be halted in disks of sufficiently low turbulent viscosity, for {alpha} {approx} 10{sup -4}. The halting is due to a feedback effect of breaking density waves that results in a slight mass redistribution and consequently an increased outward torque contribution. The simulations confirm the existence of a critical mass (M{sub {alpha}} {approx} 10M{sub {circle_plus}}) beyond which migration halts in nearly laminar disks. For {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -3}, density feedback effects are washed out and Type I migration persists. The critical masses are in good agreement with the analytic model of Rafikov. In addition, for {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -4} steep density gradients produce a vortex instability, resulting in a small time-varying eccentricity in the planet's orbit and a slight outward migration. Migration in nearly laminar disks may be sufficiently slow to reconcile the timescales of migration theory with those of giant planet formation in the core accretion model.

Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lubow, S H [STSI; Lin, D [UCSC

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Can using a global perspective help control migration? : Ecuador and Spain's Proyecto Codesarrollo Canńar-Murcia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process? Did you receive any help in the reintegrationUsing a Global Perspective Help Control Migration? Ecuadortheir time and hospitality to help me with my research while

Velasquez, Christina L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Estimates of potential radionuclide migration at the Bullion site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bullion site in Area 20 of the Nevada Test Site has been selected for an intensive study of the hydrologic consequences of underground testing, including subsequent radionuclide migration. The bulk of the chimney and cavity lie in zeolitized tuffs of low hydraulic conductivity, while the base of the cavity may extend downward into more conductive rhyolite flows. A mathematical analog to the Bullion setting is used here to estimate expected radionuclide migration rates and concentrations. Because of a lack of hydrologic data at the site, two contrasting scenarios are considered. The first is downward-transport, in which downward hydraulic gradients flush chimney contents into the conductive underlying units, enhancing migration. The other is upward-transport, in which upward gradients tend to drive chimney contents into the low-conductivity zeolitized tuffs, discouraging migration. In the downward-transport scenario, radionuclide travel times and concentrations are predicted to be similar to those encountered at Cheshire, requiring approximately 10 years to reach a proposed well 300 m downgradient. The upward transport scenario yields predicted travel times on the order of 2,000 years to the downgradient well. The most likely scenario is a combination of these results, with vertical movement playing a limited role. Radionuclides injected directly into the rhyolites should migrate laterally very quickly, with travel times as in the downward-transport scenario. Those in the zeolitized tuff-walled portion of the chimney should migrate extremely slowly, as in the upward-transport scenario.

Brikowski, T.H.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIGRATION DMITRIY SILIN, TAD PATZEK, AND SALLY M. BENSONphysics at di?erent scales. Tad Patzek is a professor ofEngineering. DMITRIY SILIN, TAD PATZEK, AND SALLY M. BENSON

Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A life-course perspective on U.S. migration experience and later-life diabetes, hypertension, and depression for middle-aged and older Mexican adults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pathways to adult-onset diabetes. Soc Biol, 52(3-4), 94-111.by older Mexicans with diabetes: how migration to the UnitedG. (2010). Social determinants of diabetes and challenges of

Torres, Jacqueline Marie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher plume propagation estimates in a high-permeability conduit like a vertical fracture.

Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

adam2 promotes migration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

migrative schedule Amir, Amihood 369 How to Migrate Agents Lambda Matthew Hohlfeld y Bennet Yee z Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: How to Migrate...

42

RIS-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RISŘ-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT Mathematical treatment project. Abstract. A mathematical model for the brine migration in rock salt around an infinite line heat source is set up. The tempera- ture field around the time dependent heat source is calculated by use

43

MIGRATION DES JOINTS DE GRAINS LA MIGRATION DES JOINTS INTERGRANULAIRES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(influence de la force motrice, de la température, de l'orientation, de la présence d'éléments étrangers produise sponta- nément, il faut qu'il existe une force motrice, c'est-à-dire que le déplacement du joint accessibles. Très schématiquement, on pourra poser entre la vitesse de migration v et la force motrice F une

Boyer, Edmond

44

Interleukin-6 triggers human cerebral endothelial cells proliferation and migration: The role for KDR and MMP-9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is involved in angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Using human cerebral endothelial cell (HCEC), we report for First time that IL-6 triggers HCEC proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner, specifically associated with enhancement of VEGF expression, up-regulated and phosphorylated VEGF receptor-2 (KDR), and stimulated MMP-9 secretion. We investigated the signal pathway of IL-6/IL-6R responsible for KDR's regulation. Pharmacological inhibitor of PI3K failed to inhibit IL-6-mediated VEGF overexpression, while blocking ERK1/2 with PD98059 could abolish IL-6-induced KDR overexpression. Further, neutralizing endogenous VEGF attenuated KDR expression and phosphorylation, suggesting that IL-6-induced KDR activation is independent of VEGF stimulation. MMP-9 inhibitor GM6001 significantly decreases HCEC proliferation and migration (p < 0.05), indicating the crucial function of MMP-9 in promoting angiogenic changes in HCECs. We conclude that IL-6 triggers VEGF-induced angiogenic activity through increasing VEGF release, up-regulates KDR expression and phosphorylation through activating ERK1/2 signaling, and stimulates MMP-9 overexpression.

Yao, Jianhua S. [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Zhai Wenwu [Department of Lung Biology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Young, William L. [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States); Yang Guoyuan [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States) and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94110 (United States)]. E-mail: gyyang@anesthesia.ucsf.edu

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

Lehman, S K

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marriage Rates in Rural China . . . . . . . . . . .Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . . . . . .and Rural-Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . 1.

Meng, Lei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ORBITAL MIGRATION OF LOW-MASS PLANETS IN EVOLUTIONARY RADIATIVE MODELS: AVOIDING CATASTROPHIC INFALL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Outward migration of low-mass planets has recently been shown to be a possibility in non-barotropic disks. We examine the consequences of this result in evolutionary models of protoplanetary disks. Planet migration occurs toward equilibrium radii with zero torque. These radii themselves migrate inwards because of viscous accretion and photoevaporation. We show that as the surface density and temperature fall the planet orbital migration and disk depletion timescales eventually become comparable, with the precise timing depending on the mass of the planet. When this occurs, the planet decouples from the equilibrium radius. At this time, however, the gas surface density is already too low to drive substantial further migration. A higher mass planet, of 10 M {sub +}, can open a gap during the late evolution of the disk, and stops migrating. Low-mass planets, with 1 or 0.1 M {sub +}, released beyond 1 AU in our models avoid migrating into the star. Our results provide support for the reduced migration rates adopted in recent planet population synthesis models.

Lyra, Wladimir; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan, E-mail: wlyra@amnh.or, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Student Trainee (Pathways Internship)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is being filled under the Pathways Internship Program . The program is designed to provide students enrolled in a wide variety of educational institutions, from high school to...

49

Fluorescent growth bands in irradiated-bitumen nodules: Evidence of episodic hydrocarbon migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minute rims of solid bitumen ({approximately}40-50 {mu}m thick) surround detrital radioactive grains in the Permian-Triassic sandstones and Arranoo Member of the Kockatea Shale from the northern Perth basin, Australia. The bitumen formed as Th- and U-bearing minerals (monazite, xenotime, zircon, thorite) irradiated and immobilized fluid hydrocarbons coming within range of alpha-particle emissions. using transmitted light and scanning electron microscopy and rims appear compositionally homogeneous, but under blue/violet epifluorescent illumination the bitumen displays complex concentric and contorted banding. These fluorescent textures indicate that multiple influxes of hydrocarbons passed through the reservoir sandstones. Following radiation-induced immobilization of hydrocarbons from the first oil influx, the bitumen nodules grew through a process of swelling and expansion outward form the mineral core during subsequent oil influxes, producing graded fluorescent growth bands. Oil droplets and lamellae also were adsorbed onto the outer portion of the nodules. Such bitumen nodules are a new and potentially important source of data for understanding the movement of hydrocarbons in sedimentary basins, specifically for identifying hydrocarbon pathways, the number of discrete hydrocarbon pulses, and the relative timing of oil migration.

Rasmussen, B. [Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evolution of Migrating Planets Undergoing Gas Accretion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the orbital and mass evolution of planets that undergo run-away gas accretion by means of 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations. The disk torque distribution per unit disk mass as a function of radius provides an important diagnostic for the nature of the disk-planet interactions. We first consider torque distributions for nonmigrating planets of fixed mass and show that there is general agreement with the expectations of resonance theory. We then present results of simulations for mass-gaining, migrating planets. For planets with an initial mass of 5 Earth masses, which are embedded in disks with standard parameters and which undergo run-away gas accretion to one Jupiter mass (Mjup), the torque distributions per unit disk mass are largely unaffected by migration and accretion for a given planet mass. The migration rates for these planets are in agreement with the predictions of the standard theory for planet migration (Type I and Type II migration). The planet mass growth occurs through gas capture within the planet's Bondi radius at lower planet masses, the Hill radius at intermediate planet masses, and through reduced accretion at higher planet masses due to gap formation. During run-away mass growth, a planet migrates inwards by only about 20% in radius before achieving a mass of ~1 Mjup. For the above models, we find no evidence of fast migration driven by coorbital torques, known as Type III migration. We do find evidence of Type III migration for a fixed mass planet of Saturn's mass that is immersed in a cold and massive disk. In this case the planet migration is assumed to begin before gap formation completes. The migration is understood through a model in which the torque is due to an asymmetry in density between trapped gas on the leading side of the planet and ambient gas on the trailing side of the planet.

Gennaro D'Angelo; Stephen H. Lubow

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

NETL Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible Oil and Natural Gas Development NETL Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible Oil and Natural Gas...

52

A Survey of Process Migration Mechanisms Jonathan M. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Survey of Process Migration Mechanisms Jonathan M. Smith Computer Science Department Columbia Migration Mechanisms Jonathan M. Smith Computer Science Department Columbia University New York, NY 10027

Smith, Jonathan M.

53

Environmental Science: Sample Pathway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Core GE 100 Intro to Env Science ES 105 Env Earth Science Sophomore Year CGS Core (CGS NS201 will fulfill CAS BI107 & 124) MA 115 Statistics Summer Environmental Internship Junior Year CH 171 Chem for Health Sciences CH

Goldberg, Bennett

54

Transverse Entanglement Migration in Hilbert Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that, although the amount of mutual entanglement of photons propagating in free space is fixed, the type of correlations between the photons that determine the entanglement can dramatically change during propagation. We show that this amounts to a migration of entanglement in Hilbert space, rather than real space. For the case of spontaneous parametric down conversion, the migration of entanglement in transverse coordinates takes place from modulus to phase of the bi-photon state and back again. We propose an experiment to observe this migration in Hilbert space and to determine the full entanglement.

K. W. Chan; J. P. Torres; J. H. Eberly

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - amp signaling pathway Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(cAMP) signaling pathway is also capable of mediating LTP and LTD in hippocampal neurons (Frey et... of GABAA receptors modulates cAMPPKA signaling pathway during a critical time...

56

Pb-Pb dating of hydrocarbon migration into a bitumen-bearing ore deposit, North Wales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous attempts at U-Pb dating of uraniferous bitumens have had limited significance because of radioelement migration. Pb-Pb dating which can be undertaken regardless of recent lead migration, has been successfully applied to uraniferous solidified bitumen from the Ty Gwyn copper deposit, North Wales. Analyses of five bitumen samples with variable mixtures of radiogenic and common lead yield a {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb age of 248 {plus minus} 21 Ma (Early Triassic). This age is interpreted as the date of hydrocarbon migration into the deposit and is reasonably consistent with the timing of hydrocarbon generation calculated from the regional burial history. The Pb-Pb dating method could be applied to date uraniferous bitumens representing hydrocarbon migration in diverse geologic environments.

Parnell, J. (Queens's Univ., Belfast (Ireland)); Swainbank, I. (NERC Isotope Geology Centre, Nottingham (England))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Experimental implementation of reverse time migration for nondestructive evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evaluation (NDE). This paper applies RTM imaging to NDE applications in bounded samples, where reverberation

58

Mechanism of constitution liquid film migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid film migration (LFM) in liquid phase sintering classically involves a large metastable liquid volume adjacent to solid, and migration occurs at an isolated solid-liquid (S-L) interface. Constitutional liquid film migration (CLFM), discovered in alloy 718, has major characteristics similar to those of LFM, except that the metastable liquid is from the constitutional liquation of precipitates on the grain boundary. The similarity between LFM and CLFM has led to the theory that coherency lattice strain responsible for LFM is also responsible for CLFM. The coherency strain hypothesis was tested in this study by evaluating whether the Hillert model of LFM would also apply for CLFM. Experimental results of CLFM in alloy 718 showed that migration velocity followed the trend predicted by the Hillert model. This indicates that the coherency strain hypothesis of LFM also applies for CLFM and that the coherency lattice strain responsible for LFM is also the driving force for CLFM.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NAWIPS Migration to AWIPS II Status Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Migrating to new architecture · Leveraged Raytheon implementations where possible · Take advantage/Integration · Software to be base-lined via Raytheon task ­ Drops will be more frequent - available for Center

60

Chemical Tools for Studying Directed Cell Migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell migration is required for many physiological processes, including wound repair and embryogenesis, and relies on precisely orchestrated events that are regulated in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. Most ...

Goguen, Brenda N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PMI Toolbox User's Guide Photon Migration Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PMI Toolbox User's Guide 2/25/2002 1 Photon Migration Imaging Toolbox 2001 http Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA. http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html #12;PMI

Boas, David

62

Migration and development in Mexican communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration from Mexico to the United States constitutes one of the world's largest labor flows and generates enormous capital flows in the opposite direction. Corresponding to each of these flows is a distinct view of the ...

Schnabl, Peter A. (Peter Andrew)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Pathway and Resource Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides information about hydrogen pathway analysis, which is analysis of the total levelized cost (including return on investment). Well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use, and WTW emissions for hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

Ruth, M. F.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

Uncovering the circadian output pathways of Neurospora crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control. Most of the advances, however, have come in describing the central oscillators of these systems, and, in some cases, the input pathways used to coordinate these oscillators to external time. Very little progress has been made in understanding...

Vitalini, Michael William

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

CRITICAL RADIONUCLIDE AND PATHWAY ANALYSIS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an update to the analysis, Assessment of SRS Radiological Liquid and Airborne Contaminants and Pathways, that was performed in 1997. An electronic version of this large original report is included in the attached CD to this report. During the operational history (1954 to the present) of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released to the environment from the various production facilities. However, as will be shown by this updated radiological critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis, only a small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to potential doses and risks to offsite people. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface waters, the principal media that carry contaminants offsite. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. The groundwater monitoring performed at the site shows that an estimated 5 to 10% of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, no evidence exists from the extensive monitoring performed that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated off the site (SRS 2011). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people. In addition, in response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Order 435.1, several Performance Assessments (WSRC 2008; LWO 2009; SRR 2010; SRR 2011) and a Comprehensive SRS Composite Analysis (SRNO 2010) have recently been completed at SRS. The critical radionuclides and pathways identified in these extensive reports are discussed and, where applicable, included in this analysis.

Jannik, T.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Pathways for Algal Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652Grow Your EnergyTechnology to Market »PathPathways

67

Climate Vision: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative ForcingTECHNOLOGY PATHWAYS

68

Exact solutions in a model of vertical gas migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is motivated by the growing interest in injectingcarbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoidingatmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and consequent global warming.One of the key questions regarding the feasibility of this technology isthe potential rate of leakage out of the primary storage formation. Weseek exact solutions in a model of gas flow driven by a combination ofbuoyancy, viscous and capillary forces. Different combinations of theseforces and characteristic length scales of the processes lead todifferent time scaling and different types of solutions. In the case of athin, tight seal, where the impact of gravity is negligible relative tocapillary and viscous forces, a Ryzhik-type solution implies square-rootof time scaling of plume propagation velocity. In the general case, a gasplume has two stable zones, which can be described by travelling-wavesolutions. The theoretical maximum of the velocity of plume migrationprovides a conservative estimate for the time of vertical migration.Although the top of the plume has low gas saturation, it propagates witha velocity close to the theoretical maximum. The bottom of the plumeflows significantly more slowly at a higher gas saturation. Due to localheterogeneities, the plume can break into parts. Individual plumes alsocan coalesce and from larger plumes. The analytical results are appliedto studying carbon dioxide flow caused by leaks from deep geologicalformations used for CO2 storage. The results are also applicable formodeling flow of natural gas leaking from seasonal gas storage, or formodeling of secondary hydrocarbon migration.

Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.; Benson, Sally M.

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

69

Giant Planet Migration through the Action of Disk Torques and Planet Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a parametric study of giant planet migration through the combined action of disk torques and planet-planet scattering. The torques exerted on planets during Type II migration in circumstellar disks readily decrease the semi-major axes, whereas scattering between planets increases the orbital eccentricities. This paper presents a parametric exploration of the possible parameter space for this migration scenario using two (initial) planetary mass distributions and a range of values for the time scale of eccentricity damping (due to the disk). For each class of systems, many realizations of the simulations are performed in order to determine the distributions of the resulting orbital elements of the surviving planets; this paper presents the results of 8500 numerical experiments. Our goal is to study the physics of this particular migration mechanism and to test it against observations of extrasolar planets. The action of disk torques and planet-planet scattering results in a distribution of final orbital elements that fills the a-e plane, in rough agreement with the orbital elements of observed extrasolar planets. In addition to specifying the orbital elements, we characterize this migration mechanism by finding the percentages of ejected and accreted planets, the number of collisions, the dependence of outcomes on planetary masses, the time spent in 2:1 and 3:1 resonances, and the effects of the planetary IMF. We also determine the distribution of inclination angles of surviving planets and the distribution of ejection speeds for exiled planets.

Althea V. Moorhead; Fred C. Adams

2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

Dominant Pathways in Protein Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method to investigate the kinetics of protein folding on a long time-scale and the dynamics underlying the formation of secondary and tertiary structures during the entire reaction. The approach is based on the formal analogy between thermal and quantum diffusion: by writing the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for the time-evolution of a protein in a viscous heat-bath in terms of a path integral, we derive a Hamilton-Jacobi variational principle from which we are able to compute the most probable pathway of folding. The method is applied to the folding of the Villin Headpiece Subdomain, in the framework of a Go-model. We have found that, in this model, the transition occurs through an initial collapsing phase driven by the starting coil configuration and a later rearrangement phase, in which secondary structures are formed and all computed paths display strong similarities. This method is completely general, does not require the prior knowledge of any reaction coordinate and represents an efficient tool to perfom ab-initio simulations of the entire folding process with available computers.

P. Faccioli; M. Sega; F. Pederiva; H. Orland

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

PROGRAM R&D PATHWAYS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors) of the 2010 Nuclear Energy Roadmap: Materials Aging and Degradation. Research and development efforts in this pathway...

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - a2 modulates migration Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D. Verkest Summary: to the destination PE. Register Migration Point Addresses Activate IAC register OS Migration Module Interrupt Handler... Low Cost Task Migration Initiation in...

73

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Anchored Mobilities: Mobile Technology and Transnational Migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anchored Mobilities: Mobile Technology and Transnational Migration Amanda Williams Donald Bren Irvine, CA 92697-3440, USA jpd@ics.uci.edu ABSTRACT Mobile technologies are deployed into diverse social mobility. We present an ethnography of transnational Thai retirees and their uses of mobile technology

Dourish,Paul

75

Price war with migrating customers Patrick Maille  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price war with migrating customers Patrick Maill´e TELECOM Bretagne 2, rue de la Ch^ataigneraie CS customers churn between providers due to better prices, better reputation or better services. We propose in this paper to study the price war between two providers in the case where users' decisions are modeled

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

Study of Golden Eagles Migration in the Calgary Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eagles Migration in the Calgary Canada A thesis submitted inMigration in the Calgary Canada by Tianqing Liao Master ofMountains of Calgary, Canada. The project began in March

Liao, Tianqing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Deadlock-free fine-grained thread migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several recent studies have proposed fine-grained, hardware-level thread migration in multicores as a solution to power, reliability, and memory coherence problems. The need for fast thread migration has been well documented, ...

Cho, Myong Hyon

78

Formation of Earth-like Planets During and After Giant Planet Migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Close-in giant planets are thought to have formed in the cold outer regions of planetary systems and migrated inward, passing through the orbital parameter space occupied by the terrestrial planets in our own Solar System. We present dynamical simulations of the effects of a migrating giant planet on a disk of protoplanetary material and the subsequent evolution of the planetary system. We numerically investigate the dynamics of post-migration planetary systems over 200 million years using models with a single migrating giant planet, one migrating and one non-migrating giant planet, and excluding the effects of a gas disk. Material that is shepherded in front of the migrating giant planet by moving mean motion resonances accretes into "hot Earths", but survival of these bodies is strongly dependent on dynamical damping. Furthermore, a significant amount of material scattered outward by the giant planet survives in highly excited orbits; the orbits of these scattered bodies are then damped by gas drag and dynamical friction over the remaining accretion time. In all simulations Earth-mass planets accrete on approximately 100 Myr timescales, often with orbits in the Habitable Zone. These planets range in mass and water content, with both quantities increasing with the presence of a gas disk and decreasing with the presence of an outer giant planet. We use scaling arguments and previous results to derive a simple recipe that constrains which giant planet systems are able to form and harbor Earth-like planets in the Habitable Zone, demonstrating that roughly one third of the known planetary systems are potentially habitable.

Avi M. Mandell; Sean N. Raymond; Steinn Sigurdsson

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Migrating graphics applications and tech-niques to the Web introduces techno-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migrating graphics applications and tech- niques to the Web introduces techno- logical challenges not present in traditional graphics. The shortage of library tools to support Web graphics application development poses a particular problem for real-time 3D Web graphics. The Internet, with its long latency

Lau, W. H. Nynson

80

Structural Dynamics of Various Causes of Migration in Jaipur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various social causes for migration in Jaipur are studied and statistical hypotheses are made in this paper.

Jayant Singh; Hansraj Yadav; Florentin Smarandache

2008-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FDTM: Block Level Data Migration Policy in Tiered Storage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FDTM: Block Level Data Migration Policy in Tiered Storage System Xiaonan Zhao, Zhanhuai Li'an 710072, China, {zhaoxn, lizhh, zenglj}@nwpu.edu.cn Abstract. ILM and tiered storage system are designed storage system with fully automatic data migration. Keywords: Data migration policy; data valuation

Boyer, Edmond

82

A novel molecular index for secondary oil migration distance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

migration distances from source rocks to reservoirs can greatly help in the search for new petroleum and correlates solely with migration distance from source rock to reservoir. Case studies serve to demonstrate alteration of buried organic matter in source rocks, followed by oil expulsion (primary migration) out

Wang, Yang

83

Spring Term 2014 SCMR & Department of Geography Migration Cluster Seminars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

migration Essex Hse 018 Tues 18 Feb 3.30-5pm JoAnn McGregor Sentimentality or speculation? Transnational.30-5pm Tobias Eule Bern University Can I Stay? - Managing Migration at the Street-Level in Germany Essex Hse 018 Tues 25 Feb 3.30-5pm Russell King The transnational links and return-migration experiences

Sussex, University of

84

Hydrodynamic particle migration in a concentrated suspension undergoing flow between rotating eccentric cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on experimental measurements and numerical predictions of shear-induced migration of particles in concentrated suspensions subjected to flow in the wide gap between a rotating inner cylinder placed eccentrically within a fixed outer cylinder (a cylindrical bearing). The suspensions consists of large, noncolloidal spherical particles suspended in a viscous Newtonian liquid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging is used to measure the time evolution of concentration and velocity profiles as the flow induced particle migration from the initial, well-mixed state. A model originally proposed by Phillips et al. (1992) is generalized to two dimensions. The coupled equations of motion and particle migration are solved numerically using an explicit pseudo-transient finite volume formulation. While not all of the qualitative features observed in the experiments are reproduced by this general numerical implementation, the velocity predictions show moderately good agreement with the experimental data.

Phan-Thien, Nhan [Univ. of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Graham, A.L.; Abbott, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Altobelli, S.A. [Lovelace Medical Foundation, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Mondy, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Multiphase fluid flow and time lapse seismics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-lapse seismic surveys aim to monitor the migration and dispersal of the CO2 ... of CO2-brine flow and seismic wave propagation to model and monitor CO2 ...

santos

87

arginine-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase pathway: Topics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

below CS111. Website: http:www.cs.bu.edu; Contact: Wayne Snyder, snyder Goldberg, Bennett 10 Biological Pathways A pathway to explore diseases mechanism Biology and Medicine...

88

National Dialogue on Career Pathways  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On Tuesday, September 23, 2014, the U.S. Departments of Labor, Education and Health and Human Services will host a National Dialogue on Career Pathways.  Federal agency leaders from each Department...

89

Directional Sensing Orients Cell Migration and Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and interactions between the cells of our nervous system during development (9). Later in life, cell movements downstream pathways. In Dictyostelium, chemotaxis plays a critical role in all stages of its life cycle of the cell cortex (10, 46, 49, 55). In neutrophils and highly developed Dictyostelium cells, the efficiency

Devreotes, Peter

90

Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Groundwater migration of radionuclides at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simple Single Resident Well (SRW) Model has been used to calculate groundwater movement since Fermilab`s inception. A new Concentration Model is proposed which is more realistic and takes advantage of computer modeling that has been developed for the siting of landfills. Site geologic and hydrologic data were given to a consultant who made the migration calculations from an initial concentration that was based upon the existing knowledge of the radioactivity leached out of the soil. The various components of the new Model are discussed, and numerical examples are given and compared with DOE/EPA limits.

Malensek, A.J.; Wehmann, A.A.; Elwyn, A.J.; Moss, K.J.; Kesich, P.M.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3, 1999of Sciencemidway-moxee-rebuildMigrating

93

Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

BrineMigrationModeling More Documents & Publications Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Establishing the Technical Basis for...

94

Catalog of Waters Important for the Spawning, Rearing or Migration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spawning, Rearing or Migration of Anadromous Fishes Organization Alaska Department of Fish and Game Published Divisions of Sport Fish and Habitat, 2012 Report Number 12-05 DOI...

95

The Built Environment and Migration: A Case Study of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Community Networks in Mexico-U.S. Migration. THe JournalTraditional Architecture of Mexico. London, UK: Thames anddevelopment: assessing Mexico's economic and social policy

Ramirez, Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Lurking Pathway Prediction And Pathway ODE Model Dynamic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulated proteins in the transduction pro- cess. And by modeling the CCL2 pathway in MTB infected cells, J N K , cM Y C and P LC showed as the most significant modules. Hence, the drug treatments inhibit- ing J N K , cM Y C and P LC would effectively...

Zhang, Rengjing

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Transportation Energy Pathways LDRD.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a system dynamics based model of the supply-demand interactions between the USlight-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet, its fuels, and the corresponding primary energy sources through the year2050. An important capability of our model is the ability to conduct parametric analyses. Others have reliedupon scenario-based analysis, where one discrete set of values is assigned to the input variables and used togenerate one possible realization of the future. While these scenarios can be illustrative of dominant trendsand tradeoffs under certain circumstances, changes in input values or assumptions can have a significantimpact on results, especially when output metrics are associated with projections far into the future. Thistype of uncertainty can be addressed by using a parametric study to examine a range of values for the inputvariables, offering a richer source of data to an analyst.The parametric analysis featured here focuses on a trade space exploration, with emphasis on factors thatinfluence the adoption rates of electric vehicles (EVs), the reduction of GHG emissions, and the reduction ofpetroleum consumption within the US LDV fleet. The underlying model emphasizes competition between13 different types of powertrains, including conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs), conventional hybrids(HEVs), plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles(BEVs).We find that many factors contribute to the adoption rates of EVs. These include the pace of technologicaldevelopment for the electric powertrain, battery performance, as well as the efficiency improvements inconventional vehicles. Policy initiatives can also have a dramatic impact on the degree of EV adoption. Theconsumer effective payback period, in particular, can significantly increase the market penetration rates ifextended towards the vehicle lifetime.Widespread EV adoption can have noticeable impact on petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas(GHG) emission by the LDV fleet. However, EVs alone cannot drive compliance with the most aggressiveGHG emission reduction targets, even as the current electricity source mix shifts away from coal and towardsnatural gas. Since ICEs will comprise the majority of the LDV fleet for up to forty years, conventional vehicleefficiency improvements have the greatest potential for reductions in LDV GHG emissions over this time.These findings seem robust even if global oil prices rise to two to three times current projections. Thus,investment in improving the internal combustion engine might be the cheapest, lowest risk avenue towardsmeeting ambitious GHG emission and petroleum consumption reduction targets out to 2050.3 AcknowledgmentThe authors would like to thank Dr. Andrew Lutz, Dr. Benjamin Wu, Prof. Joan Ogden and Dr. ChristopherYang for their suggestions over the course of this project. This work was funded by the Laboratory DirectedResearch and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories.4

Barter, Garrett; Reichmuth, David; Westbrook, Jessica; Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Yoshimura, Ann S.; Peterson, Meghan; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Guzman, Katherine Dunphy; Edwards, Donna M.; Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Coupled Flow and Deformation Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Migration in the Presence of a Caprock Fracture during Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the transport of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) during long-term CO{sub 2} injection into a typical geologic reservoir, such as a saline aquifer, could be complicated because of changes in geochemical, hydrogeological, and hydromechanical behavior. While the caprock layer overlying the target aquifer is intended to provide a tight, impermeable seal in securing injected CO{sub 2}, the presence of geologic uncertainties, such as a caprock fracture or fault, may provide a channel for CO{sub 2} leakage. There could also be a possibility of the activation of a new or existing dormant fault or fracture, which could act as a leakage pathway. Such a leakage event during CO{sub 2} injection may lead to a different pressure and ground response over a period of time. In the present study, multiphase fluid flow simulations in porous media coupled with geomechanics were used to investigate the overburden geologic response and plume behavior during CO{sub 2} injection in the presence of a hypothetical permeable fractured zone in a caprock, existing or activated. Both single-phase and multiphase fluid flow simulations were performed. The CO{sub 2} migration through an existing fractured zone leads to changes in the fluid pressure in the overburden geologic layers and could have a significant impact on ground deformation behavior. Results of the study show that pressure signatures and displacement patterns are significantly different in the presence of a fractured zone in the caprock layer. The variation in pressure and displacement signatures because of the presence of a fractured zone in the caprock at different locations may be useful in identifying the presence of a fault/fractured zone in the caprock. The pressure signatures can also serve as a mechanism to identify the activation of leakage pathways through the caprock during CO{sub 2} injection. Pressure response and ground deformation behavior from sequestration modeling could be useful in the development of smart technologies to monitor safe CO{sub 2} storage and understand CO{sub 2} transport, with limited field instrumentation.

Siriwardane, Hema J.; Gondle, Raj K.; Bromhal, Grant S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Environmental Analysis & Policy: Sample Pathway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Analysis & Policy: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Sustainable Development OR Spring GE 425 U.S. Environmental Policy (Senior) GE 309 Intermediate Env Analysis (Fall) EAP Elective Summer Environmental Internship Senior Year GE 420 Env Policy Analysis 4 th Semester

Goldberg, Bennett

100

CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA MIGRATION SURVEY INFORMATION What is SAMP?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA MIGRATION SURVEY INFORMATION What is SAMP? SAMP is the Southern African people in Canada and in Africa? SAMP recently launched a new migration project, The Diaspora Project come to Canada and do they ever think of going back? What kind of education individuals have obtained

Abolmaesumi, Purang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

R326 Dispatch Nuclear migration: Cortical anchors for cytoplasmic dynein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynein, and provide a critical link in understanding the basis of nuclear migration in yeast. The nuclearR326 Dispatch Nuclear migration: Cortical anchors for cytoplasmic dynein Kerry Bloom Nuclear body that rolls around at random inside the sack of a eukaryotic cell. Controlled nuclear movements

102

A Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services Asil A. Almonaies, Manar H. Alalfi-automatically migrat- ing monolithic legacy web applications to service oriented architecture (SOA) by separating potentially reusable features as web services. Software design re- covery and source transformation techniques

Cordy, James R.

103

Towards a Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards a Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services Asil A. Almonaies Manar H {asil,alalfi,cordy,dean}@cs.queensu.ca Abstract Migrating traditional legacy web applications to web services is an important step in the modernization of web-based business systems to more complex inter

Cordy, James R.

104

Department of Economic and Social Affairs International Migration Report 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Economic and Social Affairs International Migration Report 2002 United Nations #12;ST/ESA/SER.A/220 Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division International Migration Report 2002 rights reserved #12;iii PREFACE The Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs

Huang, Youqin

105

Analysis of Signalling Pathways using Continuous Time Markov Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calder,M. Vyshemirsky,V. Gilbert,D. Orton,R. Trans.on Computat. Syst. Biol. VI, volume 4220 pp 44-67 Springer Verlag

Calder, M.

106

Atomic Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H-SiC. Atomic Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H-SiC. Abstract: Knowledge of the migration of intrinsic point...

107

Characterization of Protein Folding by Dominant Reaction Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assess the reliability of the recently developed approach denominated Dominant Reaction Pathways (DRP) by studying the folding of a 16-residue beta-hairpin, within a coarse-grained Go-type model. We show that the DRP predictions are in quantitative agreement with the results of Molecular Dynamics simulations, performed in the same model. On the other hand, in the DRP approach, the computational difficulties associated to the decoupling of time scales are rigorously bypassed. The analysis of the important transition pathways supports a picture of the beta-hairpin folding in which the reaction is initiated by the collapse of the hydrophobic cluster.

Pietro Faccioli

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the 2002 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989. The project was initiated after detection data from passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) had shown distinct differences in migration patterns between wild and hatchery fish for three consecutive years. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) investigators first observed these differences in 1989. The data originated from tagging and interrogation operations begun in 1988 to evaluate smolt transportation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the Bonneville Power Administration began a cooperative effort with NMFS to expand tagging and interrogation of wild fish. Project goals were to characterize the outmigration timing of these fish, to determine whether consistent migration patterns would emerge, and to investigate the influence of environmental factors on the timing and distribution of these migrations. In 1992, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) began an independent program of PIT tagging wild chinook salmon parr in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Basins in northeast Oregon. Since then, ODFW has reported all tagging, detection, and timing information on fish from these streams. However, with ODFW concurrence, NMFS will continue to report arrival timing of these fish at Lower Granite Dam.

Achond, Stephen; Hockersmith, Eric E.; Sandford, Benjamin P. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Colonization, clear-cutting, and cornfields: Rural migration and deforestation in The Sierra de Lacandn National Park, Petn, Guatemala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Colonization, clear-cutting, and cornfields: Rural migration and deforestation in The Sierra de variability in the amount of forest cleared in the sample. While the high deforestation group cleared an average of 13.6 hectares, or 49% of their forest during the time period, the low deforestation group

Lopez-Carr, David

110

PATHWAY PARAMETER AND THERMONUCLEAR FUNCTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. In the theory of thermonuclear reaction rates, analytical evaluation of thermonuclear functions for non-resonant reactions, including cases with cut-off and depletion of the tail of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function were considered in a series of papers by Mathai and Haubold (1988). In the present paper we study more general classes of thermonuclear functions by introducing a pathway parameter ?, so that when ? ? 1 the thermonuclear functions in the Maxwell-Boltzmannian case are recovered. We will also give interpretations for the pathway parameter ? in the case of cut-off and in terms of moments. 1. Thermonuclear Functions The standard thermonuclear function in the Maxwell-Boltzmann case in the theory of nuclear reactions, is given by the following (Critchfield, 1972; Haubold and Mathai, 1985; Mathai and

H. J. Haubold

111

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplicon promotes migration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemoattractant protein-1 promotes the transendothelial migration of monocytes in vitro, J. Immunol. 155 (1995... Macaque trophoblast migration is regulated by RANTES Twanda L....

117

Dynamic Modeling of Cell Migration and Spreading Behaviors on Fibronectin Coated Planar Substrates and Micropatterned Geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling, actin motor activity, and lamellipodia protrusion is developed for predicting cell spreading and migration ...

Kim, Min-Cheol

118

Orbital Evolution and Migration of Giant Planets: Modeling Extrasolar Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Giant planets in circumstellar disks can migrate inward from their initial (formation) positions. Radial migration is caused by inward torques between the planet and the disk; by outward torques between the planet and the spinning star; and by outward torques due to Roche lobe overflow and consequent mass loss from the planet. We present self-consistent numerical considerations of the problem of migrating giant planets. Summing torques on planets for various physical parameters, we find that Jupiter-mass planets can stably arrive and survive at small heliocentric distances, thus reproducing observed properties of some of the recently discovered extra-solar planets. Inward migration timescales can be approximately equal to or less than disk lifetimes and star spindown timescales. Therefore, the range of fates of massive planets is broad, and generally comprises three classes: (I) planets which migrate inward too rapidly and lose all their mass; (II) planets which migrate inward, lose some but not all of their mass, and survive in very small orbits; and (III) planets which do not lose any mass. Some planets in Class III do not migrate very far from their formation locations. Our results show that there is a wide range of possible fates for Jupiter-mass planets for both final heliocentric distance and final mass.

D. E. Trilling; W. Benz; T. Guillot; J. I. Lunine; W. B. Hubbard; A. Burrows

1998-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radionuclide migration laboratory studies for validation of batch sorption data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advective and diffusive migration experiments (within the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project) involve utilizing crushed material, intact, and fractured tuff in order to test and improve (if necessary) transport models by experimentally observing the migration of sorbing and non-sorbing radionuclides on a laboratory scale. Performing a validation of the sorption data obtained with batch techniques (within the Batch Sorption Study) is an integral part of the mission of the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies. In this paper the work scope of the radionuclide migration laboratory experiments (as they apply to validation of batch sorption data) is reviewed.

Triay, I.R.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Exotic Earths: Forming Habitable Worlds with Giant Planet Migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Close-in giant planets (e.g. ``Hot Jupiters'') are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth mass planets also form interior to the migrating Jovian planet, analogous to recently-discovered ``Hot Earths''. Very water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the Habitable Zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets.

Sean N. Raymond; Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Control of charge migration in molecules by ultrashort laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to electronic many-body effects, the ionization of a molecule can trigger ultrafast electron dynamics appearing as a migration of the created hole charge throughout the system. Here we propose a scheme for control of the charge migration dynamics with a single ultrashort laser pulse. We demonstrate by fully ab initio calculations on a molecule containing a chromophore and an amine moieties that simple pulses can be used for stopping the charge-migration oscillations and localizing the charge on the desired site of the system. We argue that this control may be used to predetermine the follow-up nuclear rearrangement and thus the molecular reactivity.

Nikolay V. Golubev; Alexander I. Kuleff

2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Control of charge migration in molecules by ultrashort laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to electronic many-body effects, the ionization of a molecule can trigger ultrafast electron dynamics appearing as a migration of the created hole charge throughout the system. Here we propose a scheme for control of the charge migration dynamics with a single ultrashort laser pulse. We demonstrate by fully ab initio calculations on a molecule containing a chromophore and an amine moieties that simple pulses can be used for stopping the charge-migration oscillations and localizing the charge on the desired site of the system. We argue that this control may be used to predetermine the follow-up nuclear rearrangement and thus the molecular reactivity.

Golubev, Nikolay V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Mechanisms of contaminant migration from grouted waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from the In-Tank Precipitation process. The solution is mixed with cement, slag, and fly ash, to form a grout, termed ``Saltstone``, that will be disposed in concrete vaults at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) [1]. Of the contaminants in the Saltstone, the greatest concern to SRS is the potential release of nitrate to the groundwater because of the high initial nitrate concentration (0.25 g/cm{sup 3}) in the Saltstone and the low Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 44 mg/L. The SDF is designed to allow a slow, controlled release over thousands of years. This paper addresses a modeling study of nitrate migration from intact non-degraded concrete vaults in the unsaturated zone for the Radiological Performance Assessment (PA) of the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility [3]. The PA addresses the performance requirements mandated by DOE Order 5820.2A [4].

Magnuson, S.O. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yu, A.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

USING INTERACTION MATRICES TO DESCRIBEUSING INTERACTION MATRICES TO DESCRIBE RADIOCAESIUM MIGRATION IN GRASSLANDRADIOCAESIUM MIGRATION IN GRASSLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aii - the number of diagonal elements is a measure of the matrix resolution. - code the matrix (Argentina) H. Velasco 4 0 no 1 weak 2 medium 3 strong 4 critical Code the matrix: (Expert semi number D020 2C12 03B3 240A 2.5BCD 3BACD nrPathway Universidad Nacional de San Luis (Argentina) H. Velasco

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

125

Effects of interstitial flow on tumor cell migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interstitial flow is the convective transport of fluid through tissue extracellular matrix. This creeping fluid flow has been shown to affect the morphology and migration of cells such as fibroblasts, cancer cells, endothelial ...

Polacheck, William J. (William Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Interprovincial Migration and the Stringency of Energy Policy in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interprovincial migration flows involve substantial relocation of people and productive activity, with implications for regional energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. In China, these flows are not explicitly considered ...

Luo, Xiaohu

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

127

Quantitative studies of EGFR autocrine induced cell signaling and migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor autocrine and/or paracrine signaling plays an important role in normal epithelial cell proliferation, survival, adhesion and migration. Aberrant expression of the EGF receptor and its ...

Joslin, Elizabeth Jane

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Implementing Incremental Code Migration with XML Wolfgang Emmerich, Cecilia Mascolo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing Incremental Code Migration with XML Wolfgang Emmerich, Cecilia Mascolo and Anthony Finkelstein Dept. of Computer Science University College London Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK fW.Emmerich

Finkelstein, Anthony

129

Inter-provincial Permanent and Temporary Migration in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the role of migration in China's regional development and9: 485-502. Zhu, Yu. 2007. "China's floating population andThe settlement intention of China’s floating population in

Sun, Mingjie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A COMPUTATIONAL INVESTIGATION OF MIGRATION ENTHALPIES AND ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Predith and G. Ceder Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Materials Science and Engineering oxygen ion conduction at high temperatures. First principles calculations found the calculated migration with considerable width. INTRODUCTION High temperature perovskite oxides display the highest oxygen ion

Ceder, Gerbrand

131

LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIGRATION· PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS Alan Jaymay vary even though replacement fi~~d the pa~ameter value PIe N - P ;, RT I r:. fILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS. I.lan ~1ar

Jay Smith, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Efficient and flexible fault tolerance and migration of scientific simulation using CUMULVS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many practical scientific applications would benefit from a simple checkpointing mechanism to provide automatic restart or recovery in response to faults and failures. CUMULVS is a middleware infrastructure for interacting with parallel scientific simulations to support online visualization and computational steering. The base CUMULVS system has been extended to provide a user-level mechanism for collecting checkpoints in a parallel simulation program. Via the same interface that CUMULVS uses to identify and describe data fields for visualization and parameters for steering, the user application can select the minimal program state necessary to restart or migrate an application task. The CUMULVS run-time system uses this information to efficiently recover fault-tolerant applications by restarting failed tasks. Application tasks can also be migrated -- even across heterogeneous architecture boundaries -- to achieve load balancing or to improve the task`s locality with a required resource. This paper describes the CUMULVS interface for checkpointing, the issues faced in utilizing this interface when developing fault-tolerant and migrating applications, and the direction of future research in this area.

Kohl, J.A.; Papadopoulos, P.M.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gas giant planets as dynamical barriers to inward-migrating super-Earths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planets of 1-4 times Earth's size on orbits shorter than 100 days exist around 30-50% of all Sun-like stars. In fact, the Solar System is particularly outstanding in its lack of "hot super-Earths" (or "mini-Neptunes"). These planets -- or their building blocks -- may have formed on wider orbits and migrated inward due to interactions with the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Here, we use a suite of dynamical simulations to show that gas giant planets act as barriers to the inward migration of super-Earths initially placed on more distant orbits. Jupiter's early formation may have prevented Uranus and Neptune (and perhaps Saturn's core) from becoming hot super-Earths. Our model predicts that the populations of hot super-Earth systems and Jupiter-like planets should be anti-correlated: gas giants (especially if they form early) should be rare in systems with many hot super-Earths. Testing this prediction will constitute a crucial assessment of the validity of the migration hypothesis for the origin of close-in supe...

Izidoro, Andre; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Hersant, Franck; Pierens, Arnaud

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

F-k migration of multichannel seismic data from the Yucatan Basin, Caribbean Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

49 LIST OF FIGURES (CONTINUED) FIGURE 24 Z2, migrated at v 1750 m/s, with zero-padding. . . . 25 Z2, migrated at v 2000 m/s, with zero-padding. . . . 26 22, migrated at v 3000 m/s, with zero-padding. . . . Page 50 51 52 27 Z3, unmigrated... B3, migrated at v 2000 m/s. 57 Yucstsn Basin profile 83, migrated at v - 2250 m/s. 58 Yucatan Basin profile 83, migrated at v 3000 m/s. 85 87 89 92 93 59 A point diffractor at 6300m, s) unmigrated, b) migrated. 95 60 Unmigrated response...

Oldham, David Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

136

Fuel Dependence of Benzene Pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative importance of formation pathways for benzene, an important precursor to soot formation, was determined from the simulation of 22 premixed flames for a wide range of equivalence ratios (1.0 to 3.06), fuels (C{sub 1}-C{sub 12}), and pressures (20 to 760 torr). The maximum benzene concentrations in 15 out of these flames were well reproduced within 30% of the experimental data. Fuel structural properties were found to be critical for benzene production. Cyclohexanes and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} fuels were found to be among the most productive in benzene formation; and long-chain normal paraffins produce the least amount of benzene. Other properties, such as equivalence ratio and combustion temperatures, were also found to be important in determining the amount of benzene produced in flames. Reaction pathways for benzene formation were examined critically in four premixed flames of structurally different fuels of acetylene, n-decane, butadiene, and cyclohexane. Reactions involving precursors, such as C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, were examined. Combination reactions of C{sub 3} species were identified to be the major benzene formation routes with the exception of the cyclohexane flame, in which benzene is formed exclusively from cascading fuel dehydrogenation via cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene intermediates. Acetylene addition makes a minor contribution to benzene formation, except in the butadiene flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced directly from the fuel, and in the n-decane flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced from large alkyl radical decomposition and H atom abstraction from the resulting large olefins.

Zhang, H; Eddings, E; Sarofim, A; Westbrook, C

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

137

The inflammatory mediator leukotriene D{sub 4} induces subcellular ?-catenin translocation and migration of colon cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abnormal activation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway frequently occurs in colorectal cancer. The nuclear translocation of ?-catenin activates the transcription of target genes that promote cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. The pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) exerts its effects through the CysLT{sub 1} receptor. We previously reported an upregulation of CysLT{sub 1}R in patients with colon cancer, suggesting the importance of leukotrienes in colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of LTD{sub 4} on Wnt/?-catenin signaling and its effects on proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells. LTD{sub 4} stimulation led to an increase in ?-catenin expression, ?-catenin nuclear translocation and the subsequent transcription of MYC and CCND1. Furthermore, LTD{sub 4} significantly reduced the expression of E-cadherin and ?-catenin at the plasma membrane and increased the migration and proliferation of HCT116 colon cancer cells. The effects of LTD{sub 4} can be blocked by the inhibition of CysLT{sub 1}R. Furthermore, LTD{sub 4} induced the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK)-3? activity, indicating a crosstalk between the G-protein-coupled receptor CysLT{sub 1} and the Wnt/?-catenin pathway. In conclusion, LTD{sub 4}, which can be secreted from macrophages and leukocytes in the tumor microenvironment, induces ?-catenin translocation and the activation of ?-catenin target genes, resulting in the increased proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells. - Highlights: • Leukotriene D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) lowers membrane ?-catenin but increases nuclear ?-catenin levels in colon cancer cells. • In agreement, LTD{sub 4} triggers inactivation of GSK-3?, activation of TCF/LEF and increased expression of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc. • LTD{sub 4} also caused a significant reduction in the expression of E-cadherin and an increased migration of colon cancer cells.

Salim, Tavga [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skĺne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Sand-Dejmek, Janna [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skĺne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Section of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skĺne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Bayer HealthCare, Pharmaceuticals Medical Affairs, Solna (Sweden); Sjölander, Anita, E-mail: anita.sjolander@med.lu.se [Division of Cell and Experimental Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Center, Skĺne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

San Francisco Estuary Striped Bass Migration History Determined by Electron-microprobe Analysis of Otolith Sr/Ca Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat use has been shown to be an important factor in the bioaccumulation of contaminants in striped bass. This study examines migration in striped bass as part of a larger study investigating bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of xenobiotics to progeny in the San Francisco Estuary system. Habitat use, residence time and spawning migration over the life of females (n = 23) was studied. Female striped bass were collected between Knights Landing and Colusa on the Sacramento River during the spawning runs of 1999 and 2001. Otoliths were removed, processed and aged via otolith microstructure. Subsequently, otoliths were analyzed for strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) ratio using an electron-microprobe to measure salinity exposure and to distinguish freshwater, estuary, and marine habitat use. Salinity exposure during the last year before capture was examined more closely for comparison of habitat use by the maternal parent to contaminant burden transferred to progeny. Results were selectively confirmed by ion microprobe analyses for habitat use. The Sr/Ca data demonstrate a wide range of migratory patterns. Age of initial ocean entry differs among individuals before returning to freshwater, presumably to spawn. Some fish reside in freshwater year-round, while others return to more saline habitats and make periodic migrations to freshwater. Frequency of habitat shifts and residence times differs among fish, as well as over the lifetime of individual fish. While at least one fish spent its final year in freshwater, the majority of spawning fish spent their final year in elevated salinity. However, not all fish migrated to freshwater to spawn in the previous year. Results from this investigation concerning migration history in striped bass can be combined with contaminant and histological developmental analyses to better understand the bioaccumulation of contaminants and the subsequent effects they and habitat use have on fish populations in the San Francisco Estuary system.

Ostrach, D J; Phillis, C C; Weber, P K; Ingram, B L; Zinkl, J G

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Components Feedstock Production Delivery Total Delivered Hydrogen Cost Biomass Central Pipeline Distribution produce hydrogen at 300 psi · Liquefaction or pipeline compression included in delivery · Delivery costsHydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25

140

Mapping Circadian Output Pathways in Neurospora crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the mammalian p38 pathway, and necessary for maintaining osmotic homeostasis in Neurospora. I present data indicating the circadian regulation of the 2 other MAPK pathways in Neurospora, the mammalian ERK1 and ERK2 like MAPKs, MAK-1 and MAK-2, and show...

Bennett, Lindsay Danielle

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Influence of Acidic and Alkaline Waste Solution Properties on Uranium Migration in Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments has significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2+, Mg2+) and phosphate and a slow (100s of hours) increase in silica, Al3+, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10s to 100s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Charles T.; Zhong, Lirong

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

LONG-TERM DYNAMICS OF RADIONUCLIDE VERTICAL MIGRATION IN SOILS OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT EXCLUSION ZONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident consisted of fuel and condensation components. An important radioecological task associated with the late phase of the accident is to evaluate the dynamics of radionuclide mobility in soils. Identification of the variability (or invariability) in the radionuclide transfer parameters makes it possible to (1) accurately predict migration patterns and biological availability of radionuclides and (2) evaluate long-term exposure trends for the population who may reoccupy the remediated abandoned areas. In 1986-1987, a number of experimental plots were established within various tracts of the fallout plume to assist with the determination of the long-term dynamics of radionuclide vertical migration in the soils. The transfer parameters for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 239,240}Pu in the soil profile, as well as their ecological half-time of the radionuclide residence (T{sub 1/2}{sup ecol}) values in the upper 5-cm thick soil layers of different grasslands were estimated at various times since the accident. Migration characteristics in the grassland soils tend to decrease as follows: {sup 90}Sr > {sup 137}Cs {ge} {sup 239,240}Pu. It was found that the {sup 137}Cs absolute T{sub 1/2}{sup ecol} values are 3-7 times higher than its radioactive decay half-life value. Therefore, changes in the exposure dose resulting from the soil deposited {sup 137}Cs now depend only on its radioactive decay. The {sup 90}Sr T{sub 1/2}{sup ecol} values for the 21st year after the fallout tend to decrease, indicating an intensification of its migration capabilities. This trend appears consistent with a pool of mobile {sup 90}Sr forms that grows over time due to destruction of the fuel particles.

Farfan, E.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

143

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Tier II Canada Research Chair Migration and Ethnic Relations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tier II Canada Research Chair in Migration and Ethnic Relations Faculty of Social Science Western University The Faculty of Social Science at Western University invites applications for a Tier II Canada for Tier II Canada Research Chairs, the candidate will hold a PhD (obtained within the last ten years

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

145

Performance and Energy Modeling for Live Migration of Virtual Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance and Energy Modeling for Live Migration of Virtual Machines Haikun Liu , Cheng-Zhong Xu , Hai Jin , Jiayu Gong , Xiaofei Liao School of Computer Science and Technology Huazhong University of Science and Technology Wuhan, 430074, China {hjin, xfliao}@hust.edu.cn Department of Electrical

Xu, Cheng-Zhong

146

POPULATION Over 10,000 bowhead whales migrate annually through  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of whales made during the spring of 2001 by North Slope Borough observers standing on sea ice north of Point contributed partial funding to Alaska's North Slope Borough for counting bowheads as they migrate past Point whales. Europeans and people of other nations commercially hunted bowhead whales for oil, meat

147

Volume 57, Number 1 (2014) 21 Assisted Migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and water and air quality) (Aubin and others 2011). Assisted migration is a complex topic rife with ethical extinction, such as planting Florida torreya in States north of Florida (Torreya Guardians 2008), (right). (Terms were reused from Ste-Marie and others 2011 and Winder and others 2011; distribution maps were

148

Computation Migration based on Mobile IP and Intelligent Agent Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Computation Migration based on Mobile IP and Intelligent Agent Techniques Runtong Zhang, Dongmei Zhang, Zhigang Kan and Jian Ma Advanced Internet Technology, Nokia (China) R&D Center No. 11, He is to investigate the use of mobile agents in the platform of mobile IPv6, to provide adapted services to mobile

Zhang, Runtong

149

NAWIPS/GEMPAK Migration to AWIPS-II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 TOPICS · Background · Raytheon Code issues · Schedule · Major Tasks for NCEP · GEMPAK 6.0 · Suggested decoders/encoders, D2D, GFE, Hydro Apps, etc. #12;5 Background · N-AWIPS migration will leverage Raytheon;6 Raytheon Code Issues · Both NCEP and Unidata are waiting for the NWS and Raytheon to reach agreement

150

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

Optimized Pre-Copy Live Migration for Memory Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimized Pre-Copy Live Migration for Memory Intensive Applications Khaled Z. Ibrahim, Steven Hofmeyr, Costin Iancu, Eric Roman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Email: {kzibrahim, shofmeyr and fault tolerance. KVM and Xen use iterative pre-copy approaches which work well in practice

152

ORIGINAL PAPER Granite magma migration and emplacement along thrusts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Granite magma migration and emplacement along thrusts Eric C. Ferre´ · Olivier in the emplacement of granite plutons in contractional settings. We address both cases where contractional tectonics. This phenomenon occurs for both low-viscosity magma (basalts to andesite) and high-viscosity magma (dry granite

Galland, Olivier

153

Leveraging Load Migration and Basestaion Consolidation for Green Communications in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a useful technology for improving resource utilization and power efficiency. For example, in a virtualized power-efficient BSs in its neighborhood such that idle BSs can be turned off or put into sleep to save power. In this paper, we propose to leverage load migration and BS consolidation for green

Tang, Jian "Neil"

154

Migration to 7.4, Group Quotas, and More  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to grow to over 20k cores #12;RHIC/ATLAS Computing Facility Overview One instance for ATLAS 5100 slotsMigration to 7.4, Group Quotas, and More William Strecker-Kellogg Brookhaven National Lab #12;RHIC/ATLAS Computing Facility Overview Physics Dept. at Brookhaven National Lab--provides computing and storage

Liblit, Ben

155

Characterization of dense suspensions using frequency domain photon migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) _____________________________ Kenneth R. Hall (Head of Department) May 2004 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Characterization of Dense Suspensions Using Frequency Domain Photon Migration. (May 2004) Yingqing Huang, B.S., Tsinghua University; M....2. MSA-HSY provided by Herrera et al.............................................. 136 VI.1.3. MSA-PM structure factor model provided by Hiroike ...................138 VI.2. Summary...

Huang, Yingqing

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

Traces of Human Migrations in Helicobacter pylori Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traces of Human Migrations in Helicobacter pylori Populations Daniel Falush,1 Thierry Wirth,1 Bodo Reichard,1 Elena Katzowitsch,8 Xiaoyan Wang,1 Mark Achtman,1 * Sebastian Suerbaum8 Helicobacter pylori tuberculosis (2), Haemophilus influenzae (3), and Helicobac- ter pylori (4­8). H. pylori, a Gram

Wirth, Thierry

157

27 Migration,Poverty,Security andSocialNetworks:ACentral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

417 27 Migration,Poverty,Security andSocialNetworks:ACentral AmericanPerspective Abelardo Morales introduction to understanding the migra- tion­poverty relationship from a different perspective, i of inequality and as a resource for poverty alleviation strategies, from a Central American perspective

Richner, Heinz

158

Greening the Cloud Using Renewable-Energy-Aware Service Migration*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Greening the Cloud Using Renewable-Energy-Aware Service Migration* Uttam Mandal, M. Farhan Habib this energy consumption, and hence, carbon footprint and green house gas emission of cloud computing, is contributing to increased energy consumption, and hence, carbon footprint and green house gas emission

California at Davis, University of

159

Migration Health MIDSA Report -December 2009 Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Sectoral Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5.5 PHC Reform and Provision of Health Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 5.10 Burden on Health Care System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 5.11 Condom#12;Migration Health MIDSA Report - December 2009 Table of Contents 1 Foreword 1 2 Acronyms 3 3

Abolmaesumi, Purang

160

THEORETICAL EFFECT OF BENTONITE MIGRATION ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THEORETICAL EFFECT OF BENTONITE MIGRATION ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS TRANSPORT THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS Jason H. FitzSimmons1 and Timothy D. Stark2 ABSTRACT: Since the introduction of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) to waste containment facilities, one of the major concerns

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and uses a finite element method for the simulation of groundwater flow in the lateral (2D) direction (third dimension) a finite difference method is used in the simula- tions. Numerical experiments are done of this thesis is to investigate the possibilities of modelling salt migrations in density dependent groundwater

Vuik, Kees

162

Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to oil generation offers a possible explanation for the mechanism of the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. Detailed petrographic analysis was undertaken to study the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. The important components...

Chanchani, Jitesh

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Short-term Migration, Rural Workfare Programs and Urban Labor Markets: Evidence from India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a simple calibration exercise reveals that small changes in short-term migration can have large impacts of migration in developing countries (Banerjee and Duo, 2007; Badiani and Sar, 2009; Morten, 2012). In 2007

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

164

Development and application of chemical tools for investigating dynamic processes in cell migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell migration is a dynamic process essential for many fundamental physiological functions, including wound repair and the immune response. Migration relies on precisely orchestrated events that are regulated in a spatially ...

Goguen, Brenda Nicole

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

2013 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2013 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office 2013 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products...

166

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Algal Lipid Upgrading...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Algal Biofuels Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction...

167

acid signaling pathways: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

signaling pathways MIT - DSpace Summary: Cells communicate with other cells, and process cues from their environment, via signaling pathways, in which extracellular cues...

168

angiotensin signaling pathway: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

signaling pathways MIT - DSpace Summary: Cells communicate with other cells, and process cues from their environment, via signaling pathways, in which extracellular cues...

169

ahr signaling pathway: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

signaling pathways MIT - DSpace Summary: Cells communicate with other cells, and process cues from their environment, via signaling pathways, in which extracellular cues...

170

SciTech Connect: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Conference: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation (Presentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural...

171

DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard Automotive Applications DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard Automotive...

172

Coregulation of terpenoid pathway genes and prediction of isoprene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coregulation of terpenoid pathway genes and prediction of isoprene production in Bacillus subtilis using transcriptomics. Coregulation of terpenoid pathway genes and prediction of...

173

Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotopes in phosphate. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...

174

Energy Department Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean Energy Economy Energy Department Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean Energy Economy January 15, 2013 -...

175

Molecular Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways in FeFe-Hydrogenase. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways in FeFe-Hydrogenase. Abstract:...

176

2009 Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program 2009 Pathways to Commercial Success:...

177

Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22, 2002-July 22, 2002 Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22,...

178

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance are effective in increasing cation stability. With the help of computational modeling, more cations are being

179

A thermodynamic analysis of trinitotoluene biodegradation pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

free energy change of reaction was calculated for each pathway step using a group contribution method specifically tailored for biomolecules. Steps with large negative Gibbs free energy changes are assumed to be potentially rate-controlling. Therefore...

Shelley, Mark Dewey

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Vacancy migration, adatom motion, a.nd atomic bistability on the GaAs(110) surface studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vacancy migration, adatom motion, a.nd atomic bistability on the GaAs(110) surface studied temperature are reported. The slow dynamic behavior of vacancies and As adatoms can be resolved within a time scale of about one minute, The vacancies and As adatoms are observed to move preferably along the [110

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Determinants and Income Effects of Commuting and Migration An empirical analysis for Germany after Unification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determinants and Income Effects of Commuting and Migration An empirical analysis for Germany after differentials between East and West Germany led to massive commuting and migration flows. In this paper we: Human capital and income, Germany, commuting, migration, GSOEP JEL No.: J31, J61, O15 Address: Institute

Pfeifer, Holger

182

RURAL-FRONTIER MIGRATION AND DEFORESTATION IN THE SIERRA DE LACANDON NATIONAL PARK, GUATEMALA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RURAL-FRONTIER MIGRATION AND DEFORESTATION IN THE SIERRA DE LACANDON NATIONAL PARK, GUATEMALA Robinson #12;ii © 2002 David L. Carr ALL RIGHTS RESERVED #12;iii ABSTRACT DAVID L. CARR: Rural-frontier the greatest risk for migration to the frontier. Evidently, attention to both migration origin and destination

Lopez-Carr, David

183

A Simulation Model for the Performance Evaluation for Migrating a Legacy Paulo Pinheiro da Silva  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Simulation Model for the Performance Evaluation for Migrating a Legacy System Paulo Pinheiro da a simulation model using CAPPLES. Peculiarities of the legacy system migration that affects the simulation of perfor- mance evaluation during migration. CAPPLES is based on simulation models. Indeed, analytical

Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo

184

Physical Machine State Migration Jui-Hao Chiang, Maohua Lu, Tzi-cker Chiueh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

machine to another. This physical machine state migration (PMSM) capability greatly decreases the amount.g., the hypervisor in the case of VM migration. The PMSM prototype described in this paper is adapted from Linux's hibernation facility. The current PMSM prototype can migrate a physical machine running the MySQL DBMS server

Chiueh, Tzi-cker

185

Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500 C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

Huang, M.L.; Wang, L. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-Migration Variance Petition. Revision 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the WIPP No-Migration Variance Petition is to demonstrate, according to the requirements of RCRA {section}3004(d) and 40 CFR {section}268.6, that to a reasonable degree of certainty, there will be no migration of hazardous constituents from the facility for as long as the wastes remain hazardous. The DOE submitted the petition to the EPA in March 1989. Upon completion of its initial review, the EPA provided to DOE a Notice of Deficiencies (NOD). DOE responded to the EPA`s NOD and met with the EPA`s reviewers of the petition several times during 1989. In August 1989, EPA requested that DOE submit significant additional information addressing a variety of topics including: waste characterization, ground water hydrology, geology and dissolution features, monitoring programs, the gas generation test program, and other aspects of the project. This additional information was provided to EPA in January 1990 when DOE submitted Revision 1 of the Addendum to the petition. For clarity and ease of review, this document includes all of these submittals, and the information has been updated where appropriate. This document is divided into the following sections: Introduction, 1.0: Facility Description, 2.0: Waste Description, 3.0; Site Characterization, 4.0; Environmental Impact Analysis, 5.0; Prediction and Assessment of Infrequent Events, 6.0; and References, 7.0.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Subpage migration and replication in CC-NUMA multiprocessors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . 1. Multiple sub-pages per page scheme 2. Partial page (sub-page) invalidation scheme. . . . . . B. Hardware Supported Page Migration and Replication 1. Directory controller 2. Counter hardware 3. TLB and page table . 4. Page mover . 5... 1. Ocean 2. Raytrace 3. Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) 4. Water spatial . . 5. MP3D 1. Processor features 2. Memory features 3. Multiprocessor features RSIM Memory and Directory Subsystem RSIM Configuration Parameters and Values 33 33 33...

Nadaanayakinahalu, Sudhindra

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Migrated Aortic Stent Graft Causing Erosive Spondylopathy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report about a patient presenting with back pain 4 months after an uneventful endovascular implantation of an aortic stent graft. Computed tomography scan revealed a migration of the stent with consecutive endoleakage, kink formation, and movement of the stent toward the spine, which caused destruction of the aortic wall as well as vertebral necrosis. Explantation of the stent and replacement of the native aorta relieved the patient of his symptoms.

Gestrich, Christopher, E-mail: christopher.gestrich@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Probst, Chris, E-mail: chris.probst@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany)] [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany); Wilhelm, Kai, E-mail: kai.wilhelm@ek-bonn.de [Johanniterkrankenhaus Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany)] [Johanniterkrankenhaus Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Schiller, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.schiller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany)] [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Migrating to Autodesk MapGuide Enterprise 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration Autodesk MapGuide SDF 2 Files MapGuide 6.5 SDF 2.0 files were created with either Map 3D (manually) or using the Autodesk MapGuide 6.5 SDF Loader. Since MapGuide 2008 requires SDF 3.0 or higher versions, the SDF files will have to either be recreated with Map 3D or by using Load Procedures with Map

Ahmad, Sajjad

192

Modeling the secular evolution of migrating planet pairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The subject of this paper is the secular behaviour of a pair of planets evolving under dissipative forces. In particular, we investigate the case when dissipative forces affect the planetary semi-major axes and the planets move inward/outward the central star, in a process known as planet migration. To perform this investigation, we introduce fundamental concepts of conservative and dissipative dynamics of the three-body problem. Based on these concepts, we develop a qualitative model of the secular evolution of the migrating planetary pair. Our approach is based on analysis of the energy and the orbital angular momentum exchange between the two-planet system and an external medium; thus no specific kind of dissipative forces is invoked. We show that, under assumption that dissipation is weak and slow, the evolutionary routes of the migrating planets are traced by the Mode I and Mode II stationary solutions of the conservative secular problem. The ultimate convergence and the evolution of the system along one...

Michtchenko, Tatiana A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A distributed hard real-time Java system for high mobility components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications to adapt to changes in user requirements or to external events. We describe how we achieve run-time recon?guration in distributed Java applications by appropriately migrating servers. Guaranteed-rate schedulers at the servers provide...

Rho, Sangig

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

194

A matched-filter-based reverse-time migration algorithm for ground-penetrating radar data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Binghamton, NY 13901 USA. Publisher Item Identifier S 0196-2892(01)04016-5. Fig. 1. Relationship between the object space and the three image spaces for GPR, where F and F denote temporal and spatial FTs, respectively. Spatial location and reflectivity... of producing an image. The main scope of this paper is to present a comprehensive development of a generalized 0196–2892/01$10.00 © 2001 IEEE 930 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 39, NO. 5, MAY 2001 GPR imaging algorithm that is firmly...

Leuschen, Carl; Plumb, R. G.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Timing Your Migration to XML There is no compelling reason to leave EDI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to small and medium enterprises to the end-user creating XML documents in their word processor to locate the talented ones? Yes. The pervasiveness of XML in our environment has lead to improvements to the EDI environment? Up to a certain point. You can take the developments that arise in the XML world

196

Plant phytotoxicity: A self-regulating pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the session on regulating sludge utilization, held at BioCycle's 19th Annual National conference on Composting and Recycling, a participant asked one of the speakers, Dr. Alan Rubin of the US EPA's Office of Water Regulations and Standards, why the plant phytotoxicity pathway should be the most limiting, especially when there is no concern about human or animal health. The question related specifically to copper being the most limiting metal concentration limit for many sludge composting and land application programs under the proposed Part 503 regulations. And the most limiting pathway for copper is Pathway 7, sludge-soil-plant phytotoxicity. Rubin responded that the regulation is supposed to protect both human health and the environment, e.g. plants and animals other than humans.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Infrastructure Required for Tag/Mark Application, Detection, and Recovery Tag/Mark & release Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency Adipose fin clip Marking trailers N processing Otolith Insulated box, thermal chilling system, lab processing, smolt traps N/A Fish traps, fish *Fish mortality data may be collected at any stage of the fish life cycle from harvest, recovered

198

Migration of antimony from PET trays into food simulant and food: determination of Arrhenius parameters and comparison of predicted and measured migration data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration of antimony from PET trays into food simulant and food: determination of Arrhenius) Migration experiments with small sheets cut out from ovenable PET trays were performed in two-sided contact) was estimated to be 62% in the PET sample under study. Apparent diffusion coefficients of Sb in PET trays were

Short, Daniel

199

Variations in permeability and fine particle migrations in unconsolidated sandstones submitted to saline circulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of unconsolidated clayey sandstone were submitted to percolations with NaCl and CaCl{sub 2} solutions with ionic strengths I = 0.01 and I = 2 at 20, 60 and 90{degrees}C. The permeability decreased as a function of time for all the samples examined. When the temperature rose from 20 to 90{degrees}C, permeability decreased for the I = 0.01 solutions, but it increased for the I = 2 solutions. The fluid circulations were accompanied by an entrainment of fine particles that was all the greater as the solutions became more diluted and fluid. This behavior, explained by the phenomenon of clay flocculation-deflocculation, is governed by the values of the attraction and repulsion potentials between particles. The calculation of the forces present shows that the electrokinetic phenomena govern flocculation and migration of fine particles in sandstone.

Baudracco, J. (Univ. Paul Sabatier, Lab. de Mineralogie, U.A. 67, 39 Allees Jules Guesde, F-31400 Toulouse (FR))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

C.E. Kessel, et. al.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy use by biological protein transport pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residing within energy-conserving membranes use transmembrane ion gradients to drive substrate transport receptors impart specificity to a targeting route, and transport across or into the membrane is typicallyEnergy use by biological protein transport pathways Nathan N. Alder1 and Steven M. Theg2 1

Economou, Tassos

203

Biology: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Core CAS CH101 CAS CH102 and NS202. Major Requirements: The major in Biology is 16 courses. Courses taken to satisfy CAS major. The biology concentration also offers specializations in Ecology and Conservation Biology, Neurobiology, Cell

Goldberg, Bennett

204

1Gyeongbokgung Challenges and Development Pathways for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for FNST Development · Blanket Testing in ITER · Need for a New Fusion Nuclear Facility (FNSF/EU) South Korea U.S. EAST Being planned Fusion Nuclear Science &Technology Testing Facility (FNSF1Gyeongbokgung #12;2 Challenges and Development Pathways for Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology

Abdou, Mohamed

205

Disulfide-Linked Protein Folding Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disulfide-Linked Protein Folding Pathways Bharath S. Mamathambika1,3 and James C. Bardwell2,3, 1 of protein folding is difficult because it involves the identification and characterization of folding to protein folding in vitro and in vivo. 211 Click here for quick links to Annual Reviews content online

Bardwell, James

206

Light Duty Vehicle Pathways July 26, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light Duty Vehicle Pathways July 26, 2010 Sam Baldwin Chief Technology Officer Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy #12;2 Conventional Oil International Energy Agency #12;3 InterAcademy Panel Statement On Ocean Acidification, 1 June 2009 · Signed by the National

207

Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be recovered through variable, volume-based charges per kilowatt-hour (kWh). At the same time, however, someEXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST REDUCTIONS The Current Terrain In recent years, electric utilities have experienced

209

A DC-81-indole conjugate agent suppresses melanoma A375 cell migration partially via interrupting VEGF production and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}-mediated signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) chemicals are antitumor antibiotics inhibiting nucleic acid synthesis. An indole carboxylate-PBD hybrid with six-carbon spacer structure (IN6CPBD) has been previously demonstrated to induce melanoma cell apoptosis and reduce metastasis in mouse lungs. This study aimed at investigating the efficacy of the other hybrid compound with four-carbon spacer (IN4CPBD) and elucidating its anti-metastatic mechanism. Human melanoma A375 cells with IN4CPBD treatment underwent cytotoxicity and apoptosis-associated assays. Transwell migration assay, Western blotting, and ELISA were used for mechanistic study. IN4CPBD exhibited potent melanoma cytotoxicity through interrupting G1/S cell cycle progression, increasing DNA fragmentation and hypodipoidic DNA contents, and reducing mitochondrial membrane potential. Caspase activity elevation suggested that both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways were involved in IN4CPBD-induced melanoma apoptosis. IN4CPBD up-regulated p53 and p21, thereby concomitantly derailing the equilibrium between Bcl-2 and Bax levels. Transwell migration assay demonstrated that stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}) stimulated A375 cell motility, while kinase inhibitors treatment confirmed that Rho/ROCK, Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK pathways were involved in SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced melanoma migration. IN4CPBD not only abolished the SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced chemotactic motility but also suppressed constitutive MMP-9 and VEGF expression. Mechanistically, IN4CPBD down-regulated Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK total proteins and MYPT1 phosphorylation. In conclusion, beyond the fact that IN4CPBD induces melanoma cell apoptosis at cytotoxic dose, the interruption in the VEGF expression and the SDF-1{alpha}-related signaling at cytostatic dose may partially constitute the rationale for its in vivo anti-metastatic potency. - Research Highlights: > A novel carboxylate-PBD hybrid as anti-melanoma drug. > IN4CPBD interrupts melanoma cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis. > IN4CPBD suppresses SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced signaling and melanoma migration. > IN4CPBD abolishes angiogenic factor production and chemotactic effect of SDF-1{alpha}. > This drug is clinically applicable to melanoma therapy.

Hsieh, Ming-Chu [Graduate Institute of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hu, Wan-Ping [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yu, Hsin-Su [Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Chuan [Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Long-Sen [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Ying-Hsien, E-mail: danyhkao@gmail.com [Department of Medical Research, E-DA Hospital, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jeh-Jeng, E-mail: jjwang@kmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Determinants of Internal Migration in a Developing Country: Quantitative Evidence for Indonesia, 1930-200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1   The determinants of internal migration in a developing country: quantitative evidence for Indonesia, 1930-2000 J. van Lottuma* and D. Marksb a Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure, Geography Department... : Internal Migration; Indonesia; Gravity Model; Policy; Development JEL codes: J61; J68; N15; O15 Abstract This study specifies and estimates a gravity model for inter-provincial migration in Indonesia. Using panel data for Indonesia’s 26 provinces...

van Lottum, J; Marks, D

211

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m2) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

212

Migration and oil industry employment of north slope Alaska natives. Technical report (Final)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has two purposes: To find out why people migrate to and within the North Slope; To find out if working for the oil industry at Prudhoe Bay or Kuparuk makes North Slope Natives more likely to migrate. This is the first study of Alaska Native migration based on interviews of Alaska North Slope Native migrants, of non-Native migrants, and of Alaska North Slope Natives who are oil industry employees. It has two major chapters: one on household migration and the other on oil industry employment. The report is based on interviews conducted in March 1992.

Marshall, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal migrations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the BC Rockies" Since... to funnel migrating birds into the same landscapes where wind turbines are proposed. I will be presenting Source: Northern British Columbia,...

214

MIGRATION OF GAS-LIQUID INCLUSIONS IN KC l AND NaC l SINGLE CRYSTALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Department of Nuclear Engineering, University ofAlbert J. Machiels Nuclear Engineering Prog:ram UniversitySubmitted to Nuclear Science and Engineering MIGRATION OF

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

assessing field-scale migration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de 6 Assessment of magic angle spinning spectroscopy for studying migration in solid milk chocolate MIT - DSpace Summary: In the confectionery industry, there is...

216

An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The degradation of the ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells was studied under an accelerated stress test of catalyst support (potential hold at 1.2 V). Electrochemical behaviors of the cathode based on graphitic mesoporous carbon supported Pt catalyst were examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Impedance data were plotted and expressed in the complex capacitance form to determine useful parameters in the transmission line model: the double-layer capacitance, peak frequency, and ionic resistance. Electrochemical surface area and hydrogen crossover current through the membrane were estimated from cyclic voltammogram, while cathode Faradaic resistance was compared with ionic resistance as a function of test time. It was observed that during an accelerated stress test of catalyst support, graphitic mesoporous carbon becomes hydrophilic which increases interfacial area between the ionomer and the catalyst up to 100 h. However, the ionic resistance in the catalyst layer drastically increases after 100 h with further carbon support oxidation. The underlying mechanism has been studied and it was found that significant degradation of ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer due to catalyst support corrosion induces uneven hydration and mechanical stress in the ionomer.

Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

2011-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

NextSTEPS (Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways) PROGRAM SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NextSTEPS (Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways) PROGRAM SUMMARY Institute of Transportation in January 2011, building on the many advances of our Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways (STEPS Studies University of California, Davis Automakers, energy companies, utilities and governments are making

California at Davis, University of

219

Oncogenic Pathway Combinations Predict Clinical Prognosis in Gastric Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many solid cancers are known to exhibit a high degree of heterogeneity in their deregulation of different oncogenic pathways. We sought to identify major oncogenic pathways in gastric cancer (GC) with significant relationships ...

Ooi, Chia Huey

220

Architecture and evolutionary stability of yeast signaling pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I have researched the effect that selection for the function of the High Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) pathway has on the evolutionary stability of the pheromone response pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. I first ...

Gritton, Jeffrey S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evolutionary outcomes for pairs of planets undergoing orbital migration and circularization: second order resonances and observed period ratios in Kepler's planetary systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to study the origin of the architectures of low mass planetary systems, we perform numerical surveys of the evolution of pairs of coplanar planets in the mass range $(1-4)\\ \\rmn{M}_{\\oplus}.$ These evolve for up to $2\\times10^7 \\rmn{yr}$ under a range of orbital migration torques and circularization rates assumed to arise through interaction with a protoplanetary disc. Near the inner disc boundary, significant variations of viscosity, interaction with density waves or with the stellar magnetic field could occur and halt migration, but allow ircularization to continue. This was modelled by modifying the migration and circularization rates. Runs terminated without an extended period of circularization in the absence of migration torques gave rise to either a collision, or a system close to a resonance. These were mostly first order with a few $\\%$ terminating in second order resonances. Both planetary eccentricities were small $< 0.1$ and all resonant angles liberated. This type of survey produced o...

Xiang-Gruess, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

alternative pathway activities: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

metabolism embodies Etxeberria, Edgardo 4 Questioning Inevitability of Energy Pathways: Alternative Energy Scenarios for California Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Questioning...

223

China 2050 Pathways Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuoCatalystPathways Calculator Jump to: navigation, search

224

Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

Nadeau, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest Research Institute] [Pacific Northwest Research Institute

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

225

Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California Katharine Hayhoea,b , Daniel Cayanc emission pathways we choose. Here we explore the implications of the highest and lowest Intergovern- mental Panel on Climate Change emissions pathways for climate change and associated impacts in California

Kammen, Daniel M.

226

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a source of energy in the production of a biofuel, soil erosion might increase and fewer nutrients and lessSUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 1: INDIVIDUAL FUEL/VEHICLE PATHWAYS PART 2 Chapter 7: Comparing Land, Water

California at Davis, University of

227

Systems Biology of the JAK-STAT signalling pathway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Biology of the JAK-STAT signalling pathway Jens Timmer Center for Systems Biology Center of Freiburg http://www.fdm.uni-freiburg.de/jeti/ 1 #12;Outline · Systems Biology · JAK-STAT pathway of the Epo receptor · A dynamical model for JAK-STAT pathway · Observing the unobservable · In silico biology

Timmer, Jens

228

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 4: POLICY AND SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION Part 4: Policy and pollutants such as aerosols and black carbon. Third, more #12;250 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

California at Davis, University of

229

Genome Comparisons Based on Profiles of Metabolic Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Comparisons Based on Profiles of Metabolic Pathways Li Liao1, , Sun Kim2 , Jean and absence of the various metabolic pathways, and constitute the basis for a comparison of organisms, as applied to analyzing fully sequenced genomes, can shed light on evolution of metabolic pathways. 1

Liao, Li

230

Development of a Clinical Pathways Analysis System with Adaptive Bayesian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a Clinical Pathways Analysis System with Adaptive Bayesian Nets and Data Mining such analyses. The computation of "lift" (a measure of completed pathways improvement potential) leads us an artificial set of such records and use these for clinical pathways analyses. We use data mining software

Kopec, Danny

231

DYNAMIC INVARIANTS IN PROTEIN FOLDING PATHWAYS REVEALED BY TENSOR ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DYNAMIC INVARIANTS IN PROTEIN FOLDING PATHWAYS REVEALED BY TENSOR ANALYSIS Arvind Ramanathan Lane a spatio-temporal analysis of protein folding pathways. We applied our method to folding simulations of how a protein folds into its functionally relevant conformations. Protein folding pathways span over

Langmead, Christopher James

232

Modeling Protein Folding Pathways Christopher Bystroff, Yu Shao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Protein Folding Pathways Christopher Bystroff, Yu Shao Dept of Biology Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. e-mail:{bystrc, shaoy}@rpi.edu Summary Proteins fold through a series of intermediate states called a pathway. Protein folding pathways have been modeled using either simulations

Bystroff, Chris

233

SPECIAL ANALYSIS AIR PATHWAY MODELING OF E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Special Analysis (SA) was initiated to address a concern expressed by the Department of Energy's Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) Review Team during their review of the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008). Their concern was the potential for overlapping of atmospheric plumes, emanating from the soil surface above SRS LLW disposal facilities within the E-Area, to contribute to the dose received by a member of the public during the Institutional Control (IC) period. The implication of this concern was that the dose to the maximally-exposed individual (MEI) located at the SRS boundary might be underestimated during this time interval. To address this concern a re-analysis of the atmospheric pathway releases from E-Area was required. In the process of developing a new atmospheric release model (ARM) capable of addressing the LFRG plume overlap concern, it became obvious that new and better atmospheric pathway disposal limits should be developed for each of the E-Area disposal facilities using the new ARM. The scope of the SA was therefore expanded to include the generation of these new limits. The initial work conducted in this SA was to develop a new ARM using the GoldSim{reg_sign} program (GTG, 2009). The model simulates the subsurface vapor diffusion of volatile radionuclides as they release from E-Area disposal facility waste zones and migrate to the land surface. In the process of this work, many new features, including several new physical and chemical transport mechanisms, were incorporated into the model. One of the most important improvements was to incorporate a mechanism to partition volatile contaminants across the water-air interface within the partially saturated pore space of the engineered and natural materials through which vapor phase transport occurs. A second mechanism that was equally important was to incorporate a maximum concentration of 1.9E-07 Ci/m{sup 3} of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the air-filled pores of cementitious materials. The ARM also combines the individual transport models constructed for each E-Area disposal facility into a single model, and was ultimately used to analyze the LFRG concern regarding the potential for atmospheric plume overlap at the SRS boundary during the IC period. To evaluate the plume overlap issue, a conservative approach was adopted whereby the MEI at the SRS boundary was exposed to the releases from all E-Area disposal facilities simultaneously. This is equivalent to a 100% overlap of all atmospheric plumes emanating from E-Area. Should the dose received from this level of atmospheric plume overlap still fall below the permissible exposure level of 10 mrem/yr, then the LFRG concern would be alleviated. The structuring of the ARM enables this evaluation to be easily performed. During the IC period, the peak of the 'total plume overlap dose' was computed to be 1.9E-05 mrem/yr, which is five orders of magnitude lower than the 10 mrem/yr PA performance objective for the atmospheric release pathway. The main conclusion of this study is that for atmospheric releases from the E-Area disposal facilities, plume overlap does not cause the total dose to the MEI at the SRS boundary during the IC to exceed the Performance Assessment (PA) performance objective. Additionally, the potential for plume overlap was assessed in the post-Institutional Control period. Atmospheric plume overlap is less likely to occur during this period but conceivably could occur if the prevailing wind direction shifted so as to pass directly over all EArea disposal facilities and transport airborne radionuclides to the MEI at the 100 m point of compliance (POC). This concern was also demonstrated of little concern, as the maximum plume overlap dose was found to be 1.45E+00 mrem/yr (or {approx}15% of the performance measure) during this period and under these unlikely conditions.

Hiergesell, R.; Taylor, G.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155159 (2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155­159 (2013 productive offshore waters of Argentinian Patagonia. We then explore possible reasons for this behavior-ANDEAN PASSAGE OF MIGRATING ARCTIC TERNS OVER PATAGONIA DAVID CAMERON DUFFY1 , ALY MCKNIGHT2 & DAVID B. IRONS2 1

Duffy, David Cameron

235

Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1 , Xiaorong media, and to measure oil and water saturation. Although this technique has great advantages compared14. Using15 MRI, the oil secondary migration paths are scanned to measure the saturation distribution during

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

MODEL OF THE .MIGRATION OF ALBACORE IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL OF THE .MIGRATION OF ALBACORE IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN .By TAMIO OTSU and RICHARD N. UCHIDA of the migration of albacore in the North Pacific Ocean has been developed. This model is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a single population of albacore in the North Pacific Ocean. . The model depicts

237

SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS 1 iAware: Making Live Migration of Virtual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on harnessing live migration of VMs to achieve load balancing and power saving among different servers and destination servers during and after such VM migration. To avoid potential violations of service address is bli@cse.ust.hk. · Baochun Li is with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Li, Baochun

238

Interregional Migration in Germany: Characteristics and Effects for Regions and Migrants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interregional Migration in Germany: Characteristics and Effects for Regions and Migrants Christian of economic activity in East Germany initiated enormous migration flows from East to West Germany. People from East Germany moved towards West Germany, where wages are higher and em- ployment opportunities are more

Pfeifer, Holger

239

Vug waves: A mechanism for coupled rock deformation and fluid migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vug waves: A mechanism for coupled rock deformation and fluid migration Jason Phipps Morgan-migration mechanism in which a rock deforms by the movement of a penny-shaped, fluid-filled crack dislocation across, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA (holtz007@tc.umn.edu) [1] Vug waves are a joint deformation/fluid

Holtzman, Ben

240

ADAM: A Decentralized Parallel Computer Architecture Featuring Fast Thread and Data Migration and a Uniform Hardware  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADAM: A Decentralized Parallel Computer Architecture Featuring Fast Thread and Data Migration Parallel Computer Architecture Featuring Fast Thread and Data Migration and a Uniform Hardware Abstraction The furious pace of Moore's Law is driving computer architecture into a realm where the the speed of light

Gabrieli, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Anaerobic Migrating Blanket Reactor Treatment of Low-Strength Wastewater at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic Migrating Blanket Reactor Treatment of Low-Strength Wastewater at Low Temperatures Largus anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was studied for the treatment of low- strength soluble wastewater milk substrate as a synthetic wastewater at low temperatures (15 and 20 °C). The concentration

Angenent, Lars T.

242

Rural migration: The driving force behind tropical deforestation on the settlement frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rural migration: The driving force behind tropical deforestation on the settlement frontier Draft on the settlement frontier ABSTRACT #12;2 This paper reviews the state of knowledge and develops a conceptual model for researching frontier migration in the developing world with a focus on Latin America. Since only a small

Lopez-Carr, David

243

Migration Within the Frontier: The Second Generation Colonization in the Ecuadorian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration Within the Frontier: The Second Generation Colonization in the Ecuadorian Amazon Alisson in the physical landscape of the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon frontier, including considerable deforestation. Over, reflecting an evolving pattern of population mobility within the Amazon: rural­urban migration. Frontier

Lopez-Carr, David

244

Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates Formation and Silica Diagenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates Formation and Silica Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates-A to Opal-CT, the formation of gas hydrates, fluid substitution in hydrocarbon reservoirs, and fluid

Guerin, Gilles

245

PBRP Research Highlight Use of Lake Maurepas Wetlands by Migrating Birds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PBRP Research Highlight Use of Lake Maurepas Wetlands by Migrating Birds P.C. Stouffer and Jason A's largest migratory routes for Neotropical migratory birds, many of which use the Maurepas wetlands during spring and fall migrations. Large portions of swamp in the Maurepas wetlands have converted to marsh

Stouffer, Phil

246

Process Instance Migration: Flexible Execution of Distributed Business Processes Kristof Hamann, Sonja Zaplata, Winfried Lamersdorf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Instance Migration: Flexible Execution of Distributed Business Processes Kristof Hamann on process instance migration. It includes corresponding results in the context of dynamic and mobile environments (as, e.g., provided by mobile web services, NFC- aware process execution, future

Hamburg.Universität

247

Gas Migration from Closed Coal Mines to the Surface RISK ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY AND PREVENTION MEANS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Migration from Closed Coal Mines to the Surface RISK ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY AND PREVENTION to the surface is especially significant in the context of coal mines. This is because mine gas can migrate of the scheduled closure of all coal mining operations in France, INERIS has drawn up, at the request of national

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

Single-enzyme kinetics with branched pathways: exact theory and series expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The progress of the successive rounds of catalytic conversion of substrates into product(s) by a single enzyme is characterized by the distribution of turnover times. Establishing the most general form of dependence of this distribution on the substrate concentration [S] is one of the fundamental challenges in single molecule enzymology. The distribution of the times of dwell of a molecular motor at the successive positions on its track is an analogous quantity. We derive approximate series expansions for the [ATP]-dependence of the first two moments of the dwell time distributions of motors that catalyze hydrolysis of ATP to draw input energy. Comparison between our results for motors with branched pathways and the corresponding expressions reported earlier for linear enzymatic pathways provides deep insight into the effects of the branches. Such insight is likely to help in discovering the most general form of [S]-dependence of these fundamental distributions.

Ashok Garai; Debashish Chowdhury

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

accumulations sharing similar geologic, geographic, and temporal properties such as source rock, migration, pathway, timing, trapping mechanism, and hydrocarbon type TAPS:...

250

The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ? Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ? Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ? We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ? Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

Terakawa, Yuzo [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Croul, Sidney E. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Division of Neuropathology, University Health Network, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (Canada); Rutka, James T., E-mail: james.rutka@sickkids.ca [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Entropic Time  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

Caticha, Ariel [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, NY 12222 (United States)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

Electrohydrodynamic migration of a spherical drop in a general quadratic flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the motion of a spherical drop in a general quadratic flow acted upon by an arbitrarily oriented externally applied uniform electric field. The drop and media are considered to be leaky dielectrics. The flow field affects the distribution of charges on the drop surface, which leads to alteration in the electric field, thereby affecting the velocity field through the Maxwell stress on the fluid-fluid interface. The two-way coupled electrohydrodynamics is central towards dictating the motion of the drop in the flow field. We analytically address the electric potential distribution and Stokesian flow field in and around the drop in a general quadratic flow for small electric Reynolds number (which is the ratio of the charge relaxation time scale to the convective time scale). As a special case, we consider a drop in an unbounded cylindrical Poiseuille flow and show that, an otherwise absent, cross-stream drop migration may be obtained in the presence of a uniform electric field. Depending on the d...

Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chakraborty, Suman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

On the gap-opening criterion of migrating planets in protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to quantitatively explore the torque balance criterion for gap-opening (as formulated by Crida et al. 2006) in a variety of disks when considering a migrating planet. We find that even when the criterion is satisfied, there are instances when planets still do not open gaps. We stress that gap-opening is not only dependent on whether a planet has the ability to open a gap, but whether it can do so quickly enough. This can be expressed as an additional condition on the gap-opening timescale versus the crossing time, i.e. the time it takes the planet to cross the region which it is carving out. While this point has been briefly made in the previous literature, our results quantify it for a range of protoplanetary disk properties and planetary masses, demonstrating how crucial it is for gap-opening. This additional condition has important implications for the survival of planets formed by core accretion in low mass disks as well as giant planets or brown dwarf...

Malik, Matej; Mayer, Lucio; Meyer, Michael R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Serpentinization reaction pathways: implications for modeling approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental seawater-peridotite reaction pathways to form serpentinites at 300/sup 0/C, 500 bars, can be accurately modeled using the EQ3/6 codes in conjunction with thermodynamic and kinetic data from the literature and unpublished compilations. These models provide both confirmation of experimental interpretations and more detailed insight into hydrothermal reaction processes within the oceanic crust. The accuracy of these models depends on careful evaluation of the aqueous speciation model, use of mineral compositions that closely reproduce compositions in the experiments, and definition of realistic reactive components in terms of composition, thermodynamic data, and reaction rates.

Janecky, D.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Light Duty Vehicle Pathways | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001 Letter Report:Life-CycleDuty Vehicle Pathways Light

256

Solar Market Pathways | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned Small Business Webinar June 20, 2013 -ofSoftwareSolar CellMarket Pathways

257

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Groundto ApplyRoadmapNear-term CostHydrogen: Over1Pathway

258

During their offshore migration, sea turtle hatchlings swim away from their natal beaches and into the open ocean. Early  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During their offshore migration, sea turtle hatchlings swim away from their natal beaches © The Company of Biologists Limited 1995 At the beginning of their offshore migration, hatchling sea turtles

Lohmann, Kenneth J.

259

Functional transcriptomic analysis of the role of MAB-5/Hox in Q neuroblast migration in Caenorhabditis elegans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Directed cell migration is a fundamental process in normal development and in tumor metastasis. In C. elegans the MAB-5/Hox transcription factor is a determinant of posterior migration of the Q neuroblast ...

Tamayo, Joel V.; Gujar, Mahekta; Macdonald, Stuart J.; Lundquist, Erik A.

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ionizing Radiation Promotes Migration and Invasion of Cancer Cells Through Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine whether ionizing radiation enhances the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells through transforming growth factor (TGF-{beta})-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Methods and Materials: Six cancer cell lines originating from different human organs were irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, and the changes associated with EMT, including morphology, EMT markers, migration and invasion, were observed by microscope, Western blot, immunofluorescence, scratch assay, and transwell chamber assay, respectively. Then the protein levels of TGF-{beta} in these cancer cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in the effect of ionizing radiation on EMT was investigate by using the specific inhibitor SB431542. Results: After irradiation with {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, cancer cells presented the mesenchymal phenotype, and compared with the sham-irradiation group the expression of epithelial markers was decreased and of mesenchymal markers was increased, the migratory and invasive capabilities were strengthened, and the protein levels of TGF-{beta} were enhanced. Furthermore, events associated with EMT induced by IR in A549 could be reversed through inhibition of TGF-{beta} signaling. Conclusions: These results suggest that EMT mediated by TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in IR-induced enhancing of migratory and invasive capabilities in cancer cells.

Zhou Yongchun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Liu Junye; Li Jing; Zhang Jie [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Xu Yuqiao [Department of Pathology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Zhang Huawei; Qiu Lianbo; Ding Guirong [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Su Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, 306th Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Mei Shi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Guo Guozhen, E-mail: guozhenguo@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Preliminary conceptual study on impact of land reclamation on groundwater flow and contaminant migration in Penny's Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but will migrate northeast toward Yam O Wan. FEMWATER, a three-dimensional finite element ground water model

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

262

Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the test methods performed throughout the lifetime of the project has focused on different aspects of the concrete waste form weathering process. Diffusion of different analytes [technetium-99 (Tc-99), iodine-125 (I-125), stable iodine (I), uranium (U), and rhenium (Re)] has been quantified from experiments under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The water-saturated conditions provide a conservative estimate of the concrete’s performance in situ, and the unsaturated conditions provide a more accurate estimate of the diffusion of contaminants from the concrete.

Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Powers, Laura; Whyatt, Greg A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. •miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. •miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. •NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. •NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2–3 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of miR-196a in cervical carcinogenesis and suggested a potential use of miR-196a for clinical diagnosis and as a therapeutic target.

Zhang, Jie [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Zheng, Fangxia [Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Yu, Gang [Department for Disease Control, Tumor Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department for Disease Control, Tumor Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Yin, Yanhua, E-mail: yinyanhuablk@163.com [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Lu, Qingyang [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development of an in vitro model for migration inhibitory factor utilizing a component of cobra venom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Committee~ Head of Depar me j'7 c Member Membe May 1976 ABSTRACT Development of an In Vitro Model for Migration Inhibitory Factor Utilizing a Component of Cobra Venon. May (1976) Lee James Carmack, B. S. , Texas ASM University; Chairman of Advisory... of fractions eluted from the ion exchange column 2 Effects of whole cobra venom (CV), dialyzed cobra venom (OCV), Arvin, and Venacil on migration of normal mouse peritoneal exudate cells in cell culture 3 Effects on migration of normal mouse peritoneal...

Carmack, Lee James

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Right Ventricular Migration of a Recovery IVC Filter's Fractured Wire with Subsequent Pericardial Tamponade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Recovery filter (C.R. Bard, Tempe, AZ, USA) is a device for pulmonary embolism prophylaxis. There have been few case reports involving the migration of this particular filter or of a broken wire migrating to the heart. We report a case of right ventricular migration of a fractured wire from this filter in a patient who subsequently developed pericardial tamponade and required open heart surgery to extract the fractured wire. We discuss the current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved nonpermanent inferior vena cava filters and their reported complications. These complications can be life-threatening and may require immediate surgical intervention.

Saeed, Imran [Christiana Hospital, MAP 2, Suite 2121 (United States)], E-mail: isaeed@christianacare.org; Garcia, Mark [Christiana Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); McNicholas, Kathleen [Christiana Hospital, MAP 1, Suite 205 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using...

268

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing In fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating, biomass is rapidly heated in a fluidized bed to create...

269

alternative pathway responsible: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Questioning Inevitability of Energy Pathways: Alternative Energy Scenarios for California Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Questioning...

270

alternative pathway mediates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Questioning Inevitability of Energy Pathways: Alternative Energy Scenarios for California Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Questioning...

271

Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Whole algae hydrothermal liquefaction is one of...

272

Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Syngas upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels is one of...

273

Pathways for Implementing REDD+: Experiences from Carbon Markets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Markets and Communities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Pathways for Implementing REDD+: Experiences from Carbon Markets and Communities Agency...

274

Systems biology of endothelial mechano-activated pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple signaling pathways are employed by endothelial cells to differentially respond to distinct hemodynamic environments and acquire functional phenotypes, including regulation of inflammation, angiogenesis, blood ...

Koo, Andrew Jia-An

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation? – Revisiting the “go or grow” hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The “go or grow” hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. - Highlights: • We investigated the “go or grow” hypothesis in human cancer cells in vitro. • Proliferation and migration positively correlate in melanoma and lung cancer cells. • Duration of cytokinesis and migration shows inverse correlation. • Increased FAK activation is present in highly motile melanoma cells.

Garay, Tamás; Juhász, Éva; Molnár, Eszter [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Eisenbauer, Maria [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czirók, András [Department of Biological Physics, Eötvös University, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Dekan, Barbara; László, Viktória; Hoda, Mir Alireza [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Döme, Balázs [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); National Korányi Institute of TB and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tímár, József [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Klepetko, Walter [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Walter [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Heged?s, Balázs, E-mail: balazs.hegedus@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Global Migration in Transition: The Americas, Europe, and Italian Diaspora (1946-1960)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigates the development of post-WWII Italian migration to Argentina, Belgium, Canada, and The U.S. and it frames this case-study within the broader discussion about he ways in which past population movements ...

Maccari-Clayton, Marina

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Foraging Cost of Migration for a Partially Migratory Cyprinid Fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­70% of their energy reserves during their spawning migration [12], and both sustained flight and also stop, Lund University, Lund, Sweden, 2 National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University

279

Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 319 Abraham Flexner Way, Room 515, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Hu Chuan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 319 Abraham Flexner Way, Room 515, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States)], E-mail: chuan.hu@louisville.edu

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Implementing Incremental Code Migration with XML Wolfgang Emmerich, Cecilia Mascolo \\Lambda and Anthony Finkelstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing Incremental Code Migration with XML Wolfgang Emmerich, Cecilia Mascolo \\Lambda fW.Emmerich|C.Mascolo|A.Finkelsteing@cs.ucl.ac.uk ABSTRACT We demonstrate how XML and related

Mascolo, Cecilia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Survival of Terrestrial Planets in the Presence of Giant Planet Migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of ``Hot Jupiters'', Jovian mass planets with very short orbital periods orbiting nearby main sequence stars, has been proposed to be primarily due to the orbital migration of planets formed in orbits initially much further from the parent star. The migration of giant planets would have profound effects on the evolution of inner terrestrial planets in these systems, and previous analyses have assumed that no terrestrial planets survive after migration has occurred. We present numerical simulations showing that a significant fraction of terrestrial planets could survive the migration process, eventually returning to circular orbits relatively close to their original positions. A fraction of the final orbits are in the Habitable Zone, suggesting that planetary systems with close-in giant planets are viable targets for searches for Earth-like habitable planets around other stars.

Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Quantitative approaches to understanding signaling regulation of 3D cell migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For many cancers, dissemination of tumor cells to form metastases is not only a hallmark of the disease but an essential step to mortality. Migration and dissemination are complex, multistep processes, and study of their ...

Meyer, Aaron Samuel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - a549 cells migrate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine 25 Retinoids and Their Receptors in Cancer XIAO-KUN ZHANG, PH.D. Summary: the mitochondria. Such a migration ofTR3 from the nucleus to...

284

Oxygen Vacancy Formation and Migration in CexTh_xO Solid Solution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of magnetic properties by varying the CeO&8322; content. Citation: Xiao HY, and WJ Weber.2011."Oxygen Vacancy Formation and Migration in CexTh?xO? Solid Solution."Journal of...

285

Biased migration of confined neutrophil-like cells in asymmetric hydraulic environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cells integrate multiple measurement modalities to navigate their environment. Soluble and substrate-bound chemical gradients and physical cues have all been shown to influence cell orientation and migration. Here we ...

Mahadevan, L.

286

Evolutionary History of Helicobacter pylori Sequences Reflect Past Human Migrations in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolutionary History of Helicobacter pylori Sequences Reflect Past Human Migrations in Southeast analyse housekeeping gene sequences of the human stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori from various, Dieye FB, et al. (2011) Evolutionary History of Helicobacter pylori Sequences Reflect Past Human

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis infers migration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of rounds of pre-copying, based on our analysis... Live Migration of Virtual Machines Christopher Clark, Keir Fraser, Steven Hand, Jacob Gorm Hansen... firstname.lastname@cl.ca...

288

The role of macrophage chemoattractant signaling in cancer cell migration, metastasis and neovascularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007) Stroma-derived factor (SDF-1/ CXCL12) and human tumorCells..15 3.4 SDF-1?, VEGF andMAB Migration Adhesion Buffer SDF-1? Stromal Derived Factor-

Liu, Tiffany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal migration disappearing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: animal migration disappearing Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Marine Ecology Progress Series 233:117-130 Changes in distribution and decrease in numbers during...

290

Formation, migration, and clustering of delocalized vacancies and interstitials at a solid-state semicoherent interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomistic simulations are used to study the formation, migration, and clustering of delocalized vacancies and interstitials at a model fcc-bcc semicoherent interface formed by adjacent layers of Cu and Nb. These defects ...

Kolluri, Kedarnath

291

An empirical model of subcritical bedform migration CHAN-YI MARTIN LIN and JEREMY G. VENDITTI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An empirical model of subcritical bedform migration CHAN-YI MARTIN LIN and JEREMY G. VENDITTI the full range of conditions under which subcritical bedforms develop. Here, the relation between bedform

Venditti, Jeremy G.

292

Migration of the European sea bass Cefas have been collaborating with IFREMER scientists and the Breton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration of the European sea bass Cefas have been collaborating with IFREMER scientists bass, Dicentrarchus labrax. Although a popular and important catch for both commercial and recreational fishermen, relatively little is known about the behaviour of this highly migratory fish

293

GPER Inhibition of Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our research investigated a possible target for cardiovascular disease treatment via the G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Estrogen mitigates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration, which plays an important role...

Szynkarski, Claudia Kay

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Short- and Long- Time Transport Structures in a Three Dimensional Time Dependent Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian transport structures for three-dimensional and time-dependent fluid flows are of great interest in numerous applications, particularly for geophysical or oceanic flows. In such flows, chaotic transport and mixing can play important environmental and ecological roles, for examples in pollution spills or plankton migration. In such flows, where simulations or observations are typically available only over a short time, understanding the difference between short-time and long-time transport structures is critical. In this paper, we use a set of classical (i.e. Poincar\\'e section, Lyapunov exponent) and alternative (i.e. finite time Lyapunov exponent, Lagrangian coherent structures) tools from dynamical systems theory that analyze chaotic transport both qualitatively and quantitatively. With this set of tools we are able to reveal, identify and highlight differences between short- and long-time transport structures inside a flow composed of a primary horizontal contra-rotating vortex chain, small later...

Chabreyrie, Rodolphe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 3: SCENARIOS FOR A LOW-CARBON TRANSPORTATION FUTURE PART 3 Part 3: Scenarios

California at Davis, University of

296

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 3 CHAPTER 10: OPTIMIZING THE TRANSPORTATION CLIMATE MITIGATION WEDGE Chapter

California at Davis, University of

297

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS CHAPTER 8: SCENARIOS FOR DEEP REDUCTIONS IN GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS PART 3

California at Davis, University of

298

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-duty markets for advanced electric-drive technologies such as plug-in hybrids and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles electric vehicles (PHEVs) play a major role beyond 2025. · FCV success--Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 1: INDIVIDUAL FUEL/VEHICLE PATHWAYS PART 3 Chapter 9: Transition Scenarios

California at Davis, University of

302

Bioenergy Production Pathways and Value-Chain Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy Production Pathways and Value-Chain Components Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy on Life Cycle Analyses of Bioenergy Systems Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Bioenergy Production Pathways

303

Physics Pathway: A Digital Library Filled with Synthetic Interviews*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics Pathway: A Digital Library Filled with Synthetic Interviews* Michael G. Christel-412-268-7796 sms@cs.cmu.edu Dean Zollman Department of Physics Kansas State University Manhattan, KS 66506 1-785-532-1619 dzollman@phys.ksu.edu ABSTRACT Physics Pathway is a digital library available through an Adobe Flash portal

Christel, Mike

304

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan, batteries, and ultracapacitors. Andrew #12;316 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS AUTHORS://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/>. For information on commercial licensing, contact copyright@ucdavis.edu. #12;315 SUSTAINABLE

California at Davis, University of

305

SPIKE: a database of highly curated human signaling pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPIKE: a database of highly curated human signaling pathways Arnon Paz1 , Zippora Brownstein1 Knowledge Engine; http:// www.cs.tau.ac.il/spike/) is a database for achieving this goal, containing highly on the nature of each interaction. To make database population and pathway comprehension straightforward

Avraham, Karen

306

Pathways, Networks and Therapy: A Boolean Approach to Systems Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 1. Cell cycle control, DNA mutation and cancer . . . . . . . 89 D. Growth factor mediated pathways: combinatorial network . . . 91 1. Input-output simulation of the BN . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 2. Modeling faults and therapeutic... of pathways and therapeutic target point knowl- edge in systems biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 36 Personalized medicine using systems biology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Biology is a...

Layek, Ritwik

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modelling Inhibition in Metabolic Pathways Through Abduction and Induction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling Inhibition in Metabolic Pathways Through Abduction and Induction Alireza Tamaddoni abduction and induction can be used to understand the functional class of unknown enzymes or inhibitors. We show how we can model, within Abductive Logic Programming (ALP), inhibition in metabolic pathways

Pazos, Florencio

308

A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

Mark Zumberge

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway Abstract Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural

Boyer, Edmond

310

Cyclone-cyclone Interactions through the Ocean Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intense SST (Sea Surface Temperature) cooling caused by hurricane-induced mixing is restored at timescales on the order of weeks(1) and thus may persist long enough to influence a later hurricane passing over it. Though many studies have evaluated the effects of SST cool-ing induced by a hurricane on its own intensification(2, 3), none has looked at its effect on later storms. Using an analysis of observations and numerical model simulations, we demonstrate that hurricanes may influence the intensity of later hurricanes that pass over their linger-ing wakes. On average, when hurricanes encounter cold wakes, they experience SSTs that are ~0.4oC lower than when they do not encounter wakes and consequently decay(intensify) at a rate that is nearly three times faster(slower). In the region of warm SSTs (* 26.5oC) where the most intense and damaging hurricanes tend to occur, the percentage of hurricanes that encounter lingering cold wakes increases with hurricane frequency and was found to be as high as 40%. Furthermore, we estimate that the cumulative power dissipated(4) by the most energetic hurricanes has been reduced by as much as ~7% in a season through this effect. As the debate on changes in Atlantic hurricane activity associated with global warming(5) continues, the negative feedback between hurricane frequency and intensity resulting from hurricane-hurricane interactions through the ocean pathway deserves attention.

Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.; Knaff, John A.

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

Effect of Concrete Waste Form Properties on Radionuclide Migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation) the mechanism of contaminant release, the significance of contaminant release pathways, how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility, the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility, the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. Numerous sets of tests were initiated in fiscal years (FY) 2006-2009 to evaluate (1) diffusion of iodine (I) and technetium (Tc) from concrete into uncontaminated soil after 1 and 2 years, (2) I and rhenium (Re) diffusion from contaminated soil into fractured concrete, (3) I and Re (set 1) and Tc (set 2) diffusion from fractured concrete into uncontaminated soil, (4) evaluate the moisture distribution profile within the sediment half-cell, (5) the reactivity and speciation of uranium (VI) (U(VI)) compounds in concrete porewaters, (6) the rate of dissolution of concrete monoliths, and (7) the diffusion of simulated tank waste into concrete.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Skinner, De'Chauna J.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Wood, Marcus I.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Female Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Female Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time 1 Amy:56:27.6 Deborah Mc Eligot Deborah Storrings Male Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time 1 Macon Fessenden 20 1 5:42.2 2 0:26.9 1 34:29.7 3:23 1 0:12.8 1 17:41.1 3

Suzuki, Masatsugu

313

Cavity opening by a giant planet in a protoplanetary disc and effects on planetary migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of a Jovian planet on the gas distribution of a protoplanetary disc, using a new numerical scheme that allows us to take into consideration the global evolution of the disc, down to an arbitrarily small inner physical radius. We find that Jovian planets do not open cavities in the inner part of the disc (i.e. interior to their orbits) unless (a) the inner physical edge of the disc is close to the planet's location or (b) the planet is much more massive than the disc. In all other cases the planet simply opens a gap in the gas density distribution, whose global profile is essentially unchanged relative to the one that it would have if the planet were absent. We recognize, though, that the dust distribution can be significantly different from the gas distribution and that dust cavities might be opened in some situations, even if the gas is still present in the inner part of the disc. Concerning the migration of the planet, we find that classical Type-II migration (with speed proportional to the viscosity of the disc) occurs only if the gap opened by the planet is deep and clean. If there is still a significant amount of gas in the gap, the migration of the planet is generally slower than the theoretical Type-II migration rate. In some situations, migration can be stopped or even reversed. We develop a simple model that reproduces satisfactorily the migration rate observed in the simulations, for a wide range of disc viscosities and planet masses and locations relative to the inner disc edge. Our results are relevant for extra-solar planetary systems, as they explain (a) why some hot Jupiters did not migrate all the way down to their parent stars and (b) why the outermost of a pair of resonant planets is typically the most massive one.

A. Crida; A. Morbidelli

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Pathway Controlled Penetration (PcP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical approach employs advanced computational simulation tools to demonstrate how current assets can destroy RWK-RFI-12-0001's HDBT, a tunnel complex with two portals built into the base of a granite mountain. The granite over layer is assumed to be 60 meters thick over both portals and 80 meters over the facility's mission space. Key S&T is the completed development of a highly innovative viscoplastic fracture material model, 3D parallel gas-fracture capabilities into FDEM, and a stochastic handling of the material properties. Phase I - Develop and validate code simulation tools: (1) develop, incorporate and validate AZ-Frac material model for granite; and (2) Develop and incorporate gas-driven-fracture modeling into LANL's FDEM MUNROU code; (3) Develop and incorporate stochastic features into FDEM modeling. Phase II - Conduct PcP analysis on above HDBT: (1) Acquire HDBT design data, develop simulation model; and (2) Evaluate and select most promising defeat alternative. Phase III - Deliver code, train Service target analysts, and conduct simulations against real world HDBTs. PcP uses advanced computer simulations to enhance HDBT functional defeat efforts. Newly developed material models that account for fractural energy coupled with the finite discrete element methodology (FDEM) will provide targeting packages that will create penetration avenues for current or future lethality options. This novel computational approach requires full 3D geologic and structure characterization as well as significant high performance computing capabilities. The goal is to distinctively alter the targeting paradigm by leveraging critical DoD assets along with insitu geologic strata. In other words, assets will utilize underground rock structure to their benefit by creating rubbilization zones that will allow pathway controlled penetration.

Knight, Earl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rougier, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zubelewicz, Aleksander [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

315

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Time Off  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScienceThe43068G. ThundatSmallDepartment ofTimTime

317

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008 Report of Research.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are listed below: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m{sup 2}) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

318

Waltzing of a helium pair in tungsten: Migration barrier and trajectory revealed from first-principles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite well documented first-principles theoretical determination of the low migration energy (0.06 eV) of a single He in tungsten, fully quantum mechanical calculations on the migration of a He pair still present a challenge due to the complexity of its trajectory. By identifying the six most stable configurations of the He pair in W and decomposing its motion into rotational, translational, and rotational-translational routines, we are able to determine its migration barrier and trajectory. Our density functional theory calculations demonstrate a He pair has three modes of motion: a close or open circular two-dimensional motion in (100) plane with an energy barrier of 0.30 eV, a snaking motion along [001] direction with a barrier of 0.30 eV, and a twisted-ladder motion along [010] direction with the two He swinging in the plane (100) and a barrier of 0.31 eV. The graceful associative movements of a He pair are related to the chemical-bonding-like He-He interaction being much stronger than its migration barrier in W. The excellent agreement with available experimental measurements (0.24–0.32 eV) on He migration makes our first-principles result a solid input to obtain accurate He-W interatomic potentials in molecular dynamics simulations.

Niu, J. G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hebei University, Baoding 071000 (China); Zhan, Q., E-mail: qzhan@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Geng, W. T., E-mail: geng@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Psi Quantum Materials LLC, Laiwu 271100 (China)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

immigration in prime time spanish television. Pathways towards inferring modern racism from content analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the image of immigra- tion in television fiction based on both Cultivation Theory and previous studies about the representation of ethnic and immigrant minorities in television fiction (Greenberg, Mastro & Brand, 2002 (Green- berg, Mastro & Brand, 2002; Harwood & Anderson, 2002; Mastro & Behm-Morawitz, 2005; Mastro

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

320

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II:LIGHT-DUTY VEHICLES Vehicle Technology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Determination of Migration Parameters for Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Terephthalate and Nylon 6 by Dynamic Permeation Cell Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Migration Parameters for Volatile Organic Compounds in Polyethylene Terephthalate, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP); however

Heller, Barbara

322

Novel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and Targets Controlled by Transcription Factors CREM in the Testis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins in spermatids: Downstream targets and implicationsNovel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and TargetsNovel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and Targets

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulation pathway for biofuels production Chew Yee Ngan ,regulation pathway for biofuels production Chew Yee Ngan,for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from

Ngan, Chew Yee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

atm-activated chk2-executed pathway: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

below CS111. Website: http:www.cs.bu.edu; Contact: Wayne Snyder, snyder Goldberg, Bennett 8 Biological Pathways A pathway to explore diseases mechanism Biology and Medicine...

325

A Systems Biology Approach to Develop Models of Signal Transduction Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................................... ix LIST OF FIGURES ................................................................................................... xiii LIST OF TABLES .................................................................................................... xvi 1.... INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... 1 1.1 Signal Transduction Pathway ............................................................... 1 1.2 Signal Transduction Pathway Modeling...

Huang, Zuyi

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating ultimate pathways Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 17 A unified mechanism for protein folding: Predetermined pathways with optional errors Summary: ; therefore the off-pathway...

327

Heat transfer pathways in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permission. QC-06-053 Heat Transfer Pathways in Underfloorchange the dynamics of heat transfer within a room as wellchange the dynamics of heat transfer within a room as well

Bauman, F.; Jin, H.; Webster, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Monitoring Long-Range Electron Transfer Pathways in Proteins...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure and should offer a novel window for long-range ET. Citation: Zhang Y, J Biggs, N Govind, and S Mukamel.2014."Monitoring Long-Range Electron Transfer Pathways in...

329

A Usability Assessment of the Engineering Pathway Educational Digital Library   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be helpful to me.   Advanced Search  Engineering Pathway When using the “Advanced Search” at the top of the linked to a  combined advanced search (both K?12 and higher 

Robinson, Stefanie L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation, USA ABSTRACT In order to optimize and extend the life of photovoltaics (PV) modules, scientific photovoltaics. The statisti- cally significant relationships were investigated using lifetime and degradation

Rollins, Andrew M.

331

Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance Nicholas R. Wheeler, Laura data from Underwriter Labs, featuring measurements taken on 18 identical photovoltaic (PV) modules in modules and their effects on module performance over lifetime. Index Terms--photovoltaics, statistical

Rollins, Andrew M.

332

Polyprenyl-dependent glycan assembly pathways in microbial pathogens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyisoprenyl-dependent glycan assembly pathways form the basis for the biosynthesis of many complex glycoconjugates. This thesis addresses key aspects of undecaprenyl-phosphate related processes; undecaprenol is the linear ...

Hartley, Meredith Diane

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emissions reduction. * NG use can provide a pathway for future bio-based fuels (e.g., biogas and gas + biomass-to-liquids GBTL). Natural Gas Use in Transportation Offers...

334

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Controlling plasma distributions as driving forces for ion migration during fs laser writing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of structures written inside dielectrics with high repetition rate femtosecond lasers are known to depend strongly on the complex interplay of a large number of writing parameters. Recently, ion migration within the laser-excited volume has been identified as a powerful mechanism for changing the local element distribution and producing efficient optical waveguides. In this work it is shown that the transient plasma distribution induced during laser irradiation is a reliable monitor for predicting the final refractive index distribution of the waveguide caused by ion migration. By performing in-situ plasma emission microscopy during the writing process inside a La-phosphate glass it is found that the long axis of the plasma distribution determines the axis of ion migration, being responsible for the local refractive index increase. This observation is also valid when strong positive or negative spherical aberration is induced, greatly deforming the focal volume and inverting the index profile. ...

Fernandez, Toney Teddy; Hoyo, Jesus; Sotillo, Belen; Fernandez, Paloma; Solis, Javier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Session: Avian migration and implications for wind power development in the Eastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session was arranged to convey what is known about avian migration, particularly in the eastern US. The first presentation ''Migration Ecology: Issues of Scale and Behavior'' by Sarah Mabey frames the issue of migratory bird interactions with wind energy facilities from an ecological perspective: when, where, and why are migrant bird species vulnerable to wind turbine collision. The second presentation ''Radar Studies of Nocturnal Migration at Wind Sites in the Eastern US'' by Brian Cooper reported on radar studies conducted at wind sites in the eastern US, including Mount Storm, Clipper Wind, and others.

Mabey, Sarah; Cooper, Brian

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate than at any time in the past 60 years (USDA 2009), and the continued demand for productive agricultural that enhance ecosystem services including water, nutrient, and organic matter retention (Lal et al. 2004

Cleveland, Cory

339

Lglise I., 2008, Plurilinguisme et migrations en Guyane franaise , Cahiers de l'Observatoire des pratiques linguistiques, 2, Plurilinguisme et migrations, Presses Universitaire d'Orlans.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the overseas Department of French Guiana. L'immigration et les mobilités de population sont constitutives du populations amérindiennes depuis près de 2000 ans, colonisation et esclavage, puis migrations économiques et immigration spontanée essentiellement du Brésil, du Surinam et d'Haïti. Le corollaire en est que cette

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Prediction of diffusion coefficients in cement-based materials on the basis of migration experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chloride diffusion and migration coefficients of 15 different mortar mixtures were systematically compared. Test parameters included water/binder ratio (0.25 and 0.45), type of binder (ASTM type 1, ASTM type 3, and ASTM type 5), use of silica fume and sand volume fractions (0%, 30%, and 50%). Test results indicate the various ways of evaluating chloride transport coefficients generally yield much different values. Test results also show that the assumption of non interacting diffusing flows, used in the mathematical treatment of diffusion and migration equations, is most probably incorrect.

Delagrave, A.; Marchand, J.; Samson, E. [Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)] [Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10°C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir’s epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water’s surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Like all other vertebrates, fish need time to recover after exhaustive activity. Furthermore, a rapid rate of recovery may  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Like all other vertebrates, fish need time to recover after exhaustive activity. Furthermore. For example, a rapid rate of recovery is needed to keep migratory passage timely when adult salmon use of anaerobic swimming because the entire upstream migration is completed using stored energy reserves

Farrell, Anthony P.

343

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Transport and transportation pathways of hazardous chemicals from solid waste disposal. Environ. Health Perspect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To evaluate the impact of hazardous chemicals in solid wastes on man and other organisms, it is necessary to have information about amounts of chemical present, extent of exposure, and chemical toxicity. This paper addresses the question of organism exposure by considering the major physical and biological transport pathways and the physicochemical and biochemical transformations that may occur in sediments, soils, and water. Disposal of solid wastes in both terrestrial and oceank environments is considered. Atmospheric transport is considered for emissions from incineration of solid wastes and for wind resuspension of particulates from surface waste deposits. Solid wastes deposited in terrestrial environments are subject to leaching by surface and ground waters. Leachates may then be transported to other surface waters and drinking water aquifers through hydrologic transport. Leachates also interact with natural organic matter, clays, and microorganisms in soils and sediments. These interactions may render chemical constituents in leachates more or less mobile, possibly change chemical and physical forms, and alter their biological activity. Oceanic waste disposal practices result in migration through diffusion and ocean currents. Surface area-to-volume ratios play a major role in the initial distributions of chemicals in the aquatic environment. Sediments serve as major sources and sinks of chemical contaminants. Food chain transport in both aquatic and terrestrial environments results in the movement of hazardous chemicals from lower to higher positions in the food web. Bioconcentration is observed in both terrestrial and aquatic food chains with certain elements and synthetic organics. Bioconcentration factors tend to be higher for synthetic organics, and higher in aquatic than in terrestrial systems. Biodilution is not atypical in terrestrial environments. Synergistic and antagonistic actions are common occurrences among chemical contaminants and can be particularly important toxicity considerations in aquatic environments receiving runoff from several terrestrial sources.

Robert Van Hook

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Preliminary investigation of the nature of hydrocarbon migration and entrapment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structures. The charge time for commercial hydrocarbon accumulation is much longer in oil-water systems than in oil-gas-water systems. Faults are classified into charging faults and ?back doors? ? faults other than charging faults in stacked fault...-bounded reservoirs. The lower the displacement pressure of a fault, the higher its updip oil transportation ability. The downdip oil transportation ability of a fault is usually low and cannot cause commercial downdip oil accumulation. Back doors affect both...

Bai, Jianyong

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Cs deposition and vertical migration in soils from Argentina J. Juri Ayub, M. Rizzotto, J. Toso, H. Velasco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 137 Cs deposition and vertical migration in soils from Argentina J. Juri Ayub, M. Rizzotto, J), Universidad Nacional de San Luis. CONICET. Ejército de los Andes 950, 5700 San Luis, Argentina Abstract. Vertical migration of 137 Cs global fallout was studied in soils from Argentina. The sampling area

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

347

Effects of O vacancies and N or Si substitutions on Li+ migration in Li3PO4 electrolytes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of O vacancies and N or Si substitutions on Li+ migration in Li3PO4 electrolytes from first constructed realistic models of various types of isolated defects in crystalline Li3PO4 involving O vacancies on the production and migration of mobile Li ions. We find that mobile Li-ion vacancies are stabilized by removing

Holzwarth, Natalie

348

Tritium hazard via the ingestion pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model that allows for the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase the total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound to loose ratio of tritium in the diet. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Travis, C.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Distributed Task Migration for Thermal Management in Many-core Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chip complexity and power envelope elevate peak temperatures of chip and imbalance the thermal gradientDistributed Task Migration for Thermal Management in Many-core Systems Yang Ge, Parth Malani, Qinru York {yge2, pmalani1, qqiu}@binghamton.edu ABSTRACT In the deep submicron era, thermal hot spots

Qiu, Qinru

350

Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation and control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation a specific stock-effort dynamic model. The stock corresponds to two fish populations growing and moving between two fishing zones, on which they are harvested by two different fleets. The effort represents

Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

351

1,2-Sulfanyl Group Migration as a Driving Force: New Approach to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) For general reviews on pyrroles, see: (a) Jones, R. A. In Pyrroles, Part II, The Synthesis, Reacti. Chem. 2001, 66, 4058. (4) For reviews on pyrrole synthesis, see: (a) Sundberg, R. J. In Comprehensi1,2-Sulfanyl Group Migration as a Driving Force: New Approach to Pyrroles by Reaction of Allenic

Wang, Jianbo

352

CONSIDERATION OF THREE PROPOSED MODELS OF THE MIGRATION OF YOUNG SKIPJACK TUNA (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSIDERATION OF THREE PROPOSED MODELS OF THE MIGRATION OF YOUNG SKIPJACK TUNA (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS (KatsuUJonus pelamis) in in the eastern Pacific Ocean have a central racific spawning origin. Three (Katsuwonus pelamis) are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical surface waters of world oceans

353

The New West: Patterns of Internal Migration at the Beginning of the 21st Century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This dissertation utilized data from the United States Bureau of the Census‘ County and City Data Book: 2007 and other sources to analyze migration patterns at the structural-contextual level and the individual-level in the New West. At the structural...

Meyer, Leslie Denise

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fracturing controlled primary migration of hydrocarbon fluids during1 heating of organic-rich shales2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understand primary migration of16 hydrocarbon fluids in very low permeability source rock. Cracks nucleate.e. the transport of hydrocarbon fluids from extremely low39 permeability source rocks in which they are generated the source rock is42 formed is buried, the organic material is transformed into complex high molecular weight

356

The Migration of Di use Photon Density Waves through Highly Scattering Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The radiative transport equation is a more accurate model for the migration of photons in general of Turbid Media: Theory and Applications assumptions that reduce the general transport equation to a di to the transport equation. 2.1 Di usion Approximation to the Transport Equation The linear transport equation

357

Mortality of bats at wind turbines links to nocturnal insect migration?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Mortality of bats at wind turbines links to nocturnal insect migration? Jens Rydell & Lothar. Modern wind turbines seem to reach high enough into the airspace to interfere with the migratory movements of insects. The hypothesis is consistent with recent observa- tions of bats at wind turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

358

MDE and Mobile agents: another reflection on the agent migration Tahar GHERBI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MDE and Mobile agents: another reflection on the agent migration Tahar GHERBI Computer science code. Mobile agents are a very interesting technology to develop applications for mobile and distributed environments. A mobile agent is essentially a computer program that acts autonomously on behalf

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

359

Migration of Earth-size planets in 3D radiative discs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we address the migration of small mass planets in 3D radiative disks. Indeed, migration of small planets is known to be too fast inwards in locally isothermal conditions. However, thermal effects could reverse its direction, potentially saving planets in the inner, optically thick parts of the protoplanetary disc. This effect has been seen for masses larger than 5 Earth masses, but the minimum mass for this to happen has never been probed numerically, although it is of crucial importance for planet formation scenarios. We have extended the hydro-dynamical code FARGO to 3D, with thermal diffusion. With this code, we perform simulations of embedded planets down to 2 Earth masses. For a set of discs parameters for which outward migration has been shown in the range of $[5, 35]$ Earth masses, we find that the transition to inward migration occurs for masses in the range $[3, 5]$ Earth masses. The transition appears to be due to an unexpected phenomenon: the formation of an asymmetric cold and dense...

Lega, E; Bitsch, B; Morbidelli, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thymosin {beta}4 promotes the migration of endothelial cells without intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous studies have demonstrated the effects of T{beta}4 on cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and inflammation after exogenous treatment, but the mechanism by which T{beta}4 functions is still unclear. Previously, we demonstrated that incubation of endothelial cells with T{beta}4 induced synthesis and secretion of various proteins, including plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and matrix metaloproteinases. We also showed that T{beta}4 interacts with Ku80, which may operate as a novel receptor for T{beta}4 and mediates its intracellular activity. In this paper, we provide evidence that T{beta}4 induces cellular processes without changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. External treatment of HUVECs with T{beta}4 and its mutants deprived of the N-terminal tetrapeptide AcSDKP (T{beta}4{sub AcSDKPT/4A}) or the actin-binding sequence KLKKTET (T{beta}4{sub KLKKTET/7A}) resulted in enhanced cell migration and formation of tubular structures in Matrigel. Surprisingly, the increased cell motility caused by T{beta}4 was not associated with the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation monitored with Fluo-4 NW or Fura-2 AM. Therefore, it is unlikely that externally added T{beta}4 induces HUVEC migration via the surface membrane receptors known to generate Ca{sup 2+} influx. Our data confirm the concept that externally added T{beta}4 must be internalized to induce intracellular mechanisms supporting endothelial cell migration.

Selmi, Anna [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland)] [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Malinowski, Mariusz [Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland)] [Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland); Brutkowski, Wojciech [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)] [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Bednarek, Radoslaw [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland)] [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Cierniewski, Czeslaw S., E-mail: czeslaw.cierniewski@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the potential for contamination from toxic substances in hydraulic fracturing fluid and/or pro- duced brinesGeochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow of stray gas, metal-rich formation brines, and hydrau- lic fracturing and/or flowback fluids to drinking

362

Petrographic, geochemical, and paleohydrologic evidence of nature of petroleum migration in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed studies of the petrography and geochemistry of petroleum source rocks, the geochemistry of petroleum accumulations, and the paleohydrology of the Illinois basin suggest an episode of long-range migration of Devonian-sourced petroleum during a period of regional ground water flow. Petrographic analyses of samples of the New Albany Shale group (Devonian/Mississippian) were used to define lateral and vertical variation in composition and thermal maturity of organic matter within the basin. These data delineate likely New Albany Shale group petroleum source areas. GC, GCMS, and carbon isotopic analyses of thermally mature New Albany Shale in southeastern Illinois and Silurian-reservoired petroleum samples from central Illinois were used in making oil-oil and oil-source rock correlations. These correlations indicate long-range lateral and downward cross-stratigraphic net migration. Compaction-driven and elevation head-driven ground-water flows within the basin were numerically modeled using available stratigraphic, structural, and hydrologic data. Calculations based on compaction-driven flow show the possibility of down-stratigraphic migration. Compaction-driven flow, however, cannot explain the amount of lateral transport inferred. Regional ground-water flow due to the uplift of the Pascola arch could explain the long-range lateral migration. Calculations of the effects of advective heat transport by elevation head-driven flow agree with estimates of temperatures made from fluid inclusions in basin mineralization.

Bethke, C.M.; Pruitt, J.D.; Barrows, M.H.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Stability and Migration of Charged Oxygen Interstitials in ThO2...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oxygen interstitial mobility in ThO2 than in CeO2. Citation: Xiao HY, Y Zhang, and WJ Weber.2013."Stability and Migration of Charged Oxygen Interstitials in ThO2 and CeO2."Acta...

364

Minimizing the Population Extinction Risk by Migration Michael Khasin,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­3]. Habitat fragmentation is implicated in the decline and extinction of many endangered species [4Minimizing the Population Extinction Risk by Migration Michael Khasin,1,2 Baruch Meerson,3 Evgeniy occupying separate patches. A local population is prone to extinction due to the shot noise of birth

Meerson, Baruch

365

Novel methods reveal shifts in migration phenology of barn swallows in South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Novel methods reveal shifts in migration phenology of barn swallows in South Africa Res Altwegg National Biodiversity Institute, P/Bag X7, Claremont 7735, South Africa Animal Demography Unit, Department of Zoology and Department of Statistical Sciences, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa

de Villiers, Marienne

366

A prediction of meander migration based on large-scale flume tests in clay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

great ideas or useful hints for new research concerning the same type of problem. The past research works related to the prediction of meander migration were studied in order to have a better understanding of the existing techniques and an idea of a...

Park, Namgyu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gender-specific out-migration, deforestation and urbanization in the Ecuadorian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gender-specific out-migration, deforestation and urbanization in the Ecuadorian Amazon Alisson F rates of deforestation of any Amazonian nation. Most of this forest elimination has been caused on deforestation, urbanization and regional development, population mobility within the Amazon has hardly been

Lopez-Carr, David

368

Chemical migration in drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles: a source of controversy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may be present in a PET bottle wall. Also, recycled PET can be a source of unknown chemical compounds1 Chemical migration in drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles: a source;2 Abstract: Due to its chemical inertness and physical properties PET is particularly suitable for food

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

369

CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS IN DOVER SOLE, MICROSTOMUS PACIFICUS: LOCAL MIGRATIONS AND FIN EROSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verdes discharge site of the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP) submarine outfalls of the County 1952), Dover sole undergo seasonal onshore-offshore migrations (Mearns and Sherwood 1974). Individuals move offshore in the winter and onshore in the summer and have been collected offsouthern California

370

Migration of seismicity and earthquake interactions monitored by GPS in SE Asia triple junction: Sulawesi, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Sulawesi, Indonesia Christophe Vigny,1 Hugo Perfettini,1,2 Andrea Walpersdorf,1,2 Anne Lemoine1 Wim Simons] Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made in Sulawesi, Indonesia, from 1992 to 1999 detected, fault, fluids, seismotectonics, earthquake, Indonesia Citation: Vigny, C., et al., Migration

McCaffrey, Robert

371

Sediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

melting through laboratory ice at 22 uC in simulated summer conditions, with warmer ice producing faster boundaries was pronounced in laboratory ice warmer than 21 uC. This mechanism produced a flux of 0.1 g m22 hrSediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen* Edward E. Adams

Priscu, John C.

372

Charge Migration Efficiency Optimization in Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage (HEES) Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charge Migration Efficiency Optimization in Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage (HEES) Systems the excessive electric energy in the electrical energy storage (EES) rather than converting into a different) are typically not balanced with each other. Storage of excessive en- ergy and compensation of the energy

Pedram, Massoud

373

Multiple-Source and Multiple-Destination Charge Migration in Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple-Source and Multiple-Destination Charge Migration in Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage massimo.poncino@polito.it Abstract-- Hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) systems consist of multiple banks of heterogeneous electrical energy storage (EES) elements that are connected to each other through

Pedram, Massoud

374

Efficient Data Migration to Conserve Energy in Streaming Media Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Data Migration to Conserve Energy in Streaming Media Storage Systems Yunpeng Chai, Zhihui. Existing energy conservation techniques are inadequate to achieve high energy efficiency for streaming in this paper a new energy-efficient method called Explicit Energy Saving Disk Cooling or EESDC. EESDC

Qin, Xiao

375

Oxygen sublattice defect in cobalt oxide : formation, migration, charge localization and thermodynamic processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

643 Oxygen sublattice defect in cobalt oxide : formation, migration, charge localization of oxygen defects in CoO using classical simulations. The charge localization in the oxygen vacancy has]. The defect concentration in the oxygen sublattice is several orders of magnitude smaller, but never- theless

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

EFFECT OF BENTONITE MIGRATION IN GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 EFFECT OF BENTONITE MIGRATION IN GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT T. D. Stark1.ca.gov ABSTRACT: Since the introduction of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) to waste containment facilities, one contaminant transport through a GCL. 1 INTRODUCTION In recent years, geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs

377

Geosynthetics International, 2004, 11, No. 4 Occurrence and effect of bentonite migration in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in geosynthetic clay liners T. D. Stark1 , H. Choi2 and R. Akhtarshad3 1 Professor, Department of Civil the introduction of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) to waste containment facilities, one of the major concerns. & Akhtarshad, R. (2004). Occurrence and effect of bentonite migration in geosynthetic clay liners

378

REVIEW doi:10.1038/nature13636 Migrations and dynamics of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1 | Annual-mean precipitation, surface winds, and atmospheric energy balance. a, PrecipitationREVIEW doi:10.1038/nature13636 Migrations and dynamics of the intertropical convergence zone Tapio energy northward across the Equator, rendering the Northern Hemisphere warmer than the Southern

Gilli, Adrian

379

A one-dimensional model of vertical gas plume migration through a heterogeneous porous medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-dimensional model of vertical gas plume migration through a heterogeneous porous medium and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

380

A Network Model for The Genesis and Migration of Gas Phase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Network Model for The Genesis and Migration of Gas Phase Koukung Alex Chang and W. Brent, of a compositional fluid consisting of water with a dissolved hydrocarbon gas. The model captures both single phase 99% of the (effectively) stored CO2 resides in the liquid phase. Key Words: network model, gas

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Li ion migration in Li3PO4 electrolytes: Effects of O vacancies and N substitutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Li ion migration in Li3PO4 electrolytes: Effects of O vacancies and N substitutions Y. A. Dua and N structures of isolated defects associated with extrinsic Li ion vacancies and interstitials. In particular the combination of an O vacancy and a N substitution, stabilizing a Li ion vacancy. We also studied the effects

Holzwarth, Natalie

382

Migration within the frontier: the second generation colonists in the Ecuadorian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Migration within the frontier: the second generation colonists in the Ecuadorian Amazon Draft and dramatic changes in the physical landscape of the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon frontier, including massive; agricultural colonization; development policies; frontier areas Introduction The Amazon is the largest tropical

Lopez-Carr, David

383

Out-Migration of Second Generation Frontier Colonists and Population Redistribution in the Ecuadorian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Out-Migration of Second Generation Frontier Colonists and Population Redistribution changes in the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon frontier. Particularly in recent years, population growth, urbanization in the frontier. This paper uses longitudinal and multi-scale data on settler colonists

Lopez-Carr, David

384

Linkages among climate change, crop yields and MexicoUS cross-border migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linkages among climate change, crop yields and Mexico­US cross-border migration Shuaizhang Fenga assumed, with other factors held constant, by approximately the year 2080, climate change is estimated perspective given that many regions, espe- cially developing countries, are expected to experience significant

Oppenheimer, Michael

385

ORBITAL MIGRATION OF INTERACTING LOW-MASS PLANETS IN EVOLUTIONARY RADIATIVE TURBULENT MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The torques exerted by a locally isothermal disk on an embedded planet lead to rapid inward migration. Recent work has shown that modeling the thermodynamics without the assumption of local isothermality reveals regions where the net torque on an embedded planet is positive, leading to outward migration of the planet. When a region with negative torque lies directly exterior to this, planets in the inner region migrate outward and planets in the outer region migrate inward, converging where the torque is zero. We incorporate the torques from an evolving non-isothermal disk into an N-body simulation to examine the behavior of planets or planetary embryos interacting in the convergence zone. We find that mutual interactions do not eject objects from the convergence zone. Small numbers of objects in a laminar disk settle into near resonant orbits that remain stable over the 10 Myr periods that we examine. However, either or both increasing the number of planets or including a correlated, stochastic force to represent turbulence drives orbit crossings and mergers in the convergence zone. These processes can build gas giant cores with masses of order 10 Earth masses from sub-Earth mass embryos in 2-3 Myr.

Horn, Brandon; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th St, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Lyra, Wladimir [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Sandor, Zsolt, E-mail: bhorn@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: wlyra@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: zsolt.sandor@uibk.ac.at [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical ExchangeVed: January 12, 2010 Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution

Fayer, Michael D.

387

Modeling Zinc and Sodium Chloride Migration in Vadose Zone Soils Beneath Stormwater Infiltration Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be seen in the field. Based on model results, shallow groundwater will be rapidly and highly impactedModeling Zinc and Sodium Chloride Migration in Vadose Zone Soils Beneath Stormwater Infiltration device. Introduction Urbanization has increased the amount of impervious surfaces, leading to an increase

Clark, Shirley E.

388

Numerical methods for the simulation of salt migration in regional groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical methods for the simulation of salt migration in regional groundwater flow E.S. van Baaren #12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Model description 3 2.1 Basic Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 3.2 Finite Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.2.1 Grid

Vuik, Kees

389

Behaviour and thermal experience of adult sockeye salmon migrating through stratified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entirely by endogenous energy reserves as individuals cease feeding before leaving the ocean en routeBehaviour and thermal experience of adult sockeye salmon migrating through stratified lakes near water temperatures by utilising thermal refugia in cool-water tributaries (Berman & Quinn 1991; Goniea

Cooke, Steven J.

390

Damage Characterization of the Z24 Bridge by Transfer Function Pole Migration R. Andrew Swartz1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage Characterization of the Z24 Bridge by Transfer Function Pole Migration R. Andrew Swartz1 , Jerome P. Lynch2 1 PhD Candidate, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 2 Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Lynch, Jerome P.

391

Migration and Directional Change of Interstitial Clusters in ?-Fe: Searching for Transition States by the Dimer Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interstitial clusters produced by cascades in metals have very high mobility and exhibit thermally activated, one-dimensional glide along the crowdion direction, as revealed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Only small interstitial clusters (<4) are observed to change their glide direction during the period of MD simulations ({approx} 10 ns), but the directional change for larger clusters is inaccessible to MD due to the limited time-scale. In order to overcome the ''time barrier'' in MD simulations, the dimer method is employed to search for possible transition states of interstitials and small interstitial clusters in alpha-Fe. The method uses only the first derivatives of the potential energy to find saddle points without knowledge of the final state of the transition. The possible transition states are studied as a function of interstitial cluster size, and the lowest energy barriers correspond to defect migration along (111) directions, as seen in MD simulations. Small clusters change their direction by a (110) fragment mechanism involving rotation of each crowdion into and out of the (110) dumbbell configuration, whereas the directional change for larger clusters is a two-step process consisting of translation along a <100> direction and rotation into an equivalent (111) direction. The mechanism of changing direction for a tri-interstitial cluster is also investigated using MD simulations.

Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Hoagland, Richard G.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

Olander, D.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Controlled entanglement routing between two virtual pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate controlled entanglement routing between bunching and antibunching path-entangled two-photon states in an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer (UMZI), in which the routing process is controlled by the relative phase difference in the UMZI. Regarding bunching and antibunching path-entangled two-photon states as two virtual ports, we can consider the UMZI as a controlled entanglement router, which bases on the coherent manipulation of entanglement. Half of the entanglement within the input two-photon state is coherently routed between the two virtual ports, while the other is lost due to the time distinguishability introduced by the UMZI. Pure bunching or antibunching path entangled two-photon states are obtained based on this controlled entanglement router. The results show that we can employ the UMZI as general entanglement router for practical quantum information application.

Qiang Zhou; Shuai Dong; Wei Zhang; Lixing You; Yuhao He; Weijun Zhang; Yidong Huang; Jiangde Peng

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Roaming dynamics in ion-molecule reactions: phase space reaction pathways and geometrical interpretation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model Hamiltonian for the reaction CH$_4^+ \\rightarrow$ CH$_3^+$ + H, parametrized to exhibit either early or late inner transition states, is employed to investigate the dynamical characteristics of the roaming mechanism. Tight/loose transition states and conventional/roaming reaction pathways are identified in terms of time-invariant objects in phase space. These are dividing surfaces associated with normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds (NHIMs). For systems with two degrees of freedom NHIMS are unstable periodic orbits which, in conjunction with their stable and unstable manifolds, unambiguously define the (locally) non-recrossing dividing surfaces assumed in statistical theories of reaction rates. By constructing periodic orbit continuation/bifurcation diagrams for two values of the potential function parameter corresponding to late and early transition states, respectively, and using the total energy as another parameter, we dynamically assign different regions of phase space to reactants and products as well as to conventional and roaming reaction pathways. The classical dynamics of the system are investigated by uniformly sampling trajectory initial conditions on the dividing surfaces. Trajectories are classified into four different categories: direct reactive and non reactive trajectories,which lead to the formation of molecular and radical products respectively, and roaming reactive and non reactive orbiting trajectories, which represent alternative pathways to form molecular and radical products. By analysing gap time distributions at several energies we demonstrate that the phase space structure of the roaming region, which is strongly influenced by non-linear resonances between the two degrees of freedom, results in nonexponential (nonstatistical) decay.

F. A. L. Mauguičre; P. Collins; G. S. Ezra; S. C. Farantos; S. Wiggins

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Visualizing kinetic pathways of homogeneous nucleation in colloidal crystallization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a system undergoes a transition from a liquid to a solid phase, it passes through multiple intermediate structures before reaching the final state. However, our knowledge on the exact pathways of this process is limited, mainly due to the difficulty of realizing direct observations. Here, we experimentally study the evolution of symmetry and density for various colloidal systems during liquid-to-solid phase transitions, and visualize kinetic pathways with single-particle resolution. We observe the formation of relatively-ordered precursor structures with different symmetries, which then convert into metastable solids. During this conversion, two major cross-symmetry pathways always occur, regardless of the final state and the interaction potential. In addition, we find a broad decoupling of density variation and symmetry development, and discover that nucleation rarely starts from the densest regions. These findings hold for all our samples, suggesting the possibility of finding a unified picture for the complex crystallization kinetics in colloidal systems.

Peng Tan; Ning Xu; Lei Xu

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

396

Heterologous protein production using the twin arginine translocation pathway  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided are means for evaluating and identifying putative substrates of the twin arginine translocation (Tat) secretory pathway in Streptomyces and other bacterial species. Also provided, therefore, are simple ways to express, secrete and purify correctly folded heterologous proteins on a large scale using host microorganisms, such as, Streptomyces and the Tat pathway therein. Many of the thus-produced proteins are of significant therapeutic value in the pharmaceutical and biochemical industries, particularly when they can be secreted from the host in fully-folded active form. Accordingly, there are further provided the heterologous proteins produced by the Tat secretion pathway using the foregoing methods, and the computer algorithm used to identify the Tat signal sequence and putative substrates.

Pohlschroder, Mechtild (Philadelphia, PA); Kissinger, Jessica C (Athens, GA); Rose, R. Wesley (Glenside, PA); Brueser, Thomas (Halle, DE); Dilks, Kieran (Collingswood, NJ)

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

Low energy pathways for reproducible in vivo protein folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two proteins, one belonging to the mainly alpha class and the other belonging to the alpha/beta class, are selected to test a kinetic mechanism for protein folding. Targeted molecular dynamics is applied to generate folding pathways for those two proteins, starting from two well defined initial conformations: a fully extended and a alpha-helical conformation. The results show that for both proteins the alpha-helical initial conformation provides overall lower energy pathways to the native state. For the alpha/beta protein, 30 % (40%) of the pathways from an initial alpha-helix (fully extended) structure lead to unentangled native folds, a success rate that can be increased to 85 % by the introduction of a well-defined intermediate structure. These results open up a new direction in which to look for a solution to the protein folding problem, as detailed at the end.

Leonor Cruzeiro

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

Clean-up standards and pathways analysis methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remediation of a radioactively contaminated site requires that certain regulatory criteria be met before the site can be released for unrestricted future use. Since the ultimate objective of remediation is to protect the public health and safety, residual radioactivity levels remaining at a site after cleanup must be below certain preset limits or meet acceptable dose or risk criteria. This paper discusses cleanup standards for radioactively contaminated soils and describes the use of pathways analysis methods for deriving site-specific residual radioactivity guidelines. An example is provided in which a pathways analysis code (RESRAD) was used to establish such guidelines.

Devgun, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Office of Waste Management Programs

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Tracking a defined route for O2 migration in a dioxygen-activating diiron enzyme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For numerous enzymes reactive toward small gaseous compounds, growing evidence indicates that these substrates diffuse into active site pockets through defined pathways in the protein matrix. Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase ...

Song, Woon Ju

400

Pathways to Sustainability and the Politics of Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pathways to Sustainability and the Politics of Innovation Tuesday, January 22, 2013 12:00 ­ 1:30 p, technology, and innovation. These are not only complex and uncertain role dynamics, but they also circulate these roles in diverse ways and promote particular goals and values. Melissa Leach directs the Social

Hall, Sharon J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Prioritizing Acquisition Pathways in the State Level Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Department of Safeguards has launched a project to further develop the State-level concept for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of safeguards activities. In order to further evolve the safeguards system an emphasis is placed on integrating inspection-related activities and the State evaluation process to draw safeguards conclusions in the most efficient way. The credible implementation of acquisition pathway analysis is central to the success of the IAEA's State-level concept. NNSA's Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is sponsoring Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to produce a study that will examine the use of acquisition pathway analysis in: (1) Developing a State-specific, State-level approach (SLA) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP); (2) Maximizing the utility of the physical model; and (3) Supporting resource allocation decisions through a pathway prioritization. To deal with the challenge of developing an effective and efficient SLA, this study looks at: (1) Prioritizing proliferation pathways based on an assessment of a State's capabilities and assumed proliferation strategies; and (2) Relevant State behavior (e.g., transparency, cooperation, etc.) while avoiding subjective judgments about States themselves. The study makes use of case studies and concrete examples in order to illustrate how new concepts and approaches will be implemented, and how they may differ from more traditional safeguards approaches.

Murphy, Chantell L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pilat, Joseph F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Single Disulfide Bond Differentiates Aggregation Pathways of 2-Microglobulin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation; aggregation; domain swapping*Corresponding author Introduction Amyloid fibrils are insolubleA Single Disulfide Bond Differentiates Aggregation Pathways of ß2-Microglobulin Yiwen Chen1 at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA Deposition of wild-type ß2-microglobulin (ß2m) into amyloid

Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

403

Hierarchical Protein Folding Pathways: A Computational Study of Protein Fragments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hierarchical Protein Folding Pathways: A Computational Study of Protein Fragments Nurit Haspel,1 folding model. The model postulates that protein folding is a hierarchical top-down pro- cess. The basic words: protein folding; building blocks; pro- tein structure prediction; hierarchical folding; protein

Haspel, Nurit

404

Correct and incorrect nucleotide incorporation pathways in DNA polymerase b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correct and incorrect nucleotide incorporation pathways in DNA polymerase b Ravi Radhakrishnan a nucleotide incorporations in the DNA by using a novel protocol involving energy minimizations, dynamics simu- sive transient intermediates, for nucleotide incorporation at the template/primer DNA junction. A large

Schlick, Tamar

405

Pathways to Laser Fusion Beyond NIF Fusion Power Associates Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pathways to Laser Fusion Beyond NIF Fusion Power Associates Meeting Washington DC 10 December 2013 Research supported by the Department of Energy, NNSA #12;How far will NIF go towards ignition? NIF indirect of laser energy on capsule · Ignition and significant yield?? NIF Polar drive · Much more efficient use

406

Hydrochemical and isotopic effects associated with petroleum fuel biodegradation pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrocarbons and residual electron acceptors have been used to deduce BTEX and MTBE degradation pathways. Benzene and MTBE persist into the denitrification zone, with carbon isotope enrichment of benzene-enrichment of residual benzene gives an apparent e value of Ă?0.66x. MTBE shows no significant isotopic enrichment (d13 C

Sheffield, University of

407

Questioning Inevitability of Energy Pathways: Alternative Energy Scenarios for California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Questioning Inevitability of Energy Pathways: Alternative Energy Scenarios for California May 21.6.4 Alternative Scenario 3 ­ Patriotic Energy Independence Section 3: Developing the Scenario Model and Examining, 2002 by Rebecca Ghanadan rebeccag@socrates.berkeley.edu The Energy and Resources Group University

Kammen, Daniel M.

408

Alternative pathways to fusion energy (focus on Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alternative pathways to fusion energy (focus on Department of Energy Innovative Confinement for a restructured fusion energy science program [5] 1996 | FESAC: Opportunities in Alternative Confinement Concepts, suggests program for Innovative Concepts [1] 1995 | OTA TPX and the Alternates [2] 1995 | PCAST (given flat

409

THE FERNALD DOSIMETRY RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT Environmental Pathways -Models and Validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keystone Scientific Resources, Inc., Fort Collins, Colorado 3. Moore Technical Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho 6. Health Physics Applications, Darnestown, Maryland 7. Scinta, Inc., Silver, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho DRAFT J #12;[' r r r 1 U.l, U 1 \\ I l Environmental Pathway Analysis

410

Comparing classical pathways and modern networks: towards the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the isolation of one pathway from another. Conversely, modern high-throughput (HTP) experiments offer. As more diverse types of HTP data become avail- able, both perspectives can be effectively merged between many proteins. Conver- sely, modern high-throughput (HTP) experiments and large-scale databases

Gerstein, Mark

411

Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer cells. Vanessa Fritz, proliferation, and cancer inserm-00491405,version1-11Jun2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oncogene 2010;29(31):4369-77" DOI : 10.1038/onc.2010.182 #12;Metabolism, proliferation and cancer Fritz and Fajas 2 Abstract Cancer

Boyer, Edmond

412

Protein signaling via type III secretion pathways in phytopathogenic bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-5274 Abbreviations HR hypersensitive response Pv pathovar NLS nuclear localization signals Introduction Plants secretion pathway has revealed new mechanisms by which phytopathogenic bacteria infect plants. The suggestion that bacterial gene products are `delivered to' and `perceived by' plants cells has fundamentally

Mudgettt, Mary Beth

413

Biogas Production through the Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidising Pathway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogas Production through the Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidising Pathway Characterisation and Detection Uppsala 2012 #12;Acta Universitatis agriculturae Sueciae 2012:45 #12;Biogas production through 1.1 Aims of the thesis 12 2 Biogas production 15 2.1 Biogas production in Europe 16 2.2 Substrate

414

TECHNICAL REPORTS Understanding nutrient pathways to streams will improve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in most watersheds terrestrial P exports are greatest where surface waters transport P-rich soils rapTECHNICAL REPORTS 1892 Understanding nutrient pathways to streams will improve nutrient management) concentrations in several environmental compartments were examined in watersheds having a range of base flow

415

Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

Estrella, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Transient moisture migration and phase change front propagation in porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of transient moisture migration in a semi-infinite slab of porous concrete being heated at one side has been analyzed. The model solves the heat and mass transfer equations considering water and air migration in the concrete, including evaporation and recondensation effects. The domain is subdivided into a dry region and a wet region, with the phase-change-front motion being modeled via mass and energy conservation at the front. Approximate solutions are obtained by use of a similarity transformation and numerical integration of the resulting ordinary differential equations. Typical results and parametric evaluations are given for the cases of an impermeable outer surface as well as an outer surface exposed to ambient pressure.

Shiina, Y.; Kroeger, P.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

OUTER-DISK POPULATIONS IN NGC 7793: EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR RADIAL MIGRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed the radial surface brightness profile of the spiral galaxy NGC 7793 using HST/ACS images from the GHOSTS survey and a new HST/WFC3 image across the disk break. We used the photometry of resolved stars to select distinct populations covering a wide range of stellar ages. We found breaks in the radial profiles of all stellar populations at 280'' ({approx}5.1 kpc). Beyond this disk break, the profiles become steeper for younger populations. This same trend is seen in numerical simulations where the outer disk is formed almost entirely by radial migration. We also found that the older stars of NGC 7793 extend significantly farther than the underlying H I disk. They are thus unlikely to have formed entirely at their current radii, unless the gas disk was substantially larger in the past. These observations thus provide evidence for substantial stellar radial migration in late-type disks.

Radburn-Smith, David J.; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Roskar, Rok [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Debattista, Victor P. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Streich, David; De Jong, Roelof S.; Vlajic, Marija [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Holwerda, Benne W. [European Space Agency, ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Purcell, Chris W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Zucker, Daniel B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

An investigation of pneumatic control on immiscible contaminant migration in confined aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? dimensional (vertical and lateral) finite ? element contaminant groundwater simulator to investigate the migration of NAPL's in the unsaturated zone. The physical conception of this model is based upon the salt/fresh water interface problem occurring..., or the use of water-flooding in secondary recovery operations. " Faust[1985] and Faust et uk[1989] attested to the validity of known and accepted petroleum engineering mathematical models used to describe multiphase flow through porous media. Osborne...

Watts, John David

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

IMMIGRATION, MIGRATION ET LIBRE CIRCULATION DANS LA CONSTRUCTION DE L'EUROPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMMIGRATION, MIGRATION ET LIBRE CIRCULATION DANS LA CONSTRUCTION DE L'EUROPE Adrian Favell L'Harmattan-64. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Distribution électronique Cairn.info pour L'Harmattan. © L'Harmattan. Tous droits réservés pour tous pays. La.cairn.info-Institutd'EtudesPolitiquesdeParis--193.54.67.94-15/07/201416h15.©L'Harmattan Documenttéléchargédepuiswww

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Observation Method to Predict Meander Migration and Vertical Degradation of Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examples of bridges that were in danger of structural damage due to excessive erosion are presented herein. The Burr’s Ferry Bridge on the Sabine River, shown in Figure 1, was built over 80 years ago and is on the state line between Texas and Louisiana... and laboratory tests (full scale experimental study). ? Develop a model that relates the soil erodibility, river flow, and past observations with the meander migration and vertical degradation. ? Develop a method (called Observation Method) using computer...

Montalvo Bartolomei, Axel M

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

Rflexions autour des migrations forces en Afrique sub-saharienne1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

réfugiés climatiques. Enfin, il insiste, à travers des études de cas, sur les territoires générés par ces, 2009). Ainsi, ce rapport remet en cause l'idée reçue concernant l'ampleur des migrations sud-nord alors recherche académique et des pouvoirs politiques au Nord. Ils accaparent l'attention et font l'objet d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

423

Comparative study of methods used to estimate ionic diffusion coefficients using migration tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionic diffusion coefficients are estimated rapidly using electromigration tests. In this paper, electromigration tests are accurately simulated by numerically solving the Nernst-Planck (NP) equation (coupled with the electroneutrality condition (EN)) using the finite element method. Numerical simulations are validated against experimental data obtained elsewhere [E. Samson, J. Marchand, K.A. Snyder, Calculation of ionic diffusion coefficients on the basis of migration test results, Materials and Structures/Materiaux et Constructions 36 (257) (2003) 156-165., H. Friedmann, O. Amiri, A. Ait-Mokhtar, A direct method for determining chloride diffusion coefficient by using migration test, Cement and Concrete Research 34 (11) (2004) 1967-1973.]. It is shown that migration due to the non-linear electric potential completely overwhelms diffusion due to concentration gradients. The effects of different applied voltage differences and chloride source concentrations on estimations of chloride diffusion coefficients are explored. We show that the pore fluid within concrete and mortar specimens generally differs from the curing solution, lowering the apparent diffusion coefficient, primarily due to interactions of chloride ions with other ions in the pore fluid. We show that the variation of source chloride concentration strongly affects the estimation of diffusion coefficients in non-steady-state tests; however this effect vanishes under steady-state conditions. Most importantly, a comparison of diffusion coefficients obtained from sophisticated analyses (i.e., NP-EN) and a variety of commonly used simplifying methods to estimate chloride diffusion coefficients allows us to identify those methods and experimental conditions where both approaches deliver good estimates for chloride diffusion coefficients. Finally, we demonstrate why simultaneous use and monitoring of current density and fluxes are recommended for both the non-steady and steady-state migration tests.

Narsilio, G.A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: narsilio@unimelb.edu.au; Li, R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Institute of Geotechnical Engineering, Southeast University (SEU), Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)], E-mail: lirenmin@seu.edu.cn; Pivonka, P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: ppivonka@unimelb.edu.au; Smith, D.W. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: david.smith@unimelb.edu.au

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

On the role of Allee effect and mass migration in survival and extinction of a species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate survival and extinction of a species in metapopulation dynamics models with particular biological phenomena. We prove that the presence of Allee effect may be critical for survival and that the migration of large flocks of individuals is a possible solution to avoid extinction when the Allee effect is strong. We prove the existence of critical parameters for each model and in supercritical case we construct (at least) one non-trivial invariant measure.

Borrello, Davide

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electronic Materials Conference (EMC), 6-25-2009 Improved Migration-Enhanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic Materials Conference (EMC), 6-25-2009 Improved Migration-Enhanced Epitaxy for Self ·Scalable III-V MOSFETs ·The Shape of Things to Come·The Shape of Things to Come 2Wistey, EMC 2009 #12 · Heteroepitaxy 3Wistey, EMC 2009 W.K. Liu et al., J. Crystal Growth v. 311, p. 1979 (2009)· Selective area growth

Rodwell, Mark J. W.

426

Short- and Long- Time Transport Structures in a Three Dimensional Time Dependent Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian transport structures for three-dimensional and time-dependent fluid flows are of great interest in numerous applications, particularly for geophysical or oceanic flows. In such flows, chaotic transport and mixing can play important environmental and ecological roles, for examples in pollution spills or plankton migration. In such flows, where simulations or observations are typically available only over a short time, understanding the difference between short-time and long-time transport structures is critical. In this paper, we use a set of classical (i.e. Poincar\\'e section, Lyapunov exponent) and alternative (i.e. finite time Lyapunov exponent, Lagrangian coherent structures) tools from dynamical systems theory that analyze chaotic transport both qualitatively and quantitatively. With this set of tools we are able to reveal, identify and highlight differences between short- and long-time transport structures inside a flow composed of a primary horizontal contra-rotating vortex chain, small lateral oscillations and a weak Ekman pumping. The difference is mainly the existence of regular or extremely slowly developing chaotic regions that are only present at short time.

Rodolphe Chabreyrie; Stefan G. Llewellyn Smith

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

427

Bulk Migration of Ni/NiO in Ni-YSZ during Reducing Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the migration of Ni/NiO in Ni-YSZ can potentially help to design a better solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode. We have observed that extensive hydrogen reduction and methane steam reforming of Ni-YSZ caused bulk migration of Ni/NiO to at least ~ 5 µm deeper from the Ni-YSZ surface. No significant bulk migration effects were detected after simple thermal treatments in non-reducing/non-reforming environment. Surface analysis of a single zirconia grain in the first 10-20 nm region from annealed, hydrogen reduced and methane steam reformed Ni-YSZ shows Ni-enriched surface supporting earlier claims of Ni exsolution. 3D-EBSD analysis of thermally treated sample before exposing it to reducing and reforming environment indicated mixed NiO/YSZ phase with some porosity and random grain orientation. The surface analysis and mapping were carried out using ToF-SIMS and AES whereas EDS maps on FIB sliced areas on Ni-YSZ were utilized for the bulk analysis. The results provide additional information related to complex reactions occurring in SOFC during internal reforming conditions.

Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Baer, Donald R.; Lea, Alan S.; Zhu, Zihua; Strohm, James J.; Sitzman, S. D.; King, David L.

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

Constraints on Radial Migration in Spiral Galaxies I. Analytic Criterion for Capture at Corotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near the corotation resonance of a transient spiral arm, stellar orbital angular momenta may be changed without inducing significant kinematic heating, resulting in what has come to be known as radial migration. When radial migration is very efficient, a large fraction of disk stars experiences significant, permanent changes to their individual orbital angular momenta over the lifetime of the disk, having strong implications for the evolution of disk galaxies. The first step for a star in a spiral disk to migrate radially is to be captured in a "trapped" orbit, associated with the corotation resonance of the spiral pattern. An analytic criterion for determining whether or not a star is in a trapped orbit has previously been derived only for stars with zero random orbital energy in the presence of a spiral with fixed properties. In this first paper in a series, we derive an analytic criterion appropriate for a star that is on an orbit of finite random orbital energy. Our new criterion demonstrates that whether...

Daniel, Kathryne J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Comparison of an self-organizing migration algorithm with simulated annealing and differential evolution for automated waveform tuning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of an self-organizing migration algorithm with simulated annealing and differential algorithm, has been compared with simulated annealing (SA) and differential evolution (DE density and the electron energy distribution in plasma processes. RF plasmas are inherently non

Hopgood, Adrian

432

Diel vertical migration: Ecological controls and impacts on the biological pump in a one-dimensional ocean model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nutrients, carbon, and oxygen in the water column. Excretion, fecal pellet production, and mortality and productivity across the biomes, including the biomass of migrating organisms. We estimate that realistic

Devernal, Anne

433

Study of T cell activation and migration at the single-cell and single-molecule level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T cells are required by their immunological roles to recirculate in the body and migrate to tissue sites, a journey that exposes them to distorting forces and physical obstacles that hinder their movement. Therefore, they ...

Chang, Irene Yin-Ting

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Interfacial oxygen migration and its effect on the magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the interfacial oxygen migration effect and its induced magnetic anisotropy evolution in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt films. During depositing the MgO layer, oxygen atoms from the MgO combine with the neighboring Co atoms, leading to the formation of CoO at the Co/MgO interface. Meanwhile, the films show in-plane magnetic anisotropy (IMA). After annealing, most of the oxygen atoms in CoO migrate back to the MgO layer, resulting in obvious improvement of Co/MgO interface and the enhancement of effective Co-O orbital hybridization. These favor the evolution of magnetic anisotropy from IMA to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). The oxygen migration effect is achieved by the redox reaction at the Co/MgO interface. On the contrary, the transfer from IMA to PMA cannot be observed in Pt/Co/Pt films due to the lack of interfacial oxygen migration.

Chen, Xi; Feng, Chun, E-mail: fengchun@ustb.edu.cn, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Shaolong; Hua Li, Ming; Hua Yu, Guang, E-mail: fengchun@ustb.edu.cn, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Long Wu, Zheng [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ell3 stimulates proliferation, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell properties of breast cancer cells via a MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Ell3 enhances proliferation and drug resistance of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 is related to the cancer stem cell characteristics of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 enhances oncogenicity of breast cancer through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ell3 is a RNA polymerase II transcription elongation factor that is enriched in testis. The C-terminal domain of Ell3 shows strong similarities to that of Ell (eleven?nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene), which acts as a negative regulator of p53 and regulates cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies in our laboratory showed that Ell3 induces the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells by protecting differentiating cells from apoptosis via the promotion of p53 degradation. In this study, we evaluated the function of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines. MCF-7 cell lines overexpressing Ell3 were used to examine cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties. Ectopic expression of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines induces proliferation and 5-FU resistance. In addition, Ell3 expression increases the cancer stem cell population, which is characterized by CD44 (+) or ALDH1 (+) cells. Mammosphere-forming potential and migration ability were also increased upon Ell3 expression in breast cancer cell lines. Through biochemical and molecular biological analyses, we showed that Ell3 regulates proliferation, cancer stem cell properties and drug resistance in breast cancer cell lines partly through the MEK?extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. Murine xenograft experiments showed that Ell3 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results suggest that Ell3 may play a critical role in promoting oncogenesis in breast cancer by regulating cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties via the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

Ahn, Hee-Jin [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwangil [Department of Pathology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Pathology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung-Soon, E-mail: kspark@cha.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis The in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis pathway involves rapidly heating biomass with a catalyst to create bio-oils,...

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly pathway contributes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 29, 2004 11:59 Proceedings Trim Size: 9in x 6in paper COUNTING AND ENUMERATION OF SELF-ASSEMBLY PATHWAYS Summary: and counting the assembly pathways by which an icosahedral...

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative pathways precedes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alternative pathways with many dif... structure formation Figure 2 Pathways of protein folding. In the framework model, precedence is given... 1936-122X080609-048920.00 Key...

439

Efficient Traversal of Beta-Sheet Protein Folding Pathways Using Ensemble Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Traversal of Beta-Sheet Protein Folding Pathways Using Ensemble Models SOLOMON SHENKER,1 introduce a complete methodology to

Gifford, David K.

440

Getting from here to there – energy technology transformation pathways in the EMF-27 scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This apper discusses Getting from here to there – energy technology transformation pathways in the EMF-27 scenarios

Krey, Volker; Luderer, Gunnar; Clarke, Leon E.; Kriegler, Elmar

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Understanding Long-Term Solute Transport in Sedimentary Basins: Simulating Brine Migration in the Alberta Basin. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transport in deep sedimentary basins places important controls on ore formation, petroleum migration, CO2 sequestration, and geochemical reactions that affect petroleum reservoir quality, but large-scale transport in this type of setting remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is highlighted in the resource-rich Alberta Basin, where geochemical and hydrogeologic studies have suggested residence times ranging from hundreds of millions of years to less than 5 My, respectively. Here we developed new hydrogeologic models that were constrained by geochemical observations to reconcile these two very different estimates. The models account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, sediment deposition and erosion, sediment compressibility, and dissolution of salt deposits, including Cl/Br systematics. Prior interpretations of Cl/Br ratios in the Alberta Basin concluded that the brines were derived from evaporatively-concentrated brines that were subsequently diluted by seawater and freshwater; models presented here show that halite dissolution must have contributed strongly as well, which implies significantly greater rates of mass transport. This result confirms that Cl/Br ratios are subject to significant non-uniqueness and thus do not provide good independent indicators of the origin of brines. Salinity and Cl/Br ratios provided valuable new constraints for basin-scale models, however. Sensitivity studies revealed that permeabilities obtained from core- and field-scale tests were appropriate for basin-scale models, despite the differences in scale between the tests and the models. Simulations of groundwater age show that the residence time of porefluids in much of the basin is less than 100 My. Groundwater age increases with depth and approaches 200 My in the deepest part of the basin, but brines are significantly younger than their host rocks throughout the basin.

Alicia M. Wilson

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Development of an Ingestion Pathway Model for AXAIRQ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AXAIRQ is a dose mode code used for prospective accident assessment at the Savannah River Site and is primarily used to show regulatory compliance. For completeness of pathway analysis, an ingestion model, AXINGST, has been developed for use with, and incorporation in, AXAIRQ. Currently available ingestion models were referenced as a basis for AXINGST. AXINGST calculates a conservative ingestion dose following an atmospheric release of radionuclides and includes site specific variables where applicable.

Simpkins, A.A.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

443

Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Engineering | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies |Charles Page -toMetabolic Pathways and

444

Precision Timed Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.4 Precision Timed Machines . . . . .Precision Timed Machine 2.1precision timed (PRET) machine. pages 264–265, June 2007. [

Liu, Isaac Suyu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Brian Giebel Subject: FW: Faculty positions in Plant Genomics and Pathway Engineering at the JGI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Brian Giebel Subject: FW: Faculty positions in Plant Genomics and Pathway Engineering at the JGI: Faculty positions in Plant Genomics and Pathway Engineering at the JGI To: Jay Shendure coming out in Science targeted at recruiting individuals in plant genomics and pathway engineering

Borenstein, Elhanan

446

Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways Ali induce dominant pathway mechanisms in protein folding. Citation: Mohazab AR, Plotkin SS (2013) Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways. PLoS ONE 8(1): e53642

Plotkin, Steven S.

447

Managing site remediation using pathway analysis, application to a semi-arid site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of pathway analysis methodology to evaluate alternatives associated with remediation of a semi-arid site. Significant aspects of remediation include potential land uses, soil cleaning techniques and restoration alternatives. Important environmental transport pathways and dominant radionuclides are identified using pathway analysis. The remediation strategy is optimized based on results of the analysis.

Rutz, E.E.; Ijaz, T.; Wood, R.P.; Eckart, R.E. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Using Bit-Vector Decision Procedures for Analysis of Protein Folding Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Bit-Vector Decision Procedures for Analysis of Protein Folding Pathways Christopher James-vector decision procedures for the analysis of protein folding pathways. We argue that the protein fold- ing by the different nature of the protein folding problem, we present a translation of the protein folding pathways

Langmead, Christopher James

449

Migration enhanced lateral epitaxial overgrowth of AlN and AlGaN for high reliability deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the growth of low-defect thick films of AlN and AlGaN on trenched AlGaN/sapphire templates using migration enhanced lateral epitaxial overgrowth. Incoherent coalescence-related defects were alleviated by controlling the tilt angle of growth fronts and by allowing Al adatoms sufficient residence time to incorporate at the most energetically favorable lattice sites. Deep ultraviolet light emitting diode structures (310 nm) deposited over fully coalesced thick AlN films exhibited cw output power of 1.6 mW at 50 mA current with extrapolated lifetime in excess of 5000 hours. The results demonstrate substantial improvement in the device lifetime, primarily due to the reduced density of growth defects.

Jain, R.; Sun, W.; Yang, J.; Shatalov, M.; Hu, X.; Sattu, A.; Lunev, A.; Deng, J.; Shturm, I.; Bilenko, Y.; Gaska, R. [Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc., 1195 Atlas Road, Columbia, South Carolina 29209 (United States); Shur, M. S. [Electrical Computer and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy New York 12180 (United States)

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

450

PATHWAY: a simulation model of radionuclide-transport through agricultural food chains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PATHWAY simulates the transport of radionuclides from fallout through an agricultural ecosystem. The agro-ecosystem is subdivided into several land management units, each of which is used either for grazing animals, for growing hay, or for growing food crops. The model simulates the transport of radionuclides by both discrete events and continuous, time-dependent processes. The discrete events include tillage of soil, harvest and storage of crops,and deposition of fallout. The continuous processes include the transport of radionuclides due to resuspension, weathering, rain splash, percolation, leaching, adsorption and desorption of radionuclides in the soil, root uptake, foliar absorption, growth and senescence of vegetation, and the ingestion assimilation, and excretion of radionuclides by animals. Preliminary validation studies indicate that the model dynamics and simulated values of radionuclide concentrations in several agricultural products agree well with measured values when the model is driven with site specific data on deposition from world-wide fallout.

Kirchner, T.B.; Whicker, F.W.; Otis, M.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Petroleum migration in Denver basin inferred from thermal maturity and hydrologic data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cretaceous petroleum accumulations in the Denver basin of eastern Colorado and southwestern Nebraska occur in a productive fairway where potential source rocks are thermally immature for oil generation. Reconstructed potentiometric surfaces, vitrinite reflectance (R/sub 0/), and other thermal maturity data suggest that fluids within the basin have migrated hundreds of kilometers from western thermally mature areas (> 0.65% R/sub 0/) updip to eastern thermally immature areas (< 0.50% R/sub 0/). Oil fields such as Adena and Little Beaver with cumulative production of tens of millions of bbl of oil occur where R/sub 0/ is below the threshold 0.60% value, the commonly accepted value that indicates the beginning of thermogenic petroleum generation. Variations in cementation, evidenced in the Denver basin by present east-to-west reductions in porosity and permeability, may have affected secondary migration. Ground-water potentials for the Lower Cretaceous J sandstone, calculated from drill-stem test data, decrease from west to east across the basin with a gradient of about 3 m/km. Local potential minima in Morgan and Logan Counties, as well as an increase information water salinity from 1000 ppm to 12,000 ppm toward the basin center, suggest the concentration of formation fluids in those areas. About 65 Ma, when Cretaceous shales first became mature enough to expel hydrocarbons, the initial uplift of the Rocky Mountains created a fluid potential field similar to the present one but of greater magnitude. This ancestral potential caused the generated hydrocarbons to migrate eastward; oil pools then concentrated at paleopotential minima. The analysis of fluid potential gradients makes it possible to determine the dynamics of forces that redistribute fluids in a basin.

Jones, E.A. Jr.; Gautier, D.L.; Siever, R.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

No-migration determination. Annual report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the annual reporting requirement as specified in the Conditional No-Migration Determination (NMD) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), published in the Federal Register on November 14, 1990 (EPA, 1990a). This report covers the project activities, programs, and data obtained during the period September 1, 1993, through August 31, 1994, to support compliance with the NMD`. In the NMD, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concluded that the DOE had demonstrated, to a reasonable degree of certainty, that hazardous constituents will not migrate from the WIPP disposal unit during the test phase of the project, and that the DOE had otherwise met the requirements of 40 CFR Part 268.6, Petitions to Allow Land Disposal of a Waste Prohibited Under Subpart C of Part 268 (EPA, 1986a), for the WIPP facility. By granting the NMD, the EPA has allowed the DOE to temporarily manage defense-generated transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes, some of which are prohibited from land disposal by Title 40 CFR Part 268, Land Disposal Restrictions (EPA, 1986a), at the WIPP facility for the purposes of testing and experimentation for a period not to exceed 10 years. In granting the NMD, the EPA imposed several conditions on the management of the experimental waste used during the WIPP test phase. One of these conditions is that the DOE submit annual reports to the EPA to demonstrate the WIPP`s compliance with the requirements of the NMD. In the proposed No-Migration Variance (EPA, 1990b) and the final NMD, the EPA defined the content and parameters that must be reported on an annual basis. These reporting requirements are summarized and are cross-referenced with the sections of the report that satisfy the respective requirement.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Some effects of data base variations on numerical simulations of uranium migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of migration of chemicals in the geosphere depend on knowledge of identities of chemical species and on values of chemical equilibrium constants supplied to the simulators. In this work, some effects of variability in assumed speciation and in equilibrium constants were examined, using migration of uranium as an example. Various simulations were done of uranium migration in systems with varying oxidation potential, pH, and mator component content. A simulation including formation of aqueous species UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3//sup 0/, UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup 2 -/, UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 3//sup 4 -/, (UO/sub 2/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 3//sup -/, UO/sub 2//sup +/, U(OH)/sub 4//sup 0/, and U(OH)/sub 5//sup -/ is compared to simulation excluding formation of UO/sub 2//sup +/ and U(OH)/sub 5//sup -/. These simulations relied on older data bases, and they are compared to a further simulation using recently published data on formation of U(OH)/sub 4//sup 0/, (UO/sub 2/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 3//sup -/, UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 5//sup 5 -/, and U(CO/sub 3/)/sub 5//sup 6 -/. Significant differences in dissolved uranium concentrations are noted among the simulations. Differences are noted also in precipitation of two solids, USiO/sub 4/(c) (coffinite) and CaUO/sub 4/(c) (calcium uranate), although the solubility products of the solids were not varied in the simulations. 18 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Carnahan, C.L.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A cost-benefit analysis of rural-urban migration decisions in less developed countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COST-Bier'vlT ANAL&&! q O, ' RUR&M -URBAN M1 G -'-', ". ' !ON DECISIONS IN LESS DEUDLOl'ED COUNTRIES A. Thesis By JUAN GERARDO ASTL'-SALAZAR Submitted to the Graduate College of Tezas A&N University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...] suggests a method to obtain information on rural-urban dr:ift which xcay b. . used in government planning. TJ;ia thcois follows the format of Tha Azericen J:conom'~o B 0, '& . '. s;. '. migration has been examined by economists in the past, g and it has...

Aste-Salazar, Juan Gerardo

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Grain boundary migration induced segregation in V-Cr-Ti alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical electron microscopy results are reported for a series of vanadium alloys irradiated in the HFIR JP23 experiment at 500{degrees}C. Alloys were V-5Cr-5Ti and pure vanadium which are expected to have transmuted to V-15Cr-5Ti and V-10Cr following irradiation. Analytical microscopy confirmed the expected transmutation occurred and showed redistribution of Cr and Ti resulting from grain boundary migration in V-5Cr-5Ti, but in pure V, segregation was reduced and no clear trends as a function of position near a boundary were identified.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H. [Univ. of Hokkaido (Japan)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Canada Geese at the Hanford Site – Trends in Reproductive Success, Migration Patterns, and Contaminant Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has conducted several studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the status and condition of Canada geese on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. This report summarizes results of studies of Canada geese (Branta canadensis moffitti) at the Hanford Site dating back to the 1950s. Results include information on the nesting (reproductive) success of Canada geese using the Hanford Reach, review of the local and regional migration of this species using data from bird banding studies, and summary data describing monitoring and investigations of the accumulation of Hanford-derived and environmental contaminants by resident goose populations.

Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.; Stegen, Amanda; Hand, Kristine D.; Brandenberger, Jill M.

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

457

Modelling and Numerical Simulation of Gas Migration in a Nuclear Waste Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological radioactive waste repository. This model includes capillary effects and the gas diffusivity. The choice of the main variables in this model, Total or Dissolved Hydrogen Mass Concentration and Liquid Pressure, leads to a unique and consistent formulation of the gas phase appearance and disappearance. After introducing this model, we show computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas phase appearance and disappearance in different situations typical of underground radioactive waste repository.

Bourgeat, Alain; Smai, Farid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Bulk Migration of Ni/NiO in Ni-YSZ during Reducing Conditions. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareersEnergy,Services »"BuildingBuildingsMigration of

459

Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past decade tens of millions of dollars have beenspent by water resource agencies in California to restore the nativesalmon fishery in the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. Anexcavated deep water ship channel (DWSC), through which the river runs onits way to the Bay/Delta and Pacific Ocean, experiences episodes of lowdissolved oxygen which acts as a barrier to anadromous fish migration anda threat to the long-term survival of the salmon run. An emergencyresponse management system is under development to forecast theseepisodes of low dissolved oxygen and to deploy measures that will raisedissolved oxygen concentrations to prevent damage to the fisheryresource. The emergency response management system has been designed tointeract with a real-time water quality monitoring network and is servedby a comprehensive data management and forecasting model toolbox. TheBay/Delta and Tributaries (BDAT) Cooperative Data Management System is adistributed, web accessible database that contains terabytes ofinformation on all aspects of the ecology of the Bay/Delta and upperwatersheds. The complexity of the problem dictates data integration froma variety of monitoring programs. A unique data templating system hasbeen constructed to serve the needs of cooperating scientists who wish toshare their data and to simplify and streamline data uploading into themaster database. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of such asystem in providing decision support for management of the San JoaquinRiver fishery. We discuss how the system might be expanded to havefurther utility in coping with other emergencies and threats to watersupply system serving California's costal communities.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Jacobs, Karl C.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite-- Energy, science, andTechnology Pathways As part

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science, andPlans WorkTechnology Pathways The

462

Migrating the facility profile information management system into the world wide web  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy - Office of Special Projects and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), along with the Department of Energy - office of Scientific and Technical Information have previously designed and implemented the Environment, Safety and Health Facility Profile Information Management System (FPIMS) to facilitate greater efficiency in searching, analyzing and disseminating information found within environment, safety and health oversight documents. This information retrieval based system serves as a central repository for full-text electronic oversight documents, as well as a management planning and decision making tool that can assist in trend and root cause analyses. Continuous improvement of environment, safety and health programs are currently aided through this personal computer-based system by providing a means for the open communication of lessons learned across the department. Overall benefits have included reductions in costs and improvements in past information management capabilities. Access to the FPIMS has been possible historically through a headquarters-based local area network equipped with modems. Continued demand for greater accessibility of the system by remote DOE field offices and sites, in conjunction with the Secretary of Energy` s call for greater public accessibility to Department of Energy (DOE) information resources, has been the impetus to expand access through the use of Internet technologies. Therefore, the following paper will discuss reasons for migrating the FPIMS system into the World Wide Web (Web), various lessons learned from the FPIMS migration effort, as well as future plans for enhancing the Web-based FPIMS.

Kero, R.E.; Swietlik, C.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Laboratory and field studies related to the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report describes research conducted in FY 1990 by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Project. This multi-agency project measures the underground movement of radionuclides related to nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site. This project continues the long-term experiment at the site of the Cambric nuclear test. Water pumped from a well adjacent to the explosion cavity continues to show decreasing amounts of tritium and Krypton 85 but no Cesium 139. Analyses of drillback debris shows a distinction between refractory and volatile materials in respect to both their location in the test cavity and their leachability with groundwater. We surveyed materials used during nuclear testing to evaluate any post-test hazard; we concluded that most such materials pose a minimal hazard. The Los Alamos drilling program provided an opportunity for us to sample a collapsed zone above the cavity of a test, which was fired 2 years ago. We continue our research in colloid characterization and in detection of low levels of Technetium 99 in Nevada Test Site water. During FY 1990, we drilled a new hole in the Yucca Flat area to study radionuclide migration. This report also describes Los Alamos management and planning activities in support of this project. 20 refs., 2 figs., 14 tabs.

Thompson, J.L. (comp.)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Signalling mechanisms of SDF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of stromal-derived factor-1-{alpha} (SDF-1-{alpha}) on endothelial angiogenic effects. SDF-1-{alpha} (50 ng/ml) increased the number of cultured endothelial cells from 33,653 {+-} 1183 to 55,398 {+-} 2741, which significantly reduced by adding the BK{sub Ca}-inhibitor iberiotoxin, or the endothelial nitric oxide synthase-blocker, L-NMMA (n = 24, p < 0.05). Using the 'Fences'-assay a significant increase of HUVEC migration induced by SDF-1-{alpha} was reported, which was blocked by the addition of iberiotoxin or L-NMMA (n = 12, p < 0.05). BK{sub Ca} open-state probability (NPo) was analysed using the patch-clamp technique and NPo was increased from 0.003 (control) to 0.052 (SDF-1-{alpha}; n = 10, p < 0.05). NO synthesis was measured using a cGMP-radioimmunoassay. A significant increase of cGMP levels from 0.952 pmol/mg protein to 2.179 pmol/mg protein was observed, that was abolished by L-NMMA and significantly reduced by iberiotoxin (n = 15, p < 0.05). SDF-1-{alpha} increases endothelial proliferation and migration involving the activation of BK{sub Ca} and an increased production of NO.

Kuhlmann, Christoph Ruediger Wolfram [Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Germany)]. E-mail: Chr_Kuhlmann@web.de; Schaefer, Christian Alexander [Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Germany); Reinhold, Lars [Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Germany); Tillmanns, Harald [Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Germany); Erdogan, Ali [Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Germany)

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

465

Brine migration test report: Asse Salt Mine, Federal Republic of Germany: Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of Brine Migration Tests which were undertaken at the Asse mine of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) under a bilateral US/FRG agreement. This experiment simulates a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse salt mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. This report describes the Asse salt mine, the test equipment, and the pretest properties of the salt in the mine and in the vicinity of the test area. Also included are selected test data (for the first 28 months of operation) on the following: brine migration rates, thermomechaical behavior of the salt (including room closure, stress reading, and thermal profiles), borehole gas pressures, and borehole gas analyses. In addition to field data, laboratory analyses of pretest salt properties are included in this report. The operational phase of these experiments was completed on October 4, 1985, with the commencement of cooldown and the start of posttest activities. 7 refs., 68 figs., 48 tabs.

Coyle, A.J.; Eckert, J.; Kalia, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

467

ALL-PATHWAYS DOSE ANALYSIS FOR THE PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) All-Pathways analysis has been conducted that considers the radiological impacts to a resident farmer. It is assumed that the resident farmer utilizes a farm pond contaminated by the OSWDF to irrigate a garden and pasture and water livestock from which food for the resident farmer is obtained, and that the farmer utilizes groundwater from the Berea sandstone aquifer for domestic purposes (i.e. drinking water and showering). As described by FBP 2014b the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model (Schroeder et al. 1994) and the Surface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) model (White and Oostrom 2000, 2006) were used to model the flow and transport from the OSWDF to the Points of Assessment (POAs) associated with the 680-ft elevation sandstone layer (680 SSL) and the Berea sandstone aquifer. From this modeling the activity concentrations radionuclides were projected over time at the POAs. The activity concentrations were utilized as input to a GoldSimTM (GTG 2010) dose model, described herein, in order to project the dose to a resident farmer over time. A base case and five sensitivity cases were analyzed. The sensitivity cases included an evaluation of the impacts of using a conservative inventory, an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer, a low waste zone uranium distribution coefficient (Kd), different transfer factors, and reference person exposure parameters (i.e. at 95 percentile). The maximum base case dose within the 1,000 year assessment period was projected to be 1.5E-14 mrem/yr, and the maximum base case dose at any time less than 10,000 years was projected to be 0.002 mrem/yr. The maximum projected dose of any sensitivity case was approximately 2.6 mrem/yr associated with the use of an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer. This sensitivity case is considered very unlikely because it assumes leakage from the location of greatest concentration in the 680 SSL in to the Berea sandstone aquiver over time and does not conform to standard private water well construction practices. The bottom-line is that all predicted doses from the base case and five sensitivity cases fall well below the DOE all-pathways 25 mrem/yr Performance Objective.

Smith, F.; Phifer, M.

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

OSU-A9 inhibits angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via disrupting Akt–NF-?B and MAPK signaling pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the introduction of angiogenesis as a useful target for cancer therapy, few agents have been approved for clinical use due to the rapid development of resistance. This problem can be minimized by simultaneous targeting of multiple angiogenesis signaling pathways, a potential strategy in cancer management known as polypharmacology. The current study aimed at exploring the anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol-derived pleotropic agent that targets mainly Akt–nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling which regulates many key players of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of OSU-A9 on several key steps of angiogenesis. Results showed that OSU-A9 effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HUVECs. Besides, OSU-A9 inhibited angiogenesis as evidenced by abrogation of migration/invasion and Matrigel tube formation in HUVECs and attenuation of the in vivo neovascularization in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. Mechanistically, Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the ability of OSU-A9 to inhibit MMP-2 production and VEGF expression induced by hypoxia or phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Akt–NF-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the key regulators of angiogenesis, was observed. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, at least in part through the inhibition of Akt–NF-?B and MAPK signaling and their consequent inhibition of VEGF and MMP-2. These findings support OSU-A9's clinical promise as a component of anticancer therapy. - Highlights: • The antiangiogenic activity of OSU-A9 in HUVECs was explored. • OSU-A9 inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. • OSU-A9 targeted signaling pathways mediated by Akt-NF-kB, VEGF, and MMP-2. • The anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9 supports its clinical promise.

Omar, Hany A. [Division of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Arafa, El-Shaimaa A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Salama, Samir A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11511 (Egypt); Arab, Hany H. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11562 (Egypt); Wu, Chieh-Hsi, E-mail: chhswu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Weng, Jing-Ru, E-mail: columnster@gmail.com [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe PV devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Migrating data from TcSE to DOORS : an evaluation of the T-Plan Integrator software application.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes our evaluation of the T-Plan Integrator software application as it was used to transfer a real data set from the Teamcenter for Systems Engineering (TcSE) software application to the DOORS software application. The T-Plan Integrator was evaluated to determine if it would meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories to migrate our existing data sets from TcSE to DOORS. This report presents the struggles of migrating data and focuses on how the Integrator can be used to map a data set and its data architecture from TcSE to DOORS. Finally, this report describes how the bulk of the migration can take place using the Integrator; however, about 20-30% of the data would need to be transferred from TcSE to DOORS manually. This report does not evaluate the transfer of data from DOORS to TcSE.

Post, Debra S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Manzanares, David A.; Taylor, Jeffrey L.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The effect of stratigraphic dip on brine inflow and gas migration at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural dip of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), although regionally only about 111, has the potential to affect brine inflow and gas-migration distances due to buoyancy forces. Current models, including those in WIPP Performance Assessment calculations, assume a perfectly horizontal repository and stratigraphy. With the addition of buoyancy forces due to the dip, brine and gas flow patterns can be affected. Brine inflow may increase due to countercurrent flow, and gas may preferentially migrate up dip. This scoping study has used analytical and numerical modeling to evaluate the impact of the dip on brine inflow and gas-migration distances at the WIPP in one, two, and three dimensions. Sensitivities to interbed permeabilities, two-phase curves, gas-generation rates, and interbed fracturing were studied.

Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Larson, K.W. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4?,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other types of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Apigenin has a potential in preventing environmental arsenic induced carcinogenesis. • Apigenin suppresses CXCR4 in malignant transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. • The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to inhibition of NF-?B activity.

Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Pratheeshkumar, Poyil [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrifying transportation can reduce or eliminate dependence on foreign fuels, emission of green house gases, and emission of pollutants. One challenge is finding a pathway for vehicles that gains wide market acceptance to achieve a meaningful benefit. This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective including opportunity charging, replacing the battery over the vehicle life, improving battery life, reducing battery cost, and providing electric power directly to the vehicle during a portion of its travel. Many combinations of PHEV electric range and battery power are included. For each case, the model accounts for battery cycle life and the national distribution of driving distances to size the battery optimally. Using the current estimates of battery life and cost, only the dynamically plugged-in pathway was cost-effective to the consumer. Significant improvements in battery life and battery cost also made PHEVs more cost-effective than today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (CVs).

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

475

Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diminishing reserve of fossil fuels calls for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from renewable resources, including photosynthetic organisms, generating clean energy. Microalgae is one of the potential feedstock for biofuels production. It grows easily even in waste water, and poses no competition to agricultural crops for arable land. However, little is known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory mechanisms. Most studies relied on the homology to other plant model organisms, in particular Arabidopsis or through low coverage expression analysis to identify key enzymes. This limits the discovery of new components in the biosynthetic pathways, particularly the genetic regulators and effort to maximize the production efficiency of algal biofuels. Here we report an unprecedented and de novo approach to dissect the algal lipid pathways through disclosing the temporal regulations of chromatin states during lipid biosynthesis. We have generated genome wide chromatin maps in chlamydomonas genome using ChIP-seq targeting 7 histone modifications and RNA polymerase II in a time-series manner throughout conditions activating lipid biosynthesis. To our surprise, the combinatory profiles of histone codes uncovered new regulatory mechanism in gene expression in algae. Coupled with matched RNA-seq data, chromatin changes revealed potential novel regulators and candidate genes involved in the activation of lipid accumulations. Genetic perturbation on these candidate regulators further demonstrated the potential to manipulate the regulatory cascade for lipid synthesis efficiency. Exploring epigenetic landscape in microalgae shown here provides powerful tools needed in improving biofuel production and new technology platform for renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental survey.

Ngan, Chew Yee; Wong, Chee-Hong; Choi, Cindy; Pratap, Abhishek; Han, James; Wei, Chia-Lin

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

476

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Determination of Swimming Speeds and Energetic Demands of Upriver Migrating Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) in the Klickitat River, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program during the fall of 2001. The objective was to study the migration and energy use of adult fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) traveling up the Klickitat River to spawn. The salmon were tagged with either surgically implanted electromyogram (EMG) transmitters or gastrically implanted coded transmitters and were monitored with mobile and stationary receivers. Swim speed and aerobic and anaerobic energy use were determined for the fish as they attempted passage of three waterfalls on the lower Klickitat River and as they traversed free-flowing stretches between, below, and above the falls. Of the 35 EMG-tagged fish released near the mouth of the Klickitat River, 40% passed the first falls, 24% passed the second falls, and 20% made it to Lyle Falls. None of the EMG-tagged fish were able to pass Lyle Falls, either over the falls or via a fishway at Lyle Falls. Mean swimming speeds ranged from as low as 52.6 centimeters per second (cm s{sup -1}) between falls to as high as 189 (cm s{sup -1}) at falls passage. Fish swam above critical swimming speeds while passing the falls more often than while swimming between the falls (58.9% versus 1.7% of the transmitter signals). However, fish expended more energy swimming the stretches between the falls than during actual falls passage (100.7 to 128.2 kilocalories [kcals] to traverse areas between or below falls versus 0.3 to 1.0 kcals to pass falls). Relationships between sex, length, and time of day on the success of falls passage were also examined. Average swimming speeds were highest during the day in all areas except at some waterfalls. There was no apparent relationship between either fish condition or length and successful passage of waterfalls in the lower Klickitat River. Female fall chinook salmon, however, had a much lower likelihood of passing waterfalls than males. The study also examined energy costs and swimming speeds for fish released above Lyle Falls as they migrated to upstream spawning areas. This journey averaged 15.93 days to travel a mean maximum of 37.6 km upstream at a total energy cost of approx 3,971 kcals (34% anaerobic and 66% aerobic) for a sample of five fish. A bioenergetics example was run, which estimated that fall chinook salmon would expend an estimated 1,208 kcal to pass from the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam and 874 kcals to pass Bonneville Dam and pool and the three falls on the Lower Klickitat River, plus an additional 2,770 kcals above the falls to reach the spawning grounds, leaving them with approximately 18% (1,089 kcals) of their original energy reserves for spawning. Results of the bioenergetics example suggest that a delay of 9 to 11 days along the lower Klickitat River may deplete their remaining energy reserves (at a rate of about 105 kcal d{sup -1}) resulting in death before spawning would occur.

Brown, Richard S.; Geist, David R.; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

Efficient CO2 Fixation Pathways: Energy Plant: High Efficiency Photosynthetic Organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PETRO Project: UCLA is redesigning the carbon fixation pathways of plants to make them more efficient at capturing the energy in sunlight. Carbon fixation is the key process that plants use to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere into higher energy molecules (such as sugars) using energy from the sun. UCLA is addressing the inefficiency of the process through an alternative biochemical pathway that uses 50% less energy than the pathway used by all land plants. In addition, instead of producing sugars, UCLA’s designer pathway will produce pyruvate, the precursor of choice for a wide variety of liquid fuels. Theoretically, the new biochemical pathway will allow a plant to capture 200% as much CO2 using the same amount of light. The pathways will first be tested on model photosynthetic organisms and later incorporated into other plants, thus dramatically improving the productivity of both food and fuel crops.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid biosynthetic pathway Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pathway in Escherichia coli... . Here we identify a novel biosynthetic alternative to D2 diesel fuel, bisabolane, and engineer microbial... biosynthetic bisabolene into...

480

Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production with gaseous hydrogen pipeline delivery systems;production with gaseous hydrogen pipeline delivery systems (the central hydrogen pathway with pipeline systems in terms

Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M; Nicholas, Michael A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid pathway targets Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Marine Science, College of William and Mary Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Rahnuma: Hypergraph based tool for metabolic pathway...

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial baroreceptor pathways Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pathways Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Modelingof Feedback Mechanisms which Control the Heart Function Summary: .1 InteractionbetweenVentricleandArterialLoad . . . . . . . . . ....

483

Topological Aspects of DNA Function and Protein Folding 523 Knotting pathways in proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological Aspects of DNA Function and Protein Folding 523 Knotting pathways in proteins Joanna I Key words: artificial knot, chaperone, free energy landscape, knotted protein, protein folding

Bigelow, Stephen

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - albumin unfolding pathway Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a Partially Unfolded, Aggregation-Competent Intermediate at Summary: of protein folding (1, 2), to demonstrate the possibility of multiple pathways for folding and...

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic food pathways Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: aquatic food pathways Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Summary: and population control 1994 Jrgens -- Impact of Daphnia...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid catabolic pathway Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

metabolism of nutrients1 Summary: , and cell cultures to investigate the interconnectivity of the pathways of macronutrient and nucleic acid... -labeled car- bon skeletons...

487

atr-chk1 pathway plays: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Decision Makers Edited by Joan TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 4 CHAPTER 13: BEYOND LIFE-CYCLE ANALYSIS Chapter 13: Beyond Life generally is linear, static, highly...

488

Signatures of the protein folding pathway in two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2) Dobson, C. M. Protein Folding and Misfolding. Naturethe Complexity of Protein Folding. Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol.Signatures of the Protein Folding Pathway in Two-Dimensional

Jiang, J; Lai, Z; Wang, J; Mukamel, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid biosynthetic pathway1oa Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in trees and forage crops based on our needs. Currently, the biosynthetic pathway of lignin has been well... modification.7,8 In contrast, our understanding on the...

490

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios Hydrogen Pathways: Cost,...

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - adenine metabolic pathway Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from southernmost deserts to beyond the Summary: -consuming processes and pathways of energy production. In a model of metabolic homeostasis in turtles and rats... must be...

492

Migration Energy-Aware Workload Consolidation in Enterprise Clouds Mohammad M. Hossain Jen-Cheng Huang Hsien-Hsin S. Lee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration Energy-Aware Workload Consolidation in Enterprise Clouds Mohammad M. Hossain Jen-Cheng Huang Hsien-Hsin S. Lee College of Computing School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia--Consolidation through live VM migrations is a promising approach to improve server utilization. However, prior

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

493

Finite Element Modeling of Suspended Particle Migration in Non-Newtonian Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shear-induced migration of particles is studied during the slow flow of suspensions of spheres (particle volume fraction {phi} = 0.50) in an inelastic but shear-thinning, suspending fluid in flow between counterrotating concentric cylinders, The conditions are such that nonhydrodynamic effects are negligible. The movement of particles away from the high shear rate region is more pronounced than in a Newtonian suspending liquid. We test a continuum constitutive model for the evolution of particle concentration in a flowing suspension proposed by Phillips et al. (1992) by using shear-thinning, suspending fluids. The fluid constitutive equation is Carreau-like in its shear-thinning behavior but also varies with the local particle concentration. The model is compared with the experimental data gathered with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging.

Altobelli, S.; Baer, T.; Mondy, L.; Rao, R.; Stephens, T.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

494

Computer simulation of hydraulic fracturing in shales-influences on primary migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic tension fractures in a shale layer during sedimentation are simulated by use of computer techniques. The depth at which fractures form is directly proportional to the hydraulic conductivity and tensile strength, and inversely proportional to the rate of sedimentation and thickness of the shale layer. Hydraulic fractures may form at depths of oil generation to facilitate primary migration. This paper describes an attempt to simulate the process of hydraulic fracturing during burial and compaction of a shale layer by use of an elementary model. One objective is to investigate the role of various factors in hydraulic tension fracturing of shales in a tectonically relaxed area. Another objective is to see whether hydraulic fractures form at depths of oil generation.

Ozkaya, I.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Migration in alluvium of chlorine-36 and tritium from an underground nuclear test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a field experiment studying the migration in alluvium of radioactive elements away from an underground nuclear explosion at the Nevada Test Site in the United States. Nuclides detected in the pumped water are tritium, chlorine-36, iodine-129, and krypton-85 - all at levels below the maximum permissible concentration for drinking water in controlled areas. The chlorine-36 elution curve precedes that of tritium, and is due to an anion exclusion process. A conventional two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation does not fully describe the elution curves for tritium and chlorine-36; the tailing of the curves is longer than predicted. Successful modeling of this experiment will be important for validating codes and models to be used in the high-level nuclear waste program.

Ogard, A.E.; Thompson, J.L.; Rundberg, R.S.; Wolfsberg, K.; Kubik, P.W.; Elmore, D.; Bentley, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

The destruction of inner planetary systems during high-eccentricity migration of gas giants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hot Jupiters are giant planets on orbits a few hundredths of an AU. They do not share their system with low-mass close-in planets, despite these latter being exceedingly common. Two migration channels for hot Jupiters have been proposed: through a protoplanetary gas disc or by tidal circularisation of highly-eccentric planets. We show that highly-eccentric giant planets that will become hot Jupiters clear out any low-mass inner planets in the system, explaining the observed lack of such companions to hot Jupiters. A less common outcome of the interaction is that the giant planet is ejected by the inner planets. Furthermore, the interaction can implant giant planets on moderately-high eccentricities at semimajor axes $<1$ AU, a region otherwise hard to populate. Our work supports the hypothesis that most hot Jupiters reached their current orbits following a phase of high eccentricity, possibly excited by other planetary or stellar companions.

Mustill, Alexander J; Johansen, Anders

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

Michael J. Therien

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Simulations of Ion Migration in the LCLS RF Gun and Injector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this work was the observed surface contamination of the first LCLS RF gun copper cathode. We will present the results of simulations in regards to ion migration in the LCLS gun. Ions of residual gases will be created by interaction of molecular gas species with the UV drive laser beam and by the electron beam itself. The larger part of those ionized molecules remain in the vicinity of creation, are transported towards beam line walls or away from the cathode. However a small fraction gains enough kinetic energy, focused by RF and magnetic fields and propagates to the cathode, producing an undesirable increase of the cathode's surface work function. Although this fraction is small, during long term operation, this effect may become a significant factor limiting the source performance.

Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC; Dowell, David; /SLAC

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

500

Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

Lynd, L.R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z