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1

A Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration And Eruption At Mt Etna (Sicily, Italy) Before The 2001 And 2002-2003 Eruptions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration And Eruption At Mt Etna (Sicily, Italy) Before The 2001 And 2002-2003 Eruptions Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Two strong flank eruptions occurred in July-August 2001 and from late October 2002 to late January 2003 at Mt. Etna volcano. The two eruptions mainly involved the upper southern flank of the volcano, a particularly active area during the last 30 years, damaging several tourist facilities and threatening some villages. The composite eruptive activity

2

GIS-based modeling of secondary hydrocarbon migration pathways and its application in the northern Songliao Basin, northeast China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon migration pathways are the linkage between hydrocarbon source areas and accumulation sites. Modeling accurately the pathways of hydrocarbon migration is of important significance in determining the location of favorable petroleum exploration ... Keywords: Digital elevation model (DEM), Geographic information system (GIS), Migration pathway, Oil and gas-bearing basin, Visualization

Xuefeng Liu; Guangfa Zhong; Jingyuan Yin; Youbin He; Xianhua Li

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Assessing Accelerator-Based HPC Reverse Time Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas companies trust Reverse Time Migration (RTM), the most advanced seismic imaging technique, with crucial decisions on drilling investments. The economic value of the oil reserves that require RTM to be localized is in the order of 10^{13} ... Keywords: Reverse time migration, accelerators, GPU, Cell/B.E., FPGA, geophysics.

Mauricio Araya-Polo; Javier Cabezas; Mauricio Hanzich; Miquel Pericas; Felix Rubio; Isaac Gelado; Muhammad Shafiq; Enric Morancho; Nacho Navarro; Eduard Ayguade; Jose Maria Cela; Mateo Valero

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Characterizability of metabolic pathway systems from time series...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizability of metabolic pathway systems from time series data Eberhard O. Voit The Wallace H. Coulter, Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech. and Emory...

5

Tritium migration at the Gasbuggy site: Evaluation of possible hydrologic pathways  

SciTech Connect

An underground nuclear test named Gasbuggy was conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 1967. Subsequent groundwater monitoring in an overlying aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revealed increasing levels of tritium in monitoring well EPNG 10-36, located 132 m from the test, suggesting migration of contaminants from the nuclear cavity. There are three basic scenarios that could explain the occurrence of tritium in well 10-36: (1) introduction of tritium into the well from the land surface, (2) migration of tritium through the Ojo Alamo Formation, and (3) migration through the Pictured Cliffs Formation. The two subsurface transport scenarios were evaluated with a travel time analysis. In one, transport occurs to the Ojo Alamo sandstone either up the emplacement hole or through fractures created by the blast, and then laterally through the aquifer to the monitoring well. In the other, lateral transport occurs through fractures in the underlying Pictured Cliffs detonation horizon and then migrates up the monitoring well through plugged casing connecting the two formations. The travel time analysis indicates that the hydraulic conductivity measured in the Ojo Alamo Formation is too low for lateral transport to account for the observed arrival of tritium at the monitoring well. This suggests transport either through fractures intersecting the Ojo Alamo close to well EPNG 10-36, or through fractures in the Pictured Cliffs and up through the bottom plug in the well. The transport scenarios were investigated using hydrologic logging techniques and sampling at the monitoring well, with the fieldwork conducted after the removal of a string of 0.05-m-diameter tubing that had previously provided the only monitoring access.

Chapman, J.; Mihevc, T.; Lyles, B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Time scales of DNAPL migration in sandy aquifers examined via numerical simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time required for dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to cease migrating following release to the subsurface is a valuable component of a site conceptual model. This study uses numerical simulation to investigate the migration of six different DNAPLs in sandy aquifers. The most influential parameters governing migration cessation time are the density and viscosity of the DNAPL and the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. Releases of between 1 and 40 drums of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs, characterized by relatively high density and low viscosity, require on the order of months to a few years to cease migrating in a heterogeneous medium sand aquifer having an average hydraulic conductivity of 7.4 x 10{sup -3} cm/s. In contrast to this, the release of 20 drums of coal tar {rho}{sub D} = 1061 kg/m{sup 3}, {mu}{sub D} = 0.161 Pa(.)s) requires more than 100 years to cease migrating in the same aquifer. Altering the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer results in a proportional change in cessation times. Parameters that exhibit relatively little influence on migration time scales are the DNAPL-water interfacial tension, release volume, source capillary pressure, mean aquifer porosity, and ambient ground water hydraulic gradient. This study also demonstrates that low-density DNAPLs (e.g., coal tar) give rise to greater amounts of lateral spreading and greater amounts of pooling on capillary barriers than high-density DNAPLs such as trichloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene.

Gerhard, J.I.; Pang, T.; Kueper, B.H. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Inst. of Infrastructure & Environmental

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY); Boulanger, Albert (New York, NY); Bagdonas, Edward P. (Brookline, MA); Xu, Liqing (New Milford, NJ); He, Wei (New Milford, NJ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Imaging Faults with Reverse-Time Migration for Geothermal Exploration at Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The fault zones at Jemez Pueblo may dominate the flow paths of hot water, or confine the boundaries of the geothermal reservoir. Therefore, it is crucial to image the geometry of these fault zones for geothermal exploration in the area. We use reverse-time migration with a separation imaging condition to image the faults at Jemez Pueblo. A finite-difference full-wave equation method with a perfectly-matching-layer absorbing boundary condition is used for backward propagation of seismic reflection data from receivers and forward propagation of wavefields from sources. In the imaging region, the wavefields are separated into the upgoing and downgoing waves, and leftgoing and rightgoing waves. The upgoing and downgoing waves are used to obtain the downward-looking image, and the leftgoing and rightgoing waves are used to form the left-looking image and right-looking image from sources. The left-looking and right-looking images are normally weaker than the downward-looking image because the reflections from the fault zones are much weaker than those from sedimentary layers, but these migration results contain the images of the faults. We apply our reverse-time migration with a wavefield separation imaging condition to seismic data acquired at Jemez Pueblo, and our preliminary results reveal many faults in the area.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albrecht, Michael [TBA Power; Kaufman, Greg [Jemez Purblo; Kelley, Shari [NM Bureau of Geology and Mineral Researces; Rehfeldt, Kenneth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Zhifu [EES-17 visitor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Unraveling the Timing of Fluid Migration and Trap Formation in the Brooks Range Foothills: A Key to Discovering Hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring fractures can play a key role in the evolution and producibility of a hydrocarbon accumulation. Understanding the evolution of fractures in the Brooks Range/Colville basin system of northern Alaska is critical to developing a better working model of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. This study addressed this problem by collecting detailed and regional data on fracture distribution and character, structural geometry, temperature, the timing of deformation along the Brooks Range rangefront and adjacent parts of the Colville basin, and the in situ stress distribution within the Colville basin. This new and existing data then were used to develop a model of how fractures evolved in northern Alaska, both spatially and temporally. The results of the study indicate that fractures formed episodically throughout the evolution of northern Alaska, due to a variety of mechanisms. Four distinct fracture sets were observed. The earliest fractures formed in deep parts of the Colville basin and in the underlying Ellesmerian sequence rocks as these rocks experienced compression associated with the growing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The orientation of these deep basin fractures was controlled by the maximum in situ horizontal stress in the basin at the time of their formation, which was perpendicular to the active Brooks Range thrust front. This orientation stayed consistently NS-striking for most of the early history of the Brooks Range and Colville basin, but changed to NW-striking with the development of the northeastern Brooks Range during the early Tertiary. Subsequent incorporation of these rocks into the fold-and-thrust belt resulted in overprinting of these deep basin fractures by fractures caused by thrusting and related folding. The youngest fractures developed as rocks were uplifted and exposed. While this general order of fracturing remains consistent across the Brooks Range and adjacent Colville basin, the absolute age at any one location varies. Fracturing started in the southwest deep in the stratigraphic section during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, moving northeastward and upsection as the Colville basin filled from the west. Active fracturing is occurring today in the northeastern parts of the Colville basin, north of the northeastern Brooks thrust front. Across northern Alaska, the early deep basin fractures were probably synchronous with hydrocarbon generation. Initially, these early fractures would have been good migration pathways, but would have been destroyed where subsequently overridden by the advancing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. However, at these locations younger fracture sets related to folding and thrusting could have enhanced reservoir permeability and/or served as vertical migration pathways to overlying structural traps.

Catherine L. Hanks

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Beyond receiver functions: Passive source reverse time migration and inverse scattering of converted waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a wave equation prestack depth migration to image crust and mantle structures using multi-component earthquake data recorded at dense seismograph arrays. Transmitted P and S waves recorded on the surface are ...

Shang, Xuefeng

12

Timing is everything : along the fossil fuel transition pathway.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you'll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. Therefore, our research question is,To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?' Existing models do not include full regulatory constraints due to their often complex, and inflexible approaches to solve foroptimal' engineering instead ofrobust' and multidisciplinary solutions. This project outlines the theory and then develops an applied software tool to model the laboratory-to-market transition using the traditional technology readiness level (TRL) framework, but develops subsequent and a novel regulatory readiness level (RRL) and market readiness level (MRL). This tool uses the ideally-suited system dynamics framework to incorporate feedbacks and time delays. Future energy-economic-environment models, regardless of their programming platform, may adapt this software model component framework ormodule' to further vet the likelihood of new or innovative technology moving through the laboratory, regulatory and market space. The prototype analytical framework and tool, called the Technology, Regulatory and Market Readiness Level simulation model (TRMsim) illustrates the interaction between technology research, application, policy and market dynamics as they relate to a new or innovative technology moving from the theoretical stage to full market deployment. The initial results that illustrate the model's capabilities indicate for a hypothetical technology, that increasing the key driver behind each of the TRL, RRL and MRL components individually decreases the time required for the technology to progress through each component by 63, 68 and 64%, respectively. Therefore, under the current working assumptions, to decrease the time it may take for a technology to move from the conceptual stage to full scale market adoption one might consider expending additional effort to secure regulatory approval and reducing the uncertainty of the technology's demand in the marketplace.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Timing is everything : along the fossil fuel transition pathway.  

SciTech Connect

People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you'll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. Therefore, our research question is,To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?' Existing models do not include full regulatory constraints due to their often complex, and inflexible approaches to solve foroptimal' engineering instead ofrobust' and multidisciplinary solutions. This project outlines the theory and then develops an applied software tool to model the laboratory-to-market transition using the traditional technology readiness level (TRL) framework, but develops subsequent and a novel regulatory readiness level (RRL) and market readiness level (MRL). This tool uses the ideally-suited system dynamics framework to incorporate feedbacks and time delays. Future energy-economic-environment models, regardless of their programming platform, may adapt this software model component framework ormodule' to further vet the likelihood of new or innovative technology moving through the laboratory, regulatory and market space. The prototype analytical framework and tool, called the Technology, Regulatory and Market Readiness Level simulation model (TRMsim) illustrates the interaction between technology research, application, policy and market dynamics as they relate to a new or innovative technology moving from the theoretical stage to full market deployment. The initial results that illustrate the model's capabilities indicate for a hypothetical technology, that increasing the key driver behind each of the TRL, RRL and MRL components individually decreases the time required for the technology to progress through each component by 63, 68 and 64%, respectively. Therefore, under the current working assumptions, to decrease the time it may take for a technology to move from the conceptual stage to full scale market adoption one might consider expending additional effort to secure regulatory approval and reducing the uncertainty of the technology's demand in the marketplace.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A 4D synchrotron X-ray tomography study of the formation of hydrocarbon migration pathways in heated organic-rich shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interests in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms for the transport of hydrocarbons from the source rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures have been proposed, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes it is imperative to use the ...

Panahi, Hamed; Renard, Francois; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Meakin, Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Time scales and pathways for kinetic energy relaxation in solvated proteins: Application to carbonmonoxy myoglobin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ki- netic energy equipartitioning compared to that of the hydro- gen atoms. These backbone atomsTime scales and pathways for kinetic energy relaxation in solvated proteins: Application, the rates of kinetic energy partitioning for various elements of solvated carboxy-myoglobin were calculated

Straub, John E.

16

Upstream Migration of Pacific Lampreys in the John Day River : Behavior, Timing, and Habitat Use : Annual Report 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historic accounts and recent observations of Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) at mainstem Columbia River dams indicate the number of Pacific lampreys migrating upriver has decreased dramatically over the last 60 years. Consequently, state, federal, and tribal governments have recently expressed concern for this species. Little is known about the biological and ecological characteristics of habitats suitable for upstream migrating Pacific lampreys. If rehabilitation efforts are to be done effectively and efficiently, we must gain knowledge of factors limiting survival and reproduction of Pacific lampreys. From data gathered in the first year of this project, we can for the first time, describe the timing, extent, and patterns of movements for Pacific lampreys. We have tested methods and gained information that will allow us to refine our objectives and approach in future work. Knowledge of behavior, timing, and the resulting quantification of habitat use will provide a means to assess the suitability of overwintering and spawning habitats and allow the establishment of goals for recovery projects. Further research is necessary, including multiple years of data collection, tracking of movement patterns through the spawning season, and more rigorously examining habitat use.

Bayer, Jennifer M.; Seelye, James G.; Robinson, T. Craig

2001-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

A 4D Synchrotron X-Ray-Tomography Study of the Formation of Hydrocarbon- Migration Pathways in Heated Organic-Rich Shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interest in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low-permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing, and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms have been proposed for the transport of hydrocarbons from the rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes, it is imperative to use the latest technological advances. In this study, it is shown how insights into hydrocarbon migration in source rocks can be obtained by using sequential high-resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. Three-dimensional images of several immature "shale" samples were constructed at resolutions close to 5 um. This is sufficient to resolve the source-rock structure down to the grain level, but very-fine-grained silt particles, clay particles, and colloids cannot be resolved. Samples used in this investigation came from the R-8 unit in the upper part of the Green River shale, which is organic rich, varved, lacustrine marl formed in Eocene Lake Uinta, USA. One Green River shale sample was heated in situ up to 400 degrees C as X-ray-tomography images were recorded. The other samples were scanned before and after heating at 400 degrees C. During the heating phase, the organic matter was decomposed, and gas was released. Gas expulsion from the low-permeability shales was coupled with formation of microcracks. The main technical difficulty was numerical extraction of microcracks that have apertures in the 5- to 30-um range (with 5 um being the resolution limit) from a large 3D volume of X-ray attenuation data. The main goal of the work presented here is to develop a methodology to process these 3D data and image the cracks. This methodology is based on several levels of spatial filtering and automatic recognition of connected domains. Supportive petrographic and thermogravimetric data were an important complement to this study. An investigation of the strain field using 2D image correlation analyses was also performed. As one application of the 4D (space + time) microtomography and the developed workflow, we show that fluid generation was accompanied by crack formation. Under different conditions, in the subsurface, this might provide paths for primary migration.

Hamed Panahi; Paul Meakin; Francois Renard; Maya Kobchenko; Julien Scheibert; Adriano Mazzini; Bjorn Jamtveit; Anders Malthe-Sorenssen; Dag Kristian Dysthe

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Waterfowl Migrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waterfowl Migrations Waterfowl Migrations Nature Bulletin No. 615-A October 30, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATERFOWL MIGRATIONS Every autumn, McGinnis Slough -- a 315 acre sanctuary in our Palos preserves -- is visited by many thousands of waterfowl and provides some fascinating spectacles. Frequently, near sundown, flock after flock of ducks, coming from the north, set their wings and glide down upon the water. Meanwhile, other flocks are rising, circling, and then disappearing southwesterly toward the Illinois River Valley. Flocks of Canada geese, and sometimes a few whistling swans, also stop to rest and feed on this refuge. The annual migrations of vast numbers of waterfowl have always awed and mystified mankind. When the sky is full of ducks as far as we can see, or when we hear a distant honking and discover a great V of geese overhead, we wonder where they came from, where they go, and how they find their way so surely back and forth, each spring and fall.

19

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints  

SciTech Connect

Scenarios of new vehicle technology deployment serve various purposes; some will seek to establish plausibility. This report proposes two reality checks for scenarios: (1) implications of manufacturing constraints on timing of vehicle deployment and (2) investment decisions required to bring new vehicle technologies to market. An estimated timeline of 12 to more than 22 years from initial market introduction to saturation is supported by historical examples and based on the product development process. Researchers also consider the series of investment decisions to develop and build the vehicles and their associated fueling infrastructure. A proposed decision tree analysis structure could be used to systematically examine investors' decisions and the potential outcomes, including consideration of cash flow and return on investment. This method requires data or assumptions about capital cost, variable cost, revenue, timing, and probability of success/failure, and would result in a detailed consideration of the value proposition of large investments and long lead times. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Plotkin, S.; Stephens, T.; McManus, W.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Climate-sensitive decisions and time frames: a cross-sectoral analysis of information pathways in the Carolinas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the information dissemination pathways that support climate-sensitive decisions in North and South Carolina. The study draws from over 100 online questionnaires and follow-up interviews with leaders in the forestry, natural ...

Kirsten Lackstrom; Nathan P. Kettle; Benjamin Haywood; Kirstin Dow

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Migration of Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birds Birds Nature Bulletin No. 146 March 13, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N, Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation MIGRATION OF BIRDS High in the sky, wild geese are honking as they return to their nesting ground in the far north. Presently, our summer songbirds will appear and the ponds and marshes be repopulated by ducks and shore birds. Some birds, like the juncos and tree sparrows, resident here all winter, will leave for Canada or our northern states, in May, great flocks of warblers will arrive, tarry briefly, and pass on, not to be seen again until they migrate southward in autumn. The spectacular annual journeys of many kinds of birds, and their homing "instincts", have been a source of wonder since ancient times. In recent years, large-scale marking with small aluminum identification bands upon their legs, has yielded much information about birds their migration routes, speed of travel, summer and winter homes, length of life and life histories.

22

Migrated to Google Apps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mail Mail data Migrated to Google Apps Notes Email messages All email in top-level folders (read vs. unread) Folders and nested subfolders (Labels in Gmail) Folders map to labels in Google Mail. Junk E-mail Not migrated. Deleted Items Not migrated. Public folders (Microsoft® Exchange only) Google

Hu, Jie

23

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sound temporal envelope and time-patterns of activity in the human auditory pathway : an fMRI study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temporal envelope of sound strongly influences the intelligibility of speech, pattern analysis, and the grouping of sequential stimuli. This thesis examined the coding of sound temporal envelope in the time-patterns ...

Harms, Michael Patrick, 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The C. elegans heterochronic pathway controls the timing of NAB/EGR-mediated terminal differentiation and the onset of adulthood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most animals pass through a series of juvenile stages on their way from embryo to adult. These stages represent periods of time in which stage-specific developmental processes occur. At the end of development, the organism ...

Harris, David T. (David Taylor)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Return Migration from Sweden to Bosnia and Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study analyzes the determinants of return migration from Sweden to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and outmigration to third country during the time period 1994-2003.… (more)

Olovsson, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Preliminary investigation of the nature of hydrocarbon migration and entrapment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations indicate that hydrocarbon migration and entrapment in stacked fault-bounded reservoirs are mainly affected by the following factors: charge time, faults, pressure and geological structures. The charge time for commercial hydrocarbon accumulation is much longer in oil-water systems than in oil-gas-water systems. Faults are classified into charging faults and 'back doors' faults other than charging faults in stacked fault-bounded reservoirs. The lower the displacement pressure of a fault, the higher its updip oil transportation ability. The downdip oil transportation ability of a fault is usually low and cannot cause commercial downdip oil accumulation. Back doors affect both hydrocarbon percent charge and hydrocarbon migration pathways. Updip back doors improve updip oil charge. The lower the displacement pressure of an updip back door, the more efficient the updip oil charge before 3,000 years. Back doors whose displacement pressure is equal to or higher than 28.76 psi are effective in sealing faults in oil-water systems. On the contrary, only sealing faults result in commercial gas accumulations in stacked fault-compartmentalized reservoirs. Otherwise gas is found over oil. Downdip back doors generally have few effects on downdip hydrocarbon charge. Geopressure enhances the updip oil transportation of a fault and improves the positive effects of updip back doors during updip oil charge. Geopressure and updip back doors result in more efficient updip oil charge. A physical barrier is not necessarily a barrier to oil migration with the aid of geopressure and updip back doors. The chance for hydrocarbon charge into reservoirs along growth faults is not equal. Any one of the above controlling factors can change the patterns of hydrocarbon charge and distribution in such complex geological structures. Generally, lower reservoirs and updip reservoirs are favored. Reservoirs along low-permeability charging faults may be bypassed. Gas can only charge the updip reservoirs. Both updip and downdip back doors can facilitate oil penetrating a barrier fault to charge reservoirs offset by the barrier fault. Interreservoir migration among stacked fault-compartmentalized reservoirs is an important mechanism for hydrocarbon accumulation and trap identification. The interreservoir migration is a very slow process, even though the displacement pressures of bounding faults may be very low.

Bai, Jianyong

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Graceful network state migrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant fraction of network events (such as topology or route changes) and the resulting performance degradation stem from premeditated network management and operational tasks. This paper introduces a general class of Graceful Network State Migration ... Keywords: communication system operations and management, computer network management, network maintenance, network upgrade

Saqib Raza; Yuanbo Zhu; Chen-Nee Chuah

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

THE MIGRATION MECHANISM OF RADIATION PROTECTION  

SciTech Connect

An hypothesis concerning the primary mechanism of the biological action of radiation is presented. The energy absorbed either directly or indirectly on irradiation is assumed to damage the system in the course of migrating either within or between the protein or other macromolecules. Some of the damage responsible for the physio-chemical radiation after-effects is retained in ihe macromolecules as long-lived electronically excited states. It does not escape and in time produces additional effects. It is suggested thai this damage can be removed by intermolecular energy migration to some protective agent which forms a complex with the macromolecules. (C.H.)

Eidus, L.Kh.; Kalamkarova, M.B.; Otarova, G.K.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Manipulating the Steady State of Metabolic Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metabolic pathways show the complex interactions among enzymes that transform chemical compounds. The state of a metabolic pathway can be expressed as a vector, which denotes the yield of the compounds or the flux in that pathway at a given time. The ... Keywords: Metabolic pathway, steady state, traversal approach, genetic algorithm.

Bin Song; I. Esra Buyuktahtakin; Sanjay Ranka; Tamer Kahveci

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Dynamic computation migration in DSM systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe dynamic computation migration, the runtime choice between computation and data migration. Dynamic computation migration is useful for concurrent data structures with unpredictable read/write patterns. We implemented it in MCRL, a multithreaded ... Keywords: computation migration, data migration, replication, coherence

Wilson C. Hsieh; M. Frans Kaashoek; William E. Weihl

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Caged phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins : probes to dissect the role of phosphorylation in complex signaling pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protein phosphorylation is a central regulatory mechanism in signal transduction pathways and cellular migration. Current genetic strategies for the study of phosphorylation, including gene knockout and point mutation, are ...

Vogel, Elizabeth Maura

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fracturing controlled primary migration of hydrocarbon fluids during heating of organic-rich shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-resolved three-dimensional in situ high resolution synchrotron x-ray tomographic imaging was used to investigate the effects of slowly heating organic-rich Green River Shale from 60\\deg; to 400\\deg;C, in air without confinement, to better understand primary migration of hydrocarbon fluids in very low permeability source rock. Cracks nucleate in the interior of the sample at a temperature around 350\\deg;C. As the temperature increases, they grow and coalesce along lamination planes to form bigger cracks. This process is accompanied by a release of light hydrocarbons generated by decomposition of the initially immature organic matter, as determined by thermogravimetry and gas chromatography. These results provide the first 4D monitoring of an invasion percolation-like fracturing process in organic-rich shales. This process increases the permeability of the sample and provides pathways for fluid expulsion - an effect that might also be relevant for primary migration under natural conditions. We propose a 2D...

Kobchenko, Maya; Renard, Francois; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Malthe-Sorenssen, Anders; Mazzini, Adriano; Scheibert, Julien; Jamtveit, Bjorn; Meakin, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Rural migration in southern Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reviews the history of migration in two rural counties in Southern Nevada. It is part of a larger study about the impact of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository on in- and out-migration patterns in the state. The historical record suggests a boom and bust economic cycle has predominated in the region for the past century creating conditions that should be taken into account by decision makers when ascertaining the long-term impacts of the proposed repository.

Mosser, D.; Soden, D.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Career Pathways | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Career Career Pathways Career Pathways The Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Career Pathways Program is an innovative employment program targeting students and recent college graduates. If you are seeking an entry-level federal job or a federal internship, then check out our various opportunities! Intern Program The Pathways intern program allows students taking at least a half-time course load in an accredited high school, home schooling program, technical school, vocational school, two- or four- year college or university, or graduate or professional school to be part of a cooperative-learning environment. The program offers flexible work schedules, competitive pay, and the ability to gain experience while still completing your academic pursuits.

39

Narrowing the estimates of species migration rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of species migration rates How fast can species migrate?estimate population growth rates for each population sinceon their data 1 show that the rate of population spread is

Blois, Jessica L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

Jannik, G.T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Charge Migration Efficiency Optimization in Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage (HEES) Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Experimental results for an HEES system comprising of banks of batteries and supercapacitors demonstrate a migration efficiency improvement up to 51.3%, for su- percapacitor to battery and supercapacitor to supercapacitor charge migration. 1. INTRODUCTION Electrical energy usage changes over time due to the types

Pedram, Massoud

42

Nuclide-migration field experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering groundwater flow and radionuclide retention in the complex flow systems that can occur in geologic formations, one has a serious problem in determining if laboratory studies are being performed under conditions appropriate to natural systems. This document is the project plan for a program designed to begin to address these problems. The project is being carried out jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Argonne National Laboratory. The work has three principal objectives: (1) to develop the experimental, instrumental, and safety techniques necessary to conduct controlled, small-scale radionuclide migration field experiments, including those involving actinides; (2) to use these techniques to define radionuclide migration through rock by performing generic, at-depth experiments under closely monitored conditions; and (3) to determine whether available lithologic, geochemical, and hydrologic properties together with existing or developing transport models are sufficient and appropriate to describe real field conditions.

Erdal, B.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Johnstone, J.K.; Erickson, K.L.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.; Hines, J.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration  

SciTech Connect

How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

Lehman, S K

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

44

Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marriage Rates in Rural China . . . . . . . . . . .Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . . . . . .and Rural-Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . 1.

Meng, Lei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Measuring clinical pathway adherence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As clinical pathway adoption continues worldwide, it is necessary to establish adherence measurement methods in order to understand the difficulties and results of implementation. Adherence measurement literature mostly provides binary measurements of ... Keywords: Adherence, Clinical pathways, Dynamic programming

Joris van de Klundert; Pascal Gorissen; Stef Zeemering

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Pathway and Resource Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway and Resource Overview Pathway and Resource Overview Delivering Renewable Hydrogen Workshop - A Focus on Near-Term Applications Mark F. Ruth November 16, 2009 Palm Springs, CA NREL/PR-6A1-47108 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Definition and Presentation Outline Hydrogen pathway analysis is analysis of the total levelized cost (including return on investment), well-to- wheels (WTW) energy use, and WTW emissions for hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. This presentation focuses on * Pathway analyses using the Macro-System Model (MSM) * Resource and pathway analysis using the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA) * Status of water-electrolysis technology

47

Climate Vision: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cement Chemical Manufacturing Electric Power Forest Products Iron and Steel Mining Oil and Gas Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire...

48

Evolution of Migrating Planets Undergoing Gas Accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the orbital and mass evolution of planets that undergo run-away gas accretion by means of 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations. The disk torque distribution per unit disk mass as a function of radius provides an important diagnostic for the nature of the disk-planet interactions. We first consider torque distributions for nonmigrating planets of fixed mass and show that there is general agreement with the expectations of resonance theory. We then present results of simulations for mass-gaining, migrating planets. For planets with an initial mass of 5 Earth masses, which are embedded in disks with standard parameters and which undergo run-away gas accretion to one Jupiter mass (Mjup), the torque distributions per unit disk mass are largely unaffected by migration and accretion for a given planet mass. The migration rates for these planets are in agreement with the predictions of the standard theory for planet migration (Type I and Type II migration). The planet mass growth occurs through gas capture within the planet's Bondi radius at lower planet masses, the Hill radius at intermediate planet masses, and through reduced accretion at higher planet masses due to gap formation. During run-away mass growth, a planet migrates inwards by only about 20% in radius before achieving a mass of ~1 Mjup. For the above models, we find no evidence of fast migration driven by coorbital torques, known as Type III migration. We do find evidence of Type III migration for a fixed mass planet of Saturn's mass that is immersed in a cold and massive disk. In this case the planet migration is assumed to begin before gap formation completes. The migration is understood through a model in which the torque is due to an asymmetry in density between trapped gas on the leading side of the planet and ambient gas on the trailing side of the planet.

Gennaro D'Angelo; Stephen H. Lubow

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

50

Anodic dissolution characteristics and electrochemical migration lifetimes of Sn solder in NaCl and Na2SO4 solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ water drop tests and anodic polarization tests of pure Sn solder were carried out in deaerated 0.001% NaCl and Na"2SO"4 solutions to determine the correlation between anodic dissolution characteristics and the electrochemical migration lifetime. ... Keywords: Anodic dissolution, Electrochemical migration, Life time, Na2SO4, NaCl, Sn solder

Ja-Young Jung; Shin-Bok Lee; Young-Chang Joo; Ho-Young Lee; Young-Bae Park

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1.5: Rural to Urban Migration2. Land in the Rural-Urban MigrationMarriage Rates in Rural China . . . . . . . . . . .

Meng, Lei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Behavior and survival of fish migrating downstream in regulated rivers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dams present obstacles to fish migrating between freshwater and marine habitats. This thesis evaluated downstream migrations of fish in five rivers in Sweden and North… (more)

Ferguson, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

MIGRATION OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH SORBING MEDIA ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS--II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Transport of Radionuclides and Their Decay ProductsVolume II MIGRATION OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH iORBING MEDIAAl. M. Albert, "Radionuclide Migration with Multidimensional

Pigford, T.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Lipid Oxidation Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews state-of-the-art developments in the understanding of the oxidation of lipids and its connection with the oxidation of other biological molecules such as proteins and starch. Lipid Oxidation Pathways Hardback Books Health - Nutrition -

55

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) Speaker(s): Harmony Gates Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Melissa Lunden A new differential mobility classifier will be described. The instrument classifies aerosol particles in a channel flow between porous (or screen) electrodes. The aerosol enters the channel parallel to the porous electrodes, while a larger, particle-free cross-flow enters through one of the porous electrode. A potential difference between electrodes causes the charged aerosol particles to migrate upstream against the cross-flow. Only particles whose upward migration velocity balances the cross flow will be transmitted along the path of the classifier. Simulations of the OMAC show that it should give the same resolution at the traditional

56

Migration and development in Mexican communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration from Mexico to the United States constitutes one of the world's largest labor flows and generates enormous capital flows in the opposite direction. Corresponding to each of these flows is a distinct view of the ...

Schnabl, Peter A. (Peter Andrew)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Biological invasion-inspired migration in distributed evolutionary algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration strategy plays an important role in designing effective distributed evolutionary algorithms. In this work, a novel migration model inspired to the phenomenon known as biological invasion is devised. The migration strategy is implemented through ... Keywords: Biological invasion, Distributed evolutionary algorithm, Massive migration

I. De Falco; A. Della Cioppa; D. Maisto; U. Scafuri; E. Tarantino

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

MIGRATION OF SMALL MOONS IN SATURN's RINGS  

SciTech Connect

The motions of small moons through Saturn's rings provide excellent tests of radial migration models. In theory, torque exchange between these moons and ring particles leads to radial drift. We predict that moons with Hill radii r {sub H} {approx} 2-24 km should migrate through the A ring in 1000 yr. In this size range, moons orbiting in an empty gap or in a full ring eventually migrate at the same rate. Smaller moons or moonlets-such as the propellers-are trapped by diffusion of disk material into corotating orbits, creating inertial drag. Larger moons-such as Pan or Atlas-do not migrate because of their own inertia. Fast migration of 2-24 km moons should eliminate intermediate-size bodies from the A ring and may be responsible for the observed large-radius cutoff of r {sub H} {approx} 1-2 km in the size distribution of the A ring's propeller moonlets. Although the presence of Daphnis (r {sub H} Almost-Equal-To 5 km) inside the Keeler gap challenges this scenario, numerical simulations demonstrate that orbital resonances and stirring by distant, larger moons (e.g., Mimas) may be important factors. For Daphnis, stirring by distant moons seems the most promising mechanism to halt fast migration. Alternatively, Daphnis may be a recent addition to the ring that is settling into a low inclination orbit in {approx}10{sup 3} yr prior to a phase of rapid migration. We provide predictions of observational constraints required to discriminate among possible scenarios for Daphnis.

Bromley, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Rm 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Rm 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

Proactive process-level live migration and back migration in HPC environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the number of nodes in high-performance computing environments keeps increasing, faults are becoming common place. Reactive fault tolerance (FT) often does not scale due to massive I/O requirements and relies on manual job resubmission. This work ... Keywords: Back migration, Fault tolerance, Health monitoring, High-performance computing, Live migration

Chao Wang; Frank Mueller; Christian Engelmann; Stephen L. Scott

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evolution of Migrating Planets Undergoing Gas Accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the orbital and mass evolution of planets that undergo run-away gas accretion by means of 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations. The disk torque distribution per unit disk mass as a function of radius provides an important diagnostic for the nature of the disk-planet interactions. We first consider torque distributions for nonmigrating planets of fixed mass and show that there is general agreement with the expectations of resonance theory. We then present results of simulations for mass-gaining, migrating planets. For planets with an initial mass of 5 Earth masses, which are embedded in disks with standard parameters and which undergo run-away gas accretion to one Jupiter mass (Mjup), the torque distributions per unit disk mass are largely unaffected by migration and accretion for a given planet mass. The migration rates for these planets are in agreement with the predictions of the standard theory for planet migration (Type I and Type II migration). The planet mass growth occurs through gas capture w...

D'Angelo, Gennaro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Pathways to commercial success  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGIES (HFCIT) PROGRAM Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program August 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................................................................1-1

63

MIGRATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of migration in gravitationally unstable disks is necessary to understand the fate of protoplanets formed by disk instability. As part of a larger study, we are using a three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics code to investigate how an embedded gas giant planet interacts with a gas disk that undergoes gravitational instabilities (GIs). This Letter presents results from simulations with a Jupiter-mass planet placed in orbit at 25 AU within a 0.14 M{sub sun} disk. The disk spans 5-40 AU around a 1 M{sub sun} star and is initially marginally unstable. In one simulation, the planet is inserted prior to the eruption of GIs; in another, it is inserted only after the disk has settled into a quasi-steady GI-active state, where heating by GIs roughly balances radiative cooling. When the planet is present from the beginning, its own wake stimulates growth of a particular global mode with which it strongly interacts, and the planet plunges inward 6 AU in about 10{sup 3} years. In both cases with embedded planets, there are times when the planet's radial motion is slow and varies in direction. At other times, when the planet appears to be interacting with strong spiral modes, migration both inward and outward can be relatively rapid, covering several AUs over hundreds of years. Migration in both cases appears to stall near the inner Lindblad resonance of a dominant low-order mode. Planet orbit eccentricities fluctuate rapidly between about 0.02 and 0.1 throughout the GI-active phases of the simulations.

Michael, Scott; Durisen, Richard H. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Boley, Aaron C., E-mail: scamicha@indiana.edu, E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: aaron.boley@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Providing transactional properties for migrating workflows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current workflow management systems have several limitations that need to be addressed by the research community. This paper deals with two of them: the lack of flexibility necessary in a changing business environment, and the lack of transactional guarantees ... Keywords: migrating workflows, mobile environment, transactions, workflows

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book complements Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 1. Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods glycidol Health h

66

Pathway and Resource Overview (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides information about hydrogen pathway analysis, which is analysis of the total levelized cost (including return on investment). Well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use, and WTW emissions for hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

Ruth, M. F.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Understanding the Autophagy Pathway  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding the Autophagy Pathway Understanding the Autophagy Pathway Understanding the Autophagy Pathway Print Monday, 13 February 2012 14:22 Autophagy is a process in which a double-membrane structure called an 'autophagosome' engulfs portions of a cell's cytoplasm, including organelles. The contents of the autophagosome are then directed for degradation in the lysosome, an organelle that breaks down waste and debris in cells so the raw materials can be reused. Recent research at the ALS clarifies key aspects of enzyme activity in this process. Autophagy is key to maintaining cellular equilibrium, or homeostasis; however, dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in several diseases. Central to autophagy is a ubiquitin-like protein (Ubl) system called Atg8. In general, Ubls serve as molecular tags, altering the fate of their targets. In autophagy, Atg8 is activated by its E1 enzyme Atg7, then handed off to its E2 enzyme Atg3, and finally attached to a lipid moiety (phosphatidylethanolamine) within the expanding autophagosome.

68

Understanding the Autophagy Pathway  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding the Autophagy Pathway Understanding the Autophagy Pathway Understanding the Autophagy Pathway Print Monday, 13 February 2012 14:22 Autophagy is a process in which a double-membrane structure called an 'autophagosome' engulfs portions of a cell's cytoplasm, including organelles. The contents of the autophagosome are then directed for degradation in the lysosome, an organelle that breaks down waste and debris in cells so the raw materials can be reused. Recent research at the ALS clarifies key aspects of enzyme activity in this process. Autophagy is key to maintaining cellular equilibrium, or homeostasis; however, dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in several diseases. Central to autophagy is a ubiquitin-like protein (Ubl) system called Atg8. In general, Ubls serve as molecular tags, altering the fate of their targets. In autophagy, Atg8 is activated by its E1 enzyme Atg7, then handed off to its E2 enzyme Atg3, and finally attached to a lipid moiety (phosphatidylethanolamine) within the expanding autophagosome.

69

Scalable directoryless shared memory coherence using execution migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of deadlock-free migration-based coherent shared memory to the NUCA family of architectures. Migration-based architectures move threads among cores to guarantee sequential semantics in large ...

Lis, Mieszko

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

Proactive Process-Level Live Migration and Back Migration in HPC Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the number of nodes in high-performance computing environments keeps increasing, faults are becoming common place. Reactive fault tolerance (FT) often does not scale due to massive I/O requirements and relies on manual job resubmission. This work complements reactive with proactive FT at the process level. Through health monitoring, a subset of node failures can be anticipated when one's health deteriorates. A novel process-level live migration mechanism supports continued execution of applications during much of process migration. This scheme is integrated into an MPI execution environment to transparently sustain health-inflicted node failures, which eradicates the need to restart and requeue MPI jobs. Experiments indicate that 1-6.5 s of prior warning are required to successfully trigger live process migration while similar operating system virtualization mechanisms require 13-24 s. This self-healing approach complements reactive FT by nearly cutting the number of checkpoints in half when 70% of the faults are handled proactively. The work also provides a novel back migration approach to eliminate load imbalance or bottlenecks caused by migrated tasks. Experiments indicate the larger the amount of outstanding execution, the higher the benefit due to back migration.

Wang, Chao [ORNL; Mueller, Frank [North Carolina State University; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Built Environment and Migration: A Case Study of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv Introduction The built environment expresses the changingThe Built Environment & Migration: A Case Study in MexicoEnvironment.

Ramirez, Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Protoplanetary Migration and Creation of Scattered Planetismal Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship between protoplanet migration and the formation of the Kuiper Belt (planetesimal disk scattering) is examined.

Bruce D. Lindsay; Truell W. Hyde

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

Proliferation concerns in the Russian closed nuclear weapons complex cities : a study of regional migration behavior.  

SciTech Connect

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 left the legacy of the USSR weapons complex with an estimated 50 nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons cities containing facilities responsible for research, production, maintenance, and destruction of the weapons stockpile. The Russian Federation acquired ten such previously secret, closed nuclear weapons complex cities. Unfortunately, a lack of government funding to support these facilities resulted in non-payment of salaries to employees and even plant closures, which led to an international fear of weapons material and knowledge proliferation. This dissertation analyzes migration in 33 regions of the Russian Federation, six of which contain the ten closed nuclear weapons complex cities. This study finds that the presence of a closed nuclear city does not significantly influence migration. However, the factors that do influence migration are statistically different in regions containing closed nuclear cities compared to regions without closed nuclear cities. Further, these results show that the net rate of migration has changed across the years since the break up of the Soviet Union, and that the push and pull factors for migration have changed across time. Specifically, personal and residential factors had a significant impact on migration immediately following the collapse of the Soviet Union, but economic infrastructure and societal factors became significant in later years. Two significant policy conclusions are derived from this research. First, higher levels of income are found to increase outmigration from regions, implying that programs designed to prevent migration by increasing incomes for closed city residents may be counter-productive. Second, this study finds that programs designed to increase capital and build infrastructure in the new Russian Federation will be more effective for employing scientists and engineers from the weapons complex, and consequently reduce the potential for emigration of potential proliferants.

Flores, Kristen Lee

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Transparent Accelerator Migration in a Virtualized GPU Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a framework to support transparent, live migration of virtual GPU accelerators in a virtualized execution environment. Migration is a critical capability in such environments because it provides support for fault tolerance, on-demand ... Keywords: GPU, Virtualization, OpenCL, Migration, VOCL

Shucai Xiao; Pavan Balaji; James Dinan; Qian Zhu; Rajeev Thakur; Susan Coghlan; Heshan Lin; Gaojin Wen; Jue Hong; Wu-chun Feng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

CRITICAL RADIONUCLIDE AND PATHWAY ANALYSIS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

This report is an update to the analysis, Assessment of SRS Radiological Liquid and Airborne Contaminants and Pathways, that was performed in 1997. An electronic version of this large original report is included in the attached CD to this report. During the operational history (1954 to the present) of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released to the environment from the various production facilities. However, as will be shown by this updated radiological critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis, only a small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to potential doses and risks to offsite people. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface waters, the principal media that carry contaminants offsite. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. The groundwater monitoring performed at the site shows that an estimated 5 to 10% of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, no evidence exists from the extensive monitoring performed that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated off the site (SRS 2011). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people. In addition, in response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Order 435.1, several Performance Assessments (WSRC 2008; LWO 2009; SRR 2010; SRR 2011) and a Comprehensive SRS Composite Analysis (SRNO 2010) have recently been completed at SRS. The critical radionuclides and pathways identified in these extensive reports are discussed and, where applicable, included in this analysis.

Jannik, T.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Generation Portfolio Migration Under Market Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power companies are facing a complex and unprecedented mix of changes in regulations and technologies, forcing them to alter their generation mix and make other significant changes in their energy portfolios at an extraordinary rate. To assess issues and methodologies that can assist decisions during this process of portfolio migration, this study examines the performance of a hypothetical portfolio of generating units undertaking different strategies of unit retrofits, retirements, and replacements exte...

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff  

SciTech Connect

The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pathways Analysis for State Proliferators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computational tool to assess the most likely path a state proliferator would take in making a nuclear weapon was created in a Bayesian network. The purpose of this work was to create a tool to facilitate analysts and policymakers in learning about state proliferation. In carrying out this work, a previous Bayesian network based on nuclear weapon proliferation was expanded to include dual-use export controlled technologies. The constant nodes in the network quantifying technical capability, international networking, and available infrastructure were developed to be based on pertinent characteristics that were appropriately weighted. To verify the network, nine historical cases of state proliferation were tested over time, and the enrichment and weapon pathways were graphed. The network sufficiently modeled the cases, so it was concluded that, while one can never truly being able to sufficiently validate a network of this type, sufficient verification was achieved. The tool was used to gain knowledge and insight concerning technology transfers with four countries in hypothetical cases. This exercise proved that the network can in fact be used to learn about state proliferation under different policies and conditions.

Mella, Michael

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

4.4 Migrate a Queuing-Based Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to migrate queue X on cloud-provider-1 to queue Y on cloud-provider-2. Cloud-management-broker issues commands using native API to cloud ...

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

"OUT OF AFRICA: GENETICS AND HUMAN MIGRATIONS", Prof. Gyan Bhanot...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calendar Events January 7, 2012, 9:30am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium "OUT OF AFRICA: GENETICS AND HUMAN MIGRATIONS", Prof. Gyan Bhanot, Department of Molecular Biology,...

82

Graphene Layer Growth: Collision of Migrating Five-Member Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulations of graphene edge buildup, the rateGraphene layer growth: Collision of migrating five- memberon the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. The process is

Whitesides, Russell; Kollias, Alexander C.; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

PARS II Earned Value Data Migration Template | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Migration Template PARSITEMPLATE.xls More Documents & Publications Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) PARS II CPP Upload...

84

The Built Environment and Migration: A Case Study of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Community Networks in Mexico-U.S. Migration. THe JournalTraditional Architecture of Mexico. London, UK: Thames anddevelopment: assessing Mexico's economic and social policy

Ramirez, Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Understanding landfill gas generation and migration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas research in the US Department of Energy (DOE) from Municipal Waste (EMW) Program is focusing on two major areas of investigation: (1) Landfill gas migration processes; and (2) Landfill gas generation. With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that: (1) concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; (2) based on average methane gradients in soil gas and a simple diffusion model, up to 10E5 g methane m/sup /minus /2/ yr/sup /minus/1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and (3) during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pathways Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us » Jobs & Internships » Pathways Programs About Us » Jobs & Internships » Pathways Programs Pathways Programs As directed by President Obama, the Pathways Programs offer clear paths to Federal internships for students from high school through post-graduate school and to careers for recent graduates, and provide meaningful training and career development opportunities for individuals who are at the beginning of their Federal service. As a student or recent graduate, you can begin your career in the Federal government by choosing the path that best describes you and where you are in your academics: Internship Program: This program is for current students enrolled in a wide variety of educational institutions from high school to graduate level, with paid opportunities to work in agencies and explore Federal

88

Migrating legacy data structures based on variable overlay to Java  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Legacy information systems, such as banking systems, are usually organized around their data model. Hence, when these systems are migrated to modern environments, translation of the data model involves the most critical decisions, having strong implications ... Keywords: legacy systems migration, object-oriented data model, reverse engineering

Mariano Ceccato; Thomas Roy Dean; Paolo Tonella; Davide Marchignoli

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Migration Mechanisms of Oxygen Interstitial Clusters in UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the migration kinetics of radiation-induced point defects and defect clusters is a key to predicting the microstructural evolution and mass transport in nuclear fuels. Although the diffusion kinetics of point defects in UO2 is well explored both experimentally and theoretically, the kinetics of defect clusters is not well understood. In this work the migration mechanisms of oxygen interstitial clusters of size one to five atoms (1Oi – 5Oi) in UO2 are investigated by temperature-accelerated dynamics simulations without any a priori assumptions of migration mechanisms. It is found that the migration paths of oxygen interstitial clusters are complex and non-intuitive and that multiple migration paths and barriers exist for some clusters. It is also found that the cluster migration barrier does not increase with increasing cluster size and its magnitude has the following order: 2Oi < 3Oi < 1Oi < 5Oi < 4Oi. Possible finite-size effects are checked with three different sized systems. The results show good agreement with other available experimental and theoretical data. In particular, the relatively large migration barriers of cuboctahedral clusters (4Oi and 5Oi) are in good agreement with the experimentally measured oxygen diffusion activation energy in U4O9, which is thought to contain many such clusters. The cluster migration sequence may explain the interesting relationship between the oxygen diffusivity and stoichiometry in UO2+x.

Xian-Ming Bai; Anter El-Azab; Jianguo Yu; Todd R. Allen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Dr. Tom Shinder's ISA Server 2006 Migration Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dr. Tom Shinder's ISA Server 2006 Migration Guide provides a clear, concise, and thorough path to migrate from previous versions of ISA Server to ISA Server 2006. ISA Server 2006 is an incremental upgrade from ISA Server 2004, this book provides all ... Keywords: Computer Science, Security, Windows

Thomas W. Shinder; Debra Littlejohn Shinder; Adrian F. Dimcev; James Eaton-Lee; Jason Jones; Steve Moffat

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much speculation on extraterrestrial life has focused on finding environments where water is present. Heating of smaller icy bodies may create and sustain a possible liquid layer below the surface. If liquid water was sustained for geologically significant times (> 108 years) within the ubiquitous small bodies in the outer solar system, the opportunities for development of simple life are much greater. The lifetime of the liquid water layer will depend on several factors, including the rate of rock/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed here is based on the approach derived to study a different partially molten solid: in the viscously deforming partially molten upper mantle. We model a planetesimal core that initially a uniform equal mixture of solid ice and rock. We assume chondritic levels of radiogenic heating as the only heat source, and numerically solve for the evolution of solid and melt velocities and the distribution of melt fraction (“porosity”) during the first few million years after accretion. From a suite of numerical models, we have determined that the meltwater is segregated out of the core as fast as it is created, except in the case of very fast melting times (0.75 My vs. 0.62 My), and small ore radius (~25 to 150 km, depending on the viscosity of the ice/rock mixture in the solid core). In these latter cases, segregation is slower than migration and a high water fraction develops in the core. Heat released by water-rock reactions (not included in this model) will tend to drive up melting rates in all cases, which may favor this latter endmember.

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

MIGRATION RATES OF PLANETS DUE TO SCATTERING OF PLANETESIMALS  

SciTech Connect

Planets migrate due to the recoil they experience from scattering solid (planetesimal) bodies. To first order, the torques exerted by the interior and exterior disks will cancel, analogous to the cancellation of the torques from the gravitational interaction with the gas (Type-I migration). Assuming the dispersion-dominated regime and power laws characterized by indices {alpha} and {beta} for the surface density and eccentricity profiles, we calculate the net torque on the planet. We consider both distant encounters and close (orbit-crossing) encounters. We find that the close and distant encounter torques have opposite signs with respect to {alpha} and {beta}; and that the torque is especially sensitive to the eccentricity gradient {beta}. Compared to Type-I migration due to excitation of density waves, the planetesimal-driven migration rate is generally lower due to the lower surface density of solids in gas-rich disk, although this may be partially or fully offset when their eccentricity and inclinaton are small. Allowing for the feedback of the planet on the planetesimal disk through viscous stirring, we find that under certain conditions a self-regulated migration scenario emerges, in which the planet migrates at a steady pace that approaches the rate corresponding to the one-sided torque. If the ratio of the local disk mass in planetesimals to planet mass is low, however, migration will stall. We quantify the boundaries separating the three accretion regimes.

Ormel, C. W. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ida, S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, H., E-mail: ormel@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: hide@lowtem.hokudai.ac.jp [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

MIGRATION BEHAVIOR OF THE 234U -> 230TH -> 226Ra -> DECAY CHAIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Release of Decaying Radionuclides Through Sorbing Media,"the Migration of Radionuclides Through Geologic Media," UCB-for the Migration of Radionuclides Through Sorbing Media

Higashi, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this study are to (1) characterize the outmigration timing of different wild stocks of spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers, (2) determine if consistent patterns are apparent, and (3) determine what environmental factors influence outmigration timing. The authors PIT tagged wild spring/summer chinook salmon parr in the Snake River Basin in 1993, and subsequently monitored these fish during their smolt migration through Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary Dams during spring, summer, and fall 1994. This report details their findings.

Achord, Stephen; Matthews, Gene M.; Kamikawa, Daniel J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Low hole polaron migration barrier in lithium peroxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present computational evidence of polaronic hole trapping and migration in lithium peroxide (Li[subscript 2]O[subscript 2]), a material of interest in lithium-air batteries. We find that the hole forms in the ?* antibonding ...

Ong, Shyue Ping

96

Wandering Neuronal Migration in the Postnatal Vertebrate Forebrain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most non-mammalian vertebrate species add new neurons to existing brain circuits throughout life, a process thought to be essential for tissue maintenance, repair, and learning. How these new neurons migrate through the ...

Scott, Benjamin B.

97

Bird Migration and Bias of WSR-88D Wind Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migrating birds can greatly influence base velocity, velocity azimuth display (VAD), and VAD wind profile products of the WSR-88D. This is documented by comparing estimates of wind velocity and direction from these products with corresponding ...

Sidney A. Gauthreaux Jr.; David S. Mizrahi; Carroll G. Belser

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Inter-provincial Permanent and Temporary Migration in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the role of migration in China's regional development and9: 485-502. Zhu, Yu. 2007. "China's floating population andThe settlement intention of China’s floating population in

Sun, Mingjie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cloud Migration: A Case Study of Migrating an Enterprise IT System to IaaS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This case study illustrates the potential benefits and risks associated with the migration of an IT system in the oil & gas industry from an in-house data center to Amazon EC2 from a broad variety of stakeholder perspectives across the enterprise, thus transcending the typical, yet narrow, financial and technical analysis offered by providers. Our results show that the system infrastructure in the case study would have cost 37% less over 5 years on EC2, and using cloud computing could have potentially eliminated 21% of the support calls for this system. These findings seem significant enough to call for a migration of the system to the cloud but our stakeholder impact analysis revealed that there are significant risks associated with this. Whilst the benefits of using the cloud are attractive, we argue that it is important that enterprise decision-makers consider the overall organizational implications of the changes brought about with cloud computing to avoid implementing local optimizations at the cost ...

Khajeh-Hosseini, Ali; Sommerville, Ian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site, with vegetated clay cover and a semiarid site with unvegetated sandy silt cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the past year's work at the semiarid site indicates that rates of CH/sub 4/ flux out of the landfill surface may be as high as 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ g cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ (6.3 /times/ 10/sup 2/ Kg m/sup /minus/1/ yr/sup /minus/1/) during dry soil conditions. Such high rates represent both the loss of an energy resource and a significance factor in global warming trends since atmospheric CH/sub 4/ contributes to the greenhouse effect. An independent estimate has suggested that 8--15% of global atmospheric CH/sub 4/ is attributable to landfill sources. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations. Triplicate assays of unamended refuse (controls) are compared to assays with added moisture, nutrients, and bacterial seed. To date, moisture addition is the single most important variable in stimulating gas production, particularly in samples with visible soil content. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Vogt, M.; Piorkowski, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Part II, Smolt Monitoring Program, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the travel time of marked yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (O. nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) between points within the system, and reports the arrival timing and duration of the migrations for these species as well as coho salmon (O. kisutch). A final listing of 1984 hatchery releases is also included. 8 refs., 26 figs., 20 tabs.

McConnaha, Willis E.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Automated Tracing and Segmentation Tool for Migrating Neurons in 4D Confocal Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate tracing and segmentation of subcellular components of migrating neurons in confocal image sequences are prerequisite steps in many neurobiology studies to understand the biological machinery behind the movement of developing neurons. In this paper, we present an automated tracking, tracing, and segmentation tool for soma, leading, and trailing process of migrating neurons in time-lapse image stacks acquired with a confocal fluorescence microscope. In our approach, we first localize each neuron in the maximum intensity projection of the first frame using manual labeling of the soma and end points of the leading and trailing process. By using each soma position at the first frame, we automatically track the somas in rest of the frames. Then, leading and trailing process are traced in each frame from the soma center to the labeled end tip of the process by using fast marching algorithm. Finally, the soma, leading and trailing processes of each neuron are segmented by using the soma center and traces as seed points, and their boundaries are separated from each other. Based on qualitative results, we demonstrate the capability to automatically track, trace, and segment the soma, leading, and trailing processes of a migrating neuron with minimal user input.

Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Solecki, Dr. David [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metabolic pathways and Metabolic pathways and metabolic engineering Adam Guss Genetic and Metabolic Engineer Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sept 25, 2013 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Metabolic engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for cellulosic ethanol production NAD(P)H NAD(P) + Acetyl-P 2 H + NAD + NAD + NADH NADH P i CoA ADP ATP L-Lactic Acid Acetic Acid Ethanol NADH NAD + NADH NAD + H 2 2 H + Fd oxidized Fd reduced Formic acid H 2 Cellulose Acetaldehyde Pyruvate Acetyl-CoA Glucose-6P 0 10 20 30 40 Product concentration (mM) Clostridium thermocellum mutant fermentation Ethanol Acetate Lactate By understanding and then modifying carbon and electron flux, we have increased ethanol yield in C. thermocellum 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy

104

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Migration strategies roles for data management in CIM  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the migration path a company goes through as it moves up the data management learning curve. This migration path is based on four distinct roles for data management in CIM. The first two sections review the justification for CIM and data management. The first section describes the changing competitive environment manufacturers face and how CIM addresses the problems this situation creates. The second section identifies the two key characteristics of a database management system and the benefits provided. The third section identifies and discusses the four roles for data management in CIM. These four roles and their variations provide snapshots of where a company is on the data management learning curve. The fourth section describes the migration path a company goes through as it moves up the learning curve. Although there are similarities, there are some significant differences between this learning curve and the one experienced by MIS as it adopted data management technology. 3 refs.

Bray, O.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

111

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

112

Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate. 5 figs.

Kunz, H.R.; Guthrie, R.J.; Katz, M.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

Understanding Contaminant Transport Pathways at Rocky Flats - A Basis for the Remediation Strategy  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a Department of Energy facility located approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Processing and fabrication of nuclear weapons components occurred at Rocky Flats from 1952 through 1989. Operations at the Site included the use of several radionuclides, including plutonium-239/240 (Pu), americium-241 (Am), and various uranium (U) isotopes, as well as several types of chlorinated solvents. The historic operations resulted in legacy contamination, including contaminated facilities, process waste lines, buried wastes and surface soil contamination. Decontamination and removal of buildings at the site was completed in late 2005, culminating more than ten years of active environmental remediation work. The Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision was subsequently approved in 2006, signifying regulatory approval and closure of the site. The use of RFETS as a National Wildlife Refuge is scheduled to be in full operation by 2012. To develop a plan for remediating different types of radionuclide contaminants present in the RFETS environment required understanding the different environmental transport pathways for the various actinides. Developing this understanding was the primary objective of the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) project. Findings from the AME studies were used in the development of RFETS remediation strategies. The AME project focused on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in surface water, groundwater, air, soil and biota at RFETS. For the purposes of the AME studies, actinide elements addressed included Pu, Am, and U. The AME program, funded by DOE, brought together personnel with a broad range of relevant expertise in technical investigations. The AME advisory panel identified research investigations and approaches that could be used to solve issues related to actinide migration at the Site. An initial step of the AME was to develop a conceptual model to provide a qualitative description of the relationships among potential actinide sources and transport pathways at RFETS. One conceptual model was developed specifically for plutonium and americium, because of their similar geochemical and transport properties. A separate model was developed for uranium because of its different properties and mobility in the environment. These conceptual models were guidelines for quantitative analyses described in the RFETS Pathway Analysis Report, which used existing data from the literature as well as site-specific analyses, including field, laboratory and modeling studies to provide quantitative estimates of actinide migration in the RFETS environment. For pathways where more than one method was used to estimate offsite loads for a specific pathway, the method yielding the highest estimated off-site was used for comparison purposes. For all actinides studied, for pre-remediation conditions, air and surface water were identified to be the dominant transport mechanisms. The estimated annual airborne plutonium-239/240 load transported off site exceeded the surface water load by roughly a factor of 40. However, despite being the largest transport pathway, airborne radionuclide concentrations at the monitoring location with the highest measurements during the period studied were less than two percent of the allowable 10 milli-rem standard governing DOE facilities. Estimated actinide loads for other pathways were much less. Shallow groundwater was approximately two orders of magnitude lower, or 1/100 of the load conveyed in surface water. The estimated biological pathway load for plutonium was approximately five orders of magnitude less, or 1/100,000, of the load estimated for surface-water. The pathway analysis results were taken into consideration during subsequent remediation activities that occurred at the site. For example, when the 903 Pad area was remediated to address elevated concentrations of Pu and Am in the surface soil, portable tent structures were constructed to prevent wind and water erosion from occurring while remediation activitie

Paton, Ian [Wright Water Engineers, Inc.: 2490 W. 26th Avenue, Suite 100A, Denver, CO 80211 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Web Migration The Web What needs to be fixed?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Update Web Migration #12;2 The Web ­ What needs to be fixed? · Lack of governance · Lack of clear roles and responsibilities for Web team · Multiple people working with the Web across the site-term Web Task Force to get lab input on above #12;3 Where Do We Stand? · Creation of Web Task Force

Wechsler, Risa H.

115

Introspection-based memory de-duplication and migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Memory virtualization abstracts a physical machine's memory resource and presents to the virtual machines running on it a piece of physical memory that could be shared, compressed and moved. To optimize the memory resource utilization by fully leveraging ... Keywords: introspection, memory de-duplication, vm migration

Jui-Hao Chiang; Han-Lin Li; Tzi-cker Chiueh

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Quality Assessment of Weather Radar Wind Profiles during Bird Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind profiles from an operational C-band Doppler radar have been combined with data from a bird tracking radar to assess the wind profile quality during bird migration. The weather radar wind profiles (WRWPs) are retrieved using the well-known ...

Iwan Holleman; Hans van Gasteren; Willem Bouten

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Webmail by Google Migration Checklist for Outlook users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Webmail by Google Migration Checklist for Outlook users During your transition to Webmail by Google you must use the Webmail by Google Web Interface located at: http://webmail.njit.edu 1. Configure your Outlook Client: Install and run Google Apps Sync from http://ist.njit.edu/google/sync/. Google Apps Sync

Hu, Jie

118

Migration Problems of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) in Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Lilja, 2004) and in the present work a hydro-acoustic split-beam echo-sounder (Simrad EY60, GPT 200 k in the migration and increased energy consumption (II). These statements is supported by Katopodis (1999) who, and according to Beach (1984) this swimming behaviour is highly energy demanding. Consequently this "yo

119

OPEN Platform for Migration of Interactive Services: Architecture and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One important aspect of ubiquitous environments is to provide users with the possibility to freely move about and continue to interact with the available applications through a variety of interactive devices such as cell phones, PDAs, desktop computers, ... Keywords: Context-Awareness, Middleware, Migration Service Platform, Service Continuity, State Adaptation

Anders Nickelsen; Fabio Paternò; Agnese Grasselli; Kay-Uwe Schmidt; Miquel Martin; Francesca Mureddu

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Movements and Distribution of Northern Squawfish Downstream of Lower Snake River Dams Relative to the Migration of Juvenile Salmonids, 1992-1993 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis movements were monitored downstream of two lower Snake River dams during the juvenile salmonid migrations of 1992 and 1993. During a high flow year in 1993, the abundance of squawfish in the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam peaked in July, after the majority of juveniles had moved past Lower Granite Dam, and peak abundance was inversely related to river discharge. Few squawfish moved into the tailrace of Ice Harbor Dam in 1993 because of the extended period of spill. Distributions of squawfish in the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam varied between and within years and shifted in response to changing prey densities, flow patterns, water temperature, and diel cycles, but fish consistently used low velocity habitats. Data from Ice Harbor Dam is less extensive, but squawfish distributions there appeared to be affected by changing flow patterns and fish used low velocity habitats. The changes in distribution and abundance of squawfish in tailrace areas are evidence that predation on seaward migrating salmonids depends on the timing of migration and size and timing of runoff. Juvenile salmonids migrating in the spring and early summer will probably be less affected by squawfish predation in tailrace areas than salmon that migrate later in the summer.

Isaak, D.J.; Bjornn, T.C. (University of Idaho, Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Moscow, ID)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alpha migration through air filters: A numerical simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This theoretical study investigates the migration of alpha-emitting particles through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. As part of the study, a review of previous research relating to the alpha-migration phenomena was conducted. As a result of the literature review, a numerical model was developed to simulate the migration of alpha-emitting radionuclide aerosols through HEPA filters. This model predicts the filter performance with regard to particle penetration. It can be used to better estimate the penetration of alpha radioactive species through filter systems for environmental concerns, to aid in the use of current filter systems, and to design new filter systems. It is obvious from the review of the literature that evidence exists of migration of alpha radionuclide species through high-efficiency filter media. The theories suggest that nanometer-size particles can eventually penetrate fibrous filters because of gradual movement through the filter matrix. It is conjectured that this movement may be induced by energies caused by the alpha recoil from the decay process by thermal energies. It is further hypothesized that such nanometer-size particles, containing radionuclide species can be formed from larger particles already captured within the filter. The penetration of such small particles through high-efficiency filter media is so low that experimental corroboration of these mechanisms by penetration measurements is difficult at best. A number of items were identified that affect the migration of alpha-emitting particles through a filter. These include the size distribution of aerosol particles entering the filter, the size distribution of fragment particles produced by alpha recoil, the penetration of the challenge aerosols and fragment particles, the velocity through the filter, the radionuclide specific activity, the alpha recoil energy, and the surface-binding energies between the particle and the filter matrix.

Biermann, A.H.; da Roza, R.A.; Chang, Yun.

1991-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Acoustic And Elastic Reverse-Time Migration: Novel Angle-Domain Imaging Conditions And Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. (a)- (c) are from shale/gas interfaces, (d)-(f) shale/oilm s ? V S ? m s ? ? kg m 3 Shale Gas Oil Brine ACQUISITIONare gas, oil and brine. The reflections from shale, which

Yan, Rui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Amenity migration Lifestyle Exurbanisation Chile DIE ERDE 140 2009 (3) Special Focus "Amenity Migration" pp. 275-292  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only seasonally, increased energy consumption, soil sealing and the consumption of free space "Amenity Migration" pp. 275-292 Searching for Fresh Air, Tranquillity and Rural Culture in the Mountains industriali- sation (ISI) replacing it by export orientation and opening the country to the world market

Borsdorf, Axel

124

Migrating to internet-based e-commerce: factors affecting e-commerce adoption and migration at the firm level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web technology has enabled e-commerce. However, in our review of the literature, we found little research on how firms can better position themselves when adopting e-commerce for revenue generation. Drawing upon technology diffusion theory, we developed ... Keywords: EDI, e-commerce, innovation adoption, internet technology, migration, outsourcing, technology diffusion

Weiyin Hong; Kevin Zhu

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

D. S. Pavlov, A.I. Lupandin, V.V. Kostin DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. S. Pavlov, A.I. Lupandin, V.V. Kostin DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF FISH THROUGH DAMS OF HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANTS D. S. Pavlov, A.I. Lupandin, V.V. Kostin DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF...

126

MIGRATION OF GAS-LIQUID INCLUSIONS IN KC l AND NaC l SINGLE CRYSTALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering MIGRATION OF GAS-LIQUID INCLUSIONS IN KCi ANDLBL-11815 MIGRATION OF GAS- LIQUID INCJlJSION~; IN KC£ 1\\NDheat transport in the gas/liquid/solid ccrnposite medium;

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Development and application of chemical tools for investigating dynamic processes in cell migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell migration is a dynamic process essential for many fundamental physiological functions, including wound repair and the immune response. Migration relies on precisely orchestrated events that are regulated in a spatially ...

Goguen, Brenda Nicole

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Available Technologies: Controlling Metabolic Pathways Using ...  

Biofuels and biofuel precursors; Secondary metabolite ... the transcription factors are inserted at strategic spots to control target metabolic pathways of yeast ...

129

NETL: Advanced Research - Pathways to Commercial Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Pathways to Commercial Applications CHALLENGE: Separating H2 and CO2 Pilot plant pyrolysis unit with biomass feedstack system. Pilot plant pyrolysis unit with biomass...

130

CloudNet: dynamic pooling of cloud resources by live WAN migration of virtual machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtual machine technology and the ease with which VMs can be migrated within the LAN, has changed the scope of resource management from allocating resources on a single server to manipulating pools of resources within a data center. We expect WAN migration ... Keywords: cloud computing, virtualization, wan migration

Timothy Wood; K. K. Ramakrishnan; Prashant Shenoy; Jacobus van der Merwe

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Managing time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Professionals overwhelmed with information glut can find hope from new insights about time management.

Peter J. Denning

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Methodology for modeling the migration of EOR chemicals in fresh water aquifers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop a method for modeling the transport of EOR chemicals accidentally released to fresh water aquifers. Six examples involving hypothetical releases of EOR chemicals at surrogate aquifer sites are used to illustrate the application of this method. Typical injection rates and concentrations of EOR chemicals used at current or proposed projects were obtained from the literature and used as the basis for the hypothetical accidents. Four surrogate aquifer sites were selected from States where chemical flooding methods are employed. Each site is based on real hydrological data but presented in such a way to avoid identification with existing EOR fields. A significant amount of data is required to model ground water systems. The hypothetical examples help to indicate the type of data needed. The computer results illustrate that high levels of contamination are possible for many years. In addition, due to these high levels of contamination, it is possible for contaminants to migrate offsite of the EOR field. There are a variety of pathways through which EOR chemicals could be accidentally released to fresh water aquifers during normal EOR operations. There is insufficient EOR experience to date, however, to forecast risks accurately. 119 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

Royce, B.; Garrell, M.; Kahn, A.; Kaplan, E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tough Times for the Muskrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tough Times for the Muskrats Tough Times for the Muskrats Nature Bulletin No. 3 February 24, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation TOUGH TIMES FOR THE MUSKRATS This has been a sorry year for the muskrats. The long drought, last summer and fall, dried up many of the smaller marshes and ponds where they had been living and forced them to migrate overland to new homes. Many undoubtedly were killed while enroute by mink, hawks, or dogs. Even the larger marshes and ponds were made smaller and more shallow by the drought and now this severe winter, with its long, bitter cold, has caused many of them to freeze solid to the very bottom; thus sealing the muskrats up in their lodges and preventing them from swimming around under the ice to get food.

134

Modelling the mass migration phenomena in partially frozen heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point and with sink temperatures below the freezing temperature of the working fluid may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and not returning to the evaporator section. Eventually, sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate this phenomena. This paper presents an analytical model developed to describes this phenomena. The model provides for analytic determination of heat pipe temperature profiles, freeze-front locations and mass migration rates.

Keddy, M.D.; Merrigan, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Critchley, E. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

Inconsistent pathways of household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to provide policy-makers and waste management planners with information about how recycling programs affect the quantities of specific materials recycled and disposed of. Two questions were addressed: which factors influence household waste generation and pathways? and how reliable are official waste data? Household waste flows were studied in 35 Swedish municipalities, and a wide variation in the amount of waste per capita was observed. When evaluating the effect of different waste collection policies, it was found to be important to identify site-specific factors influencing waste generation. Eleven municipal variables were investigated in an attempt to explain the variation. The amount of household waste per resident was higher in populous municipalities and when net commuting was positive. Property-close collection of dry recyclables led to increased delivery of sorted metal, plastic and paper packaging. No difference was seen in the amount of separated recyclables per capita when weight-based billing for the collection of residual waste was applied, but the amount of residual waste was lower. Sixteen sources of error in official waste statistics were identified and the results of the study emphasize the importance of reliable waste generation and composition data to underpin waste management policies.

Dahlen, Lisa [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden)], E-mail: lisa.dahlen@ltu.se; Aberg, Helena [Department of Food, Health and Environment, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 12204, SE, 402 42 Gothenburg (Sweden); Lagerkvist, Anders [Division of Waste Science and Technology, Lulea University of Technology, SE, 971 87 Lulea (Sweden); Berg, Per E.O. [HB Anttilator, Stagnellsgatan 3, SE, 652 23, Karlstad (Sweden)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

China 2050 Pathways Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China 2050 Pathways Calculator China 2050 Pathways Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: China 2050 Pathways Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: China's Energy Research Institute (ERI), UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Renewable Energy Phase: Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan Topics: Low-carbon plans/TNAs/NAMAs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices, Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: china-en.2050calculator.net/pathways/111011011011101101011010111101101 Country: China OpenEI Keyword(s): International Eastern Asia Language: English References: Global Energy Governance Reform, 3 October 2012[1]

138

,,"PARS II Interim Migration Template"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

" " ,,"PARS II Interim Migration Template" ,,"Fields","Data" ,,"DOE Project ID:","DOE Project # and Project Name" ,,"Year:","Please select a Year" ,,"Month:","Please select a Month" ,,"Fields","Data (Entered in $K) [Data Entry field]" ,,"BCWS ($K):",0 ,,"BCWP ($K):",0 ,,"ACWP ($K):",0 ,,"Management Reserves Remaining ($K):",0 ,,"Percent Complete (%):",0 ,,"Instructions" ,,"1. Log into PARS II" ,,"2. Select the appropriate Project" ,,"3. While still on the Projects screen, click on ""Attachments""" ,,"4. Click on ""Add"""

139

SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPIC STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF NEARBY DISKS: HINTS OF STELLAR MIGRATION  

SciTech Connect

We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) to observe 12 nearby disk galaxies. We successfully measure ages in the outer disk in six systems. In three cases (NGC 2684, NGC 6155, and NGC 7437), we find that a downward break in the disk surface brightness profile corresponds with a change in the dominant stellar population with the interior being dominated by active star formation and the exterior having older stellar populations that are best fit with star formation histories that decline with time. The observed increase in average stellar ages beyond a profile break is similar to theoretical models that predict surface brightness breaks are caused by stellar migration, with the outer disk being populated from scattered old interior stars. In three more cases (IC 1132, NGC 4904, and NGC 6691), we find no significant change in the stellar population as one crosses the break radius. In these galaxies, both the inner and outer disks are dominated by active star formation and younger stellar populations. While radial migration can contribute to the stellar populations beyond the break, it appears that more than one mechanism is required to explain all of our observed stellar profile breaks.

Yoachim, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Roskar, Rok [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Debattista, Victor P., E-mail: yoachim@u.washington.edu [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Dispersing the Gaseous Protoplanetary Disc and Halting Type II Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 30 extra-solar Jupiter-like planets have shorter periods than the planet Mercury. It is generally accepted that they formed further out, past the ’snow line ’ (?1 AU), and migrated inwards. In order to be driven by tidal torques from the gaseous disc, the disc exterior to the planet had to contain about a planetary mass. The fact that the planets stopped migrating means that their outer disc was removed. We suggest, following the simulation by Bate et al. (2003), that the outer disc was accreted by the planet. This not only halts migration but removes the outer disc for planets interior to about 2 AU. The disc further out could have been removed by photoevaporation (Matsuyama et al. 2003). Furthermore, as also shown by Bate et al. (op cit) this process also provides an upper limit to planetary masses in agreement with the analysis of observed planetary masses by Zucker & Mazeh (2002). In this scenario, the endgame is a race. The central star is accreting the inner disc and the planet, while the planet is accreting the outer disc. The planet survives if it accretes its outer disc before being accreted by the star. The winner is determined solely by the ratio of the mass of the outer disc to the local surface density of the disc. Some planets are certainly eaten by the central star. Subject headings: extrasolar planets, Jupiter 1.

M. Lecar; D. D. Sasselov

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Entropic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

Caticha, Ariel [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, NY 12222 (United States)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

142

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let 6: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code July 19, 2012 - 7:14am Addthis PROBLEM: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027281 ZDI-12-127 ZDI-12-126 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The vulnerability allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent. Authentication is not required to exploit this vulnerability. 1. (ZDI-12-127) The specific flaw exists within the HsmCfgSvc.exe service

144

U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-216: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code July 19, 2012 - 7:14am Addthis PROBLEM: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027281 ZDI-12-127 ZDI-12-126 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The vulnerability allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of HP StorageWorks File Migration Agent. Authentication is not required to exploit this vulnerability.

145

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

TIMING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

1956-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pathways to Sustainable European Energy Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathways to Sustainable European Energy Systems Speaker(s): Filip Johnsson Date: May 11, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Peng Xu This talk gives a...

148

Bayesian network models of biological signaling pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cells communicate with other cells, and process cues from their environment, via signaling pathways, in which extracellular cues trigger a cascade of information flow, causing signaling molecules to become chemically, ...

Sachs, Karen, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Evaluation of Fish Movements, Migration Patterns, and Population Abundance with Streamwidth PIT Tag Interrogation Systems, Final Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two remote Streamwidth PIT tag Interrogation systems (SPIs) were operated continuously for over one year to test the feasibility of these systems for generating movement, migration, survival and smolt production estimates for salmonids. A total of 1,588 juvenile (< 100 mm FL) naturally produced salmonids (7 coho salmon, 482 cutthroat trout, and 1,099 steelhead) were PIT tagged above the upstream-most SPI (9 sites approximately 1 linear km each) in Fall 2001. Age at tagging for wild caught cutthroat and steelhead was 1 year. SPIs were operating before any PIT tagged fish were released in the creek. Over 390,000 detections were recorded from October 2001 to 31 July 2002. Efficiencies were site dependent, but overall detection efficiency for the creek was 97% with 95% confidence intervals of 91-100%. PIT tag detection efficiency ranged from 55-100% depending on the SPI and varied throughout the year with average efficiencies of 73% and 89%. SPI efficiency of PIT tag detection was not completely dependent on electronics noise levels or environmental conditions. Fish from all tagging locations were detected at the SPIs. Steelhead and cutthroat trout were primarily detected moving in the Spring (April-June) coincident with the anticipated smolt migration. Steelhead were also detected moving past SPIs at lower numbers in the Fall and Winter. Travel time between SPIs (downstream movement) was highly dependent on time of year. Travel time in the Spring was significantly faster (34.4 {+-} 7.0 hours) for all species than during any other time of year (763.1 {+-} 267.0 hours). Steelhead and cutthroat migrating in the Spring were the same age as those that did not migrate in the Spring. Peak of steelhead migration recorded at the two SPIs was 5/11 and 5/12 and the peak in the screw trap was recorded on 5/17. Steelhead smolt production estimates using SPIs (3,802 with 95% confidence intervals of 3,440 - 4,245) was similar to those using more standard screw trap methods (approximately 5,400). All species used the faster moving/deeper section of the creek at both SPIs. A backpack PIT tag detector was also developed and used as another remote 'recapture' for additional accuracy in estimating population survival and recapture probability. This unit was used at an approximate efficiency of 24% to survey the creek after the Spring migration. Twenty-five individual fish were re-located. All PIT tag data were used to calculate survival and recapture probabilities using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber population model. Survival for steelhead was high and recapture probability depended greatly on season. Probability of recapture was highest in Spring (29.5%) and relatively low in all other seasons (< 7% in Fall, Winter, and Summer). Wild steelhead PIT tagged in the field and returned to the laboratory had a tag retention rate of 97.6%. A laboratory study was designed to determine the effects of 3-sized PIT tags (12 mm, 20 mm, and 23 mm) on survival and growth of individuals. Survival from surgical implantation of 23 mm PIT tags was > 98% for fish (coho salmon and steelhead). Retention of 23 mm PIT tags was 100% for coho salmon and 89% for steelhead. For both coho and steelhead, growth rates during the first month were affected by tagging, but by the end of 2 months growth effects equalized for all tag sizes. Life history characteristics quantified with SPI techniques are comparable to standard techniques. For example, peaks of Spring migration for steelhead and cutthroat were amazingly similar to those reported from the screw trap. These techniques will enable application of less laborious methods which are more accurate at estimating life history parameters.

Zydlewski, Gayle; Winter, Christiane; McClanahan, Dee

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Natural Gas Pathways and Fuel Economy Guide Comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I presentation slides: Natural Gas pathways and Fuel economy Guide Comparison Bob Wimmer, Toyota Natural Gas Pathways Toyota estimation Vehicle Total Fuel efficiency Range...

151

Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency Title Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas...

152

Rural-urban migration in d-dimensional lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rural-urban migration phenomenon is analyzed by using an agent-based computational model. Agents are placed on lattices which dimensions varying from d=2 up to d=7. The localization of the agents in the lattice define their social neighborhood (rural or urban) not being related to their spatial distribution. The effect of the dimension of lattice is studied by analyzing the variation of the main parameters that characterizes the migratory process. The dynamics displays strong effects even for around one million of sites, in higher dimensions (d=6, 7).

Espíndola, Aquino L; Silveira, J J; Esp\\'{\\i}ndola, Aquino L.; Silveira, Jaylson J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

On rapid migration and accretion within disks around supermassive black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic nuclei should contain a cluster of stars and compact objects in the vicinity of the central supermassive black hole due to stellar evolution, minor mergers and gravitational dynamical friction. By analogy with protoplanetary migration, nuclear cluster objects (NCOs) can migrate in the accretion disks that power active galactic nuclei by exchanging angular momentum with disk gas. Here we show that an individual NCO undergoing runaway outward migration comparable to Type III protoplanetary migration can generate an accretion rate corresponding to Seyfert AGN or quasar luminosities. Multiple migrating NCOs in an AGN disk can dominate traditional viscous disk accretion and at large disk radii, ensemble NCO migration and accretion could provide sufficient heating to prevent the gravitational instability from consuming disk gas in star formation. The magnitude and energy of the X-ray soft excess observed at ~0.1-1keV in Seyfert AGN could be explained by a small population of ~10^{2}-10^{3} accreting stella...

McKernan, B; Lyra, W; Perets, H B; Winter, L M; Yaqoob, T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Incoherent twin boundary migration induced by ion irradiation in Cu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grain boundaries can act as sinks for radiation-induced point defects. The sink capability is dependent on the atomic structures and varies with the type of point defects. Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we observed that {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} incoherent twin boundary (ITB) in Cu films migrates under Cu{sup 3+} ion irradiation. Using atomistic modeling, we found that {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} ITB has the preferred sites for adsorbing interstitials and the preferential diffusion channels along the Shockley partial dislocations. Coupling with the high mobility of grain boundary Shockley dislocations within {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} ITB, we infer that {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} ITB migrates through the collective glide of grain boundary Shockley dislocations, driven by a concurrent reduction in the density of radiation-induced defects, which is demonstrated by the distribution of nearby radiation-induced defects.

Li, N.; Misra, A. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wang, J.; Wang, Y. Q. [Materials Science and Technology Division, MST-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Serruys, Y. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nastasi, M. [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hydrology and radionuclide migration program 1987 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's participation in the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the fiscal year 1987. The report discussed initial data from a new well (UE20n-1) drilled at the Cheshire site; presents a description of a proposed laboratory study of migration of colloids in fractured media; lists data collected during the drilling and initial sampling of UE20n-1; and describes a tentative proposal for work to be performed in FY88 by Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. Groundwater sampled from the new well at the Cheshire site contains tritium concentrations comparable to those measured in previous years from locations above and within the Cheshire cavity. This presence of tritium, as well as several other radionuclides, in a well 100 m away from the cavity region indicates transport of radionuclides, validates a proposed model of the flow path, and provides data on rates of groundwater flow. Previous work at the Cheshire site has shown that radionuclides are transported by colloids through fractured media. However, we have no data that can be used for predictive modeling, and existing theories are not applicable. While physical transport mechanisms of sub-micrometer colloids to defined mineral surfaces are well known, predictions based on well-defined conditions differ from experimental observations by orders of magnitude. The U.C. Berkeley group has designed a laboratory experiment to quantify colloid retention and permeability alteration by the retained colloids.

Marsh, K.V. (comp.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m2) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

District Level Analysis of Urbanization from Rural-to-Urban Migration in the Rajasthan State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration has various dimensions; urbanization due to migration is one of them. In Rajasthan State, district level analysis of urbanization due to migrants shows trend invariably for all districts of the state, though the contribution in urbanization by migrants varies from district to district. In some districts the share of migrants moving to urban areas is very impressive, in others it is not that much high. The migrants' contribution is on the raising over the decades. In this paper, the district level migration in the Rajasthan State is examined in relation to total urbanization and urbanization due to migration.

Jayant Singh; Hansraj Yadav; Florentin Smarandache

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Pathway Integration Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies - BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities - Southern California Edison and DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable

159

Digestion time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digestion time Digestion time Name: Don Mancosh Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have always given the rule of thumb in class that material we eat is with us for about 24 hours before exiting the body. The question arises about the time value of liquids. Getting a big coke prior to a 3 hour drive generally means that there will be a stop along the way. Is there a generalization made about liquids in the body similar to the one for solid food? Replies: A physician would give a better answer, but I hazard this: the only liquids which people consume (deliberately) in significant quantities are water, ethyl alcohol and various oils. Water and alcohol are absorbed on a time scale of seconds to minutes through the mouth, stomach and digestive tract. The oils are huge molecules, so I'd guess like any other greasy food they get absorbed in the upper digestive tract. Some of them, perhaps the longest and most nonpolar, are not absorbed at all --- cf. the old-time remedy of mineral oil for constipation --- so there should be some average time-before-what's-left-is-excreted such as you're looking for, and my (wild) guess is that it would not differ substantially from that for food. You can define an average lifetime in the body for alcohol, since the natural level is zero. Rough guidelines are widespread in the context of drunk driving laws. But this is not really possible for water. One's body is normally full up to the brim with water, and there's no way for the body to distinguish between water molecules recently absorbed and molecules that've been moping around since the Beatles split up. Thus the water entering the toilet bowl after the pit stop is not in general the same water as was in the big coke. If you were to consider for water just the average time between drinking and peeing, it would seem to depend strongly on how well hydrated the body was before the drink, and how much was drunk. During sustained heavy exertion in the sun and dry air one can easily drink a pint of water an hour without peeing at all. On the other hand, if one is willing to drink enough water fast enough, so as to establish a high excess of body water one can pee 8 ounces 15 minutes or less after drinking 8 ounces.

160

Migration of positively charged defects in (alpha)-quartz  

SciTech Connect

We apply a newly developed quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) scheme to simulate the migration of charged oxygen defects in {alpha}-quartz. We simulate the transition mechanism and compute the potential energy and free energy surface for the puckering of the symmetric charged oxygen vacancy and the formation of the E{prime}{sub 1} center. By overcoming low energy barriers this puckering mechanism can be reiterated allowing the drift of the positive charge localized on an over-coordinated oxygen atom. This process enhances the stability of the E{prime}{sub 1} center and can be regarded as an important channel of structural reorganization of oxygen deficient silica in the presence of strong polarizing electric fields.

Laino, T; Donadio, D; Kuo, I W

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Migrating Home Agents Towards Internet-scale Mobility Deployments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the IETF standardization process of the Mobile IPv6 and Network Mobility (NEMO) protocols is almost complete, their large-scale deployment is not yet possible. With these technologies, in order to hide location changes of the mobile nodes from the rest of the Internet, a specific router called a home agent is used. However, this equipment generates resilience and performance issues such as protocol scalability and longer paths. In order to solve these problems, we describe and analyze a new concept called Home Agent Migration. The main feature of this solution is the distribution of home agents inside the current Internet topology to reduce distances to end-nodes. As is usually done for anycast routing, they advertise the same network prefix from different locations; moreover they also exchange information

Ryuji Wakikawa; Guillaume Valadon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

C.E. Kessel, et. al.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

163

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume I, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Seelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual Smolt Monitoring Program is the result of implementation of Section 304(d)(2) of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. This is the second year of the annual systemwide program conducted by the Fish Passage Center (formerly Water Budget Center). Index reaches have been established. Travel time indices are calculated for year to year comparison. Marked groups of steelhead, spring chinook, fall chinook, and summer chinook are monitored at sampling points throughout the system. Because this program is intended to be representative of the juvenile migration, marked groups represent major hatchery production stocks. Arrival time and duration of marked groups are reported. Annual travel time indices are reported from Rock Island Dam to McNary Dam, and from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam. Hatchery and brand release information is reported.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fast Wind-Induced Migration of Leddies in the South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eddies off the Strait of Luzon (termed here as “Leddies,” analogous to “Teddies” originating from the Indonesian Throughflow) are formed rapidly and migrate swiftly. Their migration rate (~10–20 cm s?1) is an order of magnitude faster than that of ...

Doron Nof; Yinglai Jia; Eric Chassignet; Alexandra Bozec

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1 , Xiaorong media, and to measure oil and water saturation. Although this technique has great advantages compared14. Using15 MRI, the oil secondary migration paths are scanned to measure the saturation distribution during

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

Efficient Global Pointers With Spontaneous Process Migration Koji Noguchi, Michael B. Dillencourt, Lubomir F. Bic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 4 if( code_addr is registered for remote read/write ){ 5 handle_remote_readwrite(); 6 return; 7 remote read/write 14 } 15 handle_migration(); 16 } Figure 6. Signal Handler with migration heuristic We of a remote host causes the process to automatically and fully transparently handle the remote reference

California at Irvine, University of

168

A new approach and system for attentive mobile learning based on seamless migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seamless migration is one of pervasive computing applications. The function of seamless mobility is suitable for mobile services such as mobile Web-based learning. In this paper, we propose an approach that supports an attentive mobile learning paradigm. ... Keywords: Attentive, Fuzzy neural, Mobile learning, Pervasive computing, Seamless mobility, Web-based migration

De-Gan Zhang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

From MDM to DB2: a case study of security enforcement migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a case study of a migration of attribute-based access control enforcement from the application to the database tier. The proposed migration aims to improve the security and simplify the audit of the enterprise system by enforcing information ... Keywords: DB2, XACML, attribute-based access control, database security, enterprise security, master data management

Nikolay Yakovets; Jarek Gryz; Stephanie Hazlewood; Paul van Run

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Numerical modeling of gas migration into and through faulted sand reservoirs in Pabst Field (Main Pass East Block 259), northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The further exploration and development of Pabst Gas Field with faulted sand reservoirs require an understanding of the properties and roles of faults, particularly Low Throw near Vertical Faults (LTNVFs), in gas migration and accumulation at a reservoir scale. This study presents numerical modeling of gas migration and accumulation processes in Pabst Field. Based on studies of the reservoirs, structure, faults, and fluid properties of the field, reservoir scale modeling was performed to determine the gas supply style and the fault properties by means of hundreds of iterations in which the fault properties and gas supply pattern were modified to match the gas distribution obtained from modeling with the gas distribution inferred from seismic data constrained by well data and production data. This study finds that in the main three sand reservoirs of Pabst Field the overlying younger sands cut down into the underlying older sands, so that partial connections between the three sands allow gas communication among the sands. Meanwhile, three fault families break up the three sands into numerous compartments. A primary fault and large synthetic and antithetic faults act as gas migration pathways: the synthetic and antithetic faults are inlets for gas flow and the primary fault is an outlet, and LTNVFs act as barriers to gas flow. Modeling requires fault properties in the field to change while the field is formed. The porosity and permeability of the faults in Pabst Field are 10% and 0.1 md, respectively, during gas charging of the sand reservoirs. But when there is no gas charging and large gas columns are maintained, the porosity and permeability of the faults decrease to 6% and 0.001 md, respectively. Pabst Field probably has an impulse gas charge history. Fault opening and closing, gas charge and recharge, and replacement of gas by formation water may occur. A combination of stratigraphy, structure, overpressure and gas charge rate control gas migration style, gas charge history, and gas distribution in the field. The significance of the study is that this improved numerical approach for modeling gas migration into and through specifically faulted sand reservoirs fills the gap between basin modeling and production modeling.

Li, Yuqian

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Modeling biochemical pathways using an artificial chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial chemistries are candidates for methodologies that model and design biochemical systems. If artificial chemistries can deal with such systems in beneficial ways, they may facilitate activities in the new area of biomolecular engineering. In ... Keywords: Artificial chemistry, biochemical pathways, biomolecular engineering, modularity, reasoning, scalability

Kazuto Tominaga; Yoshikazu Suzuki; Keiji Kobayashi; Tooru Watanabe; Kazumasa Koizumi; Koji Kishi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

University of California, Davis Initiating Biofuel Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 STEPS Symposium: Initiating New Vehicle/Fuel Pathways Davis, California June 14, 2010 Sonia Yeh a challenge for future development of biofuels · e.g. food prices, land use conversion, biodiversity, water savings, biodiversity, soil, water, and air · Social: workers' rights and land rights · EU Renewable

California at Davis, University of

174

Rural migration in Nevada: Lincoln County. Phase 1, 1992--1993  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project was to develop insight into the scope of migration of working age Nevadans out of their county of birth; including the collection of data on their skill levels, desire to out or in-migrate, interactions between families of migratory persons, and the impact that the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca mountain might have on their individual, and collective, decisions to migrate and return. The initial phase of this project reported here was conducted in 1992 and 1993 in Lincoln County, Nevada, one of the counties designated as ``affected`` by the proposed repository program. The findings suggest that a serious out-migration problem exists in Lincoln County, and that the Yucca mountain project will likely affect decisions relating to migration patterns in the future.

Soden, D.L.; Carns, D.E.; Mosser, D.; Conary, J.S.; Ansell, J.P.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Time Brightness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Cosmology from . . . Time Brightness ... . . . 50-100 Fields Lunar Calendar Scheduled Follow-Up Imaging at Hubble, Cerro Tololo, WIYN, Isaac Newton Scheduled Follow-Up Spectroscopy at Keck Almost 1000 Galaxies per Field RESULT: ~24 Type Ia supernovae discovered while still brightening, at new moon Berkeley Lab Keck WIYN Cerro Tololo Isaac Newton Hubble Strategy We developed a strategy to guarantee a group of supernova discoveries on a certain date. Just after a new moon, we observe some 50 to 100 high-galactic lattitute fields-each containing almost a thousand high-redshift galaxies-in two nights on the Cerro Tololo 4-meter telescope with Tyson & Bernstein's wide-field camera. We return three weeks later to observe the same

176

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to 1992, decisions on dam operations and use of stored water relied on recoveries of branded hatchery fish, index counts at traps and dams, and flow patterns at the dams. The advent of PIT-tag technology provided the opportunity to precisely track the smolt migrations of many wild stocks as they pass through the hydroelectric complex and other monitoring sites on their way to the ocean. With the availability of the PIT tag, a more complete approach to these decisions was undertaken starting in 1992 with the addition of PIT-tag detections of several wild spring and summer chinook salmon stocks at Lower Granite Dam. Using data from these detections, we initiated development of a database on wild fish, addressing several goals of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning Council and Conservation Act (NPPC 1980). Section 304(d) of the program states, ''The monitoring program will provide information on the migrational characteristics of the various stocks of salmon and steelhead within the Columbia Basin.'' Further, Section 201(b) urges conservation of genetic diversity, which will be possible only if wild stocks are preserved. Section 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program states that field monitoring of smolt movement will be used to determine the best timing for water storage releases and Section 5.8A.8 states that continued research is needed on survival of juvenile wild fish before they reach the first dam with special attention to water quantity, quality, and several other factors. The goals of this ongoing study are as follows (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence these patterns. (4) Characterize the migrational behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. This report provides information on PIT tagging of wild chinook salmon parr in 2002 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish. Fish were monitored as they migrated through two in-stream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek and at juvenile migrant traps in 2002 and 2003 as well as through interrogation systems at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during 2003. Fish were also monitored by the PIT-tag trawl in the mouth of the Columbia River in 2003. In 2002-2003, we also continued to collect environmental data for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program, which was developed from 1993 to 1997. The project was designed to collect data for use in conjunction with data on parr and smolt movements to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between these movements and environmental factors. Water quality data collected consist of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH measured at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho.

Achord, Stephen; McNatt, Regan A.; Hockersmith, Eric E. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Novel Adaptive Home Migration Protocol in Home-based DSM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home migration is used to tackle the home assignment problem in home-based software distributed shared memory systems. We propose an adaptive home migration protocol to optimize the single-writer pattern which occurs frequently in distributed applications. Our approach is unique in its use of a per-object threshold which is continuously adjusted to facilitate home migration decisions. This adaptive threshold is monotonously decreasing with increased likelihood that a particular object exhibits a lasting single-writer pattern. The threshold is tuned according to the feedback of previous home migration decisions at runtime. We implement this new adaptive home migration protocol in a distributed Java Virtual Machine that supports truly parallel execution of multi-threaded Java applications on clusters. The analysis and the experiments show that our new home migration protocol demonstrates both the sensitivity to the lasting single-writer pattern and the robustness against the transient single-writer pattern. In the latter case, the protocol inhibits home migration in order to reduce the home redirection overhead.

Weijian Fang Cho-Li; Cho-li Wang; Wenzhang Zhu; Francis C. M. Lau

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nonclassical assembly pathways of anisotropic particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in synthetic methods have spawned an array of nanoparticles and bio-inspired molecules of diverse shapes and interaction geometries. Recent experiments indicate that such anisotropic particles exhibit a variety of 'nonclassical' self-assembly pathways, forming ordered assemblies via intermediates that do not share the architecture of the bulk material. Here we apply mean field theory to a prototypical model of interacting anisotropic particles, and find a clear thermodynamic impetus for nonclassical ordering in certain regimes of parameter space. In other parameter regimes, by contrast, assembly pathways are selected by dynamics. This approach suggests a means of predicting when anisotropic particles might assemble in a manner more complicated than that assumed by classical nucleation theory.

Stephen Whitelam

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode  

SciTech Connect

The degradation of the ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells was studied under an accelerated stress test of catalyst support (potential hold at 1.2 V). Electrochemical behaviors of the cathode based on graphitic mesoporous carbon supported Pt catalyst were examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Impedance data were plotted and expressed in the complex capacitance form to determine useful parameters in the transmission line model: the double-layer capacitance, peak frequency, and ionic resistance. Electrochemical surface area and hydrogen crossover current through the membrane were estimated from cyclic voltammogram, while cathode Faradaic resistance was compared with ionic resistance as a function of test time. It was observed that during an accelerated stress test of catalyst support, graphitic mesoporous carbon becomes hydrophilic which increases interfacial area between the ionomer and the catalyst up to 100 h. However, the ionic resistance in the catalyst layer drastically increases after 100 h with further carbon support oxidation. The underlying mechanism has been studied and it was found that significant degradation of ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer due to catalyst support corrosion induces uneven hydration and mechanical stress in the ionomer.

Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

2011-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Smolt Monitoring Program, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Smolt Monitoring Program Annual Report, 1986, Volume I, describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the data from Fish Passage Center freeze brands used in the analysis of travel time for Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data. Data for marked fish not presented in this report will be provided upon request. Daily catch statistics (by species), flow, and sample parameters for the smolt monitoring sites, Clearwater, Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville also will be provided upon request.

Fish Passage Center

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Biotic-Abiotic Pathways: A New Paradigm for Uranium Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science SSRL Phone List People Search Maps Biotic-Abiotic Pathways: A New Paradigm for Uranium Reduction in Sediments Sunday, March 31, 2013 Biotic-abiotic pathways: a new paradigm...

182

Energy Department Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean Energy Economy Energy Department Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean Energy Economy January 15, 2013 - 9:19am Addthis...

183

Undergraduate program guide 2014 Indicative study to career pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Undergraduate program guide 2014 Sciences #12;Indicative study to career pathways Discipline area Degree programs Potential career pathways Agriculture Bachelor of Agricultural Sciences Bachelor of Science (Animal Science) Bachelor of Science (Natural Resources) Bachelor of Science (Veterinary

184

Functional similarities of reaction sets in metabolic pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyzing metabolic pathways by means of their steady states has proven to be accurate and efficient for practical purposes. The models such as elementary flux modes (EFMs) and extreme pathways (EPs) define the boundaries of the metabolic flux cone that ...

Ferhat Ay; Tamer Kahveci

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Identifying Necessary Reactions in Metabolic Pathways by Minimal Model Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In systems biology, identifying vital functions like glycolysis from a given metabolic pathway is important to understand living organisms. In this paper, we focus on the problem of finding minimal sub-pathways producing target metabolites from source ...

Takehide Soh; Katsumi Inoue

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

Nadeau, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest Research Institute] [Pacific Northwest Research Institute

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Phase-field modeling of temperature gradient driven pore migration coupling with thermal conduction  

SciTech Connect

Pore migration in a temperature gradient (Soret effect) is investigated by a phase-field model coupled with a heat transfer calculation. Pore migration is observed towards the high temperature domain with velocities that agree with analytical solution. Due to the low thermal conductivity of the pores, the temperature gradient across individual pores is increased, which in turn, accelerates the pore migration. In particular, for pores filled with xenon and helium, the pore velocities are increased by a factor of 2.2 and 2.1, respectively. A quantitative equation is then derived to predict the influence of the low thermal conductivity of pores.

Liangzhe Zhang; Michael R Tonks; Paul C Millett; Yongfeng Zhang; Karthikeyan Chockalingam; Bulent Biner

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Enabling time travel for the scholarly web  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enabling time travel for the scholarly web Enabling time travel for the scholarly web Enabling time travel for the scholarly web An international team of information scientists has begun a study to investigate how web links in scientific and other academic articles fail to lead to the resources being referenced. July 16, 2013 Herbert Van de Sompel, a Los Alamos National Laboratory information scientist, describes the information pathway involved in preventing "reference rot" in scientific material linked to the web. Herbert Van de Sompel, a Los Alamos National Laboratory information scientist, describes the information pathway involved in preventing "reference rot" in scientific material linked to the web. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "Increasingly, scientific papers contain links to web pages containing,

189

Hydroacoustic Assessment of Downstream Migrating Salmonids at the Dalles Dam in Spring and Summer, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydroacoustic study of downstream migrating salmon and steelhead was conducted at The Dalles Dam. The primary objective was to estimate the effectiveness of the spillway and sluiceway in passing downstream migrants. The secondary goals were to provide information on the horizontal, vertical, and temporal distributions of downstream migrants. June 1, and the summer season was from July 1 to August 15, 1985. Nineteen transducers were deployed to monitor turbine, spillway, and sluiceway locations. The 10 h instantaneous spill effectiveness results showed that spill passed fish more efficiently during the summer study than during the spring study. During the period May 1-31 when the turbines, spillway, and sluiceway were all operating consistently, the sluiceway was found to be the most efficient method of passing fish on a percent flow basis. During the summer study, after the termination of spill, the sluiceway and turbines passed almost equal percentages of fish. The run timing during the spring showed steadily increasing numbers of fish until the peak of the run on May 16. Another, smaller peak occurred on May 20. Thereafter, passage gradually decreased through the end of the spring study. The spring run consisted of yearling chinook, steelhead and sockeye juvenile salmonids. During the summer study, fish passage gradually decreased, except for minor peaks near the beginning of the study. The summer migration consisted primarily of subyearling chinook juvenile salmonids.

Steig, Tracy W.; Johnson, Ward R. (BioSonics, Inc. Seattle, WA)

1986-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

AQP1 Is Not Only a Water Channel: It Contributes to Cell Migration through Lin7/Beta-Catenin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: AQP1 belongs to aquaporins family, water-specific, membrane-channel proteins expressed in diverse tissues. Recent papers showed that during angiogenesis, AQP1 is expressed preferentially by microvessels, favoring angiogenesis via the increase of permeability In particular, in AQP1 null mice, endothelial cell migration is impaired without altering their proliferation or adhesion. Therefore, AQP1 has been proposed as a novel promoter of tumor angiogenesis. Methods/Findings: Using targeted silencing of AQP1 gene expression, an impairment in the organization of F-actin and a reduced migration capacity was demonstrated in human endothelial and melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, we showed, for the first time, that AQP1 co-immunoprecipitated with Lin-7. Lin7-GFP experiments confirmed co-immunoprecipitation. In addition, the knock down of AQP1 decreased the level of expression of Lin-7 and b-catenin and the inhibition of proteasome contrasted partially such a decrease. Conclusions/Significance: All together, our findings show that AQP1 plays a role inside the cells through Lin-7/b-catenin interaction. Such a role of AQP1 is the same in human melanoma and endothelial cells, suggesting that AQP1 plays a global physiological role. A model is presented.

Elena Monzani; Riccardo Bazzotti; Carla Perego; Caterina A. M. La Porta

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

The low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends on genotype, tissue compartment, exposure regimen, and sampling times Joe Gray & Andrew Wyrobek Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objectives of this research are to characterize the early and persistent low-dose and adaptive response (AR) damage surveillance networks in mammary glands of radiation sensitive and resistant strains of mice to identify the molecular signatures/mechanisms associated with nonlinear modifications of risk for mammary gland cancer. Our approach uses low-dose exposure regimens that have been reported to induce mammary gland cancer in sensitive strains to determine whether low-dose induced pathways are differentially expressed in epithelial or stromal cells and to determine

193

New pathway to bypass the 15O waiting point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the sequential reaction process $^{15}$O($p$,$\\gamma)(\\beta^{+}$)$^{16}$O as a new pathway to bypass of the $^{15}$O waiting point. This exotic reaction is found to have a surprisingly high cross section, approximately 10$^{10}$ times higher than the $^{15}$O($p$,$\\beta^{+}$)$^{16}$O. These cross sections were calculated after precise measurements of energies and widths of the proton-unbound $^{16}$F low lying states, obtained using the H($^{15}$O,p)$^{15}$O reaction. The large $(p,\\gamma)(\\beta^{+})$ cross section can be understood to arise from the more efficient feeding of the low energy wing of the ground state resonance by the gamma decay. The implications of the new reaction in novae explosions and X-ray bursts are discussed.

I. Stefan; F. de Oliveira Santos; M. G. Pellegriti; G. Dumitru; J. C. Angélique; M. Angélique; E. Berthoumieux; A. Buta; R. Borcea; A. Coc; J. M. Daugas; T. Davinson; M. Fadil; S. Grévy; J. Kiener; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; M. Lenhardt; M. Lewitowicz; F. Negoita; D. Pantelica; L. Perrot; O. Roig; M. G. Saint Laurent; I. Ray; O. Sorlin; M. Stanoiu; C. Stodel; V. Tatischeff; J. C. Thomas

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

following three natural gas to hydrogen supply pathways areHFCVs. Three natural gas-based hydrogen supply pathways areof the hy- drogen supply pathway: natural gas extraction,

Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M; Nicholas, Michael A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Pipelines, Pathways, and Payoffs: Economic Challenges and Returns to Changing Demographics in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Multiple Pathways Pipelines, Pathways, and Payoffs:Jon Stiles & Henry Brady Pipelines, Pathways, and Payoffs:of the educational pipeline to describe how students

Stiles, Jon; Brady, Henry

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » January 2013 Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration New computational technique creates high resolution maps of subsurface CO2 after geologic sequestration. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Sanjay Srinivasan, UT-Austin High resolution inverted seismic images of CO2 migration at the Cranfield,

197

A migration tool to support resource and load sharing in heterogeneous computing environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed computing systems potentially provide significant advantages and benefits such as enhanced performance, extensibility, reliability, and better resource and load sharing. However, the evolution of hardware and software has unavoidably led ... Keywords: Client-server, Heterogeneous systems, Load balancing, Migrations

P.D Le; B Srinivasan

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NEW MIGRATIONS TO ISRAEL AND THE EMERGENCE OF A COSMOPOLITAN TEL AVIV DR. WILLIAM BERTHOMIERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEW MIGRATIONS TO ISRAEL AND THE EMERGENCE OF A COSMOPOLITAN TEL AVIV BY DR. WILLIAM BERTHOMIERE AT THE CONFERENCE COSMOPOLITANISM & ANTHROPOLOGY ASA 2006 DIAMOND JUBILEE CONFERENCE - KEELE UNIVERSITY 10-13 APRIL

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Identifying Doppler Velocity Contamination Caused by Migrating Birds. Part II: Bayes Identification and Probability Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the Bayesian statistical decision theory, a probabilistic quality control (QC) technique is developed to identify and flag migrating-bird-contaminated sweeps of level II velocity scans at the lowest elevation angle using the QC ...

Shun Liu; Qin Xu; Pengfei Zhang

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Technique for Removing the Effect of Migrating Birds in 915-MHz Wind Profiler Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described and evaluated for decreasing artifacts in radar wind profiler data resulting from overflying, migrating birds. The method processes the prerecorded, averaged spectral data of a wind profiler to derive hourly wind profiles ...

M. S. Pekour; R. L. Coulter

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites - a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover - have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; up to 10E5 g methane m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. Addressing landfill gas generation, the goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examined the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Triplicate assays of the leachates that produce insignificant quantities of biogas after 90 days incubation are being amended with sucrose, a nutrient broth, or a bacterial seed. Response of gas production to each of the three amendments was similar across all samples, regardless of the leaching method originally employed, with nutrient addition producing the most stable long-term biogas production with the highest methane content. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

Mark Zumberge

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Assessment tool for nuclear material acquisition pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An assessment methodology has been developed at Texas A&M University for predicting weapons useable material acquisition by a terrorist organization or rogue state based on an acquisition network simulation. The network has been designed to include all of the materials, facilities, and expertise (each of which are represented by a unique node) that must be obtained to acquire Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Using various historical cases and open source expert opinion, the resources required to successfully obtain the goal of every node within the network was determined. A visual representation of the network was created within Microsoft Visio and uses Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to analyze the network. This tool can be used to predict the most likely pathway(s) that a predefined organization would take in attempting to acquire SNM. The methodology uses the resources available to the organization, along with any of the nodes to which the organization may already have access, to determine which path the organization is most likely to attempt. Using this resource based decision model, various sample simulations were run to exercise the program. The results of these simulations were in accordance with what was expected for the resources allocated to the organization being modeled. The program was demonstrated to show that it was capable of taking many complex resources considerations into account and modeled them accurately.

Ford, David Grant

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

An application of Crosswell Tomography using a hydrophone receiver array and airgun source to monitor steam migration in an unconsolidated, heavy-oil sandstone, West Coalinga Field, California  

SciTech Connect

This crosswell tomography field trial demonstrates the viability and cost- reducing benefits of a hydrophone receiver array and airgun source for monitoring steam (heat) migration within an unconsolidated, heavy-oil sandstone. This project represents one of the first applications of hydrophone receivers in such an environment. Data quality from the hydrophone array proved more than adequate for P-wave tomography while costs were reduced dramatically from estimates using a clamped geophone array. Additionally, the resolution provided by the capture of travel-time data from interwell areas offered a distinct advantage over conventional monitoring techniques limited to observation wells. Two crosswell surveys were conducted in the vicinity of a new, infill steam injector. The purpose was to monitor steam migration within an 80-foot thick, sandstone interval by detecting the heat-induced velocity decrease between the first survey, conducted just before steam injection, and the second survey conducted approximately three months later. Difference plots of the two surveys clearly define regions of significant temperature change and contact temperature logs corroborate the zone of peak change. The crosswell tomography data and the inferred steam migration characteristics immediately altered an operational strategy for the drive and were later a factor in the abandonment of continuous steam injection.

Blevens, D.M. (Chevron USA Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Fairborn, J.W. (Wellseismic Computing Services, Balboa, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

STELLAR POPULATIONS AND RADIAL MIGRATIONS IN VIRGO DISK GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present new stellar age profiles, derived from well-resolved optical and near-infrared images of 64 Virgo cluster disk galaxies, whose analysis poses a challenge for current disk galaxy formation models. Our ability to break the age-metallicity degeneracy and the significant size of our sample represent key improvements over complementary studies of field disk galaxies. Our results can be summarized as follows: first, and contrary to observations of disk galaxies in the field, these cluster galaxies are distributed almost equally amongst the three main types of disk galaxy luminosity profiles (I/II/III), indicating that the formation and/or survival of Type II breaks is suppressed within the cluster environment. Second, we find examples of statistically significant inversions ({sup U}-shapes{sup )} in the age profiles of all three disk galaxy types, reminiscent of predictions from high-resolution simulations of classically truncated Type II disks in the field. These features characterize the age profiles for only about a third ({<=}36%) of each disk galaxy type in our sample. An even smaller fraction of cluster disks ({approx}11% of the total sample) exhibit age profiles that decrease outward (i.e., negative age gradients). Instead, flat and/or positive age gradients prevail ({>=}50%) within our Type I, II, and III subsamples. These observations thus suggest that while stellar migrations and inside-out growth can play a significant role in the evolution of all disk galaxy types, other factors contributing to the evolution of galaxies can overwhelm the predicted signatures of these processes. We interpret our observations through a scenario whereby Virgo cluster disk galaxies formed initially like their brethren in the field but which, upon falling into the cluster, were transformed into their present state through external processes linked to the environment (e.g., ram-pressure stripping and harassment). Current disk galaxy formation models, which have largely focused on field galaxies, fail to reproduce these results, thus calling for adequate hydrodynamical simulations of dense galaxy environments if we are to understand cluster disks. The current paper highlights numerous constraints for such simulations. In the Appendix, we confirm the claim by Erwin et al. that Type II breaks are absent in Virgo cluster S0s and discuss the detection of Type III breaks in such galaxies.

Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stephane [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia [Deptartamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); McDonald, Michael, E-mail: jroediger@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: courteau@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: p.sanchezblazquez@uam.es, E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Effect of Concrete Waste Form Properties on Radionuclide Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation) the mechanism of contaminant release, the significance of contaminant release pathways, how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility, the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility, the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. Numerous sets of tests were initiated in fiscal years (FY) 2006-2009 to evaluate (1) diffusion of iodine (I) and technetium (Tc) from concrete into uncontaminated soil after 1 and 2 years, (2) I and rhenium (Re) diffusion from contaminated soil into fractured concrete, (3) I and Re (set 1) and Tc (set 2) diffusion from fractured concrete into uncontaminated soil, (4) evaluate the moisture distribution profile within the sediment half-cell, (5) the reactivity and speciation of uranium (VI) (U(VI)) compounds in concrete porewaters, (6) the rate of dissolution of concrete monoliths, and (7) the diffusion of simulated tank waste into concrete.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Skinner, De'Chauna J.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Wood, Marcus I.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a part of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program, the Fish Passage Center collects information on the migrational characteristics of juvenile salmon and steelhead (Oncorhynchus sp.) in the Columbia River basin. This information is collected through the Smolt Monitoring Program, and is used as a tool in the management and evaluation of the Water Budget. The Water Budget is a volume of water used to enhance environmental conditions (flows) to aid in the seaward migration of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Implicit in the Water Budget concept is that by augmenting flows, travel time of juvenile salmonids will be decreased, thereby increasing survival via reductions in delayed migration and exposure to predators. This study was initiated to (1) provide physiological information about the juvenile salmonids used for these travel time estimates, (2) to analyze the physiological data, and (3) to determine if an ``index`` of smolt condition could be developed to aid in management of the Water Budget.

Beeman, John W.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Faler, Joyce C. (Seattle National Fishery Research Center, Columbia River Field Station, Cook, WA)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is a well known source rock and fractured reservoir. Production is mainly from fractures, and the mechanism by which oil migrates from the matrix into the fractures is not well understood. Microfracturing due to oil generation offers a possible explanation for the mechanism of the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. Detailed petrographic analysis was undertaken to study the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. The important components of the primary migration system are the solution seams, swarms of horizontal microfractures associated with the solution seams and the tectonic fractures from which the oil is recovered. Pressure solution is manifest in the Austin Chalk as millimeter-scale solution seams and smaller microseams. The solution seams are composites formed by the superposition of the microseams in an anastomosing network. Evidence for pressure solution is the presence of truncated fossils along seams and the high concentration of insolubles within them. A significant amount of organic matter and bitumen was observed to be concentrated within the seams. Associated with the solution seams are swarms of horizontal microftactures, many of them filled with calcite. Numerous vertical, tectonic fractures are found intersecting the solution seams. Pressure solution serves to concentrate organic matter within the solution seams and oil is generated here. It is postulated that the accompanying increase in fluid volume raises the pore pressures and fractures the rock. These newly created microfractures are avenues for migration of fluids from the seams. It is likely that oil migrates from the seams into the tectonic fractures via the microftactures. Oil may also be migrating directly from the seams into the fractures along an organic network. The matrix recharges the fractures by the mechanism postulated in this study. Thus, production can be sustained at low rates even after the initial period of decline. Further studies should attempt to correlate the carbonate in the matrix with that in the microfractures, and the oil in the seams with that in the fractures.

Chanchani, Jitesh

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Process Design and Optimization of Biorefining Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis and screening of technology alternatives is a key process-development activity in the process industries. Recently, this has become particularly important for the conceptual design of biorefineries. A structural representation (referred to as the chemical species/conversion operator) is introduced. It is used to track individual chemicals while allowing for the processing of multiple chemicals in processing technologies. The representation is used to embed potential configurations of interest. An optimization approach is developed to screen and determine optimum network configurations for various technology pathways using simple data. The design of separation systems is an essential component in the design of biorefineries and hydrocarbon processing facilities. This work introduces methodical techniques for the synthesis and selection of separation networks. A shortcut method is developed for the separation of intermediates and products in biorefineries. The optimal allocation of conversion technologies and recycle design is determined in conjunction with the selection of the separation systems. The work also investigates the selection of separation systems for gas-to-liquid (GTL) technologies using supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The task of the separation network is to exploit the pressure profile of the process, the availability of the solvent as a process product, and the techno-economic advantages of recovering and recycling the solvent. Case studies are solved to illustrate the effectiveness of the various techniques developed in this work. The result shows 1, the optimal pathway based on minimum payback period for cost efficiency is pathway through alcohol fermentation and oligomerized to gasoline as 11.7 years with 1620 tonne/day of feedstock. When the capacity is increased to 120,000 BPD of gasoline production, the payback period will be reduced to 3.4 years. 2, from the proposed separation configuration, the solvent is recovered 99% from the FT products, while not affecting the heavier components recovery and light gas recovery, and 99% of waster is recycled. The SCF-FT case is competitive with the traditional FT case with similar ROI 0.2. 3, The proposed process has comparable major parts cost with typical GTL process and the capital investment per BPD is within the range of existing GTL plant.

Bao, Buping

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?  

SciTech Connect

Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

213

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

214

Novel Biosynthetic Pathway for Production of Fatty Acid ...  

Jay Keasling and Eric Steen of Berkeley Lab have invented what may be the most efficient metabolic pathway for producing fatty acids, and their ...

215

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, Nevada, Inferred from 3d Magnetotelluric Surveying Jump to: navigation, search...

216

NREL Creates New Pathways for Producing Biofuels and Acids from...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Creates New Pathways for Producing Biofuels and Acids from Cyanobacteria Cyanobacteria use photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide into sugars such as glycogen, a carbohydrate...

217

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dryer WH - Clothes Washer Clothes Washer WH - DishwasherDishwasher Water Heating Figure 7 Breakdown of residentialUEC Water Heating (WH) Dishwasher Advanced Energy Pathways -

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008 Report of Research.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are listed below: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m{sup 2}) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

Inferences about Shear Zone Flow Pathways between CFM 06.002i2 and Pinkel from Tracer Tests 10-01 to 12-02  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an analysis of several tracer tests conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, between 2010 and early 2012, with the objective of testing a conceptual model of flow through the shear zone in which the tracer tests were conducted. The analysis includes predictions of tracer residence times in each of two flow pathways in the shear zone as a function of injection and extraction flow rates in the tracer tests. Conclusions are: (1) Separation of shear zone flow between CFM 06.002i2 and Pinkel into two predominant flow pathways seems reasonable; (2) Conceptual model is that travel time in pathway 1 is dependent on injection flow rate, and travel time in pathway 2 is dependent on extraction flow rate; (3) Predict residence time (in hours) in Pathway 1 equal to {approx}9.9/(Injection Flow Rate, ml/min), provided injection interval flow is greater than about 0.15 ml/min (which is not reliably achieved under natural flow/dilution conditions after installation of CFM 11.00X holes); and (4) Predict residence time of {approx}8 hrs in Pathway 2 with extraction flow rate of 25 ml/min.

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Patterns of gravity induced aggregate migration during casting of fluid concretes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, aggregate migration patterns during fluid concrete castings are studied through experiments, dimensionless approach and numerical modeling. The experimental results obtained on two beams show that gravity induced migration is primarily affecting the coarsest aggregates resulting in a decrease of coarse aggregates volume fraction with the horizontal distance from the pouring point and in a puzzling vertical multi-layer structure. The origin of this multi layer structure is discussed and analyzed with the help of numerical simulations of free surface flow. Our results suggest that it finds its origin in the non Newtonian nature of fresh concrete and that increasing casting rate shall decrease the magnitude of gravity induced particle migration.

Spangenberg, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark); Roussel, N., E-mail: Nicolas.roussel@lcpc.fr [Universite Paris Est, Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussees (LCPC) (France); Hattel, J.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark); Sarmiento, E.V.; Zirgulis, G. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway)] [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway); Geiker, M.R. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway) [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway); Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Session: Avian migration and implications for wind power development in the Eastern United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session was arranged to convey what is known about avian migration, particularly in the eastern US. The first presentation ''Migration Ecology: Issues of Scale and Behavior'' by Sarah Mabey frames the issue of migratory bird interactions with wind energy facilities from an ecological perspective: when, where, and why are migrant bird species vulnerable to wind turbine collision. The second presentation ''Radar Studies of Nocturnal Migration at Wind Sites in the Eastern US'' by Brian Cooper reported on radar studies conducted at wind sites in the eastern US, including Mount Storm, Clipper Wind, and others.

Mabey, Sarah; Cooper, Brian

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Greening the Cloud Using Renewable-Energy-Aware Service Migration*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the energy industry, and hence, its production is increasing worldwide [5]. In the US, RES produced 12 for timely energy production and supply. In addition, RES are generally available in remote locations - far geographical as well as temporal disparity among the demand and supply of renewable energy. Cloud services

California at Davis, University of

224

Results of deep exploratory drilling between long and Newark Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada - implications for oil migration in the nearby Yankee gold mine paleohydrothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In mid-1992, a consortium headed by Pioneer Oil and Gas (Midvale, Utah) drilled a deep (6700 ft) exploratory well in the southern Ruby Mountains-Buck Mountain are near the Alligator Ridge mining district in White Pine County, Nevada. The test well is located 1.5 mi southwest of USMX, Inc.'s, Yankee gold mine, an open-pit operation centered on a Carlin-type, sediment-hosted gold orebody noteworthy for containing abundant, fracture-controlled live oil. The Pioneer well as dry, but intersected much of the same stratigraphic section hosting gold at Yankee, thereby providing valuable clues to mechanisms of oil migration at this unusual, oil-bearing precious-metal deposit. Most of the gold at Yankee is hosted by the Devonian Pilot Shale, with a basal argillaceous limestone containing the bulk of the deposit's live oil. The equivalent section in the Pioneer wildcat well is a silty calcareous dolomite. Whereas the basal Pilot limestone at Yankee is rich in thick, locally gold- and arsenic-anomalous calcite veins and modules hosting abundant oil-bearing fluid inclusion, the basal Pilot dolomite in the Pioneer well contains only a few thin calcite-pyrite veinlets devoid of fluid inclusions. Moreover, the Yankee calcite veins have the same light-stable-isotope signatures as hydrothermal carbonate veins near or elsewhere in the Alligator Ridge district. These relationships imply that oil at Yankee migrated in the same hydrothermal system responsible for gold mineralization. Such systems elsewhere in the eastern Basin and Range, given favorable source rocks, traps, seals, and migratory pathways, might well have formed not only gold deposits, but also rich, spatially coincident oil reservoirs.

Pinnell, M.L. (Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (United States)); Hulen, J.B. (Univ. of Utah Research Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Cox, J.W. (USMX, Reno, NV (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hydrocarbon solubility and its migration processes: a look at the present status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study we review the present status of knowledge of solubility of hydrocarbons and its implications on primary migration processes. The intent is to examine the solubility and the transportation mechanisms relevant to geopressured-geothermal reservoirs, although the discussion included here accommodates a wide range of related aspects. Influences of parameters associated with hydrocarbon (especially methane) solubility have been studied. We have sought to evaluate several primary hydrocarbon migration processes and to point out their attractive features as well as their limitations. A brief discussion of hydrocarbon generation processes is also included.

Mamun, C.K.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Pathways core: a data model for cross-repository services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the NSF-funded Pathways project, we have created an interoperable data model to facilitate object re-use and a broad spectrum of cross-repository services. The resulting Pathways Core data model is designed to be lightweight to implement, ... Keywords: data model, interoperability, scholarly communication

Jeroen Bekaert; Xiaoming Liu; Herbert Van de Sompel; Carl Lagoze; Sandy Payette; Simeon Warner

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS CHAPTER 8: SCENARIOS FOR DEEP REDUCTIONS IN GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS PART 3

California at Davis, University of

232

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 3: SCENARIOS FOR A LOW-CARBON TRANSPORTATION FUTURE PART 3 Part 3: Scenarios

California at Davis, University of

233

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 3 CHAPTER 10: OPTIMIZING THE TRANSPORTATION CLIMATE MITIGATION WEDGE Chapter

California at Davis, University of

234

Fuel-Cycle Assessment of Selected Bioethanol Production Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel-Cycle Assessment of Selected Bioethanol Production Pathways in the United States ANL/ESD/06-Cycle Assessment of Selected Bioethanol Production Pathways in the United States ANL/ESD/06-7 by M. Wu, M. Wang ................................................................................ 6 2 Simplified Process Flow Diagram of Biochemical Conversion of Corn Stover to Ethanol with Steam

Argonne National Laboratory

235

Development of an ontology-based flexible clinical pathway system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficient storage of medical knowledge is critical for the advancement of medicine; a flexible platform for the storage of knowledge is the need of the hour. Therefore, this work focuses on clinical pathways--tools that effectively maintain the quality ... Keywords: clinical pathways, domain ontology, ontology, ontology-based system, task ontology

Y. C. Lin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10°C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir’s epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water’s surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Late Pleistocene to Recent sediment transport pathways of the Green Canyon OCS area, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses some of the complexities of sediment transport systems on the continental slope of the Green Canyon OCS area south of the Louisiana coast. Five Late Pleistocene to Recent sedimentary sequences are identified using a combination of seismic and well data. Sediments are transported through pathways characterized by erosional surfaces and numerous channels which form as sediments remobilize and become transported downslope. Pathway margins are constricted by physiographic highs. Several processes are identified as means of carrying fine-grained sediments to and across the continental slope. The most important of these are mass movements (slumps and slides), debris flows, and turbidity currents. Faulting and/or slumping at the shelf edge remobilizes sediments which are then carried further downslope. These remobilized sediments may be transported as debris flows or other undifferentiated high-density flows, or may develop into turbidity currents which deposit graded sediments in response to decreases in slope gradient. Slumps and slides off salt uplifts also deposit large volumes of sediments into adjacent intraslope basins and sediment transport pathways, where they may contribute significant amounts of material to the downslope transport of sediments. Discrete channels are not often observed in the pathways due to multiple episodes of channel formation and erosion which occurred during a single sea level lowstand. These multiple episodes tend to remove or obscure prominent channel features. Sedimentation is cyclic. During one sea level lowstand a sequence is deposited in and along narrow pathways which successively fill intraslope basins from the shelf edge downslope. As each basin is filled, sediments spill over and continue downslope to a lower basin. Sedimentation during the next sea level lowstand occurs in broader pathways. Less sediments are deposited in the intraslope basin areas because they remain filled from the previous sequence. By the time of deposition of the next sequence, movement of underlying salt sheets has changed the shape of the pathway. The sedimentation pattern repeats as lower depressions fill and sediments spill over. Pathways transport slope sediments in the Green canyon area. Discrete channels are not often observed in the pathways. This is a result of two mechanisms: 1) multiple episodes of erosion during a sea level lowstand tend to remove or obscure prominent channel features, and 2) most sediments deposited within the pathways are mass transport deposits which do not often become channelized. The pathways are characterized by erosional surfaces and numerous conduits which form as sediments remobilize and become transported downslope. They are laterally relatively persistent, being constricted by structural highs,

Swanson, John Patrick

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Overpotential-Dependent Phase Transformation Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective in battery development for higher storage energy density is the design of compounds that can accommodate maximum changes in ion concentration over useful electrochemical windows. Not surprisingly, many storage compounds undergo phase transitions in situ, including production of metastable phases. Unique to this environment is the frequent application of electrical over- and underpotentials, which are the electrical analogs to undercooling and superheating. Surprisingly, overpotential effects on phase stability and transformation mechanisms have not been studied in detail. Here we use synchrotron X-ray diffraction performed in situ during potentiostatic and galvanostatic cycling, combined with phase-field modeling, to reveal a remarkable dependence of phase transition pathway on overpotential in the model olivine Li{sub 1-x}FePO{sub 4}. For a sample of particle size {approx}113 nm, at both low (e.g., 75 mV) overpotentials a crystal-to-crystal olivine transformation dominates, whereas at intermediate overpotentials a crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition is preferred. As particle sizes decrease to the nanoscale, amorphization is further emphasized. Implications for battery use and design are considered.

Y Kao; M Tang; N Meethong; J Bai; W Carter; Y Chiang

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49; 49; NO. OF PAGES 7 Please cite this article in press as: Zhang Y-H P., et al. Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation, Curr Opin Biotechnol (2010), doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2010.05.005 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation Y-H Percival Zhang 1,2,3 , Jibin Sun 4 and Jian-Jiang Zhong 5 Cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB) is the implementation of complicated biochemical reactions by in vitro assembling a number of enzymes or their complexes and coenzymes. Assembly of numerous enzymes without cellular membrane, gene regulation, or undesired pathway can circumvent some of the obstacles to modifying living microorganisms. Several synthetic pathways for the production of liquid biofuels - alcohols and hydrocarbon precursors (polyols)

240

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

You are where you e-mail: using e-mail data to estimate international migration rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International migration is one of the major determinants of demographic change. Although efforts to produce comparable statistics are underway, estimates of demographic flows are inexistent, outdated, or largely inconsistent, for most countries. We estimate ... Keywords: demographics, e-mail data, migration, mobility

Emilio Zagheni; Ingmar Weber

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Combining the radial basis function eulerian and Lagrangian schemes with geostatistics for modeling of radionuclide migration through the geosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the long-term safety of a radioactive waste disposal system, mathematical models are used to describe groundwater flow, chemistry, and potential radionuclide migration through geological formations. A number of processes need to be considered, ... Keywords: Eulerian method, Geostatistics, Lagrangian method, Radial basis function, Radionuclide migration

L. Vrankar; G. Turk; F. Runovc

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Revive!: reactions to migration between different embodiments when playing with robotic pets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the issues that arise in the context of the migration of a robotic pet between different embodiments and the associated design challenges. In the following, we describe the perceptions that a group of children have of a dinosaur character ... Keywords: artificial pets, human-robot interaction, mobile and ubiquitous entertainment

Elena Márquez Segura; Henriette Cramer; Paulo Fontaínha Gomes; Stina Nylander; Ana Paiva

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Reducing game latency by migration, core-selection and TCP modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Massively Multi-player Online Games (MMOGs) have stringent latency requirements and handle large numbers of concurrent players. To support these conflicting requirements, it is common to divide the virtual environment into virtual regions, ... Keywords: MMOGs, TCP enhancements, computer games, core selection algorithms, distributed name servers, game latency, gaming, latency reduction, massively multi-player online games, object migration

Paul B. Beskow; Andreas Petlund; Geir A. Erikstad; Carsten Griwodz; Pal Halvorsen

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

"Cut me some slack": latency-aware live migration for databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-based data management platforms often employ multitenant databases, where service providers achieve economies of scale by consolidating multiple tenants on shared servers. In such database systems, a key functionality for service providers is database ... Keywords: PID controller, cloud computing, control theory, database migration, multitenancy

Sean Barker; Yun Chi; Hyun Jin Moon; Hakan Hacigümü?; Prashant Shenoy

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Charge migration efficiency optimization in hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is high-quality form of energy, and thus it is beneficial to store the excessive electric energy in the electrical energy storage (EES) rather than converting into a different type of energy. Like memory devices, no single type of EES ... Keywords: charge management, charge migration, hybrid electrical energy storage

Yanzhi Wang; Younghyun Kim; Qing Xie; Naehyuck Chang; Massoud Pedram

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ORBITAL MIGRATION OF INTERACTING LOW-MASS PLANETS IN EVOLUTIONARY RADIATIVE TURBULENT MODELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The torques exerted by a locally isothermal disk on an embedded planet lead to rapid inward migration. Recent work has shown that modeling the thermodynamics without the assumption of local isothermality reveals regions where the net torque on an embedded planet is positive, leading to outward migration of the planet. When a region with negative torque lies directly exterior to this, planets in the inner region migrate outward and planets in the outer region migrate inward, converging where the torque is zero. We incorporate the torques from an evolving non-isothermal disk into an N-body simulation to examine the behavior of planets or planetary embryos interacting in the convergence zone. We find that mutual interactions do not eject objects from the convergence zone. Small numbers of objects in a laminar disk settle into near resonant orbits that remain stable over the 10 Myr periods that we examine. However, either or both increasing the number of planets or including a correlated, stochastic force to represent turbulence drives orbit crossings and mergers in the convergence zone. These processes can build gas giant cores with masses of order 10 Earth masses from sub-Earth mass embryos in 2-3 Myr.

Horn, Brandon; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th St, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Lyra, Wladimir [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Sandor, Zsolt, E-mail: bhorn@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: wlyra@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: zsolt.sandor@uibk.ac.at [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Migration of seismicity and earthquake interactions monitored by GPS in SE Asia triple junction: Sulawesi, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Sulawesi, Indonesia Christophe Vigny,1 Hugo Perfettini,1,2 Andrea Walpersdorf,1,2 Anne Lemoine1 Wim Simons] Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made in Sulawesi, Indonesia, from 1992 to 1999 detected, fault, fluids, seismotectonics, earthquake, Indonesia Citation: Vigny, C., et al., Migration

McCaffrey, Robert

249

Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

The long range migration of hydrogen through Zircaloy in response to tensile and compressive stress gradients  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zircaloy-4, which is used widely as a core structural material in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), picks up hydrogen during service. Hydrogen solubility in Zircaloy-4 is low and zirconium hydride phases precipitate after the Zircaloy-4 lattice becomes supersaturated with hydrogen. These hydrides embrittle the Zircaloy-4, degrading its mechanical performance as a structural material. Because hydrogen can move rapidly through the Zircaloy-4 lattice, the potential exists for large concentrations of hydride to accumulate in local regions of a Zircaloy component remote from its point of entry into the component. Much has been reported in the literature regarding the long range migration of hydrogen through Zircaloy under concentration gradients and temperature gradients. Relatively little has been reported, however, regarding the long range migration of hydrogen under stress gradients. This paper presents experimental results regarding the long range migration of hydrogen through Zircaloy in response to both tensile and compressive stress gradients. The importance of this driving force for hydrogen migration relative to concentration and thermal gradients is discussed.

Kammenzind, B.F.; Berquist, B.M.; Bajaj, R.; Kreyns, P.H.; Franklin, D.G.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Migration and growth of giant planets in self-gravitating disks with varied thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the results of novel global high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of disk-planet interaction which incorporate simultaneously realistic radiation physics and the self-gravity of the gas, as well as allowing the planet to move. We find that thermodynamics and radiative physics have a remarkable effect on both migration and accretion of Jupiter mass planets. In simulations with radiative transfer adopting flux-limited diffusion, inward migration can be decreased by about 30% relative to the isothermal case, while in adiabatic runs migration nearly shuts off after a few tens of orbits. Migration varies because the relative strength of the inner and outer spiral perturbations is affected by thermodynamics, thus changing the net torque acting on the planet. Mass accretion rates on the planet can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude going from isothermal to radiative transfer and adiabatic simulations. A circumplanetary disk always forms except in adiabatic runs. With radiative transfer the disk is sub-keplerian (Vrot/Vkep ~ 0.7) owing to significant pressure support. We discuss the effect of circumplanetary disk structure on the drift of embedded dust grains and planetesimals and thus on the formation of the rocky satellites of giant planets.

Laure Fouchet; Lucio Mayer

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ab initio study of stability and migration of H and He in hcp-Sc  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to determine the relative stabilities and migration of H and He atoms in hcp-Sc. The results show that the formation energy of an interstitial H or He atom is smaller than that of a corresponding substitutional atom. The tetrahedral (T) interstitial position is more stable than an octahedral (O) position for both He and H interstitials. The nudged elastic band method has been used to study the migration of interstitial H and He atomss in hcp-Sc. It is found that the migration energy barriers for H interstitials in hcp-Sc are significantly different from those for He interstitials, but that their migration mechanisms are similar. In addition, the formation energies of five different configurations of a He-He pair were determined, revealing that the most stable configuration consists of two He atoms located at the second-neighbor tetrahedral interstitial sites along the c axis. The formation and relative stabilities of some small He clusters have also been investigated.

Yang, Li; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Zu, Xiaotao T.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

253

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We PIT tagged wild spring/summer chinook salmon parr in the Snake River Basin in 1995 and subsequently monitored these fish during their smolt migration through Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during spring and summer 1996.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Vertical migration of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and the impact on ocean optical properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Inc.) coupled to a fiber-optic spectrometer (S2000, Ocean Optics, Inc.) and a fiber-optic xenon flash. Moline, and C. S. Roesler (1999), Optical monitoring and fore- casting systems for harmful algal bloomsVertical migration of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and the impact on ocean optical

255

DEAD ZONES AS THERMAL BARRIERS TO RAPID PLANETARY MIGRATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planetary migration in standard models of gaseous protoplanetary disks is known to be very rapid ({approx}10{sup 5} years), jeopardizing the existence of planetary systems. We present a new mechanism for significantly slowing rapid planetary migration, discovered by means of radiative transfer calculations of the thermal structure of protoplanetary disks irradiated by their central stars. Rapid dust settling in a disk's dead zone-a region with very little turbulence-leaves a dusty wall at its outer edge. We show that the back-heating of the dead zone by this irradiated wall produces a positive gradient of the disk temperature, which acts as a thermal barrier to planetary migration which persists for the disk lifetime. Although we analyze in detail the migration of a super-Earth in a low-mass disk around an M star, our findings can apply to a wide variety of young planetary systems. We compare our findings with other potentially important stopping mechanisms and show that there are large parameter spaces for which dead zones are likely to play the most important role for reproducing the observed mass-period relation in longer planetary periods.

Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Pudritz, Ralph E. [Origins Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)], E-mail: hasegay@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

RAYMOND, H. L. 1979. Effects ofdams and impoundments on migrations of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1979. Growth curve fitted by inspection 071 fish represented). Each point on the growth curve"'IJ~ 12n~ RAYMOND, H. L. 1979. Effects ofdams and impoundments on migrations of juvenile chinook in sport and commercial catches (Matlock and Weaver 1979), Variations in environmental factors

257

Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

Olander, D.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Time and Frequency Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Time and Frequency Portal. Time and Frequency Portal. Programs and Projects. CODATA values of the fundamental constants ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Time Series and Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time Series and Forecasting. Leigh, Stefan and Perlman, S. (1991). "An Index for Comovement of Time Sequences With ...

260

Review: Oral Tradition and the Internet: Pathways of the Mind by John Miles Foley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oral tradition and the Internet: Pathways of the mind.Oral Tradition and the Internet: Pathways of the Mind, bybook, Oral Tradition and the Internet: Pathways of the Mind,

Litwin, Rory B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ferrocyanide safety program: Moisture migration test in ferrocyanide simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the initial phases of the Ferrocyanide Safety Program, it was presumed that actual sludge in tanks would behave as if it were a two-phase system in which a brine phase would seep through the insoluble solid phase of ferrocyanide and other precipitated salts. After flowsheet materials were produced and extensively tested, it became apparent that the ferrocyanide precipitates held extensive quantities of water (50% by weight or more) that were far above what would be expected from hydrated salts. Because little or no draining of this fluid occurred over a period of months, it was concluded that the precipitates and their solution would act as a homogeneous single phase in much the same way as natural clays. Suggestions were made that the testing of clays could add to existing knowledge of sludge hydraulic and rheologic properties, at a much-reduced cost in chemicals and time over that required for flowsheet materials. Tests were conducted in a 400-L volume of ferrocyanide sludge simulant to determine thermal characteristics around heated zones. At low heat loads, surface vapor losses were much lower than return rates, resulting in no net change in water content. Under boiling conditions, no bulk dryout occurred. These results were consistent with the results from earlier small-scale experiments.

Crippen, M.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm{sup 3} breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.

Fedele, Francesco [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Eppstein, Margaret J. [Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)]. E-mail: maggie.eppstein@uvm.edu; Laible, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Godavarty, Anuradha [Photon Migration Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3012 (United States); Sevick-Muraca, Eva M. [Photon Migration Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3012 (United States)

2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways As part of the mining vision process, industry develops technology roadmaps to identify critical pathways for the R&D needed to reach their goals. These roadmaps aid both industry and government in making decisions to support R&D critical to the industry's vision of the future. Industry Vision & Roadmaps The following documents are available for download as Adobe PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader. The Mining Industry of the Future Vision (PDF 122 KB) The industry's unified Vision document outlines broad goals for the future. As part of the mining vision process, industry develops technology roadmaps to identify critical pathways for the R&D needed to reach their goals. These roadmaps aid both industry and government in making decisions to

264

OREMPdb: a semantic dictionary of computational pathway models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background The information coming from biomedical ontologies and computational pathway models is expanding continuously: research communities keep this process up and their advances are generally shared by means of dedicated ...

Umeton, Renato

265

Heat transfer pathways in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

permission. QC-06-053 Heat Transfer Pathways in Underfloorchange the dynamics of heat transfer within a room as wellchange the dynamics of heat transfer within a room as well

Bauman, F.; Jin, H.; Webster, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Pathways for Implementing REDD+: Experiences from Carbon Markets and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pathways for Implementing REDD+: Experiences from Carbon Markets and Pathways for Implementing REDD+: Experiences from Carbon Markets and Communities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Pathways for Implementing REDD+: Experiences from Carbon Markets and Communities Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance, Implementation Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.acp-cd4cdm.org/media/237951/pathwaysimplementingreddplus.pdf References: Pathways for Implementing REDD+: Experiences from Carbon Markets and Communities[1] "The articles presented discuss and propose ideas about how to create incentives to participate in REDD+, its implementation, and possible financing; how to involve the private sector; what are the experiences from

267

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

An Assessment of Aquatic Radiation Pathways in Northern Ireland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 The fishing industry 11 3.2 Fishing areas 11 4. INTERNAL RADIATION EXPOSURE PATHWAYS 12 4.1 Fish 12 4. ANALYSIS OF DATA 19 7.1 Internal radiation exposure 19 7.1.1 Fish consumption 19 7.1.2 Crustacean and clams 14 4.3.4 Razor fish and squid 15 5. EXTERNAL RADIATION EXPOSURE PATHWAYS 15 5.1 Beach and coastal

269

Genome-wide discovery of missing genes in biological pathways of prokaryotes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome-wide Genome-wide discovery of missing genes in biological pathways of prokaryotes Yong Chen 1,3,4,5 , Fenglou Mao 1,2 , Guojun Li 1,3 , Ying Xu 1,2,6* From The Ninth Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Conference (APBC 2011) Incheon, Korea. 11-14 January 2011 Abstract Background: Reconstruction of biological pathways is typically done through mapping well-characterized pathways of model organisms to a target genome, through orthologous gene mapping. A limitation of such pathway-mapping approaches is that the mapped pathway models are constrained by the composition of the template pathways, e.g., some genes in a target pathway may not have corresponding genes in the template pathways, the so-called "missing gene" problem. Methods: We present a novel pathway-expansion method for identifying additional genes that are possibly involved in a target pathway after pathway mapping,

270

Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)  

SciTech Connect

Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

Estrella, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gas Migration In The Opalinus Clay As A Function Of The Gas Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be backfilled in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. After healing and re-saturation of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) and saturation of the backfill, the waste containers and the metallic components will corrode resulting in a generation of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon dioxide will be released as a result of oxidation and thermal decomposition of the organic components in the waste and in the clay. If the disposal boreholes and chambers are sealed gas-tight, high gas pressure may be produced leading to the potential generation of fractures in the host rock which could influence the integrity of the repository. Therefore it is essential that the gases migrate through the technical barriers (backfill) or into the surrounding host rock at lower pressure and without any irreversible damage of the repository. In order to estimate the consequences of the gas generation the knowledge of the gas paths in the host rock and the knowledge of the parameters which influence the gas migration in the host rock are important. During an ongoing project at the underground research laboratory Mt. Terri in Switzerland the gas migration in the undisturbed over-consolidated Opalinus Clay is investigated. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cytoskeletal reorganization induced by engagement of the NG2 proteoglycan leads to cell spreading and migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cells expressing the NG2 proteoglycan can attach, spread, and migrate on surfaces coated with NG2 mAbs, demonstrating that engagement of NG2 can trigger the cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for changes in cell morphology and motility. Engagement of different epitopes of the proteoglycan results in distinct forms of actin reorganization. On mAb D120, the cells contain radial actin spikes characteristic of filopodial extension, whereas on mAb N143, the cells contain cortical actin bundles characteristic of lamellipodia. Cells that express NG2 variants lacking the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains are unable to spread or migrate on NG2 mAb-coated surfaces, indicating that these portions of the molecule are essential for NG2-mediated signal transduction. Cells expressing an NG2 variant lacking the C-terminal half of the cytoplasmic domain can still spread normally on mAbs D120 and N143, suggesting that the membraneproximal cytoplasmic segment is responsible for this process. In contrast, this variant migrates poorly on mAb D120 and exhibits abnormal arrays of radial actin filaments decorated with fascin during spreading on this mAb. The C-terminal portion of the NG2 cytoplasmic domain, therefore, may be involved in regulating molecular events that are crucial for cell motility.

Xuexun Fang; Michael A. Burg; Diana Barritt; Akiko Nishiyama; William B. Stallcup; Thomas D. Pollard

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Humanist Approach to Understanding the Migration of Filipino Nurses to the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global nursing shortage created opportunities for registered nurses from less developed countries to improve their working and living conditions through migration to more progressive and affluent nations. In the Philippines, this phenomenon left the country devoid of the much needed health care professionals. In this research study, I described the lived experiences of eleven indigenous Filipino nurses who migrated to the United States. Through the phenomenology approach, I was able to probe into the meaning of the migration as the participants lived through it, approaching it from a humanist perspective and using Abraham Maslow's theory on the hierarchy of needs as the framework. The study was intended to illustrate how the economic, social, and political characteristics of both countries impacted the Filipino nurses' behavior and thought processes while in pursuit of personal goals. Ultimately, this study could be used as a guide in the development of employment and health care policies that are more responsive to the current state of the nursing profession.

Yumol, Benjamin B.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Group Migration of Dictyostelium Cells Is Regulated by Extracellular Chemoattractant Degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starvation of Dictyostelium induces a developmental program in which cells form an aggregate that eventually differentiates into a multicellular structure. The aggregate formation is mediated by directional migration of individual cells that quickly transition to group migration in which cells align in a head-to-tail manner to form streams. Cyclic AMP acts as a chemoattractant and its production, secretion, and degradation are highly regulated. A key protein is the extracellular phosphodiesterase PdsA. In this study we examine the role and localization of PdsA during chemotaxis and streaming. We find that pdsA ? cells respond chemotactically to a narrower range of chemoattractant concentrations compared with wild-type (WT) cells. Moreover, unlike WT cells, pdsA ? cells do not form streams at low cell densities and form unusual thick and transient streams at high cell densities. We find that the intracellular pool of PdsA is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, which may provide a compartment for storage and secretion of PdsA. Because we find that cAMP synthesis is normal in cells lacking PdsA, we conclude that signal degradation regulates the external cAMP gradient field generation and that the group migration behavior of these cells is compromised even though their signaling machinery is intact. This article was published online ahead of print in MBC in Press

Gene L. Garcia; Erin C. Rericha; Christopher D. Heger; Paul K. Goldsmith; Carole A. Parent; Jean E. Schwarzbauer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Livelihood Diversity: Causes of Rural-Urban Migration; Why Rwanda's poverty classification does not explain migratin flows.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The central question of this research is: How are rural-based households actively engaged into flows of rural-urban migration and how are these linkages related to… (more)

Schutten, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Changes in Gas Bubble Disease Signs for Migrating Juvenile Salmonids Experimentally Exposed to Supersaturated Gasses, 1996-1997 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to answer the question of whether gas bubble disease (GBD) signs change as a result of the hydrostatic conditions juvenile salmonids encounter when they enter the turbine intake of hydroelectric projects during their downstream migration.

Absolon, Randall F.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Integrin alpha 5 beta 1 is necessary for regulation of radial migration of cortical neurons during mouse brain development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During cerebral cortex development, post-mitotic neurons interact with radial glial fibers and the extracellular environment to migrate away from the ventricular region and form a correct laminar structure. Integrin receptors ...

Marchetti, Giovanni

278

Compiling for time predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the T-CREST project we work on hardware/software architectures and code-generation strategies for time-predictable embedded and cyber-physical systems. In this paper we present the single-path code generation approach that we plan to explore and ... Keywords: compilers, real-time systems, time predictability, worst-case execution-time analysis

Peter Puschner; Raimund Kirner; Benedikt Huber; Daniel Prokesch

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Certifying execution time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the framework Abstraction-Carrying CodE Platform for Timing validation (ACCEPT), designed for timing analysis of embedded real-time systems using the worst-case execution time (WCET) as the safety parameter. In the context ...

Vítor Rodrigues; João Pedro Pedroso; Mário Florido; Simão Melo de Sousa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization pathways in the Shewanella genus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address a practically and fundamentally important challenge of reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization machinery in any microorganism directly from its genomic sequence, we have established a subsystems-based comparative approach and applied it to 19 genomes from the Shewanella genus. The key stages of our approach include: (i) a homology-based identification of gene candidates using a genomic compilation of ~500 known components of sugar catabolic pathways; (ii) functional assignment of orthologs and prediction of alternative genes and pathway variants based on genomic (operons, regulons) and functional (subsystems, pathways) context analysis; (iii) validation of bioinformatic predictions by a combination of biochemical, genetic and physiological experiments. The obtained genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization includes ~170 protein families (mostly metabolic enzymes, transporters and transcriptional regulators) spanning 17 distinct pathways with a mosaic distribution across Shewanella species providing insights into their ecophysiology and adaptive evolution. The reconstructed catabolic pathways are significantly enriched by nonorthologous gene replacements and alternative biochemical routes. Phenotypic assays revealed a remarkable consistency between predicted and observed phenotype, an ability to utilize an individual sugar as a sole source of carbon and energy, over the entire matrix of tested strains and sugars. In addition to improving our knowledge of genomics, functional organization and evolution of the sugar catabolome, this study confirmed the efficiency of the established approach, which is scalable and applicable to other groups of microorganisms.

Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Yang, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Rodionova, Irina A.; Wang, Yanbing; Obraztsova, Anna; Zagnitko, Olga P.; Overbeek, Ross; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Osterman, Andrei L.

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

TERMOD 2; an interactive code for analysing intake of radionuclides by man through terrestrial pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TERMOD 2; an interactive code for analysing intake of radionuclides by man through terrestrial pathways

Zach, R

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration in spring, 1984. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week in April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) +- 1 mm.

Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Real-time Study of Signal Transduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Bystander Effects Using Single Nanoparticle Optics and Single Living Cell Imaging Authors: Prakash D. Nallathamby, X. Nancy Xu, Mohan Natarajan Institutions: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia and Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas The mechanisms of bystander effects remain largely unknown. Bystander responses are thought to depend on activation of cellular communication processes. Recent studies have speculated that several crucial signal transduction pathways could play a major role in bystander effects. These crucial signal transduction pathways are controlled by a coordinated

285

Time-Resolved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Time-Resolved Time-Resolved Print Of the four fundamental parameters that we use to perceive the physical world (energy, momentum, position, and time) three correspond to the three broad categories of synchrotron experimental measurement techniques: spectroscopy (energy), scattering (momentum), and imaging (position). The fourth parameter-time-can in principle be applied to all the techniques. At the ALS, many experiments can be carried out in real time, with data being recorded from the same sample as it changes over time. Some time-resolved experiments take advantage of the pulsed nature of the ALS's synchrotron radiation, which, like a strobe light, can capture a series of "snapshots" of a process that, when viewed sequentially, show us how a given process evolves over time. Other experiments simply require two pulses: one to "pump" energy into the sample system and a second to probe the system's excited state.

286

Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students November 18, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native American engineering students in their area. Since 2010, NNSA has funded a 12-week summer internship program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

287

Do Main Chain Hydrogen Bonds Create Dominant Electron Transfer Pathways?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Main Chain Hydrogen Bonds Create Dominant Electron Transfer Pathways? An Main Chain Hydrogen Bonds Create Dominant Electron Transfer Pathways? An Investigation in Designed Proteins Yongjian Zheng, Martin A. Case, James F. Wishart, and George L. McLendon J. Phys. Chem. B, 107, 7288-7292 (2003). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: We have investigated the contribution of main chain hydrogen bond (H-bond) pathways to the tunneling matrix elements which control electron transfer (ET) rates across an alpha-helical protein matrix. The paradigm system for these investigations is a metal ion-assembled parallel three-helix bundle protein that contains a ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridyl) electron donor and a ruthenium(III) pentammine electron acceptor separated by a direct metal to metal distance of ca. 19 Ã…, requiring tunneling through 15 Ã… of

288

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers November 17, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned straight to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native

289

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers November 17, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned straight to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native

290

Inferring molecular interactions pathways from eQTL data  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) helps elucidate the connection between genotype, gene expression levels, and phenotype. However, standard statistical genetics can only attribute changes in expression levels to loci on the genome, not specific genes. Each locus can contain many genes, making it very difficult to discover which gene is controlling the expression levels of other genes. Furthermore, it is even more difficult to find a pathway of molecular interactions responsible for controlling the expression levels. Here we describe a series of techniques for finding explanatory pathways by exploring graphs of molecular interactions. We show several simple methods can find complete pathways the explain the mechanism of differential expression in eQTL data.

Rashid, Imran; McDermott, Jason E.; Samudrala, Ram

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Understanding Long-Term Solute Transport in Sedimentary Basins: Simulating Brine Migration in the Alberta Basin. Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass transport in deep sedimentary basins places important controls on ore formation, petroleum migration, CO2 sequestration, and geochemical reactions that affect petroleum reservoir quality, but large-scale transport in this type of setting remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is highlighted in the resource-rich Alberta Basin, where geochemical and hydrogeologic studies have suggested residence times ranging from hundreds of millions of years to less than 5 My, respectively. Here we developed new hydrogeologic models that were constrained by geochemical observations to reconcile these two very different estimates. The models account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, sediment deposition and erosion, sediment compressibility, and dissolution of salt deposits, including Cl/Br systematics. Prior interpretations of Cl/Br ratios in the Alberta Basin concluded that the brines were derived from evaporatively-concentrated brines that were subsequently diluted by seawater and freshwater; models presented here show that halite dissolution must have contributed strongly as well, which implies significantly greater rates of mass transport. This result confirms that Cl/Br ratios are subject to significant non-uniqueness and thus do not provide good independent indicators of the origin of brines. Salinity and Cl/Br ratios provided valuable new constraints for basin-scale models, however. Sensitivity studies revealed that permeabilities obtained from core- and field-scale tests were appropriate for basin-scale models, despite the differences in scale between the tests and the models. Simulations of groundwater age show that the residence time of porefluids in much of the basin is less than 100 My. Groundwater age increases with depth and approaches 200 My in the deepest part of the basin, but brines are significantly younger than their host rocks throughout the basin.

Alicia M. Wilson

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Gene network and pathway generation and analysis: Editorial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past decade has witnessed an exponential growth of biological data including genomic sequences, gene annotations, expression and regulation, and protein-protein interactions. A key aim in the post-genome era is to systematically catalogue gene networks and pathways in a dynamic living cell and apply them to study diseases and phenotypes. To promote the research in systems biology and its application to disease studies, we organized a workshop focusing on the reconstruction and analysis of gene networks and pathways in any organisms from high-throughput data collected through techniques such as microarray analysis and RNA-Seq.

Zhao, Zhongming; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Huang, Kun

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

293

Managing time, part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Masterful time management means not just tracking of messages in your personal environment, but managing your coordination network with others.

Peter J. Denning; Ritu Raj

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

FREQUENCY AND TIME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... STRATWARM observed and FLARES expected ... observed and PROTON FLARE expected (- - ) STRATWARM ... time of observed solar or geophysical ...

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

QuickTime VR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QuickTime VR. Christine Piatko and Sandy Ressler. ... Sandy Ressler's Office. Plant Floor of Black & Decker in Fayetteville NC. ...

296

Timed Property Sequence Chart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Property Sequence Chart (PSC) is a novel scenario-based notation, which has been recently proposed to represent temporal properties of concurrent systems. This language balances expressive power and simplicity of use. However, the current version of ... Keywords: Property Sequence Chart, Real-time specification patterns, Timed Property Sequence Chart, Timing properties

Pengcheng Zhang; Bixin Li; Lars Grunske

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Noncommutative Two Time Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

W. Chagas-Filho

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

Cytotoxicological Response to Engineered Nanomaterials: A Pathway-Driven Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoparticles, while included in a growing number of consumer products, may pose risks to human health due to heavy metal leaching and/or the production of reactive oxygen species following exposures. Subcellular mechanisms of action triggered as a result of exposure to various nanoparticles are still largely unexplored. In this work, an effort to elucidate such toxicological parameters was accomplished by evaluating oxidative stress generation, changes in gene and protein expression, and cell cycle status after low-dose exposures to a variety of metal and carbon-based nanomaterials in primary human dermal cells. Additionally, mitigation of nanoparticle toxicity via microencapsulation was investigated to assess the feasibility of utilizing nanomaterials in dermally implantable biosensor applications. Cellular immune and inflammatory processes were measured via qPCR and immunoblotting, which revealed gene and protein expression modulation along the NF-kappaB pathway after a variety of nanoparticle exposures. The role of immunoregulatory transcription factor NF-kappaB was examined in an oxidative stress context in cells exposed to a panel of nanoparticles, whereby glutathione conversion and modulation of oxidative stress proteins in normal and NF-kappaB knockdown human dermal fibroblasts were monitored. Results revealed decreased antioxidant response and corresponding increased levels of oxidative stress and cell death in exposed normal cells, compared to NF-kappaB incompetent cells. However, reactive oxygen species production was not an absolute precursor to DNA damage, which was measured by the comet assay, gamma-H2AX expression, and flow cytometry. Protein analysis revealed that map kinase p38, rather than p53, was involved in the halting of the cell cycle in S-phase after ZnO exposures, which caused DNA double strand breaks. Microencapsulation of fluorescent quantum dot nanoparticles, specifically, was utilized as a method to improve system functionality and surrounding cellular viability for the purpose of a dermal analyte detection assay. In vitro results indicated a functional localization of nanoparticles, as well as cessation of cellular uptake. Subsequently, cellular metabolism was unaffected over the range of time and concentrations tested in comparison to unencapsulated quantum dot treatments, indicating the usefulness of this technique in developing nanoparticle-driven biomedical applications.

Romoser, Amelia Antonia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Major carcinogenic pathways identified by gene expression analysis of peritoneal mesotheliomas following chemical treatment in F344 rats  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to characterize the gene expression profile and to identify the major carcinogenic pathways involved in rat peritoneal mesothelioma (RPM) formation following treatment of Fischer 344 rats with o-nitrotoluene (o-NT) or bromochloracetic acid (BCA). Oligo arrays, with over 20,000 target genes, were used to evaluate o-NT- and BCA-induced RPMs, when compared to a non-transformed mesothelial cell line (Fred-PE). Analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software revealed 169 cancer-related genes that were categorized into binding activity, growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and invasion and metastasis. The microarray data were validated by positive correlation with quantitative real-time RT-PCR on 16 selected genes including igf1, tgfb3 and nov. Important carcinogenic pathways involved in RPM formation included insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), p38 MAPkinase, Wnt/{beta}-catenin and integrin signaling pathways. This study demonstrated that mesotheliomas in rats exposed to o-NT- and BCA were similar to mesotheliomas in humans, at least at the cellular and molecular level.

Kim, Yongbaek [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Thai-Vu Ton [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); De Angelo, Anthony B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Morgan, Kevin [Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ 08807 (United States); Devereux, Theodora R. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Anna, Colleen [Environmental Carcinogenesis Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Collins, Jennifer B. [Microarray Group, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Paules, Richard S. [Microarray Group, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Crosby, Lynn M. [Wyeth Research, Chazy, NY 12921 (United States); Sills, Robert C. [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)]. E-mail: sills@niehs.nih.gov

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

No-migration determination. Annual report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the annual reporting requirement as specified in the Conditional No-Migration Determination (NMD) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), published in the Federal Register on November 14, 1990 (EPA, 1990a). This report covers the project activities, programs, and data obtained during the period September 1, 1993, through August 31, 1994, to support compliance with the NMD`. In the NMD, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concluded that the DOE had demonstrated, to a reasonable degree of certainty, that hazardous constituents will not migrate from the WIPP disposal unit during the test phase of the project, and that the DOE had otherwise met the requirements of 40 CFR Part 268.6, Petitions to Allow Land Disposal of a Waste Prohibited Under Subpart C of Part 268 (EPA, 1986a), for the WIPP facility. By granting the NMD, the EPA has allowed the DOE to temporarily manage defense-generated transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes, some of which are prohibited from land disposal by Title 40 CFR Part 268, Land Disposal Restrictions (EPA, 1986a), at the WIPP facility for the purposes of testing and experimentation for a period not to exceed 10 years. In granting the NMD, the EPA imposed several conditions on the management of the experimental waste used during the WIPP test phase. One of these conditions is that the DOE submit annual reports to the EPA to demonstrate the WIPP`s compliance with the requirements of the NMD. In the proposed No-Migration Variance (EPA, 1990b) and the final NMD, the EPA defined the content and parameters that must be reported on an annual basis. These reporting requirements are summarized and are cross-referenced with the sections of the report that satisfy the respective requirement.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Quantum Operation Time Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation, a linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes towards equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

Crooks, Gavin E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Quantum Operation Time Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation, a linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes towards equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

Gavin E. Crooks

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, not specifically aimed at biofuels, target the sweeping economy-wide changes needed to reduce the unwanted "leakage SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS CHAPTER 12: KEY MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTIES FOR BIOFUEL POLICY Chapter 12: Key Measurement Uncertainties for Biofuel Policy Sonia Yeh, Mark A. Delucchi, Alissa Kendall

California at Davis, University of

304

Prioritizing Acquisition Pathways in the State Level Concept  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Department of Safeguards has launched a project to further develop the State-level concept for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of safeguards activities. In order to further evolve the safeguards system an emphasis is placed on integrating inspection-related activities and the State evaluation process to draw safeguards conclusions in the most efficient way. The credible implementation of acquisition pathway analysis is central to the success of the IAEA's State-level concept. NNSA's Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is sponsoring Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to produce a study that will examine the use of acquisition pathway analysis in: (1) Developing a State-specific, State-level approach (SLA) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP); (2) Maximizing the utility of the physical model; and (3) Supporting resource allocation decisions through a pathway prioritization. To deal with the challenge of developing an effective and efficient SLA, this study looks at: (1) Prioritizing proliferation pathways based on an assessment of a State's capabilities and assumed proliferation strategies; and (2) Relevant State behavior (e.g., transparency, cooperation, etc.) while avoiding subjective judgments about States themselves. The study makes use of case studies and concrete examples in order to illustrate how new concepts and approaches will be implemented, and how they may differ from more traditional safeguards approaches.

Murphy, Chantell L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pilat, Joseph F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2Chapter 10 Antioxidant Evaluation Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Chapter 10 Antioxidant Evaluation Strategies Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Volume 2 B8B2F5117B36BF8B8B08BEAC9266F31D Press D

306

Biogas Production through the Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidising Pathway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogas Production through the Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidising Pathway Characterisation and Detection Uppsala 2012 #12;Acta Universitatis agriculturae Sueciae 2012:45 #12;Biogas production through 1.1 Aims of the thesis 12 2 Biogas production 15 2.1 Biogas production in Europe 16 2.2 Substrate

307

Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence.

Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

NextSTEPS (Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways) PROGRAM SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NextSTEPS (Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways) PROGRAM SUMMARY Institute of Transportation and policies that could support their development are often contentious. The future of these fuels and vehicles associated with the transition to new fuels and vehicles, the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies

California at Davis, University of

309

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS CHAPTER 4: COMPARING FUEL ECONOMIES AND COSTS OF ADVANCED VS. CONVENTIONAL VEHICLES PART 2 Chapter 4: Comparing Fuel Economies and Costs of Advanced vs. Conventional Vehicles Andrew-electric vehicles, and electric-drive battery and fuel cell-powered vehicles. We present the results of our

California at Davis, University of

310

Charting the NF-kB Pathway Interactome Map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inflammation is part of a complex physiological response to harmful stimuli and pathogenic stress. The five components of the Nuclear Factor kB (NF-kB) family are prominent mediators of inflammation, acting as key transcriptional regulators of hundreds of genes. Several signaling pathways activated by diverse stimuli converge on NF-kB activation, resulting in a regulatory system characterized by high complexity. It is increasingly recognized that the number of components that impinges upon phenotypic outcomes of signal transduction pathways may be higher than those taken into consideration from canonical pathway representations. Scope of the present analysis is to provide a wider, systemic picture of the NF-kB signaling system. Data from different sources such as literature, functional enrichment web resources, protein-protein interaction and pathway databases have been gathered, curated, integrated and analyzed in order to reconstruct a single, comprehensive picture of the proteins that interact with, and participate to the NF-kB activation system. Such a reconstruction shows that the NF-kB interactome is substantially different in quantity and quality of components with respect to canonical representations. The analysis highlights that several neglected but topologically central proteins may play a role in the activation of NF-kB mediated responses. Moreover the interactome structure fits with the characteristics of a bow tie architecture. This interactome is intended as an open network resource available for further development,

Paolo Tieri; Alberto Termanini; Elena Bellavista; Stefano Salvioli; Miriam Capri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles versus conventional internal combustion engine vehicles. We first give of our alternative fuel / advanced vehicle pathways. Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from. We then discuss how GHG emissions from electric vehicle (EV) fuel cycles are estimated, before

California at Davis, University of

313

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers by Tom Myers Abstract Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential and preferential flow through fractures--could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale

314

Platinum loss and migration in porous gas diffusion fuel cell electrodes as studied by Rutherford backscattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-term operation of phosphoric acid fuel cell produces severe migration of the highly dispersed electrocatalyst, Pt, from the cathode to the anode. We have examined, before and after extended operation, the porous gas diffusion electrode assemblies by conventional Rutherford backscattering spectrometry using the ion beam facility at Los Alamos. In addition, we have made computer simulations to the data that give catalyst concentration as a function of depth. The data demonstrate that after extended operation (500 to 2000 hours), Pt is lost from the cathode and is redeposited at the outermost surface layers of the anode electrode structure. This loss is significant and several factors contributing to it are discussed.

Borodovsky, L.; Beery, J.G.; Paffett, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System for Real-Time Field Screening of Contaminants  

SciTech Connect

Sampling during environmental drilling is essential to fully characterize the spatial distribution and migration of near surface contaminants. However, analysis of the samples is expensive and time-consuming: off-site laboratory analysis can take weeks or months. An alternative screening technology, Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD), could save money and valuable time by quickly distinguishing between contaminated and uncontaminated areas. Real time measurements provided by an EMWD system enable on-the-spot decisions to be made regarding sampling strategies. The system also enhances worker safety and provides the added flexibility of being able to steer a drill bit in or out of hazardous zones.

Bishop, L.B.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Selph, M.M.; Williams, C.V.

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

On the Time Times Temperature Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently Hod proposes a lower bound on the relaxation time of a perturbed thermodynamic system. For gravitational systems this bound transforms into a condition on the fundamental quasinormal frequency. We test the bound in some spacetimes whose quasinormal frequencies are calculated exactly, as the three-dimensional BTZ black hole, the D-dimensional de Sitter spacetime, and the D-dimensional Nariai spacetime. We find that for some of these spacetimes their fundamental quasinormal frequencies do not satisfy the bound proposed by Hod.

A. Lopez-Ortega

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

What Time is It?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These are sometimes marketed as "atomic clocks", but ... problems include incorrectly setting your local time zone on the clock, batteries that need ...

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

Brine migration test report: Asse Salt Mine, Federal Republic of Germany: Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of Brine Migration Tests which were undertaken at the Asse mine of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) under a bilateral US/FRG agreement. This experiment simulates a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse salt mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. This report describes the Asse salt mine, the test equipment, and the pretest properties of the salt in the mine and in the vicinity of the test area. Also included are selected test data (for the first 28 months of operation) on the following: brine migration rates, thermomechaical behavior of the salt (including room closure, stress reading, and thermal profiles), borehole gas pressures, and borehole gas analyses. In addition to field data, laboratory analyses of pretest salt properties are included in this report. The operational phase of these experiments was completed on October 4, 1985, with the commencement of cooldown and the start of posttest activities. 7 refs., 68 figs., 48 tabs.

Coyle, A.J.; Eckert, J.; Kalia, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past decade tens of millions of dollars have beenspent by water resource agencies in California to restore the nativesalmon fishery in the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. Anexcavated deep water ship channel (DWSC), through which the river runs onits way to the Bay/Delta and Pacific Ocean, experiences episodes of lowdissolved oxygen which acts as a barrier to anadromous fish migration anda threat to the long-term survival of the salmon run. An emergencyresponse management system is under development to forecast theseepisodes of low dissolved oxygen and to deploy measures that will raisedissolved oxygen concentrations to prevent damage to the fisheryresource. The emergency response management system has been designed tointeract with a real-time water quality monitoring network and is servedby a comprehensive data management and forecasting model toolbox. TheBay/Delta and Tributaries (BDAT) Cooperative Data Management System is adistributed, web accessible database that contains terabytes ofinformation on all aspects of the ecology of the Bay/Delta and upperwatersheds. The complexity of the problem dictates data integration froma variety of monitoring programs. A unique data templating system hasbeen constructed to serve the needs of cooperating scientists who wish toshare their data and to simplify and streamline data uploading into themaster database. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of such asystem in providing decision support for management of the San JoaquinRiver fishery. We discuss how the system might be expanded to havefurther utility in coping with other emergencies and threats to watersupply system serving California's costal communities.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Jacobs, Karl C.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Semantics, experience and time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computational hypothesis, with its inherent representationalism, and the dynamical hypothesis, with its apparent absence of representations and its commitment to continuous time, stand at an impasse. It is unclear how the dynamical stance can handle ... Keywords: Computation, Experience, Invariance, Semantics, Situatedness, Time

Stephen E. Robbins

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Real-time shading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real-time procedural shading was once seen as a distant dream. When the first version of this course was offered four years ago, real-time shading was possible, but only with one-of-a-kind hardware or by combining the effects of tens to hundreds of rendering ...

Marc Olano; Kurt Akeley; John C. Hart; Wolfgang Heidrich; Michael McCool; Jason L. Mitchell; Randi Rost

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

Tuck, J.L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Migrating data from TcSE to DOORS : an evaluation of the T-Plan Integrator software application.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes our evaluation of the T-Plan Integrator software application as it was used to transfer a real data set from the Teamcenter for Systems Engineering (TcSE) software application to the DOORS software application. The T-Plan Integrator was evaluated to determine if it would meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories to migrate our existing data sets from TcSE to DOORS. This report presents the struggles of migrating data and focuses on how the Integrator can be used to map a data set and its data architecture from TcSE to DOORS. Finally, this report describes how the bulk of the migration can take place using the Integrator; however, about 20-30% of the data would need to be transferred from TcSE to DOORS manually. This report does not evaluate the transfer of data from DOORS to TcSE.

Post, Debra S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Manzanares, David A.; Taylor, Jeffrey L.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe PV devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe photovoltaic devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Alkyltransferase proteins (AGT) protect cells from the biological effects of DNA damage caused by the addition of alkyl groups (alkylation). Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) can do the same, but they lack the reactive cysteine residue that allows the alkyltransferase function, and the mechanism for cell protection has remained unknown. To address this mystery, a British-American team lead by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute recently applied a combination of x-ray structural, biochemical, and genetic studies to ATLs in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe without and with damaged DNA. By showing how a process called non-enzymatic nucleotide flipping activates ATL-initiated DNA repair, their results may improve our understanding of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development.

328

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Alkyltransferase proteins (AGT) protect cells from the biological effects of DNA damage caused by the addition of alkyl groups (alkylation). Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) can do the same, but they lack the reactive cysteine residue that allows the alkyltransferase function, and the mechanism for cell protection has remained unknown. To address this mystery, a British-American team lead by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute recently applied a combination of x-ray structural, biochemical, and genetic studies to ATLs in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe without and with damaged DNA. By showing how a process called non-enzymatic nucleotide flipping activates ATL-initiated DNA repair, their results may improve our understanding of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development.

329

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Alkyltransferase proteins (AGT) protect cells from the biological effects of DNA damage caused by the addition of alkyl groups (alkylation). Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) can do the same, but they lack the reactive cysteine residue that allows the alkyltransferase function, and the mechanism for cell protection has remained unknown. To address this mystery, a British-American team lead by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute recently applied a combination of x-ray structural, biochemical, and genetic studies to ATLs in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe without and with damaged DNA. By showing how a process called non-enzymatic nucleotide flipping activates ATL-initiated DNA repair, their results may improve our understanding of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development.

330

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Wednesday, 28 October 2009 00:00 Alkyltransferase proteins (AGT) protect cells from the biological effects of DNA damage caused by the addition of alkyl groups (alkylation). Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) can do the same, but they lack the reactive cysteine residue that allows the alkyltransferase function, and the mechanism for cell protection has remained unknown. To address this mystery, a British-American team lead by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute recently applied a combination of x-ray structural, biochemical, and genetic studies to ATLs in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe without and with damaged DNA. By showing how a process called non-enzymatic nucleotide flipping activates ATL-initiated DNA repair, their results may improve our understanding of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development.

331

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To achieve that vision, industry leaders jointly define detailed R&D agendas known as roadmaps. ITP relies on roadmap-defined priorities to target cost-shared solicitations and guide development of a balanced R&D portfolio that yields useful results in the near, mid, and long term. Industry Vision & Roadmaps Two documents address the cement industry's challenges and priorities: Vision 2030, which outlines broad goals for the future, and Roadmap 2030, which established the industry's R&D priorities. ITP and the Strategic Development Council, a council of the American Concrete Institute's

332

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways U.S. aluminum producers recognize that reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving energy efficiency offers a competitive edge in world markets. In 1996, the U.S. industry entered into partnership with DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) to work toward shared goals. Since then, the Aluminum Industry of the Future partnership has been feeding the technology pipeline so that U.S. producers will have the technologies they need to achieve their long-term economic, energy and environmental goals. The Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To achieve that vision, industry leaders jointly define detailed R&D agendas known as roadmaps. ITP relies on roadmap-defined priorities to

333

Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60-46674 60-46674 September 2009 Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production March 27, 2008 - August 31, 2009 B.D. James, G.N. Baum, J. Perez, and K.N. Baum Directed Technologies, Inc. Arlington, Virginia National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-560-46674 September 2009 Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production March 27, 2008 - August 31, 2009 B.D. James, G.N. Baum, J. Perez, and K.N. Baum

334

Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important).

Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Digital time delay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of an Ingestion Pathway Model for AXAIRQ  

SciTech Connect

AXAIRQ is a dose mode code used for prospective accident assessment at the Savannah River Site and is primarily used to show regulatory compliance. For completeness of pathway analysis, an ingestion model, AXINGST, has been developed for use with, and incorporation in, AXAIRQ. Currently available ingestion models were referenced as a basis for AXINGST. AXINGST calculates a conservative ingestion dose following an atmospheric release of radionuclides and includes site specific variables where applicable.

Simpkins, A.A.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

337

Environment Induced Time Arrow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spread of the time arrows from the environment to an observed subsystem is followed within a harmonic model. A similarity is pointed out between irreversibility and a phase with spontaneously broken symmetry. The causal structure of interaction might be lost in the irreversible case, as well. The Closed Time Path formalism is developed for classical systems and shown to handle the time arrow problem in a clear and flexible manner. The quantum case is considered, as well, and the common origin of irreversibility and decoherence is pointed out.

Janos Polonyi

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

Clemensen, R.E.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

McKinsey & Company - Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy for Brazil | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKinsey & Company - Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy for Brazil McKinsey & Company - Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy for Brazil Jump to: navigation, search Name Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy for Brazil Agency/Company /Organization McKinsey and Company Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.mckinsey.com/en/Cli Country Brazil South America References Low Carbon Pathways [1] Overview Pathways low carbon economy brazil ashx.pdf Outcomes, Lessons Learned and Good Practice References ↑ "Low Carbon Pathways" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=McKinsey_%26_Company_-_Pathways_to_a_Low_Carbon_Economy_for_Brazil&oldid=384013" Category: Programs What links here Related changes

340

Mechanisms of regulation in the interferon factor 3 (IRF- 3) pathway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gene induction, whereas NF-kB- dependent gene inductioncytokines through the NF-kB pathway 4 , hinting at theprotein) and leads to NF-kB activation 2 . This pathway is

Limmer, Kirsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Commercial Building Design Pathways Using Optimization Analysis: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Whole-building simulation and analysis has demonstrated a significant energy savings potential in a wide variety of design projects. Commercial building design, however, traditionally integrates simulation and modeling analyses too late in the design process to make a substantial impact on energy use. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) commercial building group created an optimization platform called Opt-E-Plus that uses multivariate and multi-objective optimization theory to navigate a large parameter space and find economically valid, energy-saving solutions. The analysis results provide designers and engineers valuable information that influences the design. The pathways are not full 'construction ready' design alternatives; rather, they offer guidance about performance and cost criteria to reach a range of energy and economic goals. Having this knowledge early in the design phase helps designers establish project goals and direct the design pathway before they make important decisions. Opt-E-Plus has been deployed on several projects, including a retrofit mixed-use building, a new NREL office building, and several nationwide design guides. Each of these projects had different design criteria, goals, and audiences. In each case the analysis results provided pathways that helped inform the design process.

Long, N.; Hirsch, A.; Lobato, C.; Macumber, D.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Determination of Swimming Speeds and Energetic Demands of Upriver Migrating Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) in the Klickitat River, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program during the fall of 2001. The objective was to study the migration and energy use of adult fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) traveling up the Klickitat River to spawn. The salmon were tagged with either surgically implanted electromyogram (EMG) transmitters or gastrically implanted coded transmitters and were monitored with mobile and stationary receivers. Swim speed and aerobic and anaerobic energy use were determined for the fish as they attempted passage of three waterfalls on the lower Klickitat River and as they traversed free-flowing stretches between, below, and above the falls. Of the 35 EMG-tagged fish released near the mouth of the Klickitat River, 40% passed the first falls, 24% passed the second falls, and 20% made it to Lyle Falls. None of the EMG-tagged fish were able to pass Lyle Falls, either over the falls or via a fishway at Lyle Falls. Mean swimming speeds ranged from as low as 52.6 centimeters per second (cm s{sup -1}) between falls to as high as 189 (cm s{sup -1}) at falls passage. Fish swam above critical swimming speeds while passing the falls more often than while swimming between the falls (58.9% versus 1.7% of the transmitter signals). However, fish expended more energy swimming the stretches between the falls than during actual falls passage (100.7 to 128.2 kilocalories [kcals] to traverse areas between or below falls versus 0.3 to 1.0 kcals to pass falls). Relationships between sex, length, and time of day on the success of falls passage were also examined. Average swimming speeds were highest during the day in all areas except at some waterfalls. There was no apparent relationship between either fish condition or length and successful passage of waterfalls in the lower Klickitat River. Female fall chinook salmon, however, had a much lower likelihood of passing waterfalls than males. The study also examined energy costs and swimming speeds for fish released above Lyle Falls as they migrated to upstream spawning areas. This journey averaged 15.93 days to travel a mean maximum of 37.6 km upstream at a total energy cost of approx 3,971 kcals (34% anaerobic and 66% aerobic) for a sample of five fish. A bioenergetics example was run, which estimated that fall chinook salmon would expend an estimated 1,208 kcal to pass from the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam and 874 kcals to pass Bonneville Dam and pool and the three falls on the Lower Klickitat River, plus an additional 2,770 kcals above the falls to reach the spawning grounds, leaving them with approximately 18% (1,089 kcals) of their original energy reserves for spawning. Results of the bioenergetics example suggest that a delay of 9 to 11 days along the lower Klickitat River may deplete their remaining energy reserves (at a rate of about 105 kcal d{sup -1}) resulting in death before spawning would occur.

Brown, Richard S.; Geist, David R.; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Time, energy & form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

McInnis, Martha Jane

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Dogs and Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Question: I travel often and worry how leaving for long periods of time (and boarding my dog) will affect her. I wouldn't think that dogs could understand the concept of...

346

Wood Use Across Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?Forest products history and use ?Forest resource- the big picture ?Consumption- the big picture ?Trends forest products industry ? pulp & paper ? solid woodBack in Time ?1492 ? Columbus sailed the ocean blue! ? wood use- fuelwood American Indians ?1634: Jean Nicolet

Scott Bowe; United States Wood Use

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Technical Talks Timing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Talks Timing The technical talks should last a maximum of 15 minutes with 5 minutes for set-up and 5 minutes for Q&A. No teamgroup presentations are allowed. The objective of...

348

Development Pathways to Low-Cost Engineering Beta Gamma TiAl ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Cost-Affordable Titanium III. Presentation Title, Development Pathways to ...

349

Entropic Controlled Pathways for Nano-bands and Nano-particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Controlled Processing of Nanoparticle-based Materials and Nanostructured Films. Presentation Title, Entropic Controlled Pathways for Nano-

350

Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

Michael J. Therien

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Collision probabilities of migrating small bodies and dust particles with planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilities of collisions of migrating small bodies and dust particles produced by these bodies with planets were studied. Various Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, long-period comets, trans-Neptunian objects, and asteroids were considered. The total probability of collisions of any considered body or particle with all planets did not exceed 0.2. The amount of water delivered from outside of Jupiter's orbit to the Earth during the formation of the giant planets could exceed the amount of water in Earth's oceans. The ratio of the mass of water delivered to a planet by Jupiter-family comets or Halley-type comets to the mass of the planet can be greater for Mars, Venus, and Mercury, than that for Earth.

Ipatov, S I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Simulations of Ion Migration in the LCLS RF Gun and Injector  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for this work was the observed surface contamination of the first LCLS RF gun copper cathode. We will present the results of simulations in regards to ion migration in the LCLS gun. Ions of residual gases will be created by interaction of molecular gas species with the UV drive laser beam and by the electron beam itself. The larger part of those ionized molecules remain in the vicinity of creation, are transported towards beam line walls or away from the cathode. However a small fraction gains enough kinetic energy, focused by RF and magnetic fields and propagates to the cathode, producing an undesirable increase of the cathode's surface work function. Although this fraction is small, during long term operation, this effect may become a significant factor limiting the source performance.

Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC; Dowell, David; /SLAC

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A distributed hard real-time Java system for high mobility components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we propose a methodology for providing real-time capabilities to component-based, on-the-fly recon?gurable, distributed systems. In such systems, software components migrate across computational resources at run-time to allow applications to adapt to changes in user requirements or to external events. We describe how we achieve run-time recon?guration in distributed Java applications by appropriately migrating servers. Guaranteed-rate schedulers at the servers provide the necessary temporal protection and so simplify remote method invocation management. We describe how we manage overhead and resource utilization by controlling the parameters of the server schedulers. According to our measurements, this methodology provides real-time capability to component-based recon?gurable distributed systems in an effcient and effective way. In addition, we propose a new resource discovery protocol, REALTOR, which is based on a combination of pull-based and push-based resource information dissemination. REALTOR has been designed for real-time component-based distributed applications in very dynamic or adverse environments. REALTOR supports survivability and information assurance by allowing the migration of components to safe locations under emergencies suchas externalattack, malfunction, or lackofresources. Simulation studies show that under normal and heavy load conditions REALTOR remains very effective in finding available resources, and does so with a reasonably low communication overhead.REALTOR 1)effectively locates resources under highly dynamic conditions, 2) has an overhead that is system-size independent, and 3) works well in highlyadverse environments.We evaluate the effectiveness of a REALTOR implementation as part of Agile Objects, an infrastructure for real-time capable, highly mobile Java components.

Rho, Sangig

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

In-situ tuff water migration/heater experiment: experimental plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tuffs on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are currently under investigation as a potential isolation medium for heat-producing nuclear wastes. The National Academy of Sciences has concurred in our identification of the potentially large water content ({le}40 vol %) of tuffs as one of the important issues affecting their suitability for a repository. This Experimental Plan describes an in-situ experiment intended as an initial assessment of water generation/migration in response to a thermal input. The experiment will be conducted in the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff in Tunnel U12g (G-Tunnel) located in the north-central region of the NTS. While the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff is not a potential repository medium, it has physical, thermal, and mechanical properties very similar to those tuffs currently under consideration and is accessible at depth (400 m below the surface) in an existing facility. Other goals of the experiment are to support computer-code and instrumentation development, and to measure in-situ thermal properties. The experimental array consists of a central electrical heater, 1.2 m long x 10.2 cm diameter, surrounded by three holes for measuring water-migration behavior, two holes for measuring temperature profiles, one hole for measuring thermally induced stress in the rock, and one hole perpendicular to the heater to measure displacement with a laser. This Experimental Plan describes the experimental objectives, the technical issues, the site, the experimental array, thermal and thermomechanical modeling results, the instrumentation, the data-acquisition system, posttest characterization, and the organizational details.

Johnstone, J.K.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Investigating the dosimetric and tumor control consequences of prostate seed loss and migration  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Low dose-rate brachytherapy is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. However, once implanted, the seeds are vulnerable to loss and movement. The goal of this work is to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Five patients were used in this study. For each patient three treatment plans were created using Iodine-125, Palladium-103, and Cesium-131 seeds. The three seeds that were closest to the urethra were identified and modeled as the seeds lost through the urethra. The three seeds closest to the exterior of prostatic capsule were identified and modeled as those lost from the prostate periphery. The seed locations and organ contours were exported from Prowess and used by in-house software to perform the dosimetric and radiobiological evaluation. Seed loss was simulated by simultaneously removing 1, 2, or 3 seeds near the urethra 0, 2, or 4 days after the implant or removing seeds near the exterior of the prostate 14, 21, or 28 days after the implant. Results: Loss of one, two or three seeds through the urethra results in a D{sub 90} reduction of 2%, 5%, and 7% loss, respectively. Due to delayed loss of peripheral seeds, the dosimetric effects are less severe than for loss through the urethra. However, while the dose reduction is modest for multiple lost seeds, the reduction in tumor control probability was minimal. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. The results presented show that loss of multiple seeds can cause a substantial reduction of D{sub 90} coverage. However, for the patients in this study the dose reduction was not seen to reduce tumor control probability.

Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Stathakis, Sotirios; Swanson, Gregory; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States) and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karalinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm 17176 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering Offenbach Clinic, Offenbach 63069 (Germany) and Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens (Greece); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Enhancing a Pathway-Genome Database (PGDB) to Capture Subcellular Localization of Metabolites and Enzymes: The Nucleotide-Sugar Biosynthetic Pathways of Populus trichocarpa  

SciTech Connect

Understanding how cellular metabolism works and is regulated requires that the underlying biochemical pathways be adequately represented and integrated with large metabolomic data sets to establish a robust network model. Genetically engineering energy crops to be less recalcitrant to saccharification requires detailed knowledge of plant polysaccharide structures and a thorough understanding of the metabolic pathways involved in forming and regulating cell-wall synthesis. Nucleotide-sugars are building blocks for synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. The biosynthesis of nucleotide-sugars is catalyzed by a multitude of enzymes that reside in different subcellular organelles, and precise representation of these pathways requires accurate capture of this biological compartmentalization. The lack of simple localization cues in genomic sequence data and annotations however leads to missing compartmentalization information for eukaryotes in automatically generated databases, such as the Pathway-Genome Databases (PGDBs) of the SRI Pathway Tools software that drives much biochemical knowledge representation on the internet. In this report, we provide an informal mechanism using the existing Pathway Tools framework to integrate protein and metabolite sub-cellular localization data with the existing representation of the nucleotide-sugar metabolic pathways in a prototype PGDB for Populus trichocarpa. The enhanced pathway representations have been successfully used to map SNP abundance data to individual nucleotide-sugar biosynthetic genes in the PGDB. The manually curated pathway representations are more conducive to the construction of a computational platform that will allow the simulation of natural and engineered nucleotide-sugar precursor fluxes into specific recalcitrant polysaccharide(s).

Nag, A.; Karpinets, T. V.; Chang, C. H.; Bar-Peled, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Construction of Professional Identity and Pathways of Participation of Full Time Faculty Members in University Restructuring in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with me. I used four interview techniques to ensure rapportinterviews…………………………..…………………………………….127 Document analysis……………………………………..………………………………………129 Data analysis…………………………………..………………………………………………………………137 Basic analytical operations……..…………………………………………………………..140 Analytical techniques:

Montero Hernandez, Virginia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Construction of Professional Identity and Pathways of Participation of Full Time Faculty Members in University Restructuring in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

institucional (pp. 55-145). México, D.F. : Paidós. Dill, D.Becoming a scientist in Mexico. The challenge of creating acatastrofe silenciosa. Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Montero Hernandez, Virginia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 663 2001 Materials Research Society EFFECTS OF LICHENS ON URANIUM MIGRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 663 © 2001 Materials Research Society EFFECTS OF LICHENS ON URANIUM involuta from uraniferous spoil heaps in Cornwall, England, growing directly on the secondary uranium and transmission electron microscopy to assess the effect of Trapelia on uranium migration. We observed

Kasama, Takeshi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Understanding Historical Human Migration Patterns and Interbreeding (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eske Willerslev from the University of Copenhagen on "Understanding Historical Human Migration Patterns and Interbreeding Using the Ancient Genomes of a Palaeo-Eskimo and an Aboriginal Australian" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

Willerslev, Eske [University of Copenhagen

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Trapping and migration of methane associated with the gas hydrate stability zone at the Blake Ridge Diapir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on lateral variations of the BGHS and BSR. This may be important for gas hydrate studies in regions of the manuscript. References Brown, K.M., 1996. The nature, distribution, and origin of gas hydrate in the ChileTrapping and migration of methane associated with the gas hydrate stability zone at the Blake Ridge

Taylor, Michael H.

363

Quantum tunneling time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model of a quantum clock is applied to the old and controversial problem of how long a particle takes to tunnel through a quantum barrier. The model I employ has the advantage of yielding sensible results for energy eigenstates, and does not require the use of time-dependant wave packets. Although the treatment does not forbid superluminal tunneling velocities, there is no implication of faster-than-light signaling because only the transit duration is measurable, not the absolute time of transit. A comparison is given with the weak-measurement post-selection calculations of Steinberg.

P. C. W. Davies

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NSIT Computer Time Services: Internet Time Service (ITS) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Special Publication 250-59 NIST Computer Time Services: Internet Time Service (ITS), Automated Computer Time Service (ACTS), ...

2012-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

Probabilistic timed behavior trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Behavior Tree notation has been developed as a method for systematically and traceably capturing user requirements. In this paper we extend the notation with probabilistic behaviour, so that reliability, performance, and other dependability properties ... Keywords: behavior trees, model checking, probabilities, timed automata

Robert Colvin; Lars Grunske; Kirsten Winter

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Do hierarchical structures assemble best via hierarchical pathways?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hierarchically structured natural materials possess functionalities unattainable to the same components organized or mixed in simpler ways. For instance, the bones and teeth of mammals are far stronger and more durable than the mineral phases from which they are derived because their constituents are organized hierarchically from the molecular scale to the macroscale. Making similarly functional synthetic hierarchical materials will require an understanding of how to promote the self-assembly of structure on multiple lengthscales, without falling foul of numerous possible kinetic traps. Here we use computer simulation to study the self-assembly of a simple hierarchical structure, a square crystal lattice whose repeat unit is a tetramer. Although the target material is organized hierarchically, it self-assembles most reliably when its dynamic assembly pathway consists of the sequential addition of monomers to a single structure. Hierarchical dynamic pathways via dimer and tetramer intermediates are also viable modes of assembly, but result in general in lower yield: these intermediates have a stronger tendency than monomers to associate in ways not compatible with the target structure. In addition, assembly via tetramers results in a kinetic trap whereby material is sequestered in trimers that cannot combine to form the target crystal. We use analytic theory to relate dynamical pathways to the presence of equilibrium phases close in free energy to the target structure, and to identify the thermodynamic principles underpinning optimum self-assembly in this model: 1) make the free energy gap between the target phase and the most stable fluid phase of order kT, and 2) ensure that no other dense phases (liquids or close-packed solids of monomers or oligomers) or fluids of incomplete building blocks fall within this gap.

Thomas K. Haxton; Stephen Whitelam

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Genepool Time Heatmaps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genepool Time Heatmaps Genepool Time Heatmaps Heatmap of Time and Slots Requested vs Time Waited (in hours) | Queue: All | Last 7 Days Time Requested Slots 1wk Job Count Longest Wait 1 23.0 (233) 0.37 (1819) 27.54 (49888) 5.85 (124593) 1.23 (39835) 0.34 (732) 0 0.4 (224) 0.02 (1) 217325 538.96 2 0 0.01 (19) 2.54 (78) 0.2 (140) 0.99 (2683) 0 0 0 0 2920 9.1 4 0.08 (1) 0 2.82 (141) 0.36 (143) 1.07 (12) 0.06 (5) 0.01 (5) 0.06 (1) 1.3 (5) 313 20.48 6 0.01 (2) 0 0.09 (32) 0.07 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 35 1.22 8 0.04 (24) 4.32 (7423) 5.31 (1999) 0.53 (316) 13.14 (2486) 0.01 (2) 1.21 (88) 1.3 (34) 8.33 (68) 12440 46.16 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8.56 (1) 0 1 8.56 16 0 0 0 0.03 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.03 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.01 (1) 1 0.01 32 0 0 0 0.04 (14) 0 0 0 0.01 (6) 0 20 0.26

368

Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy: The Business Response to Climate Change |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy: The Business Response to Climate Change Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy: The Business Response to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy: The Business Response to Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: Centre for Low Carbon Futures Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: Finance, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.lowcarbonfutures.org/assets/media/lcf_pathways_report_a4.pdf.pdf Cost: Free Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy: The Business Response to Climate Change Screenshot References: Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy: The Business Response to Climate Change[1] "Based on a nationwide survey of over 400 of the larger and more active and

369

Identifying Critical Pathways to High-Performance PV: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV)Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of photovoltaics (PV) for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to our energy supply and our environment in the 21st century. To accomplish this, the NCPV directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices. Details of the subcontractor and in-house progress will be described toward identifying critical pathways of 25% polycrystalline thin-film tandem cells and developing multijunction concentrator modules to 33%.

Symko-Davies, M.; Noufi, R.; Kurtz, S.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Timed fast charger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a charger for rechargeable electrochemical cells, a transformer charging circuit supplies a charging current to the battery at a fast charge rate for a predetermined time followed by a continuous slow charge rate. A normally closed automatic reset thermostat in series with the rectifier diodes in the charging circuit, and thermally coupled to them, opens after a period of time, dependent upon the heat generated by the rectifier diodes and upon the thermal mass of the thermostat and diodes, and terminates the fast charge current. A resistor, shunted across the thermostat and thermally coupled to it, establishes a slow charge rate current path when the thermostat opens. Heat generated in the resistor causes the thermostat to remain open as long as the battery is connected and ac power is supplied to the transformer primary winding.

Mullersman, F.H.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Internet Topology over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are few studies that look closely at how the topology of the Internet evolves over time; most focus on snapshots taken at a particular point in time. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the topology of the Autonomous Systems graph of the Internet, examining how eight commonly-used topological measures change from January 2002 to January 2010. We find that the distributions of most of the measures remain unchanged, except for average path length and clustering coefficient. The average path length has slowly and steadily increased since 2005 and the average clustering coefficient has steadily declined. We hypothesize that these changes are due to changes in peering policies as the Internet evolves. We also investigate a surprising feature, namely that the maximum degree has changed little, an aspect that cannot be captured without modeling link deletion. Our results suggest that evaluating models of the Internet graph by comparing steady-state generated topologies to snapshots of the real data ...

Edwards, Benjamin; Stelle, George; Forrest, Stephanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Space Time Matter inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a model of power-law inflationary inflation using the Space-Time-Matter (STM) theory of gravity for a five dimensional (5D) canonical metric that describes an apparent vacuum. In this approach the expansion is governed by a single scalar (neutral) quantum field. In particular, we study the case where the power of expansion of the universe is $p \\gg 1$. This kind of model is more successful than others in accounting for galaxy formation.

Mariano Anabitarte; Mauricio Bellini

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrifying transportation can reduce or eliminate dependence on foreign fuels, emission of green house gases, and emission of pollutants. One challenge is finding a pathway for vehicles that gains wide market acceptance to achieve a meaningful benefit. This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective including opportunity charging, replacing the battery over the vehicle life, improving battery life, reducing battery cost, and providing electric power directly to the vehicle during a portion of its travel. Many combinations of PHEV electric range and battery power are included. For each case, the model accounts for battery cycle life and the national distribution of driving distances to size the battery optimally. Using the current estimates of battery life and cost, only the dynamically plugged-in pathway was cost-effective to the consumer. Significant improvements in battery life and battery cost also made PHEVs more cost-effective than today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (CVs).

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Anion retention in soil: Possible application to reduce migration of buried technetium and iodine  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a literature review of our present knowledge of the anion exchange properties of a number of soils and minerals, which may potentially be used as anion exchangers to retard migration of such anions as iodide (I{sup {minus}}), iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) away from disposal site. The amorphous clays allophane and imogolite, are found to be among the most important soil components capable of developing appreciable amounts of positive charge for anion exchange even at about neutral pH. Decreases in the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio and soil pH result in an increase in soil AEC. Allophane and imogolite rich soils have an AEC ranging from 1 to 18 meq/100g at pH about 6. Highly weathered soils dominated by Fe and Al oxides and kaolinite may develop a significant amount of AEC as soil pH falls. The retention of iodine (I) and technetium ({Tc}), by soils is associated with both soil organic matter, and Fe and Al oxides, whereas sorption on layer silicate minerals in negligible. Fe and Al oxides become more important in the retention of anionic I{sup {minus}}, IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} as pH falls, since more positive charge is developed on the oxide surfaces. Although few studies, if any, have been conducted on I and {Tc} sorption by soil allophane and imogolite, it is estimated that a surface plough soil (2 million pounds soil per acre) with 5 meq/100g AEC, as is commonly found in andisols, shall retain approximately 5900 kg I and 4500 kg {Tc}. It is conceivable that an anion exchanger such as an andisol could be used to modify the near field environment of a radioactive waste disposal facility. This whole disposal system would then offer similar migration resistance to anions as is normally afforded to cations by usual and normal soils. 93 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Gu, B.; Schulz, R.K. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Soil Science)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

QUADRENNIAL MCNP TIMING STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, is widely used around the world for many radiation protection and shielding applications. As a well-known standard it is also an excellent vehicle for assessing the relative performance of scientific computing platforms. Every three-to-four years a new version of MCNP is released internationally by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For each of the past few releases, we have also done a timing study to assess the progress of scientific computing platforms and software. These quadrennial timing studies are valuable to the radiation protection and shielding community because (a) they are performed by a recognized scientific team, not a computer vendor, (b) they use an internationally recognized code for radiation protection and shielding calculations, (c) they are eminently reproducible since the code and the test problems are internationally distributed. Further, if one has a computer platform, operating system, or compiler not presented in our results, its performance is directly comparable to the ones we report because it can use the same code, data, and test problems as we used. Our results, using a single processor per platform, indicate that hardware advances during the past three years have improved performance by less than a factor of two and software improvements have had a marginal effect on performance. The most significant impacts on performance have resulted from developments in multiprocessing and multitasking. The other most significant advance in the last three years has been the accelerated improvements in personal computers. In the last timing study, the tested personal computer was approximately a factor of four slower that the fastest machine tested, a DEC Alphastation 500. In the present study, the fastest PC tested was less than a factor of two slower than the fastest platform, which is a Compaq (previously DEC) Alpha XP1000.

E. C. SELCOW; B. D. LANSRUD

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Exploiting VERITAS Timing Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 499 pixel photomultiplier cameras of the VERITAS gamma ray telescopes are instrumented with 500MHz sampling Flash ADCs. This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the best methods by which to exploit this information so as to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio for the detection of Cherenkov light pulses. The FADCs also provide unprecedented resolution for the study of the timing characteristics of Cherenkov images of cosmic-ray and gamma-ray air showers. This capability is discussed, together with the implications for gamma-hadron separation.

J. Holder; for the VERITAS Collaboration

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration  

SciTech Connect

Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state [Pu] coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state [Pu] depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO{sub 2+x} formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI).

Haschke, J M; Siekhaus, W J

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

VERTICAL MIGRATION OF RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VICINITY OF THE CHERNOBYL CONFINEMENT SHELTER  

SciTech Connect

Studies on vertical migration of Chernobyl-origin radionuclides in the 5-km zone of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) in the area of the Red Forest experimental site were completed. Measurements were made by gamma spectrometric methods using high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors with beryllium windows. Alpha-emitting isotopes of plutonium were determined by the measurement of the x-rays from their uranium progeny. The presence of {sup 60}Co, {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 154,155}Eu, and {sup 241}Am in all soil layers down to a depth of 30 cm was observed. The presence of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am were noted in the area containing automorphous soils to a depth of 60 cm. In addition, the upper soil layers at the test site were found to contain {sup 243}Am and {sup 243}Cm. Over the past ten years, the {sup 241}Am/{sup 137}Cs ratio in soil at the experimental site has increased by a factor of 3.4, nearly twice as much as would be predicted based solely on radioactive decay. This may be due to 'fresh' fallout emanating from the ChNPP Confinement Shelter.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

explore its metabolism for bioethanol or other bioprocessthe metabolic pathways for bioethanol production as well as

Tang, Yinjie J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Pathways, Networks and Therapy: A Boolean Approach to Systems Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The area of systems biology evolved in an attempt to introduce mathematical systems theory principles in biology. Although we believe that all biological processes are essentially chemical reactions, describing those using precise mathematical rules is not easy, primarily due to the complexity and enormity of biological systems. Here we introduce a formal approach for modeling biological dynamical relationships and diseases such as cancer. The immediate motivation behind this research is the urgency to find a practicable cure of cancer, the emperor of all maladies. Unlike other deadly endemic diseases such as plague, dengue and AIDS, cancer is characteristically heterogenic and hence requires a closer look into the genesis of the disease. The actual cause of cancer lies within our physiology. The process of cell division holds the clue to unravel the mysteries surrounding this disease. In normal scenario, all control mechanisms work in tandem and cell divides only when the division is required, for instance, to heal a wound platelet derived growth factor triggers cell division. The control mechanism is tightly regulated by several biochemical interactions commonly known as signal transduction pathways. However, from mathematical point of view, these pathways are marginal in nature and unable to cope with the multi-variability of a heterogenic disease like cancer. The present research is possibly one first attempt towards unraveling the mysteries surrounding the dynamics of a proliferating cell. A novel yet simple methodology is developed to bring all the marginal knowledge of the signaling pathways together to form the simplest mathematical abstract known as the Boolean Network. The malfunctioning in the cell by genetic mutations is formally modeled as stuck-at faults in the underlying Network. Finally a mathematical methodology is discovered to optimally find out the possible best combination drug therapy which can drive the cell from an undesirable condition of proliferation to a desirable condition of quiescence or apoptosis. Although, the complete biological validation was beyond the scope of the current research, the process of in-vitro validation has been already initiated by our collaborators. Once validated, this research will lead to a bright future in the field on personalized cancer therapy.

Layek, Ritwik

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling Peter O'Neill University of Oxford Abstract The ATM and TGFbeta signal transduction pathways are essential to cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation (IR) and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFbeta signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. As a consequence of partial stimulation of these pathways important questions arise not only on the validity of the linear no-threshold assumption used in radiation regulations, but also on our ability to extrapolate experimental and human epidemiology data from high to low doses. The

382

Efficient CO2 Fixation Pathways: Energy Plant: High Efficiency Photosynthetic Organisms  

SciTech Connect

PETRO Project: UCLA is redesigning the carbon fixation pathways of plants to make them more efficient at capturing the energy in sunlight. Carbon fixation is the key process that plants use to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere into higher energy molecules (such as sugars) using energy from the sun. UCLA is addressing the inefficiency of the process through an alternative biochemical pathway that uses 50% less energy than the pathway used by all land plants. In addition, instead of producing sugars, UCLA’s designer pathway will produce pyruvate, the precursor of choice for a wide variety of liquid fuels. Theoretically, the new biochemical pathway will allow a plant to capture 200% as much CO2 using the same amount of light. The pathways will first be tested on model photosynthetic organisms and later incorporated into other plants, thus dramatically improving the productivity of both food and fuel crops.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gas generation and migration studies involving recently generated /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste for the TRU Waste Sampling Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of the multicontractor TRU Waste Sampling Program. Radiolytically generated gases were vented through a filtering device to determine its effectiveness in maintaining hydrogen concentrations within acceptably safe levels. In the second part of the study measurements were made to determine the ability of these gases, particularly hydrogen, to migrate through a sealed rigid polyethylene drum liner. Void volumes in these drums were found to be generally in excess of 90%. The carbon composite filter was found to satisfactorily vent hydrogen up to moderately high levels of alpha activity in the waste substrate. The sealed 90-mil liner was found to inhibit, but not prevent, the migration of hydrogen and other radiolytically generated gases.

Zerwekh, A.; Warren, J.L.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Soybean Genome Analysis Reveals Pathways for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 13, 2010 January 13, 2010 Soybean Genome Analysis Reveals Pathways for Improving Biodiesel, Disease Resistance, and Reducing Waste Runoff WALNUT CREEK, CA-Soybean, one of the most important global sources of protein and oil, is now the first legume species with a published complete draft genome sequence. The sequence and its analysis appear in the January 14 edition of the journal Nature. The research team comprised 18 institutions, including the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), Purdue University and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The DOE, National Science Foundation, USDA and United Soybean Board supported the research. helix made of soybeans

385

Technology Improvement Pathway to Cost-effective Vehicle Electrification: Preprint  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

454 454 February 2010 Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification Preprint A. Brooker, M. Thornton, and J. Rugh National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at SAE 2010 World Congress Detroit, Michigan April 13-15, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

386

Release criteria and pathway analysis for radiological remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific activity concentrations were derived for soils contaminated with mixed fission products (MFP), or uranium-processing residues, using the Department of Energy (DOE) pathway analysis computer code RESRAD at four different sites. The concentrations and other radiological parameters, such as limits on background-subtracted gamma exposure rate were used as the basis to arrive at release criteria for two of the sites. Valid statistical parameters, calculated for the distribution of radiological data obtained from site surveys, were then compared with the criteria to determine releasability or need for further decontamination. For the other two sites, RESRAD has been used as a preremediation planning tool to derive residual material guidelines for uranium. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Subbaraman, G.; Tuttle, R.J.; Oliver, B.M. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Devgun, J.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

Lynd, L.R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Security Implications and Considerations for Serial to Internet Protocol-Based Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update report describes the requirements, risks, benefits, vulnerabilities, and potential compliance issues with North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) critical infrastructure protection (CIP) standards that utilities might face when migrating their supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems from serial-based communications to communications based on the Internet protocol (IP) suite. The report is based on a survey of several utilities that have taken ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Review and Documentation of Research and Technologies on Passage and Protection of Downstream Migrating Catadromous Eels at Hydroele ctric Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents current knowledge on behavior of downstream migrating catadromous eels, engineering and operational factors that influence eel injury and mortality during hydroelectric turbine passage, and the effectiveness of physical and behavioral technologies designed to reduce entrainment and guide eels to safe passage routes. This information will be valuable to industry, resource agencies, private-sector environmental organizations, and universities involved in research, management, and prot...

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Good Timing: NIST/CU Collaboration Adds Timing Capability ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... With the added capability to track the timing of dynamic biochemical reactions, cell ... to measure sensor signals at two points in time at a rate of up to ...

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Time Bucket Formulation for the TSP with Time Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 10, 2009 ... The Traveling Salesman Problem with Time Windows (TSPTW) is the problem of finding a ... To obtain a good partition of the time windows, we.

392

EGF-Receptor-Mediated Mammary Epithelial Cell Migration is Driven by Sustained ERK Signaling from Autocrine Stimulation  

SciTech Connect

Aberrant expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor family ligands, as well as the receptors themselves, has been implicated in various types of cancers. EGF family ligands are synthesized as membrane-anchored proteins requiring proteolytic release to form the mature soluble factor. Despite the pathophysiological importance of autocrine systems, how the rate of protease-mediated ligand release quantitatively influences receptor-mediated signaling and consequent cell behavior is poorly understood. Therefore, we explored the relationship between autocrine EGF release rates and receptor-mediated ERK activation and migration in human mammary epithelial cells. A quantitative spectrum of EGF release rates was achieved using a set of chimeric transmembrane EGF ligand precursors modulated by the addition of the metalloprotease inhibitor batimastat. We found that ERK activation increased with increasing ligand release rates despite concomitant EGF receptor downregulation. Cell migration speed depended linearly on the steady-state phospho-ERK level obtained from either autocrine or exogenous ligand, but was much greater at any given phospho-ERK level for autocrine compared to exogenous stimulation. In contrast, cell proliferation rates were relatively constant across the various treatment conditions. Thus, in these cells, ERK-mediated migration stimulated by EGF receptor signaling is most sensitively regulated by autocrine ligand control mechanisms.

Joslin, Elizabeth J.; Opresko, Lee; Wells, Alan; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Radionuclide Migration Experiments in Tuff Blocks/Underunsaturated and Saturated Conditions at a Scale of Up to 1 Metre  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To complement migration experiments with non-radioactive tracers in the Busted Butte experimental facility (BBTF) at the Nevada Test Site, an exploratory migration experiment has been performed under unsaturated conditions in a {approx}0.3m x {approx}0.3m x {approx}0.3m block of tuff. Longer term migration experiments, up to 600 days, under unsaturated and saturated conditions in {approx}1 m3 blocks of tuff have recently been completed. Na-fluorescein, 3H (as tritiated water), 22Na, 60Co, 95mTc and/or 99Tc (as the pertechnetate anion), 137Cs, and 237Np were used as tracers in all three experiments. Under unsaturated conditions, Tc is transported slightly faster than 3H, while under saturated conditions, the chemical conditions became highly reducing, leading to significant retardation of Tc along the flow field. If chemically reducing conditions can be demonstrated to exist in the saturated zone downstream from the proposed repository, the geological formations underlying the proposed repository horizon can potentially act as a geological barrier to the transport of some multivalent radionuclides.

Vandergraaf, T. T.; Drew, D. J.; Ticknor, K. V.; Hamon, C. J.; Seddon, W. A.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for gas and brine migration at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, May 1992  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis, stepwise regression analysis and examination of scatterplots are used in conjunction with the BRAGFLO model to examine two phase flow (i.e., gas and brine) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. The analyses consider either a single waste panel or the entire repository in conjunction with the following cases: (1) fully consolidated shaft, (2) system of shaft seals with panel seals, and (3) single shaft seal without panel seals. The purpose of this analysis is to develop insights on factors that are potentially important in showing compliance with applicable regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (i.e., 40 CFR 191, Subpart B; 40 CFR 268). The primary topics investigated are (1) gas production due to corrosion of steel, (2) gas production due to microbial degradation of cellulosics, (3) gas migration into anhydrite marker beds in the Salado Formation, (4) gas migration through a system of shaft seals to overlying strata, and (5) gas migration through a single shaft seal to overlying strata. Important variables identified in the analyses include initial brine saturation of the waste, stoichiometric terms for corrosion of steel and microbial degradation of cellulosics, gas barrier pressure in the anhydrite marker beds, shaft seal permeability, and panel seal permeability.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Bean, J.E. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garner, J.W.; Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schreiber, J.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swift, P.N. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Brazil-Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy for Brazil AgencyCompany Organization McKinsey and Company Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies...

396

Examining Coach Pathways and Learning Situations: High-Performance Head Hockey Coaches who Played Goal .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Using archival analysis and interviews this study examined the career pathways, learning experiences, and athletic experiences of 11 high-performance head hockey coaches who played goal… (more)

Crickard, Travis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Novel Chemical Pathway for Producing Low Cost Ti by Direct ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chemical pathway is described for producing titanium metal or titanium hydride powder that has realistic potential for drastic reductions in energy consumption ...

398

IMproved Assessment of the Greenhouse gas balance of bioeNErgy pathways (IMAGINE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMproved Assessment of the Greenhouse gas balance of bioeNErgy pathways (IMAGINE) Evaluation. Abstract The potential greenhouse gas (GHG) savings resulting from the displacement of fossil energy

399

A new user-friendly experiment visual database system application to the gas migration test (GMT) at the Grimsel test site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Long-term integrated field investigations combine information from different groups (laboratory, modeling, experimental) often working in different locations and on different time scales. The results of these different groups are evaluated and integrated for decision making during the experiment execution, but at the end of the experiment a huge database exists, which may be difficult to use at a later stage - for example, for further modeling, benchmarking etc. How can one preserve the information obtained and present it in a transparent and user-friendly manner? A new visual database system developed is presented and its application to the 'Gas Migration in-situ Test (GMT)' is described. The GMT project has been conducted to assess the gas migration (for example from TRU waste) through the engineered barrier system and the adjacent geosphere. The experiment was initiated in 1997 under the auspices of RWMC and with primary funding by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The project consists of a large-scale in-situ test, laboratory tests and numerical modeling. The in-situ test has been performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland operated by NAGRA (National cooperative for the disposal of radioactive waste, Switzerland). Laboratory tests have been performed in facilities in Japan, Germany, Spain and Switzerland. Finally, the modeling activities, performed within the modeling group, have included teams from the US, Spain, France, Japan, Germany and Switzerland with support from organizations BGR, ENRESA, ANDRA, and RWMC. More than 250 reports document the various data and analyses. The database developed uses a three layered framework. The first (or bottom) layer is the data storage which contains all reports, publications as well as the raw data; the second layer is a data flow diagram - from material data, generation of input data to the model and output to the end user; the third layer is the interface with external users to facilitate optimal use of the database for their needs - it includes search through key words, publication year, data type etc. (authors)

Shimura, Tomoyuki; Asano, Hidekazu [RWMC, N0.15 Mori Bldg., 2-8-10, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ando, Kenichi; Okuma, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Shuichi [Obayashi Corporation, SHinagawa InterCity B, 2-15-2, Konan, Minatoku, Tokyo, 108-8502 (Japan); Vomvoris, Stratis [NAGRA, Wettingen (Switzerland)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Heliosphere in Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of the dynamic nature of the interstellar medium, the Sun should have encountered a variety of different interstellar environments in its lifetime. As the solar wind interacts with the surrounding interstellar medium to form a heliosphere, different heliosphere shapes, sizes, and particle contents result from the different environments. Some of the large possible interstellar parameter space (density, velocity, temperature) is explored here with the help of global heliosphere models, and the features in the resulting heliospheres are compared and discussed. The heliospheric size, expressed as distance of the nose of the heliopause to the Sun, is set by the solar wind - interstellar pressure balance, even for extreme cases. Other heliospheric boundary locations and neutral particle results correlate with the interstellar parameters as well. If the H0 clouds identified in the Millennium Arecibo survey are typical of clouds encountered by the Sun, then the Sun spends ~99.4% of the time in warm low density ISM, where the typical upwind heliosphere radii are up to two orders of magnitude larger than at present.

H. -R. Müller; P. C. Frisch; B. D. Fields; G. P. Zank

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


402

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Comparison of Small Polaron Migration and Phase Separation in Olivine LiMnPO? and LiFePO? using Hybrid Density Functional Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using hybrid density functional theory based on the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional, we compared polaron migration and phase separation in olivine LiMnPO? to LiFePO?. The barriers for free hole and electron ...

Ong, Shyue Ping

404

Re-thinking the immigrant narrative in a global perspective : representations of labor, gender and im/migration in contemporary cultural productions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Santiago. Island paradox : Puerto Rico in the 1990s. Newbetween the U.S. and Puerto Rico. While I have organized myCharco 101 —Migration from Puerto Rico At first glance, it

Mata, Irene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Barrier island evolution and reworking by inlet migration along the Mississippi-Alabama gulf coast  

SciTech Connect

The five barrier islands along the Mississippi-Alabama coast are located 10 to 14 mi (16 to 23 km) offshore and separate Mississippi Sound from the Gulf of Mexico. The barrier islands in the chain are, from east to west: Dauphin Island, Petit Bois Island, Horn Island, Ship Island, and Cat Island. The islands are low sand bodies situated on a relatively broad Holocene sand platform that extends 70 mi (113 km) from Dauphin Island on the east to Cat Island on the west. The platform varies in thickness from 25 to 75 ft (7.6 to 23 m) and rests on Holocene marine clays or on Pleistocene sediments. The barrier island chain predates the St. Bernard lobe of the Mississippi delta complex, which began to prograde about 3,000 years ago, and continued until it was abandoned approximately 1,500 years ago. In contrast to the other islands, Cat Island at the western down-drift end of the Mississippi-Alabama barrier island chain is characterized by more than 12 prominent east west-oriented progradational linear ridges. The ridge system of Cat Island is interpreted as a relict of an earlier stage in the life cycle of the barrier platform when there was a more robust littoral drift system and an abundant sediment supply During the Pre-St. Bernard Delta period of vigorous sedimentation, all of the islands in the barrier chain probably exhibited progradational ridges similar to those now found only on Cat Island. Presently, only vestigial traces of these progradational features remain on the islands to the east of Cat Island. Unlike Cat Island, which has been protected and preserved by the St. Bernard Delta, the other barrier islands have been modified and reworked during the past 1,500 years by processes of island and tidal inlet migration, accompanied by a general weakening of the littoral drift and a reduction of the available sediment supply.

Rucker, J.B.; Snowden, J.O. (Univ. of New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Crystal structure of a macrophage migration inhibitory factor from Giardia lamblia  

SciTech Connect

Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a eukaryotic cytokine that affects a broad spectrum of immune responses and its activation/inactivation is associated with numerous diseases. During protozoan infections MIF is not only expressed by the host, but, has also been observed to be expressed by some parasites and released into the host. To better understand the biological role of parasitic MIF proteins, the crystal structure of the MIF protein from Giardia lamblia (Gl-MIF), the etiological agent responsible for giardiasis, has been determined at 2.30 Å resolution. The 114-residue protein adopts an ?/? fold consisting of a four-stranded ?-sheet with two anti-parallel ?-helices packed against a face of the ?-sheet. An additional short ?-strand aligns anti-parallel to ?4 of the ?-sheet in the adjacent protein unit to help stabilize a trimer, the biologically relevant unit observed in all solved MIF crystal structures to date, and form a discontinuous ?-barrel. The structure of Gl-MIF is compared to the MIF structures from humans (Hs-MIF) and three Plasmodium species (falciparum, berghei, and yoelii). The structure of all five MIF proteins are generally similar with the exception of a channel that runs through the center of each trimer complex. Relative to Hs-MIF, there are differences in solvent accessibility and electrostatic potential distribution in the channel of Gl-MIF and the Plasmodium-MIFs due primarily to two “gate-keeper” residues in the parasitic MIFs. For the Plasmodium MIFs the gate-keeper residues are at positions 44 (Y==>R) and 100 (V==>D) and for Gl-MIF it is at position 100 (V==>R). If these gate-keeper residues have a biological function and contribute to the progression of parasitemia they may also form the basis for structure-based drug design targeting parasitic MIF proteins.

Buchko, Garry W.; Abendroth, Jan; Robinson, Howard; Zhang, Yanfeng; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Edwards, Tom E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Distributed Fault-Tolerant Avionic Systems - A Real-Time Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the problem of introducing advanced forms of fault-tolerance via reconfiguration into safety-critical avionic systems. This is required to enable increased availability after fault occurrence in distributed integrated avionic systems(compared to static federated systems). The approach taken is to identify a migration path from current architectures to those that incorporate re-configuration to a lesser or greater degree. Other challenges identified include change of the development process; incremental and flexible timing and safety analyses; configurable kernels applicable for safety-critical systems.

Burke, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NIST Time Scale Data Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Time Scale Data Archive. ... The AT1 scale is run in real time using data from an ensemble of cesium standards and hydrogen masers. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

Time and Frequency Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Controlled ClocksTelephone TimeDivision HistoryFrequently Asked Questions (FAQ)Time and Frequency from A to Z: An illustrated glossaryA Walk ...

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Time dependent Directional Profit Model for Financial Time Series Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time dependent Directional Profit Model for Financial Time Series Forecasting Jingtao YAO Chew Lim@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Goodness­of­fit is the most popular criterion for neural network time series forecasting. In the context of financial time series forecasting, we are not only concerned at how good the forecasts fit

Yao, JingTao

411

Special functions and pathways for problems in astrophysics: An essay in honor of A.M. Mathai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper provides a review of A.M. Mathai's applications of the theory of special functions, particularly generalized hypergeometric functions, to problems in stellar physics and formation of structure in the Universe and to questions related to reaction, diffusion, and reaction-diffusion models. The essay also highlights Mathai's recent work on entropic, distributional, and differential pathways to basic concepts in statistical mechanics, making use of his earlier research results in information and statistical distribution theory. The results presented in the essay cover a period of time in Mathai's research from 1982 to 2008 and are all related to the thematic area of the gravitationally stabilized solar fusion reactor and fractional reaction-diffusion, taking into account concepts of non-extensive statistical mechanics. The time period referred to above coincides also with Mathai's exceptional contributions to the establishment and operation of the Centre for Mathematical Sciences, India, as well as the ...

Haubold, H J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Research article: Identifying novel prostate cancer associated pathways based on integrative microarray data analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development and diverse application of microarray and next generation sequencing technologies has made the meta-analysis widely used in expression data analysis. Although it is commonly accepted that pathway, network and systemic level approaches ... Keywords: Gene set enrichment analysis, GeneGo database, KEGG database, Meta-analysis, Pathway enrichment analysis

Ying Wang; Jiajia Chen; Qinghui Li; Haiyun Wang; Ganqiang Liu; Qing Jing; Bairong Shen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

HARNESSING PLANT BIOMASS FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOMATERIALS Plant surface lipid biosynthetic pathways and their utility for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HARNESSING PLANT BIOMASS FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOMATERIALS Plant surface lipid biosynthetic pathways and their utility for metabolic engineering of waxes and hydrocarbon biofuels Reinhard Jetter1,2,* and Ljerka Kunst1 biosynthetic pathways can be used in metabolic engineering of plants for the production of hydrocarbon biofuels

Kunst, Ljerka

414

Integration of Caenorhabditis elegans MAPK pathways mediating immunity and stress resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistance through the modulation of PMK-1 activity. The regulation of p38 and JNK-like MAPK pathwaysIntegration of Caenorhabditis elegans MAPK pathways mediating immunity and stress resistance by MEK and JNK classes of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have evolutionarily conserved roles

Ausubel, Frederick M.

415

High Efficiency Solar Power via Separated Photo and Voltaic Pathways  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project demonstrates a novel nanostructured solar cell architecture capable of achieving high efficiency levels that is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture. The high efficiency will be achieved by the novel structure that separates the path of the photons from the path of the generated charge carriers. In this way, the photon path can be long for maximum light absorption, while the path for carriers can be short for maximum electronic energy harvesting. The combination of maximum light absorption coupled with maximum carrier harvesting is the basis for the expected high efficiency. The project will develop high efficiency solar cell prototypes utilizing this unique nanostructured architecture. The project addresses the fundamental limitation inherent in all current solar cell designs, and which opens a pathway to development for high efficiency solar cells at low cost. Realizing this goal will result in a levelized cost of electricity in the range of 10¢/kWh, which would achieve the long-sought goal of making photovoltaic electricity cost competitive with fossil-fuel generated electricity without any governmental subsidies. This breakthrough would spur the already rapid growth in the photovoltaic industry to an explosive pace, with significant, widespread benefit to the national economy and the nation’s energy security. The initial target of the program is to develop single-junction solar cells using ultrathin amorphous silicon with the performance approaching that of single crystal silicon cells.

Michael J. Naughton

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

ATOM-ECONOMICAL PATHWAYS TO METHANOL FUEL CELL FROM BIOMASS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An economical production of alcohol fuels from biomass, a feedstock low in carbon and high in water content, is of interest. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a Liquid Phase Low Temperature (LPLT) concept is under development to improve the economics by maximizing the conversion of energy carrier atoms (C,H) into energy liquids (fuel). So far, the LPLT concept has been successfully applied to obtain highly efficient methanol synthesis. This synthesis was achieved with specifically designed soluble catalysts, at temperatures < 150 C. A subsequent study at BNL yielded a water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for the production of hydrogen from a feedstock of carbon monoxide and H{sub 2}O at temperatures < 120 C. With these LPLT technologies as a background, this paper extends the discussion of the LPLT concept to include methanol decomposition into 3 moles of H{sub 2} per mole of methanol. The implication of these technologies for the atom-economical pathways to methanol fuel cell from biomass is discussed.

MAHAJAN,D.; WEGRZYN,J.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modulation of the NF-kB Pathway by Bordetella  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is a cell-associated and secreted adhesin produced by Bordetella pertussis with pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory activity in host cells. Given the importance of the NF-kB transcription factor family in these host cell responses, we examined the effect of FHA on NF-kB activation in macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells, both of which are relevant cell types during natural infection. Methodology/Principal Findings: Exposure to FHA of primary human monocytes and transformed U-937 macrophages, but not BEAS-2B epithelial cells, resulted in early activation of the NF-kB pathway, as manifested by the degradation of cytosolic IkBa, by NF-kB DNA binding, and by the subsequent secretion of NF-kB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. However, exposure of macrophages and human monocytes to FHA for two hours or more resulted in the accumulation of cytosolic IkBa, and the failure of TNF-a to activate NF-kB. Proteasome activity was attenuated following exposure of cells to FHA for 2 hours, as was the nuclear translocation of RelA in BEAS-2B cells. Conclusions: These results reveal a complex temporal dynamic, and suggest that despite short term effects to the contrary, longer exposures of host cells to this secreted adhesin may block NF-kB activation, and perhaps lead to a compromised immune response to this bacterial pathogen.

Pertussis Filamentous Hemagglutinin; Tzvia Abramson; Hassya Kedem; David A. Relman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

First-passage-time problems in time-aware networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First passage time or the first time that a stochastic process crosses a boundary is a random variable whose probability distribution is sought in engineering, statistics, finance, and other disciplines. The probability ...

Suwansantisuk, Watcharapan, 1978-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

NIST: A Walk Through Time - The "Atomic Age" of Time ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Transportation, communication, financial transactions, manufacturing, electric power and many ... The next generation of time standards is presently ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "migration pathway timing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Oxygen-oxygen bonds : catalytic redox pathways in energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: The present understanding of energy - its many forms, and its governing role in the time evolution of physical systems - underlies many of the most fundamental and unifying principles furnished by scientific ...

Fried, Stephen D. (Stephen David), 1987-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evaluating, Migrating, and Consolidating Databases and Applications for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is assuming responsibilities for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during fiscal year 2006. During the transition, LM is consolidating databases and applications that support these various functions into a few applications which will streamline future management and retrieval of data. This paper discussed the process of evaluating, migrating, and consolidating these databases and applications for LTS and M activities and provides lessons learned that will benefit future transitions. (authors)

Surovchak, S. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, Broomfield, Colorado (United States); Marutzky, S.; Thompson, B.; Miller, K.; Labonte, E. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Two phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in porous media: application to gas migration in a nuclear waste repository  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological repository for radioactive waste. This model includes capillary effects and the gas high diffusivity. Moreover, it is written in variables (total hydrogen mass density and liquid pressure) chosen in order to be consistent with gas appearance or disappearance. We discuss the well possedness of this model and give some computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas generation in a water saturated repository.

Alain Bourgeat; Mladen Jurak; Farid Smaï

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geochemistry and migration of contaminants at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site, St. Charles County, Missouri, 1989--91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations were conducted by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the US Department of Energy at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site to determine the geochemistry of the shallow aquifer and geochemical controls on the migration of uranium and other constituents from the raffinate (waste) pits. Water-quality analyses from monitoring wells at the site and vicinity property indicate that water in the shallow aquifer is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type that is at equilibrium with respect to calcite and slightly supersaturated with respect to dolomite.

Schumacher, J.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Boundary cap cells constrain spinal motor neuron somal migration at motor exit points by a semaphorin - plexin mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motor neuron cell body positioning. Targeting Npn-2 and Plexin-A2 by RNAi in the chick induces ectopic migration of motor neuron cell bodies To assess the involvement of these receptors we applied a loss-of-function strategy in the chick, with vectors... in regulating motor neuron cell body positioning, we next looked for possible common downstream cytoplasmic mediators. Members of the MICAL (molecule interacting with CasL) family of flavoprotein monooxygenases [34,35] are among an increasing number of molecules...

Bron, Romke; Vermeren, Matthieu; Kokot, Natalie; Little, Graham E; Mitchell, Kevin J; Andrews, William; Cohen, James

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environmental radiation dose criteria and assessment: pathway modeling and surveillance  

SciTech Connect

From nuclear science symposium; San Francisco, California, USA (14 Nov 1973). The controversy in recent years over the extent of the risk to the public from environmental radioactivity attributable to nuclear facilities (in particular nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing facilities) has resulted in a lowering of previously acceptable environmental radiation levels. The proposal by the AEC to limit effluents from light-water-cooled nuclear reactors so that the exposure of any individual in the public would not exceed 5 mR/yr, and the pronouncement by the BEIR Committee that the current environmental radiation protection guides are unnecessarily high, are illustrative. In turn the AEC has issued a Safety Guide calling for considerable refinement in the measuring and reporting of effluents from nuclear power plants, and has only recently issued a counterpart dealing with the measuring and reporting of radioactivity in the environs of nuclear power plants. The EPA has also recently issued a guide for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity. Currently, power reactor operators are being required by the AEC Regulatory Staff to conduct detailed, sensitive environmental surveillance. Much of this appears to be based on extremely conservative assumptions throughout, including doseeffect relationships, exposure situations, pathway models, reconcentration factors and intakes, which cannot be substantiated when examined in the light of current experience in the vicinity of existing power reactors. The expenditures occasioned by the required additional in-plant features necessary to meet the currently proposed effluent release criteria appear difficult to justify on a reasonable basis. Environmental monitoring at the proposed concentration limits appear even more excessive in terms of dollars per man-rem of potential dose commitment. (auth)

Hull, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NIST Time Scale Data Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Time Scale Data Archive. Updated monthly. Return to Archive index Leap second and UT1-UTC information. This page ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Personalised time-dependent learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time-dependent instruction appears to shape next-generation learning systems, where the value of instruction is as important as the time it takes to learn. The ability to grasp the exact knowledge required to accomplish a specific task, in the ... Keywords: adaptive learning, authoring tools, knowledge management, learning granularity, learning objects, learning resources, learning technology, learning web, ontology, personalised learning, semantic web, time constraints, time-dependent learning, timeliness

R. Benlamri; Y. Atif; J. Berri

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Dynamic plan migration for snapshot-equivalent continuous queries in data stream systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data stream management system executes a large number of continuous queries in parallel. As stream characteristics and query workload change over time, the plan initially installed for a continuous query may become inefficient. As a consequence, the ...

Jürgen Krämer; Yin Yang; Michael Cammert; Bernhard Seeger; Dimitris Papadias

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Biofuels Fuels Technology Pathway Options for Advanced Drop-in Biofuels Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced drop-in hydrocarbon biofuels require biofuel alternatives for refinery products other than gasoline. Candidate biofuels must have performance characteristics equivalent to conventional petroleum-based fuels. The technology pathways for biofuel alternatives also must be plausible, sustainable (e.g., positive energy balance, environmentally benign, etc.), and demonstrate a reasonable pathway to economic viability and end-user affordability. Viable biofuels technology pathways must address feedstock production and environmental issues through to the fuel or chemical end products. Potential end products include compatible replacement fuel products (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and JP8 and JP5 jet fuel) and other petroleum products or chemicals typically produced from a barrel of crude. Considering the complexity and technology diversity of a complete biofuels supply chain, no single entity or technology provider is capable of addressing in depth all aspects of any given pathway; however, all the necessary expert entities exist. As such, we propose the assembly of a team capable of conducting an in-depth technology pathway options analysis (including sustainability indicators and complete LCA) to identify and define the domestic biofuel pathways for a Green Fleet. This team is not only capable of conducting in-depth analyses on technology pathways, but collectively they are able to trouble shoot and/or engineer solutions that would give industrial technology providers the highest potential for success. Such a team would provide the greatest possible down-side protection for high-risk advanced drop-in biofuels procurement(s).

Kevin L Kenney

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Water Budget is a volume of water used to enhance environmental conditions (flows) in the Columbia and Snake rivers for juvenile salmonids during their seaward migration. To manage the Water Budget, the Fish Passage Center estimates travel times of juvenile salmonids in index reaches of the main-stem rivers, using information on river flows and the migrational characteristics of the juvenile salmonids. This study was initiated to provide physiological information on the juvenile salmonids used for these travel time estimates. The physiological ability to respond to stressors was evaluated by measuring concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and chlorides before and after a 30-s handling-stress challenge test. The development of smoltification was assessed by measuring gill Na{sup +}--K{sup +} ATPase activity and plasma thyroxine concentrations. Prevalence of bacterial kidney disease in spring chinook salmon was generally higher than in 1988, ranging from 81--100{percent} using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Fish from Snake River hatcheries had more severe infections than those from mid-Columbia hatcheries. 42 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Beeman, John W.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Faler, Joyce C. (Seattle National Fishery Research Center, Columbia River Field Station, Cook, WA)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

1999-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

The LCLS Timing Event System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Judges 9:00- 9:25 Materials Science Mathew Cherukara Shock Induced Chemistry of NiAl Nano-Composites Chen, X. Gyrya, V. 9:25- 9:50 Materials Science Christian Sorensen Explosive...

437

Oil gravity distribution in the diatomite at South Belridge Field, Kern County, CA: Implications for oil sourcing and migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding oil gravity distribution in the Belridge Diatomite has led to economic infill development and specific enhanced recovery methods for targeted oil properties. To date more than 100 wells have provided samples used to determining vertical and areal distribution of oil gravity in the field. Detailed geochemical analyses were also conducted on many of the oil samples to establish different oil types, relative maturities, and to identify transformed oils. The geochemical analysis also helped identify source rock expulsion temperatures and depositional environments. The data suggests that the Belridge diatomite has been charged by a single hydrocarbon source rock type and was generated over a relatively wide range of temperatures. Map and statistical data support two distinct oil segregation processes occurring post expulsion. Normal gravity segregation within depositional cycles of diatomite have caused lightest oils to migrate to the crests of individual cycle structures. Some data suggests a loss of the light end oils in the uppermost cycles to the Tulare Formation above, or through early biodegradation. Structural rotation post early oil expulsion has also left older, heavier oils concentrated on the east flank of the structure. With the addition of other samples from the south central San Joaquin area, we have been able to tie the Belridge diatomite hydrocarbon charge into a regional framework. We have also enhanced our ability to predict oil gravity and well primary recovery by unraveling some key components of the diatomite oil source and migration history.

Hill, D.W.; Sande, J.J. [Shell Western E& P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States); Doe, P.H. [Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

All Time, All the Time: Improving NIST Radio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... need for manual adjustments when Daylight Saving Time begins and ends, and allowing automatic resetting of clocks following a power outage.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Time Bucket Formulation for the TSP with Time Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 5, 2009 ... Abstract: The Traveling Salesman Problem with Time Windows (TSPTW) is the problem of finding a minimum-cost path visiting a set of cities ...

440

NIST: A Walk Through Time - World Time Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A Walk Through Time - Home Page ... and technologists recognized the inadequacy of timekeeping based on the motion of the Earth, which fluctuates ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

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