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1

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

2

Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

3

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) region consists of nine neighboring states: Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Battelle Memorial Institute leads MRCSP, which includes nearly 40 organizations from the research community, energy industry, universities, non-government, and government organizations. The region has a diverse range of CO 2 sources and many opportunities for reducing CO 2 emissions through geologic storage and/or EOR. Potential locations for geologic storage in the MRCSP states extend from the deep rock formations in the broad

4

DOE/EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment for Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test (October 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26 26 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test Decatur, Illinois October 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY U.S. Department of Energy MGSC Phase III National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment ______________________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents i October 2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................................... v LIST OF FIGURES ........................................................................................................................

5

EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) 35: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan Summary NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide approximately $65.5 million in financial assistance in a cost-sharing arrangement with the project proponent, MRCSP. MRCSP's proposed project would use CO2 captured from an existing natural gas processing plant in Chester Township, pipe it approximately 1 mile to an injection well, and inject it into a deep saline aquifer for geologic sequestration. This project would demonstrate the geologic sequestration of 1,000,000 metric

6

EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration...

7

Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26507 304-285-4133 dawn.deel@netl.doe.gov Darrell Paul Project Manager Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Project Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 614-424-5890...

8

NETL: Carbon Storage - Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MRCSP MRCSP Carbon Storage Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing MRCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) was established to assess the technical potential, economic viability, and public acceptability of carbon storage within a region consisting of nine contiguous states: Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. A group of leading universities, state geological surveys, non-governmental organizations and private companies, led by Battelle Memorial Institute, has been assembled to carry out this research. The MRCSP currently consists of nearly 40 members; each contributing technical knowledge, expertise and cost sharing.

9

The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

11

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NETL: News Release - Carbon Sequestration Field Test Begins in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 , 2007 Carbon Sequestration Field Test Begins in Illinois Basin Field Test Pairs Geologic Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery WASHINGTON, DC - The Midwest Geological...

14

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geo- logic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: An Analysis of86 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,MONITORING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION B. R. Strazisar,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Zhou, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

NETL: Carbon Storage - Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois State agencies, and university researchers...

18

NETL: Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL...

19

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. Geologic Carbon Sequestration Strategies forfor carbon capture and sequestration. Environmental Sciencein Siting Geologic Carbon Sequestration Projects Phillip N.

Price, P.N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (MRCSP) MANAGING CLIMATE CHANGE AND SECURING A FUTURE FOR THE MIDWEST'S INDUSTRIAL BASE  

SciTech Connect

This is the third semiannual report for Phase I of the Midwest Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The project consists of nine tasks to be conducted over a two-year period that started in October 2003. The makeup of the MRCSP and objectives are described. Progress on each of the active Tasks is also described and where possible, for those Tasks at some point of completion, a summary of results is presented.

David Ball; Robert Burns; Judith Bradbury; Bob Dahowski; Casie Davidson; James Dooley; Neeraj Gupta; Rattan Lal; Larry Wickstrom

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of geologic carbon sequestration. Geophys Res Lett 2005;from geologic carbon sequestration sites: Unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration Jennifer L.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Probability Estimation of CO2 Leakage Through Faults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on EffectiveFaults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Yingqi Zhang*,faults at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites is a

Zhang, Yingqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

27

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of geologic carbon sequestration Catherine A. Petersleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites. Env EarthDOE) Conference on Carbon Sequestration, 2005. Alexandria,

Peters, C. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zoneleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites Fotini K.assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Time-windows-based filtering method for near-surface detection of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Lehua Pan,of CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites from within

Pan, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Regulation and Permitting of Carbon Dioxide Geologic Sequestration Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the United States regulations and project experiences associated with permitting injection wells used for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This report is an update of a previous Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study on this subject published in December 2008 when the draft regulations governing geologic sequestration were first published.BackgroundSeparating ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

33

An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 1 An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration Gardiner Hill, BP Craig Lewis, Chevron 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 2 Disclaimer * The following may not be the only Industry Perspective on Storage & Sequestration * It represents the opinions of BP and Chevron and some other energy companies that we have talked to 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 3 Overview * Potential New Business Impact * Business Drivers for R&D * Technology Objectives * Definitions of Storage & Sequestration * Break-down of Geologic Storage R&D Categories * Where We Think Industry (and others) are already strong * Where We Think Additional R&D Gaps Still

34

Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research andfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from a geologic carbon sequestration site showing the

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Regulation and Permitting of Carbon Dioxide Transport and Geologic Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive review and analysis of United States (U.S.) regulations that will have a direct impact on permitting and commercial-scale deployment of carbon dioxide (CO2) transport and sequestration projects. The report focuses on specific regulations associated with CO2 transport and sequestration, including pipeline regulations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) proposed rules for characterizing, operating, monitoring, and closing CO2 geologic sequestration we...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced more than $12.7 million in funding for geologic sequestration training and research projects. The 43 projects will offer training opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The results of these projects (detailed below) will make a vital contribution to the scientific, technical, and institutional knowledge necessary to establish frameworks for the development of commercial CCS projects. These projects will produce a trained workforce necessary for the

37

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

38

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

39

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

40

Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

Haidari, Arman S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Recovery Act: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work under the project entitled "Geologic Sequestration Training and Research," was performed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Southern Company from December 1, 2009, to June 30, 2013. The emphasis was on training of students and faculty through research on topics central to further development, demonstration, and commercialization of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). The project had the following components: (1) establishment of a laboratory for measurement of rock properties, (2) evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks, (3) evaluation of porosity, permeability, and storage capacity of reservoirs, (4) simulation of CO2 migration and trapping in storage reservoirs and seepage through seal layers, (5) education and training of students through independent research on rock properties and reservoir simulation, and (6) development of an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. Four graduate students and one undergraduate student participated in the project. Two were awarded Ph.D. degrees for their work, the first in December 2010 and the second in August 2013. A third graduate student has proposed research on an advanced technique for measurement of porosity and permeability, and has been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. The fourth graduate student is preparing his proposal for research on CCUS and solid waste management. The undergraduate student performed experimental measurements on caprock and reservoir rock samples and received his B.S.M.E. degree in May 2012. The "Caprock Integrity Laboratory," established with support from the present project, is fully functional and equipped for measurement of porosity, permeability, minimum capillary displacement pressure, and effective permeability to gas in the presence of wetting phases. Measurements are made at ambient temperature and under reservoir conditions, including supercritical CO2. During the course of the project, properties of 19 samples provided by partners on companion projects supported by NETL were measured, covering a range of permeabilities from 0.28 ndarcy to 81 mdarcy. Reservoir simulations were performed for injection of 530,000 tonnes of CO2 through a single well into the Middle Donovan formation in Citronelle Dome, in southwest Alabama, over 40 years, followed by migration and trapping for 10,000 years, using the TOUGH2 and TOUGHREACT software packages from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It was estimated that 50 kg CO2/m3 of formation would be converted to mineral phases within the CO2 plume during that time. None of the sand units considered for CO2 storage in Citronelle Dome have thickness exceeding the estimated critical CO2 column height (Berg, 1975) at which seepage might begin, through their confining shale layers. A model for leakage through caprock, based on work by Hildenbrand et al. (2004), including a functional relationship between capillary pressure and the effective permeability to gas in the presence of a wetting phase, demonstrated the sensitivity of long-term storage to caprock permeability and thickness. A traditional course on coal combustion was augmented with material on climate change, coal gasification, and carbon sequestration. A total of 49 students completed the course during two offerings, in Fall 2010 and Fall 2012. It has become a popular advanced elective course in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Walsh, Peter; Esposito, Richard; Theodorou, Konstantinos; Hannon, Michael; Lamplugh, Aaron; Ellison, Kirk

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Update (DOE Project No. DE-FC26-05NT42589)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neeraj Gupta, Technical Director Neeraj Gupta, Technical Director Darrell Paul, Program Manager Battelle, Columbus, OH Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Update (DOE Project No. DE-FC26-05NT42589) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline Quick Overview of MRSCP MRCSP Benefit to the DOE Program MRCSP Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Technical Status Accomplishments to Date Summary Appendix Organization Chart Bibliography 3 About the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership * Formed in 2003 as a public/private consortium * Consists of nearly 40 members, led by Battelle

43

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Geologic Carbon Sequestration Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Assessment for Deployment S. Julio Friedmann Carbon Management Program APL Global Security Principle Directorate, LLNL http:co2.llnl.gov friedmann2@llnl.gov...

45

Modeling the Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Sequestration of CO the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 corresponding author Prasad Saripalli Senior Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1313 Sigma V Complex (K6-81) Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-1667 fax: (509) 376-5368 prasad.saripalli@pnl.gov 2 Modeling the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Modeling the injection of CO 2 and its sequestration will require simulations of a multi- well injection system in a large reservoir field. However, modeling at the injection well

46

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geologic Coal Formations  

SciTech Connect

BP Corporation North America, Inc. (BP) currently operates a nitrogen enhanced recovery project for coal bed methane at the Tiffany Field in the San Juan Basin, Colorado. The project is the largest and most significant of its kind wherein gas is injected into a coal seam to recover methane by competitive adsorption and stripping. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and BP both recognize that this process also holds significant promise for the sequestration of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, while economically enhancing the recovery of methane from coal. BP proposes to conduct a CO2 injection pilot at the tiffany Field to assess CO2 sequestration potential in coal. For its part the INEEL will analyze information from this pilot with the intent to define the Co2 sequestration capacity of coal and its ultimate role in ameliorating the adverse effects of global warming on the nation and the world.

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geochemistry in carbon sequestration environments. Abstractimplications for carbon sequestration. Environ Earth Sci. ,CCS) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Developing

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and HB 90:Carbon capture and sequestration, http://legisweb.conference on carbon capture and sequestration, Pittsburgh,The DOEs Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships are

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION GUIDELINES FOR GEOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is a key technology pathway to substantial reduction of greenhouse gas emissions for the state of California and the western region. Current estimates suggest that the sequestration resource of the state is large, and could safely and effectively accept all of the emissions from large CO2 point sources for many decades and store them indefinitely. This process requires suitable sites to sequester large volumes of CO2 for long periods of time. Site characterization is the first step in this process, and the state will ultimately face regulatory, legal, and technical questions as commercial CCS projects develop and commence operations. The most important aspects of site characterizations are injectivity, capacity, and effectiveness. A site can accept at a high rate a large volume of CO2 and store it for a long time is likely to serve as a good site for geological carbon sequestration. At present, there are many conventional technologies and approaches that can be used to estimate, quantify, calculate, and assess the viability of a sequestration site. Any regulatory framework would need to rely on conventional, easily executed, repeatable methods to inform the site selection and permitting process. The most important targets for long-term storage are deep saline formations and depleted oil and gas fields. The primary CO2 storage mechanisms for these targets are well understood enough to plan operations and simulate injection and long-term fate of CO2. There is also a strong understanding of potential geological and engineering hazards for CCS. These hazards are potential pathway to CO2 leakage, which could conceivably result in negative consequences to health and the environmental. The risks of these effects are difficult to quantify; however, the hazards themselves are sufficiently well understood to identify, delineate, and manage those risks effectively. The primary hazard elements are wells and faults, but may include other concerns as well. There is less clarity regarding the legal and regulatory issues around site characterization for large CCS injection volumes. In particular, it is not clear what would constitute due diligence for a potential selection and operation of a commercial site. This is complicated by a lack of clarity around permitting issues and subsurface ownership. However, there are many natural, industrial, regulatory, and legal analogs for these questions. However, solutions will need to evolve within the set of laws and practices current to the State. The chief conclusion of this chapter is that there is enough knowledge today to characterize a site for geological carbon sequestration safely and effective permitting and operation. From this conclusion and others flow a set of recommendations that represent potential actions for decision makers.

Friedmann, S J

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

51

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is the injection of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} into deep geologic formations where the CO{sub 2} is intended to remain indefinitely. If successfully implemented, geologic carbon sequestration will have little or no impact on terrestrial ecosystems aside from the mitigation of climate change. However, failure of a geologic carbon sequestration site, such as large-scale leakage of CO{sub 2} into a potable groundwater aquifer, could cause impacts that would require costly remediation measures. Governments are attempting to develop regulations for permitting geologic carbon sequestration sites to ensure their safety and effectiveness. At present, these regulations focus largely on decreasing the probability of failure. In this paper we propose that regulations for the siting of early geologic carbon sequestration projects should emphasize limiting the consequences of failure because consequences are easier to quantify than failure probability.

Price, P.N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

Smith, Ellen D [ORNL; Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Hydro-mechanical Model and Analytical Solutions for Geomechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

We present a hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow in greater detail. The simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcys law. Two parts were coupled using the standard linear poroelasticity. Analytical solutions for pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario. The model predicts the temporal and spatial variation of pressure field and effects of permeability and elastic modulus of formation on the fluid pressure distribution.

Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain HR

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

TOUGH+CO2: A multiphase fluid-flow simulator for CO2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGH+CO"2 is a new simulator for modeling of CO"2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers. It is a member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 family of codes for multicomponent, multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation. The code accounts for heat ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Modeling, Multiphase flow, Parallel computing, Saline aquifer, TOUGH+, TOUGH2

Keni Zhang; George Moridis; Karsten Pruess

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Comparison of three options for geologic sequestration of CO2 - a case study for California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Options for sequestration of CO{sub 2} are best viewed in light of the regional distribution of CO{sub 2} sources and potential sequestration sites. This study examines the distribution of carbon emissions from fossil fuel power plants in California and their proximity to three types of reservoirs that may be suitable for sequestration: (1) active or depleted oil fields, (2) active or depleted gas fields, and (3) brine formations. This paper also presents a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of sequestering CO{sub 2} generated from large fossil-fuel fired power plants in California and discusses the comparative advantages of three different types of reservoirs for this purpose. Based on a volumetric analysis of sequestration capacity and current CO{sub 2} emission rates from oil/gas fired power plants, this analysis suggests that oil reservoirs, gas fields and brine formations can all contribute significantly to sequestration in California. Together they could offer the opportunity to meet both short and long term needs. In the near term, oil and gas reservoirs are the most promising because the trapping structures have already stood the test of time and opportunities for offsetting the cost of sequestration with revenues from enhanced oil and gas production. In the long term, if the trapping mechanisms are adequately understood and deemed adequate, brine formations may provide an even larger capacity for geologic sequestration over much of California.

Benson, S.M.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Reactive transport modeling for CO2 geological sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers.geological storage of carbon dioxide. Int. J. Greenhouse GasIPCC special report on carbon dioxide capture and storage.

Xu, T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock?s elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties and attenuation vary versus CO{sub 2} saturation in the reservoir during injection and subsequent distribution of CO{sub 2} in the reservoir; (b) what are the combined effects of saturation and pore pressure on the elastic properties; and (c) what are the combined effects of saturation and rock fabric alteration on the elastic properties. The main new results are (a) development and application of the capillary pressure equilibrium theory to forecasting the elastic properties as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation; (b) a new method of applying this theory to well data; and (c) combining this theory with other effects of CO{sub 2} injection on the rock frame, including the effects of pore pressure and rock fabric alteration. An important result is translating these elastic changes into synthetic seismic responses, specifically, the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) response depending on saturation as well as reservoir and seal type. As planned, three graduate students participated in this work and, as a result, received scientific and technical training required should they choose to work in the area of monitoring and quantifying CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned May 20, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon capture and storage technologies, has completed a preliminary geologic characterization and sequestration field test at FirstEnergy's R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The project provided significant geologic understanding and "lessons learned" from a region of the Appalachian Basin with few existing deep well penetrations for geologic characterization. The initial targets for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the

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61

Fondazione Eni Enrico MatteiEnvironmental Externalities of Geological Carbon Sequestration Effects on Energy Scenarios Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological carbon sequestration seems one of the promising options to address, in the near term, the global problem of climate change, since carbon sequestration technologies are in principle available today and their costs are expected to be affordable. Whereas extensive technological and economic feasibility studies rightly point out the large potential of this clean fossil fuel option, relatively little attention has been paid so far to the detrimental environmental externalities that the sequestering of CO2 underground could entail. This paper assesses what the relevance might be of including these external effects in long-term energy planning and scenario analyses. Our main conclusion is that, while these effects are generally likely to be relatively small, carbon sequestration externalities do matter and influence the nature of future world energy supply and consumption. More importantly, since geological carbon storage (depending on the method employed) may in some cases have substantial external impacts, in terms of both environmental damage and health risks, it is recommended that extensive studies are performed to quantify these effects. This article addresses three main questions: (i) What may energy supply look like if one accounts for large-scale CO2 sequestration in the construction of long-term energy and

Koen Smekens; Bob Van Der Zwaan; Nota Di Lavoro

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A fluid pressure and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

We present a hydro-mechanical model and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process in greater detail. In order for analytical solutions, the simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the theory of linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcy's law. The model was derived through coupling the two parts using the standard linear poroelasticity theory. Analytical solutions for fluid pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario and the solutions for ground deformation were obtained using the method of Green's function. Solutions predict the temporal and spatial variation of fluid pressure, the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on the fluid pressure, the ground surface uplift, and the radial deformation during the entire injection period.

Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain HR

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

GS3: A Knowledge Management Architecture for Collaborative Geologic Sequestration Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern scientific enterprises are inherently knowledge-intensive. In general, scientific studies in domains such as groundwater, climate, and other environmental modeling as well as fundamental research in chemistry, physics, and biology require the acquisition and manipulation of large amounts of experimental and field data in order to create inputs for large-scale computational simulations. The results of these simulations must then be analyzed, leading to refinements of inputs and models and further simulations. In this paper we describe our efforts in creating a knowledge management platform to support collaborative, wide-scale studies in the area of geologic sequestration. The platform, known as GS3 (Geologic Sequestration Software Suite), exploits and integrates off-the-shelf software components including semantic wikis, content management systems and open source middleware to create the core architecture. We then extend the wiki environment to support the capture of provenance, the ability to incorporate various analysis tools, and the ability to launch simulations on supercomputers. The paper describes the key components of GS3 and demonstrates its use through illustrative examples. We conclude by assessing the suitability of our approach for geologic sequestration modeling and generalization to other scientific problem domains

Gorton, Ian; Black, Gary D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Wurstner, Signe K.; Hui, Peter SY

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geochemical studies relevant to carbon sequestration.National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington, DC,Conference on Carbon Sequestration, May 14-17, Washington

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions with Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration in Deep Geological Formations  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations has quickly emerged as an important option for reducing greenhouse emissions. If CCS is implemented on the scale needed for large reductions in CO2 emissions, a billion of tonnes or more of CO2 will be sequestered annually a 250 fold increase over the amount sequestered annually today. Sequestering these large volumes will require a strong scientific foundation of the coupled hydrological-geochemical-geomechanical processes that govern the long term fate of CO2 in the subsurface. Methods to characterize and select sequestration sites, subsurface engineering to optimize performance and cost, safe operations, monitoring technology, remediation methods, regulatory oversight, and an institutional approach for managing long term liability are also needed.

Benson, Dr. Sally [Stanford University; Cole, David R [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions November 16, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Geologic capacity exists to permanently store hundreds of years of regional carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in nine states stretching from Indiana to New Jersey, according to injection field tests conducted by the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). MRCSP's just-released Phase II final report indicates the region has likely total storage of 245.5 billion metric tons of CO2, mostly in deep saline rock formations, a large capacity compared to present day emissions. While distributed sources such as agriculture, transportation, and home heating account for a significant amount of CO2 emissions in the MRCSP

67

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The practice of underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in the USA in 1916, provides useful insight into the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide--the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. In many ways, UNGS is directly relevant to geologic CO{sub 2} storage because, like CO{sub 2}, natural gas (essentially methane) is less dense than water. Consequently, it will tend to rise to the top of any subsurface storage structure located below the groundwater table. By the end of 2001 in the USA, about 142 million metric tons of natural gas were stored underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine aquifers. Based on their performance, UNGS projects have shown that there is a safe and effective way of storing large volumes of gases in the subsurface. In the small number of cases where failures did occur (i.e., leakage of the stored gas into neighboring permeable layers), they were mainly related to improper well design, construction, maintenance, and/or incorrect project operation. In spite of differences in the chemical and physical properties of the gases, the risk-assessment, risk-management, and risk-mitigation issues relevant to UNGS projects are also pertinent to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Influence of Shrinkage and Swelling Properties of Coal on Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The potential for enhanced methane production and geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in coalbeds needs to be evaluated before large-scale sequestration projects are undertaken. Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep unmineable coal seams with the potential for enhanced coalbed methane production has become a viable option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The coal matrix is believed to shrink during methane production and swell during the injection of carbon dioxide, causing changes in tlie cleat porosity and permeability of the coal seam. However, the influence of swelling and shrinkage, and the geomechanical response during the process of carbon dioxide injection and methane recovery, are not well understood. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model based on constitutive equations that account for the coupled fluid pressure-deformation behavior of a porous medium was developed and implemented in an existing reservoir model. Several reservoir simulations were performed at a field site located in the San Juan basin to investigate the influence of swelling and shrinkage, as well as other geomechanical parameters, using a modified compositional coalbed methane reservoir simulator (modified PSU-COALCOMP). The paper presents numerical results for interpretation of reservoir performance during injection of carbon dioxide at this site. Available measured data at the field site were compared with computed values. Results show that coal swelling and shrinkage during the process of enhanced coalbed methane recovery can have a significant influence on the reservoir performance. Results also show an increase in the gas production rate with an increase in the elastic modulus of the reservoir material and increase in cleat porosity. Further laboratory and field tests of the model are needed to furnish better estimates of petrophysical parameters, test the applicability of thee model, and determine the need for further refinements to the mathematical model.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.; Smith, D.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

NETL: 2008 Conference Proceedings - Regional Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Webinar with the American Waterworks Association - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Webinar with the American Waterworks Association December 8, 2008 Table of Contents Disclaimer Agenda [PDF-20KB] Presentations PRESENTATIONS Introductions of Webinar Participants Sarah Wade, Moderator, RCSP Public Outreach Working Group/ Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Brief Overview of AWWA and Their Interest, Roles/Responsibilities, Specific Concerns Cynthia Lane, AWWA Brief Overview of DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program [PDF-1.4MB] Dawn Deel, Project Manager, National Energy Technology Laboratory Ensuring Integrity of Geologic Sequestration: Integrated Application of Simulation, Risk Assessment, and MVA [PDF-1.5MB] Brian McPherson, Principal Investigator, Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP)

70

Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3): a collaborative approach to the management of geological GHG storage projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic storage projects associated with large anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) will have lifecycles that may easily span a century, involve several numerical simulation cycles, and have distinct modeling teams. The process used for numerical simulation of the fate of GHG in the subsurface follows a generally consistent sequence of steps that often are replicated by scientists and engineers around the world. Site data is gathered, assembled, interpreted, and assimilated into conceptualizations of a solid-earth model; assumptions are made about the processes to be modeled; a computational domain is specified and spatially discretized; driving forces and initial conditions are defined; the conceptual models, computational domain, and driving forces are translated into input files; simulations are executed; and results are analyzed. Then, during and after the GHG injection, a continuous monitoring of the reservoir is done and models are updated with the newly collected data. Typically the working files generated during all these steps are maintained on workstations with local backups and archived once the project has concluded along with any modeling notes and records. We are proposing a new concept for supporting the management of full-scale GHG storage projects where collaboration, flexibility, accountability and long-term access will be essential features: the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite, GS3.

Bonneville, Alain HR; Black, Gary D.; Gorton, Ian; Hui, Peter SY; Murphy, Ellyn M.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; White, Mark D.; Williams, Mark D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. 2002 GeologicalNational Conference on Carbon Sequestration. Washington, DC.model for geological carbon sequestration, 2002 Geological

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Recovery Act: Multi-Objective Optimization Approaches for the Design of Carbon Geological Sequestration Systems  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project is to provide training opportunities for two graduate students in order to improve the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies. The graduate student effort will be geared towards the formulation and implementation of an integrated simulation-optimization framework to provide a rigorous scientific support to the design CCS systems that, for any given site: (a) maximize the amount of carbon storage; (b) minimize the total cost associated with the CCS project; (c) minimize the risk of CO2 upward leakage from injected formations. The framework will stem from a combination of data obtained from geophysical investigations, a multiphase flow model, and a stochastic multi-objective optimization algorithm. The methodology will rely on a geostatistical approach to generate ensembles of scenarios of the parameters that are expected to have large sensitivities and uncertainties on the model response and thus on the risk assessment, in particular the permeability properties of the injected formation and its cap rock. The safety theme will be addressed quantitatively by including the risk of CO2 upward leakage from the injected formations as one the objectives that should be minimized in the optimization problem. The research performed under this grant is significant to academic researchers and professionals weighing the benefits, costs, and risks of CO2 sequestration. Project managers in initial planning stages of CCS projects will be able to generate optimal tradeoff surfaces and with corresponding injection plans for potential sequestration sites leading to cost efficient preliminary project planning. In addition, uncertainties concerning CCS have been researched. Uncertainty topics included Uncertainty Analysis of Continuity of Geological Confining Units using Categorical Indicator Kriging (CIK) and the Influence of Uncertain Parameters on the Leakage of CO2 to Overlying Formations. Reductions in uncertainty will lead to safer CCS projects.

Bau, Domenico

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon 66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project December 18, 2007 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of One Million Tons of CO2 at Illinois Site WASHINGTON, DC - Following closely on the heels of three recent awards through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, DOE today awarded $66.7 million to the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) for the Department's fourth large-scale carbon sequestration project. The Partnership led by the Illinois State Geological Survey will conduct large volume tests in the Illinois Basin to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to

75

An Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2 Karsten Pruess (K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510/486-6732) Chin-Fu Tsang (CFTsang@lbl.gov; 510/486-5782) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. David H.-S. Law (Law@arc.ab.ca; 780/450-5034) Alberta Research Council 250 Karl Clark Rd., Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1E4, Canada Curtis M. Oldenburg (CMOldenburg@lbl.gov; 510/486-7419) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Mathematical models and numerical simulation tools will play an important role in evaluating the feasibility of CO2 storage in subsurface reservoirs, such as brine aquifers,

76

Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources in Berkeley, June 12, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPAs mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}brine might occur.

Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

IN SITU MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NMR FOR STUDYING GEOLOGICAL CO(2) SEQUESTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological carbon sequestration (GCS) is one of the most promising ways of mitigating atmospheric greenhouse gases (1-3). Mineral carbonation reactions are potentially important to the long-term sealing effectiveness of caprock but remain poorly predictable, particularly in low-water supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-dominated environments where the chemistry has not been adequately explored. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information is desirable for investigating mechanisms and rates of GCS mineral carbonation reactions. MAS-NMR is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, or a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof (4,5). However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS rotor (6,7), where non-metal materials must be used. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability, and its application to mineral carbonation chemistry in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures.

Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the potential impacts of unexpected surface releases of CO{sub 2} is an essential part of risk assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have extended a mesoscale atmospheric model to model dense gas dispersion of CO{sub 2} leakage. The hazard from CO{sub 2} leakage is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool. Simulation of dispersion in idealized topographies shows that CO{sub 2} can persist even under high winds. Simulation of a variety of topographies, winds, and release conditions allows the generation of a catalog of simulation results that can be queried to estimate potential impacts at actual geologic carbon sequestration sites.

Chow, Fotini K.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

DOE Awards $126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon $126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects DOE Awards $126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects May 6, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis Projects in California and Ohio Join Four Others in Effort to Drastically Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced awards of more than $126.6 million to the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) and the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) for the Department's fifth and sixth large-scale carbon sequestration projects. These industry partnerships, which are part of DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, will conduct large volume tests in California and Ohio to demonstrate the ability of a geologic

80

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin February 17, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute

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81

Offshore Extension of Deccan Traps in Kachchh, Central Western India: Implications for Geological Sequestration Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deccan basalts in central western India are believed to occupy large onshore-offshore area. Using geophysical and geological observations, onshore sub-surface structural information has been widely reported. On the contrary, information about offshore structural variations has been inadequate due to scarcity of marine geophysical data and lack of onshore-offshore lithological correlations. Till date, merely a few geophysical studies are reported that gauge about the offshore extent of Deccan Traps and the Mesozoic sediments (pre-Deccan). To fill this gap in knowledge, in this article, we present new geophysical evidences to demonstrate offshore continuation of the Deccan volcanics and the Mesozoic sediments. The offshore multi-channel seismic and onshore-offshore lithological correlations presented here confirm that the Mesozoic sedimentary column in this region is overlain by 0.2-1.2-km-thick basaltic cover. Two separate phases of Mesozoic sedimentation, having very distinctive physical and lithological characteristics, are observed between overlying basaltic rocks and underlying Precambrian basement. Using onshore-offshore seismic and borehole data this study provides new insight into the extent of the Deccan basalts and the sub-basalt structures. This study brings out a much clearer picture than that was hitherto available about the offshore continuation of the Deccan Traps and the Mesozoic sediments of Kachchh. Further, its implications in identifying long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} within sub-basalt targets are discussed. The carbon sequestration potential has been explored through the geological assessment in terms of the thickness of the strata as well as lithology.

Pandey, D. K., E-mail: pandey@ncaor.org [National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research (India); Pandey, A. [IITM, Centre for Climate Change Research (India); Rajan, S. [National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and consequences of carbon dioxide sequestration, NatureData on Global Change. Carbon Dioxide Information AnalysisCA 94720 Glossary Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) -

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Progress Summary: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the in the Illinois Basin Illinois Basin for geological carbon for geological carbon sequestration sequestration Small Small - - scale (a few thousand tons, truck scale...

85

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO 2 S. D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. Doughty (CADoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453 ) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 P. R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313), Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 510-495-2461) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 K. Pruess(K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116,

86

DOE/EA-1482: Environmental Assessment for Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations (October 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82 82 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT EXPERIMENT FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN SALINE AQUIFER BRINE FORMATIONS FRIO FORMATION, LIBERTY COUNTY, TEXAS OCTOBER 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ii iii National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for a field test of the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin, under contract with DOE, has studied the potential for sequestration of CO 2 in geologic formations of the United States as part of a broader series of DOE-sponsored research projects to

87

Advances in Geological CO{sub 2} Sequestration and Co-Sequestration with O{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of CO{sub 2} for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and sequestration in brine-bearing formations for long term storage has been in practice or under investigation in many locations globally. This study focused on the assessment of cement wellbore seal integrity in CO{sub 2}- and CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-saturated brine and supercritical CO{sub 2} environments. Brine chemistries (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}) at various saline concentrations were investigated at a pressure of 28.9 MPa (4200 psi) at both 50{degree}C and 85{degree}C. These parameters were selected to simulate downhole conditions at several potential CO{sub 2} injection sites in the United States. Class H portland cement is not thermodynamically stable under these conditions and the formation of carbonic acid degrades the cement. Dissociation occurs and leaches cations, forming a CaCO{sub 3} buffered zone, amorphous silica, and other secondary minerals. Increased temperature affected the structure of C-S-H and the hydration of the cement leading to higher degradation rates.

Verba, Circe A; O'Connor, William K.; Ideker, J.H.

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

FY12 ARRA-NRAP Report Studies to Support Risk Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research conducted during FY2012 to support the assessment of environmental risks associated with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and storage. Several research focus areas are ongoing as part of this project. This includes the quantification of the leachability of metals and organic compounds from representative CO2 storage reservoir and caprock materials, the fate of metals and organic compounds after release, and the development of a method to measure pH in situ under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions. Metal leachability experiments were completed on 6 different rock samples in brine in equilibrium with scCO2 at representative geologic reservoir conditions. In general, the leaching of RCRA metals and other metals of concern was found to be limited and not likely to be a significant issue (at least, for the rocks tested). Metals leaching experiments were also completed on 1 rock sample with scCO2 containing oxygen at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10% to simulate injection of CO2 originating from the oxy-fuel combustion process. Significant differences in the leaching behavior of certain metals were observed when oxygen is present in the CO2. These differences resulted from oxidation of sulfides, release of sulfate, ferric iron and other metals, and subsequent precipitation of iron oxides and some sulfates such as barite. Experiments to evaluate the potential for mobilization of organic compounds from representative reservoir materials and cap rock and their fate in porous media (quartz sand) have been conducted. Results with Fruitland coal and Gothic shale indicate that lighter organic compounds were more susceptible to mobilization by scCO2 compared to heavier compounds. Alkanes demonstrated very low extractability by scCO2. No significant differences were observed between the extractability of organic compounds by dry or water saturated scCO2. Reaction equilibrium appears to have been reached by 96 hours. When the scCO2 was released from the reactor, less than 60% of the injected lighter compounds (benzene, toluene) were transported through dry sand column by the CO2, while more than 90% of the heavier organics were trapped in the sand column. For wet sand columns, most (80% to 100%) of the organic compounds injected into the sand column passed through, except for naphthalene which was substantial removed from the CO2 within the column. A spectrophotometric method was developed to measure pH in brines in contact with scCO2. This method provides an alternative to fragile glass pH electrodes and thermodynamic modeling approaches for estimating pH. The method was tested in simulated reservoir fluids (CO2NaClH2O) at different temperatures, pressures, and ionic strength, and the results were compared with other experimental studies and geochemical models. Measured pH values were generally in agreement with the models, but inconsistencies were present between some of the models.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, C. J.; Zhong, Lirong; Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO 2 Christine Doughty (cadoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453) Karsten Pruess (k_pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; 510-486-5875) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Susan D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Paul R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313) Bureau of Economic Geology P.O. Box X, The University of Texas Austin, TX 78713 Christopher T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 530-752-1372) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences 1 Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616 Abstract The capacity of fluvial brine-bearing formations to sequester CO 2 is investigated using numerical simulations of CO

90

Underground reconnaissance and environmental monitoring related to geologic CO2 sequestration studies at the DUSEL Facility, Homestake Mine, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Underground field reconnaissance was carried out in the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) to identify potential locations for the planned geologic carbon sequestration experimental facility known as DUSEL CO{sub 2}. In addition, instrumentation for continuous environmental monitoring of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity was installed at various locations within the Homestake mine. The motivation for this work is the need to locate and design the DUSEL CO{sub 2} facility currently being planned to host CO{sub 2} and water flow and reaction experiments in long column pressure vessels over large vertical length scales. Review of existing geologic data and reconnaissance underground revealed numerous potential locations for vertical experimental flow columns, with limitations of existing vertical boreholes arising from limited vertical extent, poor continuity between drifts, and small diameter. Results from environmental monitoring over 46 days reveal spatial and temporal variations related to ventilation, weather, and ongoing dewatering of the mine.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salve, Rohit

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Although models that simulate the fracturing process exist, they can be significantly improved by extending the models to account for nonsymmetric, nonplanar fractures, coupling the models to more realistic reservoir simulators, and implementing advanced multiphase flow models for the transport of proppant. Third, it may be possible to deviate from current hydraulic fracturing technology by using different proppants (possibly waste materials that need to be disposed of, e.g., asbestos) combined with different hydraulic fracturing carrier fluids (possibly supercritical CO2 itself). Because current technology is mainly aimed at enhanced oil recovery, it may not be ideally suited for the injection and storage of CO2. Finally, advanced concepts such as increasing the injectivity of the fractured geologic formations through acidization with carbonated water will be investigated. Saline formations are located through most of the continental United States. Generally, where saline formations are scarce, oil and gas reservoirs and coal beds abound. By developing the technology outlined here, it will be possible to remove CO2 at the source (power plants, industry) and inject it directly into nearby geological formations, without releasing it into the atmosphere. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a technology capable of sequestering CO2 in geologic formations at a cost of US $10 per ton.

L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

Midwest Nuclear Compact (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Midwest Nuclear Compact establishes a Midwest Nuclear Board to cooperatively evaluate and make recommendations regarding the development of nuclear technology, distribute information about...

93

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor, Presented at the Oil Reserves Conference, Paris,water, coal, oil & gas, mineral reserves or other geological

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Bayesian hierarchical models for soil CO{sub 2} flux and leak detection at geologic sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper characterizations of background soil CO{sub 2} respiration rates are critical for interpreting CO{sub 2} leakage monitoring results at geologic sequestration sites. In this paper, a method is developed for determining temperature-dependent critical values of soil CO{sub 2} flux for preliminary leak detection inference. The method is illustrated using surface CO{sub 2} flux measurements obtained from the AmeriFlux network fit with alternative models for the soil CO{sub 2} flux versus soil temperature relationship. The models are fit first to determine pooled parameter estimates across the sites, then using a Bayesian hierarchical method to obtain both global and site-specific parameter estimates. Model comparisons are made using the deviance information criterion (DIC), which considers both goodness of fit and model complexity. The hierarchical models consistently outperform the corresponding pooled models, demonstrating the need for site-specific data and estimates when determining relationships for background soil respiration. A hierarchical model that relates the square root of the CO{sub 2} flux to a quadratic function of soil temperature is found to provide the best fit for the AmeriFlux sites among the models tested. This model also yields effective prediction intervals, consistent with the upper envelope of the flux data across the modeled sites and temperature ranges. Calculation of upper prediction intervals using the proposed method can provide a basis for setting critical values in CO{sub 2} leak detection monitoring at sequestration sites.

Yang, Ya-Mei; Small, Mitchell J.; Junker, Brian; Bromhal, Grant S.; Strazisar, Brian; Wells, Arthur

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Experimental Determination of Ca-Silicate Dissolution Rates: A Source of Calcium for Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental Determination of Ca-Silicate Dissolution Rates: Experimental Determination of Ca-Silicate Dissolution Rates: A Source of Calcium for Geologic CO 2 Sequestration Susan A. Carroll (carroll6@llnl.gov; 925-423-5694) Energy and Environment Directorate Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory L-219 Livermore, CA 94550 Kevin G. Knauss (knauss@llnl.gov; 925-422-1372) Energy and Environment Directorate Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory L-219 Livermore, CA 94550 2 Introduction The international scientific community recognizes that greenhouse gases have the potential to influence climate, and that potential changes in sea level and weather patterns would be largely deleterious. Because CO 2 is emitted in such large quantities and its atmospheric concentration has been consistently rising throughout the recent past, it is only prudent to focus attention on reducing

96

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs L. A. Davis Lorne.Davis@coe.ttu.edu Department of Petroleum Engineering A. L. Graham Alan.Graham@coe.ttu.edu H. W. Parker** Harry.Parker@coe.ttu.edu Department of Chemical Engineering Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409 M. S. Ingber ingber@me.unm.edu A. A. Mammoli mammoli@me.unm.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 L. A. Mondy lamondy@engsci.sandia.gov Energetic and Multiphase Processes Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0834 Quanxin Guo quan@advantekinternational.com Ahmed Abou-Sayed a.abou-sayed@att.net

97

Carbon Capture & Sequestration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Learn about the Energy Department's work to capture and transport CO2 into underground geologic formations, also known as carbon capture and sequestration.

98

NETL: News Release - Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Large-Scale Test to Inject One Million Metric Tonnes of Carbon Dioxide into Saline Formation Washington, DC-The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change.

99

Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

Sheng Wu

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

100

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002). U.S. Natural Gas Storage. http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_OF UNDERGROUND NATURAL GAS STORAGE TO GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATIONof underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Separation and Capture of CO2 from Large Stationary Sources and Sequestration in Geological Formations: A Summary of the 2003 Critical Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, and the resulting global warming effect, is a major air quality concern. CO2 is the most abundant greenhouse gas emitted by fossil-fuel combustion for power generation, transportation, and heating. Reducing worldwide emissions of CO2 will require many mitigation measures, including reductions in energy consumption, more efficient use of available energy, renewable energy sources, and carbon sequestration. The feasibility of capturing CO2 from large point sources and subsequent geological sequestration is the subject of this years Critical Review.

White, C.M.; Strazisar, B.R.; Granite, E.J.; Hoffman, J.S.; Pennline, H.W.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Final Report for the ZERT Project: Basic Science of Retention Issues, Risk Assessment & Measurement, Monitoring and Verification for Geologic Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) collaborative was formed to address basic science and engineering knowledge gaps relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. Many of the research activities fall between areas normally funded by different directorates at DOE and might be considered too applied for the basic science directorate and too basic in nature for other directorates. An executive committee comprised of institutional leads (and leaders in the field of carbon sequestration) met annually and talked via a monthly scheduled conference call to identify research gaps and research strengths among the ZERT institutions. The executive committee established the following major objectives: (1) Improve computational tools for simulation of CO{sub 2} behavior in the subsurface. This includes adding reactive transport, development of coupled models to include geomechanics, inclusion of hysteretic effects, parallelization, etc. (2) Test efficacy of near-surface detection techniques, help establish detection limits for those techniques, and provide data to assist in development of transport models in the near-surface region. Development of a field site to help accomplish this objective. (3) Develop a comprehensive risk assessment framework that will allow flexible coupling of multiple computational models for different components/processes of the system. (4) Perform gap analysis to determine critical missing data for CO{sub 2} properties in the subsurface including thermodynamic properties of CO{sub 2} - brine mixtures, reaction rates, relative permeabilities, etc. In addition, perform laboratory based experiments to generate that key data. (5) Investigate innovative leakage mitigation strategies. Many of these efforts were multi-institutional. Computational code improvement was undertaken by LBNL, LLANL, PNNL, and NETL, all ZERT institutions participated in the near-surface detection experiments, the systems level risk modeling was lead by LANL, but built to incorporate process level models developed by other ZERT institutions and utilizes information from ZERT investigations of natural analogs for escape mechanisms, and all institutions measured properties of CO2 - brine and/or rock interactions.

Lee Spangler; Alfred Cunningham; David Lageson; Jesse Melick; Mike Gardner; Laura Dobeck; Kevin Repasky; Joseph Shaw; Richard Bajura; B. Peter. McGrail; Curtis M. Oldenburg; Jeff Wagoner; Rajesh Pawar

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Midwest Building Energy Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Stacey Paradis Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance sparadis@mwalliance.org 312-784-7267 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Purpose * Reduce Energy Use in New Construction (Energy Codes) * Reduce Energy Use in Existing Construction (Benchmarking) Objectives * Technical Assistance to States In Midwest Adopt Latest Model Energy Codes * Foster Maximum Compliance with Current Energy Codes

105

Midwest Building Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Stacey Paradis Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance sparadis@mwalliance.org 312-784-7267 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Purpose * Reduce Energy Use in New Construction (Energy Codes) * Reduce Energy Use in Existing Construction (Benchmarking) Objectives * Technical Assistance to States In Midwest Adopt Latest Model Energy Codes * Foster Maximum Compliance with Current Energy Codes

106

Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for MVA at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment of a Deployment of a Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for MVA at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Description Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) emphasizes monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2

107

Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Using X?ray Computed Microtomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: X-ray microtomography (XMT), a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging technique, was applied to demonstrate its capability to visualize the mineralogical alteration and microstructure changes in hydrated Portland cement exposed to carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions. Steel coupons and basalt fragments were added to the cement paste in order to simulate cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. XMT image analysis showed the changes of material density and porosity in the degradation front (density: 1.98 g/cm3, porosity: 40%) and the carbonated zone (density: 2.27 g/cm3, porosity: 23%) after reaction with CO2- saturated water for 5 months compared to unaltered cement (density: 2.15 g/cm3, porosity: 30%). Three-dimensional XMT imaging was capable of displaying spatially heterogeneous alteration in cement pores, calcium carbonate precipitation in cement cracks, and preferential cement alteration along the cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. This result also indicates that the interface between cement and host rock or steel casing is likely more vulnerable to a CO2 attack than the cement matrix in a wellbore environment. It is shown here that XMT imaging can potentially provide a new insight into the physical and chemical degradation of wellbore cement by CO2 leakage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Jansik, Danielle P.; Um, Wooyong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-Case Study Altmark, North German Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasand S. T. Kandji, Review Carbon sequestration in tropicalfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone

Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Update (DOE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

110

Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

John Rogers

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

The role of optimality in characterizing CO2 seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect

Storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep geological formations for greenhouse gas mitigation is gaining momentum and moving from its conceptual and testing stages towards widespread application. In this work we explore various optimization strategies for characterizing surface leakage (seepage) using near-surface measurement approaches such as accumulation chambers and eddy covariance towers. Seepage characterization objectives and limitations need to be defined carefully from the outset especially in light of large natural background variations that can mask seepage. The cost and sensitivity of seepage detection are related to four critical length scales pertaining to the size of the: (1) region that needs to be monitored; (2) footprint of the measurement approach, and (3) main seepage zone; and (4) region in which concentrations or fluxes are influenced by seepage. Seepage characterization objectives may include one or all of the tasks of detecting, locating, and quantifying seepage. Each of these tasks has its own optimal strategy. Detecting and locating seepage in a region in which there is no expected or preferred location for seepage nor existing evidence for seepage requires monitoring on a fixed grid, e.g., using eddy covariance towers. The fixed-grid approaches needed to detect seepage are expected to require large numbers of eddy covariance towers for large-scale geologic CO{sub 2} storage. Once seepage has been detected and roughly located, seepage zones and features can be optimally pinpointed through a dynamic search strategy, e.g., employing accumulation chambers and/or soil-gas sampling. Quantification of seepage rates can be done through measurements on a localized fixed grid once the seepage is pinpointed. Background measurements are essential for seepage detection in natural ecosystems. Artificial neural networks are considered as regression models useful for distinguishing natural system behavior from anomalous behavior suggestive of CO{sub 2} seepage without need for detailed understanding of natural system processes. Because of the local extrema in CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in natural systems, simple steepest-descent algorithms are not effective and evolutionary computation algorithms are proposed as a paradigm for dynamic monitoring networks to pinpoint CO{sub 2} seepage areas.

Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

NETL: News Release -Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16, 2011 Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions Regional Partnership's Phase II Field Tests Validate Earlier Research Results Washington, D.C. - Geologic...

114

Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks  

SciTech Connect

Colorado School of Mines conducted research and training in the development and validation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS (Geological Sequestration) probabilistic simulation and risk assessment model. CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment is used to develop advanced numerical simulation models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational practices; ensure site safety; and refine site monitoring, verification, and accounting efforts. As simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decrease, thereby providing more accurate risk assessment. The models considered the full coupling of multiple physical processes (geomechanical and fluid flow) and describe the effects of stochastic hydro-mechanical (H-M) parameters on the modeling of CO{sub 2} flow and transport in fractured porous rocks. Graduate students were involved in the development and validation of the model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in subsurface formations, and to evaluate the risk of potential leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers. The main major contributions from the project include the development of: 1) an improved procedure to rigorously couple the simulations of hydro-thermomechanical (H-M) processes involved in CO{sub 2} GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random fracture patterns; and 3) probabilistic methods to account for the effects of stochastic fluid flow and geomechanical properties on flow, transport, storage and leakage associated with CO{sub 2} GS. The research project provided the means to educate and train graduate students in the science and technology of CO{sub 2} GS, with a focus on geologic storage. Specifically, the training included the investigation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in underground formations, and the evaluation of the risk of potential CO{sub 2} leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers.

Gutierrez, Marte

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels are abundant, inexpensive to produce, and are easily converted to usable energy by combustion as demonstrated by mankind's dependence on fossil fuels for over 80% of its primary energy supply (13). This reliance on fossil fuels comes with the cost of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that exceed the rate at which CO{sub 2} can be absorbed by terrestrial and oceanic systems worldwide resulting in increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration as recorded by direct measurements over more than five decades (14). Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas linked to global warming and associated climate change, the impacts of which are currently being observed around the world, and projections of which include alarming consequences such as water and food shortages, sea level rise, and social disruptions associated with resource scarcity (15). The current situation of a world that derives the bulk of its energy from fossil fuel in a manner that directly causes climate change equates to an energy-climate crisis. Although governments around the world have only recently begun to consider policies to avoid the direst projections of climate change and its impacts, sustainable approaches to addressing the crisis are available. The common thread of feasible strategies to the energy climate crisis is the simultaneous use of multiple approaches based on available technologies (e.g., 16). Efficiency improvements (e.g., in building energy use), increased use of natural gas relative to coal, and increased development of renewables such as solar, wind, and geothermal, along with nuclear energy, are all available options that will reduce net CO{sub 2} emissions. While improvements in efficiency can be made rapidly and will pay for themselves, the slower pace of change and greater monetary costs associated with increased use of renewables and nuclear energy suggests an additional approach is needed to help bridge the time period between the present and a future when low-carbon energy is considered cheap enough to replace fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one such bridging technology (1). CCS has been the focus of an increasing amount of research over the last 15-20 years and is the subject of a comprehensive IPCC report that thoroughly covers the subject (1). CCS is currently being carried out in several countries around the world in conjunction with natural gas extraction (e.g., 2, 3) and enhanced oil recovery (17). Despite this progress, widespread deployment of CCS remains the subject of research and future plans rather than present action on the scale needed to mitigate emissions from the perspective of climate change. The reasons for delay in deploying CCS more widely are concerns about cost (18), regulatory and legal uncertainty (19), and potential environmental impacts (21). This chapter discusses the long-term (decadal) sustainability and environmental hazards associated with the geologic CO{sub 2} storage (GCS) component of large-scale CCS (e.g., 20). Discussion here barely touches on capture and transport of CO{sub 2} which will occur above ground and which are similar to existing engineering, chemical processing, and pipeline transport activities and are therefore easier to evaluate with respect to risk assessment and feasibility. The focus of this chapter is on the more uncertain part of CCS, namely geologic storage. The primary concern for sustainability of GCS is whether there is sufficient capacity in sedimentary basins worldwide to contain the large of amounts of CO{sub 2} needed to address climate change. But there is also a link between sustainability and environmental impacts. Specifically, if GCS is found to cause unacceptable impacts that are considered worse than its climate-change mitigation benefits, the approach will not be widely adopted. Hence, GCS has elements of sustainability insofar as capacity of the subsurface for CO{sub 2} is concerned, and also in terms of whether the associated environmental risks are acceptable or not to the public.

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zonethe feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test November 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a key technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. The injection, which is expected to last 6-8 months, is an integral step in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is conducting the field test to

118

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program...

119

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

120

midwest | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

midwest midwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 76, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power midwest projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

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121

Final Report for the ZERT Project: Basic Science of Retention Issues, Risk Assessment & Measurement, Monitoring and Verification for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

ZERT has made major contributions to five main areas of sequestration science: improvement of computational tools; measurement and monitoring techniques to verify storage and track migration of CO{sub 2}; development of a comprehensive performance and risk assessment framework; fundamental geophysical, geochemical and hydrological investigations of CO{sub 2} storage; and investigate innovative, bio-based mitigation strategies.

Spangler, Lee; Cunningham, Alfred; Lageson, David; Melick, Jesse; Gardner, Mike; Dobeck, Laura; Repasky, Kevin; Shaw, Joseph; Bajura, Richard; McGrail, B Peter; Oldenburg, Curtis M; Wagoner, Jeff; Pawar, Rajesh

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hawkeye Renewables formerly Midwest Renewables | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(formerly Midwest Renewables) Place Iowa Falls, Iowa Zip 50126 Product Midwest bioethanol producer References Hawkeye Renewables (formerly Midwest Renewables)1 LinkedIn...

123

NETL: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Plenary Session Industry Focus Panel Discussion Session 1A. Geologic Sequestration I - Overview Session 1B. Capture & Separation I - Industrial Efforts Session 1C. Modeling I - Case Studies & Deployment Session 2A. Geologic Sequestration II - EOR/EGR Session 2B. Capture & Separation II - Improved Processes Session 2C. Modeling II - Economics Poster Presentations International Panel Discussion Session 3A. Geologic Sequestration III - Enhanced Coalbed Methane Session 3B. Capture & Separation III - Adsorption Studies Session 3C. Terrestrial Sequestration I - Ecosystem Behavior Session 4A. Geologic Sequestration IV - Saline Aquifers Session 4B. Capture & Separation IV - Power Systems Concepts

124

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in Deep, Unmineable Coalbeds: An Integrated Researdh and Commercial-Scale Field Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal-Seq consortium is a government-industry collaborative consortium with the objective of advancing industry's understanding of complex coalbed methane and gas shale reservoir behavior in the presence of multi-component gases via laboratory experiments, theoretical model development and field validation studies. This will allow primary recovery, enhanced recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration operations to be commercially enhanced and/or economically deployed. The project was initially launched in 2000 as a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored investigation into CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams. The initial project accomplished a number of important objectives, which mainly revolved around performing baseline experimental studies, documenting and analyzing existing field projects, and establishing a global network for technology exchange. The results from that Phase have been documented in a series of reports which are publicly available. An important outcome of the initial phase was that serious limitations were uncovered in our knowledge of reservoir behavior when CO{sub 2} is injected into coal. To address these limitations, the project was extended in 2005 as a government-industry collaborative consortium. Selected accomplishments from this phase have included the identification and/or development of new models for multi-component sorption and diffusion, laboratory studies of coal geomechanical and permeability behavior with CO{sub 2} injection, additional field validation studies, and continued global technology exchange. Further continuation of the consortium is currently being considered. Some of the topics that have been identified for investigation include further model development/refinement related to multicomponent equations-of-state, sorption and diffusion behavior, geomechanical and permeability studies, technical and economic feasibility studies for major international coal basins, the extension of the work to gas shale reservoirs, and continued global technology exchange.

Scott Reeves; George Koperna

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pp. 112, 2005. DOE, Carbon sequestration research andNational Conference on Carbon Sequestration, National Energyverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.

Tsang, C.-F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

US DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program New Initiatives for U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program New Initiatives for U.S. Climate Change Geological Sequestration North American Coalbed Methne Forum Charles W. Byrer National Energy Technology...

127

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Dr. Helen Kerr

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The effects of initial acetate concentration on CO[subscript 2]?brine-anorthite interactions under geologic CO[subscript 2] sequestration conditions  

SciTech Connect

Acetate is one of the most abundant organic compounds in many formation waters and is likely to be present in deep saline aquifers suitable for geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration (GCS). This work studied the effect of initially present acetate on the dissolution of anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}) and on subsequent secondary mineral precipitation under GCS conditions (35 C and 74.8 atm). Anorthite was chosen as a model mineral because of the abundance of feldspar in clayey sandstones and the possibility of metal carbonation. In this study, acetate was found to decrease the cumulative aqueous concentrations of Al, Si, and Ca upon CO{sub 2} injection by inhibiting anorthite dissolution and increasing the amount of secondary mineral precipitates. The extent of the effect of acetate on metal concentration changes was element-specific (Al > Si > Ca), and the effect was found to be more significant in systems with lower salinity and lower pH. For anorthite dissolution, acetic acid inhibited the proton-mediated decomposition of the Al/Si-containing feldspar framework, while acetate anions may have facilitated the ion-exchange between interstitial Ca and aqueous cations. For secondary mineral precipitation, stoichiometry analysis of aqueous metal concentrations suggested the formation of Al-containing mineral(s). The presence of kaolinite as a secondary mineral was confirmed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy's electron diffraction data. An increase in the relative amount of precipitation due to the initial presence of acetate was suggested by mass balancing and verified on the cleaved anorthite surfaces by atomic force microscopy analysis. These results provide new insights for understanding and predicting GCS system evolution upon scCO{sub 2} injection in the initial presence of acetate.

Yang, Yi; Ronzio, Christian; Jun, Young-Shin (WU); (Yale)

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 12, 2006 September 12, 2006 Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins: Midwest Partnership Looks at Appalachian Basin for Safe Storage Sites Seismic Surveys to Determine Viability of Rock Formations for CO2 Storage WASHINGTON, DC - Tapping into rock formations at sites thousands of feet deep, a government-industry team is using seismic testing to help determine whether those sites can serve as reservoirs to safely store carbon dioxide (CO2), a major greenhouse gas. MORE INFO WATCH: NETL Project Manager Charlie Byrer discuss this important project Learn more about DOE's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership web site The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is sponsoring the tests in a program to develop carbon sequestration

132

CO₂ Sequestration Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Carbon Sequestration Carbon Sequestration 2011-01-31-Sequestration1.jpg Why it Matters: Underground carbon sequestration is a technique in which one of the primary greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), is removed from the atmosphere by injecting it into subsurface salt acquifers. This is a key potential global warming mitigation strategy. Key Challenges: A variety of geochemical processes can affect the mechanism of CO2 dissolution and the volume of CO2 that can be stored - the key result determining whether the strategy is effective or not. Simulation is the only way to study the detailed effects of geological flow, gravitational instability, rock heterogeneity, and brine salinity. These multicomponent, multiphase simulations must be carried out at high

133

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxycombustion Technology Research And The National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Sequestration Program Prof. Jost O.L. Wendt Honorary Session - Oxycombustion Of Coal III Salt...

134

Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS) technologies. The tabs within NATCARB open different maps for query and analysis capabilities: (1) the RCSP tab shows the seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership ( R C...

135

Risk-Informed Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (RI-MVA). An NRAP White Paper Documenting Methods and a Demonstration Model for Risk-Informed MVA System Design and Operations in Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper accompanies a demonstration model that implements methods for the risk-informed design of monitoring, verification and accounting (RI-MVA) systems in geologic carbon sequestration projects. The intent is that this model will ultimately be integrated with, or interfaced with, the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) integrated assessment model (IAM). The RI-MVA methods described here apply optimization techniques in the analytical environment of NRAP risk profiles to allow systematic identification and comparison of the risk and cost attributes of MVA design options.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Sullivan, E. C.; Anderson, Richard M.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Carbon Capture and Storage » Regional Science & Innovation » Carbon Capture and Storage » Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent of industrial CO2 emissions; 96 percent of the total land mass; and essentially all the geologic sequestration sites in the U.S. potentially available for carbon storage.

137

New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program June 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The State of New Jersey is the newest member of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program--the centerpiece of national efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The addition of New Jersey, the 43rd state to join the program, helps strengthen U.S. efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. New Jersey--along with Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia--is a regional partner and a participant in the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

138

New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program June 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The State of New Jersey is the newest member of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program--the centerpiece of national efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The addition of New Jersey, the 43rd state to join the program, helps strengthen U.S. efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. New Jersey--along with Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia--is a regional partner and a participant in the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

139

NETL: The Carbon Sequestration Newsletter: July 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 2001 July 2001 This newsletter is produced by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and presents summaries of significant events related to carbon sequestration that have taken place over the past month. TABLE OF CONTENTS Sequestration in the News Events / Announcements from NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program Publications Legislative Activity Related to Carbon Sequestration Sequestration in the News New York Times The June 17 edition of the New York Times contains an article on carbon sequestration in geologic formations, Strategy has a Greenhouse Gas Bottled Up Under Land and Sea. The article mentions President Bush's support of carbon sequestration technologies, the $15 million Southern Saskatchewan project in Weyburn oil fields, and the reactions from environmental groups. Go to the New York Times to find the article by entering "Weyburn" on the web site's search feature.

140

Coal Bed Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COAL BED SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE COAL BED SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE R. Stanton (rstanton@usgs.gov; 703-648-6462) U.S. Geological Survey MS 956 National Center Reston, VA 20192 R. Flores (rflores@usgs.gov; 303-236-7774) U.S. Geological Survey MS 939, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 P.D. Warwick (pwarwick@usgs.gov; 703-648-6469) H. Gluskoter (halg@usgs.gov; 703-648-6429) U.S. Geological Survey MS 956 National Center Reston, VA 20192 G.D. Stricker (303-236-7763) U.S. Geological Survey MS 939, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 Introduction Geologic sequestration of CO 2 generated from fossil fuel combustion may be an environmentally attractive method to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Of the geologic options, sequestering CO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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141

Midwest Transmission Workshop I Summary  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 The meeting was opened with a review of the purposes of the workshop: (1) Present and discuss key studies and assessments of transmission upgrades, additions and related issues for the upper Midwest, including work that addresses the full range of views on these topics; (2) Understand the various transmission issues in the upper Midwest and discuss options for addressing the issues; and (3) Identify the decision makers and entities that need to play an active role if transmission issues are to be resolved, and agree on next steps for engaging these individuals and organizations through education, outreach, and information dissemination.

Kevin Bryan

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NETL: Gasifipedia - Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Carbon sequestration, also termed carbon storage, is the permanent storage of CO2, usually in deep geologic formations. Industrially-generated CO2 -- resulting from fossil fuel combustion, gasification, and other industrial processes -- is injected as a supercritical fluid into geologic reservoirs, where it is held in place by natural traps and seals. Carbon storage is one approach to minimizing atmospheric emissions of man-made CO2. As discussed above, the main purpose of CO2 EOR such as the Weyburn Project is tertiary recovery of crude oil, but in effect substantial CO2 remains sequestered/stored as a result. Current Status of CO2 Storage CO2 storage is currently underway in the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway and the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, have been injecting CO2 into geologic storage formations more than a decade. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, as well. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. In addition, a number of smaller pilot projects are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future long-term CO2 storage. To date, more than 200 small-scale CO2 storage projects have been carried out worldwide. A demonstration project that captures CO2 from a pulverized coal power plant and pipes it to a geologic formation for storage recently came online in Alabama.

143

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

144

Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capture and liquefy CO{sub 2} from ethanol plants in the Illinois area were evaluated so that ethanol plants could be considered as an alternate source for CO{sub 2} in the event that successful enhanced oil recovery tests create the need for additional sources of CO{sub 2} in the area. Estimated equipment and operating costs needed to capture and liquefy 68 metric tonnes/day (75 tons/day) and 272 tonnes/day (300 tons/day) of CO{sub 2} for truck delivery from an ethanol plant are provided. Estimated costs are provided for food/beverage grade CO{sub 2} and also for less purified CO{sub 2} suitable for enhanced oil recovery or sequestration. The report includes preliminary plant and equipment designs and estimates major capital and operating costs for each of the recovery options. Availability of used equipment was assessed.

Robert Finley

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO2. II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100 °C and 1-600 bar.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO CO 2 -H 2 O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO 2 . II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100°C and up to 600 bar. Nicolas Spycher and Karsten Pruess Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, USA September 2004 ABSTRACT Correlations presented by Spycher et al. (2003) to compute the mutual solubilities of CO 2 and H 2 O are extended to include the effect of chloride salts in the aqueous phase. This is accomplished by including, in the original formulation, activity coefficients for aqueous CO 2 derived from several literature sources, primarily for NaCl solutions. Best results are obtained when combining the solubility correlations of Spycher et al. (2003) with the activity coefficient formulation of Rumpf et al. (1994) and Duan and Sun (2003), which

146

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL's NETL's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program Advances of Multi-pollutant and CO 2 Control Technologies Chicago, IL April 30, 2007 Timothy Fout Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory T. Fout, Apr. 2007 Outline for Presentation * NETL Overview * The Issue * The Solutions * What is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * DOE's Sequestration Program Structure * CO 2 Capture Research Projects T. Fout, Apr. 2007 National Energy Technology Laboratory * Only DOE national lab dedicated to fossil energy - Fossil fuels provide 85% of U.S. energy supply * One lab, five locations, one management structure * 1,100 Federal and support-contractor employees * Research spans fundamental science to technology demonstrations West Virginia

147

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Midwest Transmission Workshop II Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 After introductions of all participants, Abby Arnold, RESOLVE, reviewed the purpose of the meeting and the agenda. The purpose of the workshop was to share the results of the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) scenario development for wind and other fuel sources and the corresponding implications for transmission throughout the MISO control area. The workshop agenda is included in Attachment A.

Kevin Bryan

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

149

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Midwest Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Pipelines in the Midwest Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links. Overview Twenty-six interstate and at ...

150

Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Place Carmel, IN References SGIC1 No information has been entered for this organization. Add Organization This article is a...

151

Midwest Energy Cooperative (Ohio) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMidwestEnergyCooperative(Ohio)&oldid412696" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases Utility Companies...

152

Argonne TDC: Midwest Links - Argonne National Laboratory  

Midwest Links . Illinois Tectnology Enterprise Center (ITEC): A state-funded center that opened its doors in Fall 2002 to serve life science / technology based ...

153

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROCEEDINGS Geologic Storage Options and Capacities for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Wickstrom, Lawrence H.;...

154

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 26670 of 28,560 results. Article Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium...

155

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16-19, 2009 Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium www.sequestration.org Illinois Basin Tanquary Field Project Acknowledgements This work is supported by the U.S....

156

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Midwest Renewable Energy Corporation Partners LLC | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind energy Product Iberdrola subsidiary that develops wind farms in Midwest USA and Canada. References Midwest Renewable Energy Corporation Partners LLC1 LinkedIn Connections...

158

DOE Carbon Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Program Charles E. Schmidt Carbon Sequestration Product Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory David J. Beecy Director, Office of Environmental Systems...

159

Midwest Transmission Workshop III Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 On March 12-13, 2002, the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), in cooperation with regional stakeholders, held a two-day workshop: Planning for Electrical Transmission Needs in the Upper Midwest. The workshop was the outgrowth of an effort to develop a forum and process for consideration of transmission options that strives for equitable allocation of benefits and impacts among all affected parties. The goal of this workshop was to provide a catalyst for an enhanced, inclusive process for transmission planning with participation of and acceptance by all affected stakeholders. Participants in the meeting included representatives of state and regional regulatory agencies, utilities and power generators, the wind industry, environmental and landowner interests, and other interested parties (see Attachment A for a list of meeting participants).

Kevin Bryan

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

160

Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery and Blender Net Production of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery and Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels per Day)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

163

The Carbon Sequestration Newsletter: September 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PBS News-Hour with Jim Lehrer On August 6, Spencer Michaels presented a fifteen minute report on carbon sequestration, emphasizing MBARI’s work on ocean sequestration research and the Weyburn geologic sequestration project. For a transcript or video of the report, see CO2: Burial at Sea? PBS News-Hour with Jim Lehrer On August 6, Spencer Michaels presented a fifteen minute report on carbon sequestration, emphasizing MBARI’s work on ocean sequestration research and the Weyburn geologic sequestration project. For a transcript or video of the report, see CO2: Burial at Sea? Washington Post On August 19th Eileen Claussen and Elliot Diringer of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change published an editorial, "The Climate Challenge Begins at Home," which highlights bills currently in congress, including Jefford’s four pollutant bill, the Stevens/Byrd Climate Change Act, and McCain and Lieberman’s Cap-and-Trade proposal. USA Today An August 27th article talks about the United States’ strong reliance on coal and indicated the Bush Administration may look towards coal gasification as a means of reducing GHG emissions.

164

Midwest Underground Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Technology Underground Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Underground Technology Facility Midwest Underground Technology Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Midwest Underground Technology Energy Purchaser Midwest Underground Technology Location Champaign IL Coordinates 40.15020987°, -88.29149723° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.15020987,"lon":-88.29149723,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

165

Mid-West Electric Consumers Association  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mid-West Electric Consumers Association Mid-West Electric Consumers Association 4350 Wadsworth Blvd., Suite 330, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Tel: (303) 463-4979 Fax: (303) 463-8876 April 1, 2009 Transmission Infrastructure Program Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 281213 Lakewood, CO 80228-8213 Comments on the Proposed Adoption of a Transmission Infrastructure Program The Mid-West Electric Consumers Association appreciates the opportunity to comment on the Western Area Power Administration's ("Western" or "WAPA") two Federal Register notices: Notice of Proposed Program and Request for Public Comments, and Notice of Availability of Request for Interest (FRN), published March 4, 2009 (pp. 9392-9393). The Mid-West Electric Consumers Association was founded in 1958 as the regional

166

Environment Midwest, January 1977 through December 1977  

SciTech Connect

This document compiles the January 1977 through December 1977 issuances of ENVIRONMENT MIDWEST into a single volume. This periodical publication reports on environmental protection in the midwestern United States.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Midwest Energy Cooperative (Indiana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indiana) Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Energy Cooperative Place Indiana Utility Id 12377 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

168

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the...

170

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide T. Mill (ted.mill@sri.com; 650-859-3605) SRI, PS273 333 Ravenswood Menlo Park, CA 94025 D. Ross (dsross3@yahoo.com; 650-327-3842) U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg 15 MS 999 345 Middlefield Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Introduction The United States currently meets 80% of its energy needs by burning fossil fuels to form CO 2 . The combustion-based production of CO 2 has evolved into a major environmental challenge that extends beyond national borders and the issue has become as politically charged as it is technologically demanding. Whereas CO 2 levels in the atmosphere had remained stable over the 10,000 years preceeding the industrial revolution, that event initiated rapid growth in CO 2 levels over the past 150 years (Stevens, 2000). The resulting accelerating accumulation of

171

SWP Carbon Sequestration Training Center  

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Training Center Presentation, Training Center Presentation, October 2010 SWP Carbon Sequestration Training Center Principal Investigators: New Mexico Tech, Andrew Campbell and Peter Mozley University of Utah, Brian McPherson Texas A&M University, Tarla Peterson SWP Training Center Presentation, October 2010 Background  Funded by DOE/NETL.  Purpose is to train more scientists and engineers for work in geological sequestration.  Three year grant.  Designed to be self sustaining. SWP Training Center Presentation, October 2010 Our goal is provide education about CCS at a variety of educational levels in order to promote a pipeline of future CCS scientists and engineers.  High School  K-12 Teachers  Undergraduate  Graduate  Professionals  Outreach SWP Training Center Presentation,

172

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

173

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

174

CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN COAL: CHARACTERIZATION OF MATRIX DEFORMATION, SORPTION CAPACITY AND DYNAMIC PERMEABILITY AT IN-SITU STRESS CONDITIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in geological formation is one of the climate change mitigation options. The successful application of this technology is dependent on (more)

Pone, Jean Denis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Midwest Grain Processors MGP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest Grain Processors MGP Midwest Grain Processors MGP Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Grain Processors (MGP) Place Lakota, Iowa Zip 50451 Product Iowa-based bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock. Coordinates 48.042535°, -98.335979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.042535,"lon":-98.335979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Carbon Capture and Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration...

177

Carbon Sequestration - Public Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Meeting Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Public Meeting May 18, 2004 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Technology Manager Carbon Sequestration Program Overview * What is Carbon Sequestration * The Fossil Energy Situation * Greenhouse Gas Implications * Pathways to Greenhouse Gas Stabilization * Sequestration Program Overview * Program Requirements & Structure * Regional Partnerships * FutureGen * Sources of Information What is Carbon Sequestration? Capture can occur: * at the point of emission * when absorbed from air Storage locations include: * underground reservoirs * dissolved in deep oceans * converted to solid materials * trees, grasses, soils, or algae Capture and storage of CO 2 and other Greenhouse Gases that

178

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) could become an instrumental part of a future carbon trading system in the US. If the US starts operating an emissions trading scheme (ETS) similar to that of the European Union's then limits on CO{sub 2} emissions will be conservative in the beginning stages. The government will most likely start by distributing most credits for free; these free credits are called allowances. The US may follow the model of the EU ETS, which during the first five-year phase distributed 95% of the credits for free, bringing that level down to 90% for the second five-year phase. As the number of free allowances declines, companies will be forced to purchase an increasing number of credits at government auction, or else obtain them from companies selling surplus credits. In addition to reducing the number of credits allocated for free, with each subsequent trading period the number of overall credits released into the market will decline in an effort to gradually reduce overall emissions. Companies may face financial difficulty as the value of credits continues to rise due to the reduction of the number of credits available in the market each trading period. Governments operating emissions trading systems face the challenge of achieving CO{sub 2} emissions targets without placing such a financial burden on their companies that the country's economy is markedly affected.

Hoversten, Shanna

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_________________________________________________________________________ 91 Figure 13: Monitoring in Natural Gas Storage Fields___________________________________ 102 Monitoring Approaches_____________________________________________ 68 Table 7: Gas Storage Fields with Some Type of Natural Gas Leak_________________________ 88 Table 8: Remediation Options for CO2 Leakage from

180

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................123 #12; vii Natural Gas Storage Regulatory Programs..................................................................66 Table 7: Gas Storage Fields with Some Type of Natural Gas Leak............................................................................................................................................92 Figure 13: Monitoring in Natural Gas Storage Fields

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181

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Assessment of Geological Carbon An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin A DOE Regional Sequestration Partnership A DOE Regional Sequestration Partnership Current Status: May 2005 Current Status: May 2005 MGSC Project Team MGSC Project Team Presented by Presented by Robert J. Finley Robert J. Finley Illinois State Geological Survey Illinois State Geological Survey Midwest Geological Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium Sequestration Consortium Midwest Geological Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) A DOE Regional Partnership A DOE Regional Partnership   Led by Illinois State Geological Survey in Led by Illinois State Geological Survey in collaboration with the Indiana and Kentucky collaboration with the Indiana and

184

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and biomass burning are the dominant contributors to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and global warming. Many approaches to mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions are being pursued, and among the most promising are terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. Recent advances in ecology and microbial biology offer promising new possibilities for enhancing terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. A workshop was held October 29, 2007, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration (BECS). The workshop participants (approximately 30 scientists from California, Illinois, Oregon, Montana, and New Mexico) developed a prioritized list of research needed to make progress in the development of biological enhancements to improve terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. The workshop participants also identified a number of areas of supporting science that are critical to making progress in the fundamental research areas. The purpose of this position paper is to summarize and elaborate upon the findings of the workshop. The paper considers terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration separately. First, we present a summary in outline form of the research roadmaps for terrestrial and geologic BECS. This outline is elaborated upon in the narrative sections that follow. The narrative sections start with the focused research priorities in each area followed by critical supporting science for biological enhancements as prioritized during the workshop. Finally, Table 1 summarizes the potential significance or 'materiality' of advances in these areas for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

Oldenburg, Curtis; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Torn, Margaret S.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

NETL: News Release - DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 17, 2008 November 17, 2008 DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration Atlas New Version Provides Additional Information on Carbon Dioxide Storage 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas II WASHINGTON, D. C.- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the release of its second Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada, which documents more than 3,500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential in oil and gas reservoirs, coal seams, and saline formations. Preliminary estimates suggest the availability of more than 1,100 years of CO2 storage for the United States and Canada in these geologic formations. "In the year since it was first published, the carbon sequestration atlas has proven to be an invaluable tool to the entire sequestration community," said Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy James Slutz. "The second edition will bolster our efforts to find environmentally sound, cost-effective methods to sequester carbon dioxide."

187

HigHligHts NETL News Release, "Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO 2 Injection into Michigan Basin." The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), has commenced a two-month field test that will inject up to 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into a saline formation some 3,200 to 3,500 feet below the Earth's surface. The Core Energy-owned, Antrim gas field location advantageously provides the project with a DTE Energy-owned gas processing plant that supplies the CO 2 ; an eight-mile CO 2 pipeline previously used for enhanced oil

188

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Production Refineries Etc.... C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 Carbon Sequestration Program Goals * Deliver technologies & best practices that validate:...

189

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to plan for potential CO{sub 2} mitigation mandates, utilities need better information on CO{sub 2} mitigation options, especially carbon sequestration options that involve non-utility operations. One of the major difficulties in evaluating CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies and practices, both geologic storage of captured CO{sub 2} and storage in biological sinks, is obtaining consistent, transparent, accurate, and comparable economics. This project is comparing the economics of major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} sequestration, including captured CO{sub 2} storage options such as active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of biological sinks such as forests and croplands. An international group of experts has been assembled to compare on a consistent basis the economics of this diverse array of CO{sub 2} sequestration options. Designs and data collection are nearly complete for each of the CO{sub 2} sequestration options being compared. Initial spreadsheet development has begun on concepts involving storage of captured CO{sub 2}. No significant problems have been encountered, but some additional outside expertise will be accessed to supplement the team's expertise in the areas of life cycle analysis, oil and gas exploration and production, and comparing CO{sub 2} sequestration options that differ in timing and permanence of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Plans for the next reporting period are to complete data collection and a first approximation of the spreadsheet. We expect to complete this project on time and on budget.

Bert R. Bock; Richard G. Rhudy; David E. Nichols

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

191

NETL: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Carbon Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded cooperative agreements to seven Regional Carbon Sequestration...

192

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Development Phase Field Tests Pittsburgh, PA October 5, 2010...

193

Midwest Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest Electric Member Corp Midwest Electric Member Corp Place Nebraska Utility Id 12539 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Irrigation(All-Energy and Demand Charges) Commercial Large Power Industrial Rural Residential Residential School & Churches - Single Phase School & Churches - Three Phase Security Lights Metered Lighting Security Lights Unmetered Lighting Single-Phase Commercial - Monthly Commercial Single-Phase Dryer Service Commercial

194

Midwest, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest, Wyoming: Energy Resources Midwest, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.4113604°, -106.2800242° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.4113604,"lon":-106.2800242,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

Midwest Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest Energy Cooperative Midwest Energy Cooperative Place Michigan Utility Id 12377 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png CONTROLLED WATER HEATING SERVICE SCHEDULE CWH (40 Gal) Residential CONTROLLED WATER HEATING SERVICE SCHEDULE CWH (80 Gal) Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE SCHEDULE A Residential FARM AND HOME TIME-OF-USE SERVICE SCHEDULE A-TOU Residential FARM AND HOME TOU SERVICE PILOT SCHEDULE A-TOU PILOT Residential GENERAL SERVICE - Single Phase Commercial GENERAL SERVICE - Three Phase Commercial

196

Midwest Renewable Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Corporation Place Joice, Iowa Zip Iowa 50446 Sector Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Midwest Renewable Energy Corporation (MREC) is a wind energy project developer in the Midwest USA and Canada. Coordinates 43.362225°, -93.458114° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.362225,"lon":-93.458114,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

Shale caprock integrity under carbon sequestration conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration technology requires injection and storage of large volumes of carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) in subsurface geological formations. Shale caprock which constitutes more than 60% of effective seals for geologic hydrocarbon bearing formations are therefore of considerable interest in underground CO 2 storage into depleted oil and gas formations. This study investigated experimentally shale caprocks geophysical and geochemical behavior when in contact with aqueous CO 2 over a long period of time. The primary concern is a potential increase in hydraulic conductivity of clay-rich rocks as a result of acidic brine-rock minerals geochemical interactions. Both

Abiola Olabode; Lauren Bentley; Mileva Radonjic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Midwest Independent System Operator (Multiple States) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent System Operator (Multiple States) Independent System Operator (Multiple States) Midwest Independent System Operator (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Interconnection Provider Midwest Independent System Operator Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) is a Regional Transmission Organization, which administers wholesale electricity markets in all or parts of 11 U.S. states and the Canadian province of Manitoba. MISO administers electricity transmission grids across the Midwest and into Canada, and provides tools, transmission planning strategies, and integration for utilities in those markets.

199

Midwest gasoline prices returning to normal - Today in Energy - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As previously reported, Midwest gasoline prices shot up in April and May with refinery outagessome planned, some notthat lasted longer than expected, thus ...

200

Midwest Renewable Energy Services LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest Renewable Energy Services LLC Place Florida Zip FL 33408 Sector Services, Wind energy Product MRE Services provides scheduling services to deliver a substantial portion of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Diesel Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Cat. Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Midwest (PADD 2) Downstream Charge Capacity of ...

202

Midwest Gasoline and Distillate Fuel Near-Term Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reviewed the potential Midwest petroleum supply-demand balance and its implications for price behavior in the fourth quarter of 2001.

Information Center

2001-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

Midwest Renewable Energy Projects LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Projects LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Renewable Energy Projects LLC Place Florida Zip FL 33408 Sector Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product MRE Projects LLC is a...

204

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

205

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Studies Sequestration Studies Introduction, Issues and Plans Philip Goldberg National Energy Technology Laboratory Workshop on CO 2 Sequestration with Minerals August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Program Research effort seeks to refine and validate a promising CO 2 sequestration technology option, mineral sequestration also known as mineral carbonation Goals: * Understand the fundamental mechanisms involved in mineral carbonation * Generate data to support process development * Operate continuous, integrated small-scale process unit to support design Current Partnerships In order to effectively develop Mineral Sequestration, a multi-laboratory Working Group was formed in the Summer of 1998, participants include: * Albany Research Center * Arizona State University * Los Alamos National Laboratory

206

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

Brian McPherson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Coalbed Methane Test 1 FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium Contacts: DOENETL Project Mgr. Name...

208

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is a diverse partnership covering eleven states involving the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) an interstate compact; regulatory agencies and/or geological surveys from member states; the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); academic institutions; a Native American enterprise; and multiple entities from the private sector. Figure 1 shows the team structure for the partnership. In addition to the Technical Team, the Technology Coalition, an alliance of auxiliary participants, in the project lends yet more strength and support to the project. The Technology Coalition, with its diverse representation of various sectors, is integral to the technical information transfer, outreach, and public perception activities of the partnership. The Technology Coalition members, shown in Figure 2, also provide a breadth of knowledge and capabilities in the multiplicity of technologies needed to assure a successful outcome to the project and serve as an extremely important asset to the partnership. The eleven states comprising the multi-state region are: Alabama; Arkansas; Florida; Georgia; Louisiana; Mississippi; North Carolina; South Carolina; Tennessee; Texas; and Virginia. The states making up the SECARB area are illustrated in Figure 3. The primary objectives of the SECARB project include: (1) Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program by promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. This requires the development of relevant data to reduce the uncertainties and risks that are barriers to sequestration, especially for geologic storage in the SECARB region. Information and knowledge are the keys to establishing a regional carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage industry with public acceptance. (2) Supporting the President's Global Climate Change Initiative with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by 2012. A corollary to the first objective, this objective requires the development of a broad awareness across government, industry, and the general public of sequestration issues and establishment of the technological and legal frameworks necessary to achieve the President's goal. The information developed by the SECARB team will play a vital role in achieving the President's goal for the southeastern region of the United States. (3) Evaluating options and potential opportunities for regional CO{sub 2} sequestration. This requires characterization of the region regarding the presence and location of sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), primarily CO{sub 2}, the presence and location of potential carbon sinks and geological parameters, geographical features and environmental concerns, demographics, state and interstate regulations, and existing infrastructure.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

NETL: 2010 - Carbon Sequestration Peer Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Peer Review Carbon Sequestration Peer Review During March 15 - 19, 2010, a total of 16 projects from NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program were peer reviewed....

210

"Table HC12.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total...

211

Table HC12.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating Characteristics East North Central West North Central Midwest Census Region U.S. Housing Units (millions) Census Division Total Midwest

212

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Review Meeting October 12-14, 2005 Table of Contents Agenda PDF-1438KB Phase I Program Review Meeting Phase II Kick-Off Meeting Phase...

213

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co Co 2 SequeStration Potential of texaS low-rank CoalS Background Fossil fuel combustion is the primary source of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a major greenhouse gas. Sequestration of CO 2 by injecting it into geologic formations, such as coal seams, may offer a viable method for reducing atmospheric CO 2 emissions. Injection into coal seams has the potential added benefit of enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The potential for CO 2 sequestration in low-rank coals, while as yet undetermined, is believed to differ significantly from that for bituminous coals. To evaluate the feasibility and the environmental, technical, and economic impacts of CO 2 sequestration in Texas low-rank coal beds, the Texas Engineering Experimental Station is conducting a four-year study

214

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation  

SciTech Connect

Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration into an immobile form. Until recently the scientific focus of mineralization reactions with reservoir rocks has been those that follow an aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation mechanism, driven by the sharp reduction in pH that occurs with CO2 partitioning into the aqueous phase. For sedimentary basin formations the kinetics of aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation reactions are sufficiently slow to make the role of mineralization trapping insignificant over a century period. For basaltic saline formations aqueous-phase mineralization progresses at a substantially higher rate, making the role of mineralization trapping significant, if not dominant, over a century period. The overlooked mineralization reactions for both sedimentary and basaltic saline formations, however, are those that occur in liquid or supercritical CO2 phase; where, dissolved water appears to play a catalyst role in the formation of carbonate minerals. A model is proposed in this paper that describes mineral carbonation over sequestration reservoir conditions ranging from dissolved CO2 in aqueous brine to dissolved water in supercritical CO2. The model theory is based on a review of recent experiments directed at understanding the role of water in mineral carbonation reactions of interest in geologic sequestration systems occurring under low water contents.

White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Midwest www.midwestCHPTAP.org John Cuttica University of Illinois at Chicago 312-996-4382 cuttica@uic.edu Cliff Haefke University of Illinois at Chicago 312-355-3476 chaefk1@uic.edu Illinois Adkins Energy, Lena Advocate South Suburban Hospital, Hazel Crest Antioch Community High School, Antioch Elgin Community College, Elgin Evanston Township High School, Evanston Hunter Haven Farms, Inc., Pearl City Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest

216

DOE Recognizes Midwest Industrial Efficiency Leaders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Industrial Efficiency Leaders Midwest Industrial Efficiency Leaders DOE Recognizes Midwest Industrial Efficiency Leaders September 10, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis DETROIT, MI - The U.S. Department of Energy and Michigan Governor Jennifer M. Granholm joined with over 300 industry, state, and federal leaders to recognize industrial efficiency leaders and plot a course to accelerate industrial energy efficiency in the Midwest. As part of the Midwest Industrial Energy Efficiency Exchange that began last night and continued today, Governor Granholm and DOE announced 11 Save Energy Now awards recognizing industry leaders for their exemplary energy saving accomplishments. Attendees at the Energy Efficiency Exchange also had an opportunity to learn about new energy saving technologies and ways to

217

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of April 1, 2005-September 30, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. While Phase 2 planning is well under way, the content of this report focuses exclusively on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period. Progress during this period was focused in the three areas: geological carbon storage capacity in New Mexico, terrestrial sequestration capacity for the project area, and the Integrated Assessment Model efforts. The geologic storage capacity of New Mexico was analyzed and Blanco Mesaverde (which extends into Colorado) and Basin Dakota Pools were chosen as top two choices for the further analysis for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the system dynamics model preliminary analysis. Terrestrial sequestration capacity analysis showed that the four states analyzed thus far (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) have relatively limited potential to sequester carbon in terrestrial systems, mainly due to the aridity of these areas, but the large land area offered could make up for the limited capacity per hectare. Best opportunities were thought to be in eastern Colorado/New Mexico. The Integrated Assessment team expanded the initial test case model to include all New Mexico sinks and sources in a new, revised prototype model in 2005. The allocation mechanism, or ''String of Pearls'' concept, utilizes potential pipeline routes as the links between all combinations of the source to various sinks. This technique lays the groundwork for future, additional ''String of Pearls'' analyses throughout the SW Partnership and other regions as well.

Brian McPherson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Midwest Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Address 1330 Canterbury Road Place Hays, Kansas Zip 67601 Product Electricity Natural Gas Number of employees 201-500 Phone number 785-625-3437 Website www.mwenergy.com/elecrate Utility Id 12524 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Midwest Energy Inc. Smart Grid Project was awarded $712,257 Recovery Act

220

Midwest Electric, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric, Inc Electric, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Electric, Inc Place Ohio Zip 45885 Year founded 1936 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 1-800-962-3830 Website www.midwestrec.com Coordinates 40.5396595°, -84.3962535° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5396595,"lon":-84.3962535,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Midwest Renewable Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Renewable Energy LLC Place Sutherland, Nebraska Zip 69165 Product 25mmgy (94.6m litre/y) ethanol producer. Coordinates 37.19651°, -77.561418° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.19651,"lon":-77.561418,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Overview R&D Overview Office of Fossil Energy Justin "Judd" R. Swift Asst. Secretary for International Affairs Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2 nd U.S/China CO 2 Emission Control Science & Technology Symposium May 28-29, 2008 Hangzhou, China Office of Fossil Energy Technological Carbon Management Options Improve Efficiency Sequester Carbon  Renewables  Nuclear  Fuel Switching  Demand Side  Supply Side  Capture & Store  Enhance Natural Sinks Reduce Carbon Intensity All options needed to:  Affordably meet energy demand  Address environmental objectives Office of Fossil Energy DOE's Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure Regional Carbon Sequestration

225

CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS  

SciTech Connect

An area planted in 2004 on Bent Mountain in Pike County was shifted to the Department of Energy project to centralize an area to become a demonstration site. An additional 98.3 acres were planted on Peabody lands in western Kentucky and Bent Mountain to bring the total area under study by this project to 556.5 acres as indicated in Table 2. Major efforts this quarter include the implementation of new plots that will examine the influence of differing geologic material on tree growth and survival, water quality and quantity and carbon sequestration. Normal monitoring and maintenance was conducted and additional instrumentation was installed to monitor the new areas planted.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pavan Balaji selected as TEDxMidwest Emerging Leader | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

selected as TEDxMidwest Emerging Leader May 14, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Pavan Balaji, a computer scientist in Argonne's Mathematics and Computer Science Division, was selected as a...

227

Midwest (PADD 2) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 0: 0: 0: 0: ...

228

Midwest (PADD 2) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981-4-34-7: 14: ...

229

A Climatic Review of Summer 1983 in the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The review of the climate of the summer of 1983 and associated economic impacts were collated by the state climatologists of 12 states of the Upper Midwest. Their data archives and facilities permitted relatively fast analysis of cooperative ...

W. M. Wendland; L. D. Bark; D. R. Clark; R. B. Curry; J. W. Enz; K. G. Hubbard; V. Jones; E. L. Kuehnast; W. Lytle; J. Newman; F. V. Nurnberger; P. Waite

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Carbon Sequestration Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science July 2001 Focus Area Overview Presentation Mission and Scope Program Relationships Scientific Challenges Research Plans Facility Plans Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area New Projects Contribute to Sequestration Science Systems Integration Virtual Simulation of CO 2 Capture Technologies Cleanup Stream Gas Gasification Gasification MEA CO 2 Capture Facility Oxygen Membrane 3 km 2 inch tube 800m - 20 °C, 20 atm Liquid CO 2 , 100 tons ~1 kg CO 2 / s = 5 MW ^ CO 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels CO 2 Sequestration Aquifer H 2 O Flue gas H 2 O CH 4 CH 4 CO 2 Oil field Oil well Power plant CH 4 Coal - bed Aquiclude H 2 O CO 2 /N 2 CO 2 N 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 Water Rock , 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels Combustor Oxygen Membrane Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area

231

Water Balance of the 1993 Midwest Flood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout the spring and summer months of 1993, extended rainfall throughout much of the Midwestern United States caused record flooding that inundated much of the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB). Precipitation in May was more then twice the normal over an area that extended from southeastern South Dakota across Iowa to eastern Kansas. From early June to the end of July, high amounts of precipitation persisted over the upper Midwest (Wahl, et al., 1993). USGS records indicated that at 45 streamflow gauging stations, the peak discharge recorded during 1993 had recurrence intervals of greater than 100 years. However, because of the natural and man-made changes in the flood region, some sites had less-than-record peak discharges (Parret, et al., 1993). The storage of large volumes of water in reservoirs significantly reduced the peak flow and flood damages downstream from the dams (Southard, 1993). Following the 1993 Midwest flood, President Clinton established the Scientific Assessment and Strategy Team (SAST) on November 24, 1993, to study the effects of the flood and to make recommendations about future flood preparedness. The SAST joined the Interagency Floodplain Management Review Committee (FMRC) on January 10, 1994 (FMRC, 1994). As part of this effort, the SAST project identified a need for a daily water balance of the flooded area to determine how much water fell and how quickly it moved through the landscape. There were two significant policy issues resulting from the flood: (1) how did the flood volume and velocity of flow increase by land use changes associated with agricultural development in the Midwest, including extensive drainage of wetlands; and (2) what plan should be adopted for restoration of failed levee systems. The first of these questions is hydrologic, the second, hydraulic. The hydraulic issues were addressed by the SAST project and related efforts by modeling the motion of water through the main tributaries of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers where the major levee failures occurred. The hydrologic questions were not so readily addressed because of the huge region affected by the flood, some 700,000 km2 in area. Flood hydrology models are normally applied to regions 100 to 1,000 times smaller than this area. Thus, the need for the present study arose to model the movement of water through the landscape of the SAST study area by constructing a daily water balance in a series of subwatersheds in the flooded area. A USGS WEB site designated for SAST is located at: http://edcwww2.cr.usgs.gov/sast-home.html . Figure 1.1 shows the location and the extent of the SAST study area. This region covers all of the UMRB above St. Louis and that portion of the Missouri Basin whose drainage enters the Missouri River by watershed (Missouri, Platte, Kansas, Osage, and Gasconade Rivers). The contribution of the remainder of the Missouri Basin was accounted for by using gauged data from tributary flows at the border of the study region. The goal of this project was to calculate the daily water balance for the SAST region for 1993. A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to determine the balance. GIS offers a technology to formulate more objective and consistent methods to synthesize collected data and to assess water quality and quantity over large areas (Maidment, 1996). The spatial resolution of the SAST region was defined by the location of discharge gauging stations as well as the completeness and quality of the discharge record. The preliminary analysis was performed using daily discharge values recorded at 261 USGS stations from 01/01/1993 to 09/30/1993. The final water balance was estimated for 132 watersheds defined by the stations that have a complete discharge record for all days of 1993. The cumulative storage values were then spatially averaged over 4

Mizgalewicz, Pawel J.; Maidment, David R.; White, W. Scott; Ridd, Merrill K.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Wind Farm KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Wind Farm Facility KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Energy Purchaser KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Location IA Coordinates 42.4837°, -96.3068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4837,"lon":-96.3068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

2008 Midwest Levee Failure: Erosion Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States contains an estimated 100,000 miles (160000 km) of levees in which erosion related issues are the top priorities. Proper documentation of overtopping induced erosion is a complicated issue involving the collection and analysis of timesensitive field data and personal observations. This thesis is a study of the performance of the Midwest Levee system during the 2008 flooding events. The goal of the Midwest Levee investigation was to gather and analyze perishable data in an effort to provide a comprehensive overview at each breach location. To predict how a site will perform during a particular flood event, there are three main inputs: the flood conditions, the site conditions, and the soil properties. Site geometry and imperfections can greatly affect the performance of a levee system. Any low spots or potential seepage paths can concentrate the flow and be detrimental to the levee. The vegetative cover is the single most important condition at a site. As seen in the Brevator case, vegetative armor can prevent failure of a levee comprised of less resistant soils subjected to long periods of overtopping. Recommended grasses include: Switchgrass, Smooth Brome, Reed Canarygrass, and Tall Fescue. It is also recommended that grasses are kept at least 0.5 m tall during the flood season and to limit the presence of trees to 10 m beyond the levee toe. The erosion resistance of the materials comprising the levee is also important. From the correlations in this study, it was determined that erodibility is influenced by grain size, relative compaction, clay content, and activity. Devices like the Torvane and Pocket Erodometer can also be used to get a quick field estimate of erosion. While these correlations and field devices give insight into an erodibility value, they are no substitute for site specific analysis with laboratory equipment such as the Erosion Function Apparatus. Soil behavior is highly nonlinear and the entire erosion function is needed to get an accurate measure of the erodibility of a soil. By combining these properties in an erosion matrix, a prediction of whether a site will withstand a given flood event can be made.

Bernhardt, Michelle Lee

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers is estimated to be as high as 1,000 gigatonnes of CO2.(IPCC). Published reports on the potential for sequestration fail to address the necessity of storing CO2 in a closed system. This work addresses issues related to sequestration of CO2 in closed aquifers and the risk associated with aquifer pressurization. Through analytical modeling we show that the required volume for storage and the number of injection wells required are more than what has been envisioned, which renders geologic sequestration of CO2 a profoundly nonfeasible option for the management of CO2 emissions unless brine is produced to create voidage and pressure relief. The results from our analytical model match well with a numerical reservoir simulator including the multiphase physics of CO2 sequestration. Rising aquifer pressurization threatens the seal integrity and poses a risk of CO2 leakage. Hence, monitoring the long-term integrity of CO2 storage reservoirs will be a critical aspect for making geologic sequestration a safe, effective and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. Verification of long-term CO2 residence in receptor formations and quantification of possible CO2 leaks are required for developing a risk assessment framework. Important aspects of pressure falloff tests for CO2 storage reservoirs are discussed with a focus on reservoir pressure monitoring and leakage detection. The importance of taking regular pressure falloffs for a commercial sequestration project and how this can help in diagnosing an aquifer leak will be discussed. The primary driver for leakage in bulk phase injection is the buoyancy of CO2 under typical deep reservoir conditions. Free-phase CO2 below the top seal is prone to leak if a breach happens in the top seal. Consequently, another objective of this research is to propose a way to engineer the CO2 injection system in order to accelerate CO2 dissolution and trapping. The engineered system eliminates the buoyancy-driven accumulation of free gas and avoids aquifer pressurization by producing brine out of the system. Simulations for 30 years of CO2 injection followed by 1,000 years of natural gradient show how CO2 can be securely and safely stored in a relatively smaller closed aquifer volume and with a greater storage potential. The engineered system increases CO2 dissolution and capillary trapping over what occurs under the bulk phase injection of CO2. This thesis revolves around identification, monitoring and mitigation of the risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration.

Anchliya, Abhishek

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) of the project (October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, no changes occurred during the fifth or sixth quarters of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, refinements have been made to the general mapping and screening of sources and sinks. Integration and geographical information systems (GIS) mapping is ongoing. Characterization during this period was focused on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB continues to expand upon its assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has used results of a survey and focus group meeting to refine approaches that are being taken to educate and involve the public. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB has evaluated findings from work performed during the first 18-months. The focus of the project team has shifted from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team is developing an integrated approach to implementing the most promising opportunities and in setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. Milestones completed during the fifth and sixth project quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Predicting and Evaluating the Effectiveness of Ocean Carbon Sequestration by Direct Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the ocean is a potentially effective carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection and develop the appropriate analytic framework to allow us to compare the effectiveness of this strategy with other carbon management options. Here, after a brief review of direct oceanic injection, we estimate the effectiveness of ocean carbon sequestration using one dimensional and three dimensional ocean models. We discuss a new measure of effectiveness of carbon sequestration in a leaky reservoir, which we denote sequestration potential. The sequestration potential is the fraction of global warning cost avoided by sequestration in a reservoir. We show how these measures apply to permanent sequestration and sequestration in leaky reservoirs, such as the oceans, terrestrial biosphere, and some geologic formations. Under the assumptions of a constant cost of carbon emission and a 4% discount rate, injecting 900 m deep in the ocean avoids {approx}90% of the global warming cost associated with atmospheric emission; an injection 1700 m deep would avoid > 99 % of the global warming cost. Hence, for discount rates in the range commonly used by commercial enterprises, oceanic direct injection may be nearly as economically effective as permanent sequestration at avoiding global warming costs.

Caldeira, K; Herzog, H J; Wickett, M E

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION THE UNITED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is investigating the CO 2 storage potential of the abundant oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal, and saline formations within the southwestern United States. In 2010, field-scale pilot injection tests were completed, paving the way for larger scale commercial projects, including an EOR project in Texas using an anthropogenic source of CO 2 . SWP draws on the experience of professionals within the fields of geology, engineering, economics, public policy, public outreach, and education. Stakeholders in SWP projects include private industry,

238

Terrestrial Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program Capture and Storage of Carbon in Terrestrial Ecosystems Background Clean, affordable energy is essential for U.S. prosperity and security in the 21st century. More than half of the electricity currently generated in the United States comes from coal-fired boilers, and there is little indication that this percentage will diminish through 2020 and beyond. In addition, the use of coal for electricity generation is projected to more than double in developing nations by 2020. This ever growing demand for fossil-fuel-based power and the consequential rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations requires innovative methods to capture and store CO 2 . Terrestrial ecosystems, which include both soil and vegetation, are widely recognized

239

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

240

WCM Decisionmakers Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Midwest Geological Sequestration the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium - Sequestration Technology Transfer Center (MGSC-STTC) Sallie E. Greenberg Advanced Energy Technology Initiative Illinois State Geological Survey Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium greenberg@isgs.illinois.edu November 18, 2009 * DOE Kickoff Meeting * Pittsburgh, PA MGSC-STTC Vision  Technical training  Academic career path development  Network of universities  Training faculty members  Revenue through grants, fundraising, product sales, course tuition  Satisfying technical training needs, while creating ways to transfer knowledge in more sustainable long-term setting  Continuing to foster connections and build communication framework for general outreach, Phase II, and Phase III

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural CO2 Analogs for Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report summarizes research conducted at three naturally occurring geologic CO{sub 2} fields in the US. The fields are natural analogs useful for the design of engineered long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in geologic formations. Geologic, engineering, and operational databases were developed for McElmo Dome in Colorado; St. Johns Dome in Arizona and New Mexico; and Jackson Dome in Mississippi. The three study sites stored a total of 2.4 billion t (46 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} equivalent to 1.5 years of power plant emissions in the US and comparable in size with the largest proposed sequestration projects. The three CO{sub 2} fields offer a scientifically useful range of contrasting geologic settings (carbonate vs. sandstone reservoir; supercritical vs. free gas state; normally pressured vs. overpressured), as well as different stages of commercial development (mostly undeveloped to mature). The current study relied mainly on existing data provided by the CO{sub 2} field operator partners, augmented with new geochemical data. Additional study at these unique natural CO{sub 2} accumulations could further help guide the development of safe and cost-effective design and operation methods for engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites.

Scott H. Stevens; B. Scott Tye

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

SWP Carbon Sequestration Training Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Center Presentation, October 2010 SWP Carbon Sequestration Training Center Principal Investigators: New Mexico Tech, Andrew Campbell and Peter Mozley University of Utah,...

243

Carbon Sequestration in European Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments...

244

NETL: News Release - Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 10, 2004 Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program Adds Partners Seven States, Thirteen Organizations Added; Will Help Develop Sequestration Options WASHINGTON, DC -...

245

Carbon Sequestration Conference | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Sequestration Conference Carbon Sequestration Conference May 9, 2006 - 10:37am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you. It's a pleasure for me...

246

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable...

247

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Title Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Price, Phillip N.,...

248

Sequestration of CO2 by Ocean Fertilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation for NETL Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 SEQUESTRATION OF CO 2 BY OCEAN FERTILIZATION Authors: Dr. Michael Markels, Jr. (Markels@greenseaventure.com...

249

NETL: Carbon Storage - Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSLF Carbon Storage Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum CSLF Logo The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) is a voluntary climate initiative of industrially developed and...

250

U.S. DOE Carbon Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Program Sarah M. Forbes - National Energy Technology Laboratory IBC's Carbon Sequestration Conference October 24-25, 2002 Houston, Texas SMK - LERDWG - 10902 2 *...

251

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 January Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important...

252

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate...

253

Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (Multiple States) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Tracking System (Multiple States) Renewable Energy Tracking System (Multiple States) Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Illinois Program Type Green Power Purchasing Provider MidWest ISO The Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS®) tracks renewable energy generation in participating States and Provinces and assists in verifying compliance with individual state/provincial or voluntary Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) and objectives. M-RETS® is a tool to keep track of all relevant information about renewable energy produced and delivered in the region. Currently, several States and Provinces participate in M-RETS®: Illinois,

254

Midwest Energy Inc. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest Energy Inc. Midwest Energy Inc. Country United States Headquarters Location Hays, Kansas Recovery Act Funding $712,257.00 Total Project Value $1,424,514.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Midwest Energy Inc. Smart Grid Project Coordinates 38.8791783°, -99.3267702° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

255

Remote Sensing of Flooding in the U.S. Upper Midwest during the Summer of 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. upper Midwest was subjected to severe flooding during the summer of 1993. Heavy rainfall in the Mississippi River basin from April through July caused flooding of many Midwest rivers, including the Mississippi, Illinois, Missouri, and ...

Liam E. Gumley; Michael D. King

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

North Woods River: The St. Croix River in Upper Midwest History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

>, PhD Student, Department of History, PO Box 6023, BuildingRiver in Upper Midwest History. By McMahon, Eileen M. andRiver in Upper Midwest History. Madison, WI: University of

Karalus, Daniel E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Sequestration and Enhanced Coal Bed Methane: Tanquary Farms Test Site, Wabash County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a pilot project to test storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot was conducted at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois. A four-well design?? an injection well and three monitoring wells??was developed and implemented, based on numerical modeling and permeability estimates from literature and field data. Coal cores were taken during the drilling process and were characterized in detail in the lab. Adsorption isotherms indicated that at least three molecules of CO{sub 2} can be stored for each displaced methane (CH{sub 4}) molecule. Microporosity contributes significantly to total porosity. Coal characteristics that affect sequestration potential vary laterally between wells at the site and vertically within a given seam, highlighting the importance of thorough characterization of injection site coals to best predict CO{sub 2} storage capacity. Injection of CO{sub 2} gas took place from June 25, 2008, to January 13, 2009. A ??continuous? injection period ran from July 21, 2008, to December 23, 2008, but injection was suspended several times during this period due to equipment failures and other interruptions. Injection equipment and procedures were adjusted in response to these problems. Approximately 92.3 tonnes (101.7 tons) of CO{sub 2} were injected over the duration of the project, at an average rate of 0.93 tonne (1.02 tons) per day, and a mode injection rate of 0.6??0.7 tonne/day (0.66??0.77 ton/day). A Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) program was set up to detect CO{sub 2 leakage. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels were monitored as were indirect indicators of CO{sub 2} leakage such as plant stress, changes in gas composition at wellheads, and changes in several shallow groundwater characteristics (e.g., alkalinity, pH, oxygen content, dissolved solids, mineral saturation indices, and isotopic distribution). Results showed that there was no CO{sub 2} leakage into groundwater or CO{sub 2} escape at the surface. Post-injection cased hole well log analyses supported this conclusion. Numerical and analytical modeling achieved a relatively good match with observed field data. Based on the model results the plume was estimated to extend 152 m (500 ft) in the face cleat direction and 54.9 m (180 ft) in the butt cleat direction. Using the calibrated model, additional injection scenarios??injection and production with an inverted five-spot pattern and a line drive pattern??could yield CH{sub 4} recovery of up to 70%.

Scott Frailey; Thomas Parris; James Damico; Roland Okwen; Ray McKaskle; Charles Monson; Jonathan Goodwin; E. Beck; Peter Berger; Robert Butsch; Damon Garner; John Grube; Keith Hackley; Jessica Hinton; Abbas Iranmanesh; Christopher Korose; Edward Mehnert; Charles Monson; William Roy; Steven Sargent; Bracken Wimmer

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Proposed roadmap for overcoming legal and financial obstacles to carbon capture and sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Many existing proposals either lack sufficient concreteness to make carbon capture and geological sequestration (CCGS) operational or fail to focus on a comprehensive, long term framework for its regulation, thus failing to account adequately for the urgency of the issue, the need to develop immediate experience with large scale demonstration projects, or the financial and other incentives required to launch early demonstration projects. We aim to help fill this void by proposing a roadmap to commercial deployment of CCGS in the United States.This roadmap focuses on the legal and financial incentives necessary for rapid demonstration of geological sequestration in the absence of national restrictions on CO2 emissions. It weaves together existing federal programs and financing opportunities into a set of recommendations for achieving commercial viability of geological sequestration.

Jacobs, Wendy (Harvard Environmental Law and Policy, Cambridge, MA (US)); Chohen, Leah; Kostakidis-Lianos, Leah; Rundell, Sara (Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA (US))

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Midwest (PADD 2) Imports by PADD of Processing from Venezuela of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Imports by PADD of Processing from Venezuela of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)

260

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 195781. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration performance in coalbed methane reservoirs under various operational conditions. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Therefore, we interpreted and created isopleth maps of coal occurrences, and correlated individual coal seams within the coal bearing subdivisions of the Wilcox Group--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations. Preliminary modeling studies were run to determine if gravity effects would affect the performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbed methane reservoirs. Results indicated that gravity could adversely affect sweep efficiency and, thus, volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced in thick, vertically continuous coals. Preliminary modeling studies were also run to determine the effect of injection gas composition on sequestration in low-rank coalbeds. Injected gas composition was varied from pure CO{sub 2} to pure N{sub 2}, and results show that increasing N{sub 2} content degrades CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production performance. We have reached a Data Exchange Agreement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. We are currently incorporating the Anadarko data into our work, and expect these data to greatly enhance the accuracy and value of our studies.

Duane A. Mcvay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Sequestration Capacity Classification Scott M. Frailey and Robert J. Finley Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium Illinois State Geological Survey May 2-5, 2005, Hilton Alexandria Mark Center, Alexandria Virginia CO 2 Sequestration Capacity Classification Scott M. Frailey and Robert J. Finley Illinois State Geological Survey Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium A DOE Regional Partnership www.sequestration.org Outline * Purpose of Petroleum Reserve Classification * Purpose of CO 2 Storage Classification * Analogy to CO 2 Storage Classification * CO 2 Storage Classification Example * Recommendations References * Guidelines for Application of Petroleum Reserves Definitions, Society of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers, 1998 * Guidelines for Evaluation of Petroleum

263

NETL Sequestration Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initial Set of Working Hypotheses Concerning Some Chemical and Initial Set of Working Hypotheses Concerning Some Chemical and Physical Phenomena That Occur When CO2 Is Injected Into a Coal Bed Curt M. White, National Energy Technology Laboratory The presentation will describe some of the technological impediments to performing sequestration of CO2 in deep unmineable coalbeds with concomitant enhanced coalbed methane recovery on a wide scale. The impediments include: 1) developing techniques to handle millions of gallons of produced water; 2) a lack of knowledge concerning the methane content of deep unmineable coal seams; and 3) a lack of understanding of some of the chemical and physical phenomena that occur when CO2 is injected into a coalbed. This includes a lack of knowledge concerning the flow of CO2 in coal, the uncertain

264

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

James Rutledge

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding of carbon sequestration in australia: socio-Laboratory 2006 Carbon sequestration: regional partnerships129) NETL: Carbon Sequestration; www.netl.doe.gov/

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential for carbon sequestration through reforestationV. Matzek. 2004. Carbon sequestration and plant communitygeosequestration: Secure carbon sequestration via plant

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Microsoft PowerPoint - Sequestration Briefing - October-07.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration R&D Overview Office of Fossil Energy Carbon Sequestration Briefing October 2007 Sean Plasynski, PhD Sequestration Technology Manager Office of Fossil Energy...

269

FutureGen -- A Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FutureGen -- A Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative FutureGen -- A Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative A fact sheet on the Integrated Sequestration and...

270

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shallow Carbon SequeStration Shallow Carbon SequeStration DemonStration ProjeCt Background The Shallow Carbon Sequestration Pilot Demonstration Project is a cooperative effort involving City Utilities of Springfield (CU); Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR); Missouri State University (MSU); Missouri University of Science & Technology (MS&T); AmerenUE; Aquila, Inc.; Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc.; Empire District Electric Company; and Kansas City Power & Light. The purpose of this project is to assess the feasibility of carbon sequestration at Missouri power plant sites. The six electric utilities involved in the project account for approximately 90 percent of the electric generating capacity in Missouri. Description The pilot demonstration will evaluate the feasibility of utilizing the Lamotte and

271

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M. Frailey M. Frailey Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting November 16-19, 2009 Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium www.sequestration.org Illinois Basin Tanquary Field Project Acknowledgements  This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, as part of the Regional Sequestration Partnerships Program, and by the Illinois Office of Coal Development

272

Optimal Geological Enviornments for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susan D. Hovorka susan D. Hovorka Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 130 P.O. Box X Austin, TX 78713 512-471-4863 susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu Optimal GeOlOGical envirOnments fOr carbOn DiOxiDe stOraGe in saline fOrmatiOns Background For carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration to be a successful component of the United States emissions reduction strategy, there will have to be a favorable intersection of a number of factors, such as the electricity market, fuel source, power plant design and operation, capture technology, a suitable geologic sequestration site, and a pipeline right-of-way from the plant to the injection site. The concept of CO 2 sequestration in saline water-bearing formations (saline reservoirs), isolated at

273

Midwest City, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest City, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Midwest City, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4495065°, -97.3967019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.4495065,"lon":-97.3967019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

274

Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Operator Smart Grid Project Operator Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Country United States Headquarters Location Carmel, Indiana Additional Benefit Places Iowa, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Wisconsin Recovery Act Funding $17,271,738.00 Total Project Value $34,543,476.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project Coordinates 39.978371°, -86.1180435° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

275

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 101, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

276

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 76, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power midwest projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 259.1 KiB)

277

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 100, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / East- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

278

Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) Energy Storage Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) is a nonprofit member-based organization regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). As a Regional Transmission Organization (RTO), MISO provides electricity consumers in 13 states with regional grid management and open access to transmission facilities at a tariff closely regulated by FERC. MISO follows a cycle known as the MISO Transmission Expansion Plan (MTEP) that results in annual recommendations to proceed with expansion pro...

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

NETL: News Release - Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20, 2010 20, 2010 Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications Program Provides Hands-On CCS Experience for Students, Early Career Professionals Washington, D.C. - Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. MORE INFO Link to the RECS Web site for more information and to apply The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2010, scheduled for July 18-28 in Albuquerque, N.M., and the deadline to apply is May 15. An intensive science-based program, RECS 2010 will combine classroom instruction with field activities at a geologic storage test site and

280

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Now Accepting 2010 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications April 20, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2010, scheduled for July 18-28 in Albuquerque, N.M., and the deadline to apply is May 15. An intensive science-based program, RECS 2010 will combine classroom instruction with field activities at a geologic storage test site and visits to a power plant and coal mine. Topics cover the range of CCS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Ocean Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Carbon Ocean Carbon Sequestration Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Ocean Carbon Sequestration Options * The direct injection of a relatively pure CO 2 stream that has been generated, for example, at a power plant or from an industrial process * The enhancement of the net oceanic uptake from the atmosphere, for example, through iron fertilization The DOE Center for Research on Ocean Carbon Sequestration (DOCS) * Established July 1999 * Centered at LBNL and LLNL * Participants S Eric Adams MIT S Jim Barry MBARI S Jim Bishop DOCS Scientific Co-director LBNL S Ken Caldeira DOCS Scientific Co-director LLNL S Sallie Chisholm MIT S Kenneth Coale Moss Landing Marine Laboratory S Russ Davis Scripps Institution of Oceanography S Paul Falkowski Rutgers S Howard Herzog MIT S Gerard Nihous Pacific International Center for High Technology Research

282

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracturing (e.g. , in hydraulic fracturing, steam floods,gas storage and some hydraulic fracturing exempted U.S.

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than Domengine Nortonville shale gas cap Domengine gas reservoir Capay shale gas water gas water gas watersandstone / shale marine some gas water less saline

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water usage occurs in the air separation and ?ue gas con-and usage for various fossil power plants (from DOE-NETL 2007b). GE, CoP (E-gas) andusage for various fossil plants (from DOE-NETL 2007a). E-Gas,

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4, oil and gas exploration and production wells dot theof hydrocarbon exploration and production, we conclude that

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Development of Novel Monitoring Tools for Geologic Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO 2 storage reservoir and the soil surface to advance MMV tools to better assess CO 2 impacts to and leaking from a reservoir. Specifically, both direct and indirect CO 2...

287

A Strategy for Monitoring of Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Science, Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. DepartmentSecretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Oil, Gas and Shale

Myer, Larry R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impact of increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. Energyof potential impact for carbon dioxide injection. Journal ofGeochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers.

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional cooling water requirements (DOE-NETL 2007c). InU.S. DOE compared the relative water requirements for newrequirements will be similar to those listed by the DOE

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. (2007), A review of injection well mechanical integrityand noise logging for injection well integrity. Technicalflow behind pipe in injection wells. Technical Report CR-

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in Deep, Unmineable Coalbeds: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

base case where no gas injection occurs, and one each for N 2 and CO 2 injection at a rate of 500 Mcfd. The simulation well pattern is a quarter 5 -spot; reservoir parameters are...

292

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In SPE Offshore Europe Oil & Gas Conference, Aberdeen, UK,Analysis and performance of oil well cement with 30 years ofconsequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether regions of oil and gas exploration, and depleted oilimaging for oil and gas exploration is almost entirely

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and performance baseline for fossil energy plants, vol 1.of Energy, Of?ce of Fossil EnergyOf?ce of Oil and Naturalfossil fuels, particularly coal, are large enough and cost low enough to ensure their continuing dominance of energy

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Reactive transport modeling of geologic CO2 sequestration in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleipner facility, where properties of the waste stream, target saline aquifer, and shale cap rock are relatively well constrained. The principle goal has been to discover and...

296

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science, 52, 93- 125, 2005. RRC (Railroad Commission ofFort Bend County, Texas, 1991. RRC Well Database, http://HMR HS MGD mpg Mt NEE NSE RRC SGR TDS UIC US (U.S. ) USDW

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

injection control program oil and gas related injectionNETL 2008). Depleted oil and gas ?elds have the additionalare *144,000 Class II (oil and gas related injection) wells

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991State Role Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC)Class II Wells used by oil and gas operators for waste

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Texas), Hearing file Oil and Gas Docket Nos. 3-96,354 andCounties, Texas, in Typical Oil and Gas Fields of SoutheastAs shown in Figure 4, oil and gas exploration and production

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finally, a key issue in desalination is brine condensatean opportunity for inland desalination, whereby fresh waterthe inlet pressure for the desalination system, reducing the

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NETL: News Release - First Geologic Sequestration Field Test...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tons of CO2 into Strata Production Company's West Pearl Queen reservoir near Hobbs. The quantity of CO2 injected in the New Mexico project is comparable to a single day of...

302

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. , namely re-injection of produced water at oilO/yr) Mostly replaces produced water and oil Class 1H >> 33fields (oil and water are produced on average at a ratio of

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represents natural gas combined cycle, PC Sub and PC Superintegrated gasi?cation combined cycle (IGCC) plants withand natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) with amine capture (

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Combining geothermal energy capture with geologic carbon dioxide sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of disposal, it could also be used as a working fluid in geo- thermal energy capture. CO2's high heat facility, and biofuel plants. Geothermal energy could be used for electricity generation, district heating spacing and higher permeability. [12] Fluid mobility density divided by dynamic vis- cosity (i

Saar, Martin O.

305

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and production, natural gas storage, acid gas disposal,mitigation from the natural gas storage and oil industries.of leaks occurring in natural gas storage ?elds (Perry 2003;

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and gas production, natural gas storage, and extraction ofSDWA applicability Natural gas storage and some hydraulicnatural gas processing facility), into deep subsurface rock formations for long-term storage.

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas fields and in natural gas storage operations. One largeof gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along withoriginated from a natural gas storage facility eight miles

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hillebrenner) field as a natural gas storage facility andgroundwater recharge, natural gas storage, solution mining,leg of the Fulshear natural gas storage reservoir southeast

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and gas production, natural gas storage, and extraction ofSDWA applicability Natural gas storage and some hydraulic

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Louisiana Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Act (Louisiana...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

industrial, or other uses, including the use of carbon dioxide for enhanced recovery of oil and gas. The mandates a coordinated statewide program related to the storage...

311

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of contaminants from source rocks, and such samplingsource term (i.e. , leaking fluid) is compared against in situ reaction components by sampling of rocks

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pet-coke or biomass) is ?rst gasi?ed, creating syngas. Usingshift reac- tion, the syngas can be chemically shifted; theto further cool the syngas before entering the Selexol

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and performance of oil well cement with 30 years ofrequirements. Class II Wells used by oil and gas operatorsof Alaska Oil and Gas Division Old Wells vs. New Wells ?

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

GEODISC - The Search for Geological Sequestration Sites in Australia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a hydrostatic pressure gradient of 10.5 MPakm, a mean surface temperature of 15C and a geothermal gradient of 25Ckm, the density plateau is 720 kg m -3 , while for a...

315

DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration March 17, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has created a comprehensive new document that examines existing and emerging techniques to monitor, verify, and account for carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in geologic formations. The report, titled Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations, should prove to be an invaluable tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere through geologic sequestration. The report was prepared by NETL with input from the seven Regional Carbon

316

CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION LEADERSHIP FORUM (CSLF): A CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE The undersigned national governmental entities (collectively the "Members") set forth the following Terms of Reference for the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), a framework for international cooperation in research and development for the separation, capture, transportation and storage of carbon dioxide. The CSLF will seek to realize the promise of carbon capture and storage over the coming decades, making it commercially competitive and environmentally safe. 1. Purpose of the CSLF To facilitate the development of improved cost-effective technologies for the separation and capture of carbon dioxide for its transport and long-term safe storage; to make these

317

Midwest Energy (Gas and Electric)- How$mart Energy Efficiency Finance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Midwest Energy offers its residential and small commercial electricity and natural gas customers in good standing a way to finance energy efficiency improvements on eligible properties. Under the...

318

Crude oil movements from the Midwest to the Gulf Coast on the rise ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... the 5-year moving average is an average of 2005-2009 data; ... Crude oil movements from the Midwest ...

319

Gasoline prices rise in the Midwest as the summer driving season ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: gasoline liquid fuels Midwest oil/petroleum prices. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

320

Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East of England #12;Low Carbon Innovation Centre Report for EEDA Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective 20/04/2009 ii Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East

Everest, Graham R

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Development Phase Field Tests Pittsburgh, PA October 5, 2010 Presented by: Gerald R. Hill, Ph.D. Senior Technical Advisor Southern States Energy Board Acknowledgements  This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.  Cost share and research support provided by SECARB/SSEB Carbon Management Partners Through innovations in energy and environmental policies, programs and technologies, the Southern States Energy Board enhances economic development and the quality of life in the South. - SSEB Mission Statement SSEB Carbon Management Program  Established 2003  Characterizing Southeast Region

322

Integrated Mid-Continent Carbon Capture, Sequestration & Enhanced Oil Recovery Project  

SciTech Connect

A consortium of research partners led by the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration and industry partners, including CAP CO2 LLC, Blue Source LLC, Coffeyville Resources, Nitrogen Fertilizers LLC, Ash Grove Cement Company, Kansas Ethanol LLC, Headwaters Clean Carbon Services, Black & Veatch, and Schlumberger Carbon Services, conducted a feasibility study of a large-scale CCS commercialization project that included large-scale CO{sub 2} sources. The overall objective of this project, entitled the 'Integrated Mid-Continent Carbon Capture, Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project' was to design an integrated system of US mid-continent industrial CO{sub 2} sources with CO{sub 2} capture, and geologic sequestration in deep saline formations and in oil field reservoirs with concomitant EOR. Findings of this project suggest that deep saline sequestration in the mid-continent region is not feasible without major financial incentives, such as tax credits or otherwise, that do not exist at this time. However, results of the analysis suggest that enhanced oil recovery with carbon sequestration is indeed feasible and practical for specific types of geologic settings in the Midwestern U.S.

Brian McPherson

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Efforts Field Efforts Sequestering CO 2 in Geologic Formations SPE 2003 Eastern Section Meeting of AAPG September 6 - 10, 2003 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Scott M. Klara - National Energy Technology Laboratory What's All The Fuss About? CO 2 Concentrations On The Rise (~280 ppm to 370 ppm over last 100 years) Temperature Change from Present ( o C) CO 2 Concentration (ppmv) 200 150 50 350 300 250 200 100 0 ∆T atm (Vostok) CO 2 (Vostok) 2 0 -2 -4 Time Before Present (kyr) CO 2 & CH 4 - The Primary GHG Contributors Methane 9% Nitrous Oxide 5% HFCs, PFCs, SF 6 2% CO 2 from Energy 81% Other CO 2 3% "EIA Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S.: 2000" United States Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Equivalent Global Warming Basis) All Fossil Fuels & Energy Sectors Contribute CO 2 Emissions Industry 32% Industry 32% Commercial

324

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

326

A Survey of the Quality ofWater Drawn from Domestic Wells in Nine Midwest States Page 1 of 2 http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/programs/emergenc/WellWater/MidwestWell.htm 10/6/99  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Survey of the Quality ofWater Drawn from Domestic Wells in Nine Midwest States Page 1 of 2 http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/programs/emergenc/WellWater/MidwestWell.htm 10/6/99 Centers for Disease Control from Domestic Wells in Nine Midwest States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center

327

Implications of the greenhouse effect for the Midwest economy  

SciTech Connect

Although a great deal of research effort has been devoted to determining potential future changes in carbon dioxide concentrations, global temperature changes and ecosystem effects, relatively little attention has thus far been paid to potential regional impacts and the formulation of coherent policies to combat the problems. This paper will discuss how the Midwest might fare under conditions of higher mean temperatures or a major federal control program; it also discusses some of the research and development activities underway at Argonne National Laboratory that could help develop a balanced portfolio of technologies for combating the greenhouse effect. For the purposes of this paper we have defined a six-state region--consisting of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin--to typify the Midwest. These are the same states that comprise Federal Region 5. Temperatures were averaged for the thirty-year period 1950--1980 and do not include some of the higher summer temperatures we have been experiencing in the 1980s. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Streets, D.G.; Bloyd, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Prepared for 1 st Upper Midwest Regional Freight Transportation Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are here at this workshop because of a common interest in freight. We bring a wide variety of perspectives the typically longer-range perspective of the public providers of highways; the often short-range perspective of the private sector carriers, shippers and logistics managers; and the independent perspective of university researchers. Our immediate goal is to identify critical issues in facilitating regional freight transportation in the Upper Midwest. What are the gaps in current planning, organizational and financial methods? What key infrastructure improvements are needed to make the region competitive in the twenty first century? A regional perspective is logical because most freight does not stay within the borders of an individual state. For the Upper Midwest region Figures 1 and 2 show that the proportion of all ton-miles of truck shipments that stay within a state ranges from a low of 17 % in Indiana to a high of 46 % in Michigan. The regional average is 26 % which is essential the same as the national average of 27 % (1). Because rail shipments tend to be much longer than truck shipments, the proportion of rail shipments that stay within a state are likely to be even smaller. Thus, most freight shipments are affected by conditions outside of the state of origin or destination. By working together states, carriers, shippers and other stakeholders in the Upper

Dr. Robert; L. Smith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) estimate the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and methane production from, low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the east-central Texas region, (2) quantify uncertainty associated with these estimates, (3) conduct reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells, and (4) compare the results with those obtained from previous studies of vertical wells. To estimate the total volumes of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered in, and total volumes of methane that can be produced from, the Wilcox Group low-rank coals in east-central Texas, we used data provided by Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, data obtained during this research, and results of probabilistic simulation modeling studies we conducted. For the analysis, we applied our base-case coal seam characteristics to a 2,930-mi{sup 2} (1,875,200-ac) area where Calvert Bluff coal seams range between 4,000 and 6,200 ft deep. Results of the probabilistic analysis indicate that potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor, range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we presented the paper SPE 100584 at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on May 15-18, 2006. Also, we submitted an abstract to be considered for inclusion in a special volume dedicated to CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic media, which is planned for publication by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Methods for Integrated Leak Detection Inference at CO2 Sequestration Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods for Integrated Leak Detection Inference at CO2 Sequestration Sites Methods for Integrated Leak Detection Inference at CO2 Sequestration Sites Speaker(s): Mitchell Small Date: March 23, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This seminar will explain a methodology for combining site characterization and soil CO2 monitoring for detecting leaks at geologic CO2 sequestration sites. Near surface CO2 fluxes resulting from a leak are simulated using the TOUGH2 model for different values of soil permeability, leakage rate and vadose zone thickness. Natural background soil CO2 flux rates are characterized by a Bayesian hierarchical model that predicts the background flux as a function of soil temperature. A presumptive leak is assumed if the monitored flux rate exceeds a critical value corresponding to a very high (e.g., 99%) prediction interval for the natural flux conditioned on

332

carbon sequestration via direct injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has caused concern about possible global climate change. As a result, international negotiations have produced the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), completed during the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. The treaty, which the United States has ratified, calls for the "stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." The primary greenhouse gas is CO 2 , which is estimated to contribute to over two-thirds of any climate change. The primary source of CO

333

Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. Edmonds, J.J. Dooley, and S.H. Kim Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute THE ROADMAP * Greenhouse gas emissions may not control themselves. * Climate policy may happen.--There are smart and dumb ways to proceed. The smart ways involve getting both the policy and the technology right--the GTSP. * There are no silver bullets--Expanding the set of options to include carbon capture and sequestration can help limit the cost of any ceiling on CO 2 concentrations. * Managing greenhouse emissions means managing carbon. * Carbon can be captured, transported, and sequestered in many ways.

334

Weyburn Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration ProjeCt Background Since September 2000, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has been transported from the Dakota Gasification Plant in North Dakota through a 320-km pipeline and injected into the Weyburn oilfield in Saskatchewan, Canada. The CO 2 has given the Weyburn field, discovered 50 years ago, a new life: 155 million gross barrels of incremental oil are slated to be recovered by 2035 and the field is projected to be able to store 30 million tonnes of CO 2 over 30 years. CO 2 injection began in October of 2005 at the adjacent Midale oilfield, and an additional 45-60 million barrels of oil are expected to be recovered during 30 years of continued operation. A significant monitoring project associated with the Weyburn and Midale commercial

335

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Tropical forestry practices for carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration through forestry has the potential to play a significant role in ameliorating global environmental problems such as atmospheric accumulation of GHG's and climate change. This chapter provides an overview of various aspects related to carbon sequestration through forestry. It describes the main concepts of carbon fixation; the trends in global environmental policy are discussed; different forestry practices are listed; examples of existing projects are given; and finally, a case study of a carbon sequestration project in Malaysia is described. The paper also discusses issues related to the quantification of carbon sequestration potential of different forestry options. This section was included with the intention of specifically highlighting some problems related to commercial transactions for carbon sequestration. Key words: carbon sequestration, CO2 offset, tropical forestry, dipterocarps.

Pedro Moura-costa; Innoprise-face Foundation

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Southwestern Regional Partnership For Carbon Sequestration (Phase 2) Pump Canyon CO2- ECBM/Sequestration Demonstration, San Juan Basin, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Within the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP), three demonstrations of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration are being performed -- one in an oilfield (the SACROC Unit in the Permian basin of west Texas), one in a deep, unmineable coalbed (the Pump Canyon site in the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico), and one in a deep, saline reservoir (underlying the Aneth oilfield in the Paradox basin of southeast Utah). The Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-enhanced coalbed methane (CO{sub 2}/ECBM) sequestration demonstration project plans to demonstrate the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coal seams via a small-scale geologic sequestration project. The site is located in San Juan County, northern New Mexico, just within the limits of the high-permeability fairway of prolific coalbed methane production. The study area for the SWP project consists of 31 coalbed methane production wells located in a nine section area. CO{sub 2} was injected continuously for a year and different monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques were implemented to track the CO{sub 2} movement inside and outside the reservoir. Some of the MVA methods include continuous measurement of injection volumes, pressures and temperatures within the injection well, coalbed methane production rates, pressures and gas compositions collected at the offset production wells, and tracers in the injected CO{sub 2}. In addition, time-lapse vertical seismic profiling (VSP), surface tiltmeter arrays, a series of shallow monitoring wells with a regular fluid sampling program, surface measurements of soil composition, CO{sub 2} fluxes, and tracers were used to help in tracking the injected CO{sub 2}. Finally, a detailed reservoir model was constructed to help reproduce and understand the behavior of the reservoir under production and injection operation. This report summarizes the different phases of the project, from permitting through site closure, and gives the results of the different MVA techniques.

Advanced Resources International

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

NETL: Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of...

339

Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley CA 94720 Abstract Depleted natural gas reservoirs are promising targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Although depleted, these reservoirs are not devoid of...

340

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting October 3-4, 2006 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Updates on Regional Characterization...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: 2010 Conference Proceedings - Regional Carbon Sequestration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting October 5-7, 2010 Table of Contents Disclaimer Presentations Welcoming Remarks Major International Demonstration...

342

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Program Review...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Program Review Meeting November 16-17, 2004 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was...

343

NETL: 2009 Conference Proceedings - Regional Carbon Sequestration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting November 16-19, 2009 Table of Contents Disclaimer Presentations Focused Workshops (Concurrent Sessions) Session 1:...

344

NETL: ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Logo Projects in this area are funded, in whole or in part, with funds appropriated by the American Recovery and...

345

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science -- Workshop Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 22, 2001 Outline * Background and Motivation * What is carbon sequestration? * A decade of progress * A century of challenges * Workshop schedule...

346

NETL: Conference Proceedings: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnershi...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Project Review Meeting December 12-13, 2007 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Factsheets Disclaimer This...

347

Progress Summary: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Illinois November 16, 2011 The Path to a 1-Million Tonne Demonstration of Carbon Sequestration from a Biofuel Source: The Illinois Basin - Decatur Project * The...

348

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon...

349

Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlightsbanner Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides Samuel M. Webb (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory), Bradley M. Tebo (Oregon Health...

350

Reclamation Practices and Procedures for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Carbon Sequestration Coordinator, Jim Burger, Virginia Tech Pamla Wood Clark Dorman Pennie DuBarry I. How can current reclamation practices be modified to enhance carbon...

351

Reclamation Practices and Procedures for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Carbon Sequestration Coordinator: Jim Burger Facilitators: Pamela Wood Clark Dorman Pennie DuBarry How can current reclamation practices be modified to enhance carbon storage...

352

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 75, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEIO EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - Midwest Reliability Council / East - Reference Case (xls, 258.6 KiB) Quality Metrics

353

Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc (MEPI) Place O'Neill, Nebraska Zip 68763 Product Focused on ethanol production. Coordinates 34.82186°, -97.513329° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.82186,"lon":-97.513329,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

354

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration...

355

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basin - Sugar Creek and Basin - Sugar Creek and Mumford Hills EOR Test (Reservoir Engineering and Geology) Scott M. Frailey Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting November 16-19, 2009 Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium www.sequestration.org Acknowledgements  This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, as part of the Regional Sequestration Partnerships Program,

356

Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT): Sensitivity Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT): Sensitivity Studies Robin L. Newmark (newmark@llnl.gov, 925-423-3644) Abelardo L. Ramirez (ramirez3@llnl.gov; 925-422-6909) William D. Daily (daily1@llnl.gov; 925-422-8623) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P.O. Box 808 Livermore, Ca. 94550 Abstract If geologic formations are used to sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), monitoring the CO 2 injection will be required to confirm the performance of the reservoir system, assess leaks and flow paths, and understand the geophysical and geochemical interactions between the CO 2 and the geologic minerals and fluids. Electrical methods are well suited for monitoring processes involving fluids, as electrical properties are sensitive to the

357

Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO2 Sequestration … Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* NREL/TP-510-32575 * NREL/TP-510-32575 Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO 2 Sequestration - Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 January 2004 * NREL/TP-510-32575 Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO 2 Sequestration - Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann Prepared under Task No. BB04.4010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

358

Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits and challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration...

359

2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the...

360

A Clearer Picture of Carbon Sequestration: Simulations Shed Light...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clearer Picture of Carbon Sequestration Clearer Picture of Carbon Sequestration Simulations Shed Light on Fate of Sequestered CO January 31, 2011 | Tags: Chemistry, Earth...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Why it Matters: Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is considered to be...

362

EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania...

363

Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could Mean More Oil and Less CO2 Emissions Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could Mean More Oil...

364

EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase III Gordon Creek Project near Price, Utah in Carbon County EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration...

365

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand Title Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and...

366

Carbon Dioxide Capture/Sequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide CaptureSequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) Carbon Dioxide CaptureSequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) Eligibility Commercial Industrial Utility Program...

367

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and related Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) power plantspower plants, petroleum refining, chemical processing industries, and natural gasnatural gas. If CO 2 capture and geologic sequestration from coal-fired power plants

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama Jack C. Pashin (jpashin@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Richard H. Groshong, Jr. (rgroshon@wgs.geo.ua.edu; 205-348-1882) Deparment of Geology University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Richard E. Carroll (rcarroll@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Abstract Sequestration of CO 2 in coal is a market-based environmental solution with potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while increasing coalbed methane recovery. Producing coalbed methane through injection of CO 2 is also more efficient than current techniques requiring

369

Geologic and Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David J. Wildman Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area Leader (Acting) National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940...

370

Carbon dioxide sequestration: When and how much  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze carbon dioxide (CO sequestration as a strategy to manage future climate change in an optimal economic growth framework. We approach the problem in two ways: first, by using a simple analytical model, and second, by using a numerical optimization model which allows us to explore the problem in a more realistic setting. CO sequestration is not a perfect substitute for avoiding CO2 production because CO2 leaks back to the atmosphere and hence imposes future costs. The efficiency factor of CO2 sequestration can be expressed as the ratio of the avoided emissions to the economically equivalent amount of sequestered CO2 emissions. A simple analytical model in terms of a net-present value criterion suggests that short-term sequestration methods such as afforestation can be somewhat ( 60 %) efficient, while long term sequestration (such as deep aquifer or deep ocean sequestration) can be very ( 90%) efficient. A numerical study indicates that CO2 sequestration methods at a cost within the range of present estimates reduce the economically optimal CO2 concentrations and climate related damages. The potential savings associated with CO2 sequestration is equivalent in our utilitarian model to a one-time investment of several percent of present gross world product. 1 1

Klaus Keller; Zili Yang; Matt Hall; David F. Bradford

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Table HC1-10a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 -- -- -- NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 24.5 17.1 7.4 NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 17.1

372

"Table HC12.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,9.7,7.3,2.4 "Town",19,5,2.9,2.1 "Suburbs",22.7,5.7,4.3,1.4 "Rural",22.3,5.2,3.3,1.9 "Climate Zone1" "Less than 2,000 CDD and--" "Greater than 7,000 HDD",10.9,6.9,4.9,"Q" "5,500 to 7,000 HDD",26.1,12.3,9.9,"Q"

373

"Table HC12.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,24.5,17.1,7.4 "2 or More",3.7,0.9,0.5,0.4 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,23.5,16.2,7.3 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,1.9,1.4,0.5 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q"

374

"Table HC12.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S.",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,25.3,17.6,7.7 "1.",103.3,24,16.8,7.3 "2 or More",6.2,1.3,0.8,0.5 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,0.3,"Q","Q" "Most-Used Oven Fuel" "Electric",67.9,14.7,9.5,5.2 "Natural Gas",36.4,9.6,7.5,2.1

375

"Table HC12.2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.5,0.3,"Q" "500 to 999",23.8,3.9,2.4,1.5 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,4.4,3.2,1.2 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,3.5,2.4,1.1 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,3.2,2.1,1.1 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,2.7,1.8,0.9 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,2.1,1.6,0.5

376

Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. Midwest Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Michigan "The silica heat flow estimator does provide estimates of surface heat flow which appear to be in good agreement with conventional estimates, but which are not entirely free from disturbances caused by groundwater movements. The technique should be more widely applied to areas where conventional heat flow measurements are lacking." References Raymond Vugrinovich (1987) Regional Heat Flow Variations In The

377

Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Multiple States)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an agreement between the states of Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin that provides for the cooperative and safe...

378

Midwest (PADD 2) No 2 Diesel Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) No 2 Diesel Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway Consumers (Thousand Gallons) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

379

Review of the Unusual Winter of 198283 In the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatologists from the climate centers of 12 states of the upper Midwest contributed temperature, precipitation, and related data for December 1982, January and February 1983. Analyses present the month-to-month spatial anomaly patterns of these ...

W. M. Wendland; L. D. Bark; D. R. Clark; R. B. Curry; J. W. Enz; K. G. Hubbard; V. Jones; E. L. Kuehnast; W. Lytle; J. Newman; F. V. Nurnberger; P. Waite

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Processes Leading to the Formation of Mesoscale Waves in the Midwest Cyclone of 15 December 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 15 December 1987, several long-lived, large-amplitude mesoscale wave disturbances accompanied a rapidly developing extratropical cyclone in the midwest United States. Previous observational and modeling studies have suggested that the ...

Peter J. Pokrandt; Gregory J. Tripoli; David D. Houghton

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Large-Amplitude Mesoscale Wave Disturbances Within the Intense Midwest Extratropical Cyclone of 15 December 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 15 December 1987 several long-lived, large-amplitude mesoscale wave disturbances embedded within a rapidly intensifying extratropical cyclone traversed the Midwest and created life-threatening blizzard conditions. Within the wave disturbances, ...

Russell S. Schneider

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Synoptic Climatology of the Bimodal Precipitation Distribution in the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the synoptic climatology of the precipitation regime in the Upper Midwest. The annual march of precipitation is characterized by a bimodal distribution, with maxima occurring during the months of June and ...

Michael J. Keables

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

On the Impact of WRF Model Vertical Grid Resolution on Midwest Summer Rainfall Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model exploratory sensitivity simulations were performed to determine the impact of vertical grid resolution (VGR) on the forecast skill of Midwest summer rainfall. Varying the VGR indicated that a refined VGR, ...

Eric A. Aligo; William A. Gallus Jr.; Moti Segal

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

"Table HC12.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"N","N","N" "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment"

385

"Table HC12.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,8.1,5.6,2.5 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,17.5,12.1,5.4 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,11.9,8.4,3.4 "2.",16.2,3.5,2.2,1.3 "3 or More",9,2.1,1.5,0.6 "Number of Laptop PCs" "1.",22.5,4.6,2.8,1.9 "2.",4,0.9,0.6,0.2

386

Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298 and/or log Kr,298 are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at temperatures in the range of 50C to 100C or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the efforts taken to develop a preliminary design for the first commercial-scale CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) project associated with biomass power integrated into a pulp and paper operation. The Boise Wallula paper mill is located near the township of Wallula in Southeastern Washington State. Infrastructure at the paper mill will be upgraded such that current steam needs and a significant portion of the current mill electric power are supplied from a 100% biomass power source. A new biomass power system will be constructed with an integrated amine-based CO2 capture plant to capture approximately 550,000 tons of CO2 per year for geologic sequestration. A customized version of Fluor Corporations Econamine Plus carbon capture technology will be designed to accommodate the specific chemical composition of exhaust gases from the biomass boiler. Due to the use of biomass for fuel, employing CCS technology represents a unique opportunity to generate a net negative carbon emissions footprint, which on an equivalent emissions reduction basis is 1.8X greater than from equivalent fossil fuel sources (SPATH and MANN, 2004). Furthermore, the proposed project will offset a significant amount of current natural gas use at the mill, equating to an additional 200,000 tons of avoided CO2 emissions. Hence, the total net emissions avoided through this project equates to 1,100,000 tons of CO2 per year. Successful execution of this project will provide a clear path forward for similar kinds of emissions reduction that can be replicated at other energy-intensive industrial facilities where the geology is suitable for sequestration. This project also represents a first opportunity for commercial development of geologic storage of CO2 in deep flood basalt formations. The Boise paper mill site is host to a Phase II pilot study being carried out under DOEs Regional Carbon Partnership Program. Lessons learned from this pilot study and other separately funded projects studying CO2 sequestration in basalts will be heavily leveraged in developing a suitable site characterization program and system design for permanent sequestration of captured CO2. The areal extent, very large thickness, high permeability in portions of the flows, and presence of multiple very low permeability flow interior seals combine to produce a robust sequestration target. Moreover, basalt formations are quite reactive with water-rich supercritical CO2 and formation water that contains dissolved CO2 to generate carbonate minerals, providing for long-term assurance of permanent sequestration. Sub-basalt sediments also exist at the site providing alternative or supplemental storage capacity.

B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

388

Regional partnerships lead US carbon sequestration efforts  

SciTech Connect

During the sixth annual conference on carbon capture and sequestration, 7-10 May 2007, a snapshot was given of progress on characterization efforts and field validation tests being carried out through the Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Initiative. The initiative is built on the recognition that geographical differences in fossil fuel/energy use and CO{sub 2} storage sinks across North America will dictate approaches to carbon sequestration. The first characterization phase (2003-2005) identified regional opportunities and developed frameworks to validate and deploy technologies. The validation phase (2005-2009) includes 10 enhanced oil recovery/enhanced gas recovery field tests in progress in Alberta and six US states and is applying lessons learned from these operations to sequestration in unmineable coal seams. Storage in saline formations are the focus of 10 field tests, and terrestrial sequestration will be studied in 11 other projects. 1 tab., 3 photos.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

SciTech Connect

The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and over 1,900 MW can be dispatched on less than thirty minutes notice. These legacy DR programs are increasingly used by utilities for economic in addition to reliability purposes, with over two-thirds (68percent) of these programs callable based on market conditions. - Approximately 60percent of DLC programs and 30percent of interruptible rate programs called ten or more DR events in 2006. Despite the high frequency of DR events, customer complaints remained low. The use of economic criteria to trigger DR events and the flexibility to trigger a large number of events suggests that DR resources can help improve the efficiency of MISO wholesale markets. - Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels averaged about $5/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $6/kW-month for DLC programs. Few programs offered incentive payments that were explicitly linked to actual load reductions during events and at least 27 DR programs do not have penalties for non-performance. - Measurement and verification (M&V) protocols to estimate load impacts vary significantly across MISO states. Almost half of the DR programs have not been evaluated in recent times and thus performance data for DR events is not available. For many DLC programs, M&V protocols may need to be enhancedin order to allow participation in MISO's proposed EDR schedule. System operators and planners will need to develop more accurate estimates of the load reduced capability and actual performance.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

Site insolation and wind power characteristics: technical report Midwest region  

SciTech Connect

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Midwest Region of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 22 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation is related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal. Also, joint probability distribution tables are constructed showing the number of occurrences, out of a finite sample size, of daily average solar and wind power within selected intervals, by month. Information of this nature is intended as an aid to preliminary planning activities for the design and operation of solar and wind energy utilization and conversion systems.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Integrated Estimates of Global Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the contribution of terrestrial carbon sequestration to international climate change mitigation requires integration across scientific and disciplinary boundaries. As part of a scenario analysis for the US Climate Change Technology Program, measurements and geographic data were used to develop terrestrial carbon sequestration estimates for agricultural soil carbon, reforestation and pasture management. These estimates were then applied in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model to evaluate mitigation strategies within policy and technology scenarios aimed at achieving atmospheric CO2 stabilization by 2100. Adoption of terrestrial sequestration practices is based on competition for land and economic markets for carbon. Terrestrial sequestration reach a peak combined rate of 0.5 to 0.7 Gt carbon yr-1 in mid-century with contributions from agricultural soil (0.21 Gt carbon yr-1), reforestation (0.31 Gt carbon yr-1) and pasture (0.15 Gt carbon yr-1). Sequestration rates vary over time period and with different technology and policy scenarios. The combined contribution of terrestrial sequestration over the next century ranges from 31 to 41 GtC. The contribution of terrestrial sequestration to mitigation is highest early in the century, reaching up to 20% of total carbon mitigation. This analysis provides insight into the behavior of terrestrial carbon mitigation options in the presence and absence of climate change mitigation policies.

Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage (CCS) "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. Best Practices for Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide details the most suitable operational approaches and techniques for terrestrial sequestration, a carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation strategy capable of removing CO2 already in the air. Consequently, terrestrial sequestration, which uses photosynthesis - part of the natural carbon cycle - to create

393

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board, represents a 13-state region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Texas, and Virginia and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB comprises more than 100 participants representing Federal and state governments, industry, academia, and nonprofit organizations. The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and infrastructure to conduct field tests of carbon storage technologies and to

394

Development Of An Agroforestry Sequestration Project In Khammam District Of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in estimating carbon sequestration potential, baselineA, Kandji, ST, (2003) Carbon sequestration in tropicalStudies on enhancing carbon sequestration in soils. Energy,

Sudha, P.; Ramprasad, V.; Nagendra, M.D.V.; Kulkarni, H.D.; Ravindranath, N.H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery: Identifying candidate sites for pilot study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process modeling of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas2001. Reichle, D. et al.. Carbon sequestration research andCarbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying

Oldenburg, C.M.; Benson, S.M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Soil Degradation and Global Change: Role of Soil Erosion and Deposition in Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

andM. York. 1999. Carbon SequestrationResearchandofsoilmovementon carbonsequestrationinagriculturalanddepositionin carbonsequestration Asmeret Asefaw

Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Harden, Jennifer W.; Harte, John; Torn, Margaret S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

398

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Minesoils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The SOC dynamics in soil macro and micro-aggregate fractions and its effect on long-term carbon (C) sequestration are discussed. Introduction Carbon (C) management in the next...

399

Progress Summary: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

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of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) via the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program (contract number DE-FC26-05NT42588) and by a cost...

400

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions of Canada, according to the latest edition of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Atlas (Atlas III). The updated preliminary estimate, based on current emission rates, documents 1,800 billion to more than 20,000 billion metric tons of CO2 storage potential in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal areas. This suggests the availability of approximately

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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401

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration in Oil Fields: A Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces Grant S. Bromhal, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880, gbromhal@netl.doe.gov, M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, and Duane H. Smith, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Underground injection of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is a common practice in the oil and gas industry and has often been cited as a proven method of sequestering CO 2 (US DOE, 1999). Of all sequestration methods, this is probably the best understood, as carbon dioxide has been used in the oil industry for many years. Additionally, most oil fields have been relatively well characterized geologically, and

402

RMOTC - Geologic & Resivoir Data  

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Geologic & Reservoir Data Data Sets Online Data Rooms Geologic & Reservoir Data Hills surrounding RMOTC Testing Facility Over the years, the field has become very well...

403

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Carbon sequestration research and development  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process  

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Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Gasification Process First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 16, 2001 May 16, 2001 Jeff Seabright Jeff Seabright Texaco Inc. Texaco Inc. Presentation Highlights Presentation Highlights * * Texaco and climate change Texaco and climate change * * Introduction to gasification Introduction to gasification * * Environmental benefits of gasification Environmental benefits of gasification * * CO CO 2 2 capture & sequestration capture & sequestration * * Challenges going forward Challenges going forward Texaco's Climate Change Policy Texaco's Climate Change Policy * * Know enough to take action now Know enough to take action now

406

NETL: News Release - First-of-a-Kind Sequestration Field Test Begins in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2009 8, 2009 First-of-a-Kind Sequestration Field Test Begins in West Virginia DOE-Sponsored Test to Evaluate Carbon Storage in Unmineable Coal Seams Washington, D.C. - Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) began today in a first-of-a-kind field trial of enhanced coalbed methane recovery with simultaneous CO2 sequestration in an unmineable coal seam. The ultimate goal of the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored project is to help mitigate climate change by providing an effective and economic means to permanently store CO2 in unmineable coal seams. CONSOL Energy Inc., West Virginia University, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) are collaborating in the $13 million field trial, located in Marshall County, W.Va. The site was chosen because of its accessibility, availability, and typical northern Appalachian topography and geology. The project is funded by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and managed by NETL.

407

Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration  

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Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of CO 2 Sequestration Larry R. Myer (LRMyer@lbl.gov; 510/486-6456) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Science Division One Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Introduction Geophysical techniques will be used in monitoring of geologic sequestration projects. Seismic and electrical geophysical techniques will be used to map the movement of CO 2 in the subsurface and to establish that the storage volume is being efficiently utilized and the CO 2 is being safely contained within a known region. Rock physics measurements are required for interpretation of the geophysical surveys. Seismic surveys map the subsurface velocities and attenuation while electrical surveys map the conductivity. Laboratory measurements are required to convert field

408

Microsoft Word - CCS Geologic Storage-Intro_2011l.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Geologic carbon sequestration involves the storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep underground geologic formations. The majority of geologic formations considered for CO 2 storage, deep saline or depleted oil and gas reservoirs, are layers of subsurface porous rock that are overlain by a layer or multiple layers of low-permeability rock. Under high pressures, CO 2 is a supercritical fluid, with the high- density characteristics of a liquid but behaves like a gas by filling all available volume. Coal seams are also a viable option for geologic storage. When CO 2 is injected into a coal formation it is adsorbed onto the coal surfaces and methane gas is released and produced in adjacent wells. NETL's Core R&D research is focused on developing the ability to characterize a geologic formation

409

Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, and an immiscible CO{sub 2} flood pilot was conducted in the Jackson sandstone (Mississippian System Big Clifty Sandstone Member) at the Sugar Creek Field in Hopkins County, western Kentucky. Up to 12% incremental oil recovery was estimated based on these pilots. A CO{sub 2} huff ??n?? puff (HNP) pilot project was conducted in the Cypress Sandstone in the Loudon Field. This pilot was designed to measure and record data that could be used to calibrate a reservoir simulation model. A pilot project at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois, tested the potential storage of CO{sub 2} in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} storage and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot results from all four sites showed that CO{sub 2} could be injected into the subsurface without adversely affecting groundwater. Additionally, hydrocarbon production was enhanced, giving further evidence that CO{sub 2} storage in oil reservoirs and coal beds offers an economic advantage. Results from the MVA program at each site indicated that injected CO{sub 2} did not leave the injection zone. Topical reports were completed on the Middle and Late Devonian New Albany Shale and Basin CO{sub 2} emissions. The efficacy of the New Albany Shale as a storage sink could be substantial if low injectivity concerns can be alleviated. CO{sub 2} emissions in the Illinois Basin were projected to be dominated by coal-fired power plants.

Robert Finley

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assessment of CO2 Sequestration and ECBM Potential of U.S. Coalbeds  

SciTech Connect

In October, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, through contractor Advanced Resources International, launched a multi-year government-industry R&D collaboration called the Coal-Seq project. The Coal-Seq project is investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams, by performing detailed reservoir studies of two enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) field projects in the San Juan basin. The two sites are the Allison Unit, operated by Burlington Resources, and into which CO{sub 2} is being injected, and the Tiffany Unit, operating by BP America, into which N{sub 2} is being injected (the interest in understanding the N{sub 2}-ECBM process has important implications for CO{sub 2} sequestration via flue-gas injection). The purposes of the field studies are to understand the reservoir mechanisms of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} injection into coalseams, demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the ECBM and sequestration processes, an engineering capability to simulate them, and to evaluate sequestration economics. In support of these efforts, laboratory and theoretical studies are also being performed to understand and model multi-component isotherm behavior, and coal permeability changes due to swelling with CO{sub 2} injection. This report describes the results of an important component of the overall project, applying the findings from the San Juan Basin to a national scale to develop a preliminary assessment of the CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery potential of U.S. coalbeds. Importantly, this assessment improves upon previous investigations by (1) including a more comprehensive list of U.S. coal basins, (2) adopting technical rationale for setting upper-bound limits on the results, and (3) incorporating new information on CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} replacement ratios as a function of coal rank. Based on the results of the assessment, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) The CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of U.S. coalbeds is estimated to be about 90 Gt. Of this, about 38 Gt is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 14 Gt is in the Powder River basin, 10 Gt is in the San Juan basin, and 8 Gt is in the Greater Green River basin. By comparison, total CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation plants is currently about 2.2 Gt/year. (2) The ECBM recovery potential associated with this sequestration is estimated to be over 150 Tcf. Of this, 47 Tcf is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 20 Tcf is in the Powder River basin, 19 Tcf is in the Greater Green River basin, and 16 Tcf is in the San Juan basin. By comparison, total CBM recoverable resources are currently estimated to be about 170 Tcf. (3) Between 25 and 30 Gt of CO{sub 2} can be sequestered at a profit, and 80-85 Gt can be sequestered at costs of less than $5/ton. These estimates do not include any costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and transportation, and only represent geologic sequestration. (4) Several Rocky Mountain basins, including the San Juan, Raton, Powder River and Uinta appear to hold the most favorable conditions for sequestration economics. The Gulf Coast and the Central Appalachian basin also appear to hold promise as economic sequestration targets, depending upon gas prices. (5) In general, the 'non-commercial' areas (those areas outside the main play area that are not expected to produce primary CBM commercially) appear more favorable for sequestration economics than the 'commercial' areas. This is because there is more in-place methane to recover in these settings (the 'commercial' areas having already been largely depleted of methane).

Scott R. Reeves

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

Sequestration in the Media: Changes in Public Perception  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media: Media: Changes in Public Perception Third Annual Conference on Carbon Sequestration Alexandria, VA, May 2-6, 2004 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Phil DiPietro and Rose Dakin, Energetics Inc. and Sarah Forbes, NETL Carbon Sequestration SF 05/3/04 Purpose of the Analysis * Assemble and study published articles on Carbon Sequestration between 1989 and 2003 * Quantify trends, themes and areas of emphasis * Compare results to priorities within the carbon sequestration research community Carbon Sequestration SF 05/3/04 Methodology * Use data on sequestration-related articles from NETL's Carbon Sequestration Newsletter - Conduct additional archive searches to find missed articles and articles that pre- date the newsletter * Define a set of sequestration-related

414

Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Land-Use Change Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential PDF file Full text Global Change Biology 6:317-327 (2000) Wilfred M. Post...

415

Sour Gas Streams Safe for Carbon Sequestration, DOE-Sponsored...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sour Gas Streams Safe for Carbon Sequestration, DOE-Sponsored Study Shows Sour Gas Streams Safe for Carbon Sequestration, DOE-Sponsored Study Shows September 23, 2010 - 1:00pm...

416

Readout of Secretary Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration and State Grid Readout of Secretary Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration and State Grid July 16, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis...

417

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies in US  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Sequestration Studies in US Mineral Sequestration Studies in US Philip Goldberg 1 , Zhong-Ying Chen 2 , William O'Connor 3 , Richard Walters 3 , and Hans Ziock 4 1 National Energy Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, goldberg@netl.doe.gov, (412)386-5806 2 Science Applications International Corporation, 1710 Goodridge Dr. McLean, VA, zhong- ying.chen@saic.com, (703)676-7328 3 Albany Research Center, Albany, OR oconner@arc.doe.gov, walters@alrc.doe, (541)967-5834 4 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, ksl@lanl.gov, ziock@lanl.gov, (505)667- 7265 Abstract Carbon sequestration by reacting naturally occurring Mg and Ca containing minerals with CO 2 to form carbonates has many unique advantages. Most notably is the fact that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO

418

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Carbon Sequestration Initiative CSI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sequestration Initiative CSI Sequestration Initiative CSI Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Sequestration Initiative (CSI) Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip MA 02139-4307 Sector Carbon Product Massachusetts based consortium which was formed in 2000 to investigate carbon capture and storage technologies. Coordinates 43.003745°, -89.017499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.003745,"lon":-89.017499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

Decarbonization and Sequestration for Mitigating Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR MITIGATING GLOBAL WARMING M. Steinberg (msteinbe@bnl.gov); 631-344-3036 Brookhaven National Laboratory 12 South Upton Street Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA ABSTRACT Mitigating the global warming greenhouse effect while maintaining a fossil fuel economy, requires improving efficiency of utilization of fossil fuels, use of high hydrogen content fossil fuels, decarbonization of fossil fuels, and sequestering of carbon and CO 2 applied to all the sectors of the economy, electric power generation, transportation, and industrial, and domestic power and heat generation. Decarbonization means removal of carbon as C or CO 2 either before or after fossil fuel combustion and sequestration means disposal of the recovered C or CO 2 including its utilization. Removal and recovery of CO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Midwest Forensics Resource Center Project Summary June 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the MFRC Research and Development Program, is to provide technological advances in forensic science for the benefit of our regional partners as well as the forensic community at large. Key areas of forensic science need are identified through our interactions with our Midwest partners and our R&D advisory group, as well as through our participation in national meetings in forensic science. Under the sponsorship of the National Institute of Justice, the MFRC solicits proposals for the development of practical and useful technology, instrumentation, and methodology that address needs in areas related to forensic science and its application to operational crime laboratories. The MFRC facilitates proposal development by working to establish partnerships between researchers and our regional partners. The MFRC administers a peer-review of the proposals and then funds the selected projects at a cost of approximately $55,000 each, with a 12-month period of performance. The process for selection of these projects includes the following steps: (1) drafting of a call for proposals by MFRC staff, (2) review of the draft call by members of the R&D advisory committee, (3) review and approval of the call by NIJ, (4) issuance of the call to ISU, Ames Laboratory, regional partners, and research organizations, (5) receipt of proposals, (6) review of proposals by R&D advisory committee, (7) ranking and selection by MFRC staff using advisory committee reviews, with concurrence by NIJ, (8) notification of proposers, (9) receipt and review of progress reports by MFRC, (10) receipt and review of final reports by MFRC, R&D advisory committee, and NIJ. The decision to fund any specific project is based upon a peer-reviewed call-for-proposal system administered by the MFRC. The reviewers are crime laboratory specialists and scientists who are asked to rate the proposals on four criteria areas including: (1) relevance to the mission of the MFRC, (2) technical approach and procedures, (3) capabilities, teaming, and leveraging, and (4) implementation plan. A successful proposal demonstrates knowledge of the background for the research and related work in the field and includes a research plan with a defined plan to implement the technology to benefit our partners at the crime laboratories. The project summaries are meant to demonstrate the range of research funded by the MFRC including chemistry, DNA, and patterned evidence. The project summaries describe the forensic need the projects serve as well as the benefits derived from the technology. The summaries provide a brief description of the technology and the accomplishments to date. In addition, the collaboration with regional partners and the status of the implementation of the technology are highlighted. These technical summaries represent the development and implementation of practical and useful technology for crime laboratories that the MFRC hopes to accomplish.

David Baldwin

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

An Intense Small-Scale Wintertime Vortex in the Midwest United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intense small-scale low pressure system that moved across portions of the midwest United States is examined. The system produced a continuous band of significant snowfall, typically only 50 km wide but extending over 1500 km in length. The ...

William A. Gallus Jr.; James F. Bresch

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Developing a dataset to assess ecosystem services in the Midwest United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Midwest United States produces around one-quarter of the world's grain supply. The demand for corn ethanol is likely to cause a shift toward greater corn planting. To be prepared for the potential impacts of increased corn production, we need a better ... Keywords: geographic information science, land use and land cover, landscape ecology, vegetation mapping and modeling

Megan Mehaffey; Rick Van Remortel; Elizabeth Smith; Randy Bruins

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Temporal and Spatial Variations in Hail in the Upper Great Plains and Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of hail days during 196180 in the northern Great Plains-Midwest was evaluated on a temporal and spatial basis to help interpret crop-hail losses. Comparisons with earlier (190160) hail day data revealed the seven-state study ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Initial characterization of mudstone nanoporosity with small angle neutron scattering using caprocks from carbon sequestration sites.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological carbon sequestration relies on the principle that CO{sub 2} injected deep into the subsurface is unable to leak to the atmosphere. Structural trapping by a relatively impermeable caprock (often mudstone such as a shale) is the main trapping mechanism that is currently relied on for the first hundreds of years. Many of the pores of the caprock are of micrometer to nanometer scale. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of porosity at these scales are poorly characterized. Differences in pore shape and size can cause variation in capillary properties and fluid transport resulting in fluid pathways with different capillary entry pressures in the same sample. Prediction of pore network properties for distinct geologic environments would result in significant advancement in our ability to model subsurface fluid flow. Specifically, prediction of fluid flow through caprocks of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs is a critical step in evaluating the risk of leakage to overlying aquifers. The micro- and nanoporosity was analyzed in four mudstones using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). These mudstones are caprocks of formations that are currently under study or being used for carbon sequestration projects and include the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Total organic carbon varies from shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. Neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e. minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume of pores and their arrangement in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. Results from this study, combined with high-resolution TEM imaging, provide insight into the differences in volume and geometry of porosity between these various mudstones.

McCray, John (Colorado School of Mines); Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis (Colorado School of Mines); Mouzakis, Katherine (Colorado School of Mines); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

NETL: News Release - Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 17, 2005 February 17, 2005 Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program Adds Canadian Provinces Will Develop, Deploy and Validate Carbon Sequestration Options WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Provinces of Alberta and British Columbia have joined Saskatchewan and Manitoba as Canadian partners in the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, the centerpiece of North American efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The program, a network of federal and state agencies, as well as private sector entities, will determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future carbon capture, storage, and sequestration in different areas of the country. MORE INFO

427

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SECARB efforts can be found on their website. The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), represents a 13-State region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB is comprised of over 100 participants representing Federal and State governments, industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and

428

Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Climate Policies Provider Nebraska Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee Under this statute, the Director of Natural Resources will document and quantify carbon sequestration and greenhouse emissions reductions

429

DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations October 5, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact onCCS Opportunities in the United States [click on imageto link to the publication]Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed the manual to better understand the characteristics of geologic formations

430

INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 4, 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE), the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO), and the Norwegian Research Council (NRC) entered into a ''Project Agreement for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration''. Government organizations from Japan, Canada, and Australia, and a Swiss/Swedish engineering firm later joined the agreement, which outlined a research strategy for ocean carbon sequestration via direct injection. The members agreed to an initial field experiment, with the hope that if the initial experiment was successful, there would be subsequent field evaluations of increasingly larger scale to evaluate environmental impacts of sequestration and the potential for commercialization. This report is a summary of the evolution of the collaborative effort, the supporting research, and results for the International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration. Almost 100 papers and reports resulted from this collaboration, including 18 peer reviewed journal articles, 46 papers, 28 reports, and 4 graduate theses. A full listing of these publications is in the reference section.

Howard J. Herzog; E. Eric Adams

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

in three types of geological formations found in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in three types of geological formations found in the United States in three types of geological formations found in the United States and Canada: saline formations, unmineable coal seams, and oil and gas reservoirs. The methodologies are based on widely accepted assumptions associated with fluid distribution and displacement processes commonly applied in petroleum and groundwater science. Leadership for this document was provided by the Capacity and Fairways Subgroup, a subcommittee convened in 2006 by the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Geological Working Group to develop the first carbon sequestration atlas. The document will be presented as an appendix in Atlas II, which DOE expects to release later this year. The Atlas recently won an APEX Grand Award for publication

432

DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces February 16, 2005 - 10:14am Addthis Will Develop, Deploy, and Validate Carbon Sequestration Options WASHINGTON, DC -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Provinces of Alberta and British Columbia have joined Saskatchewan and Manitoba as Canadian partners in the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program, the centerpiece of North American efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The program, a network of federal and state agencies, as well as private sector entities, will determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future carbon capture, storage, and sequestration in different areas of

433

DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces February 16, 2005 - 10:14am Addthis Will Develop, Deploy, and Validate Carbon Sequestration Options WASHINGTON, DC -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Provinces of Alberta and British Columbia have joined Saskatchewan and Manitoba as Canadian partners in the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program, the centerpiece of North American efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The program, a network of federal and state agencies, as well as private sector entities, will determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future carbon capture, storage, and sequestration in different areas of

434

International Collaboration on CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

On December 4, 1997, the US Department of Energy (USDOE), the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO), and the Norwegian Research Council (NRC) entered into a Project Agreement for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration. Government organizations from Japan, Canada, and Australia, and a Swiss/Swedish engineering firm later joined the agreement, which outlined a research strategy for ocean carbon sequestration via direct injection. The members agreed to an initial field experiment, with the hope that if the initial experiment was successful, there would be subsequent field evaluations of increasingly larger scale to evaluate environmental impacts of sequestration and the potential for commercialization. The evolution of the collaborative effort, the supporting research, and results for the International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration were documented in almost 100 papers and reports, including 18 peer-reviewed journal articles, 46 papers, 28 reports, and 4 graduate theses. These efforts were summarized in our project report issued January 2005 and covering the period August 23, 1998-October 23, 2004. An accompanying CD contained electronic copies of all the papers and reports. This report focuses on results of a two-year sub-task to update an environmental assessment of acute marine impacts resulting from direct ocean sequestration. The approach is based on the work of Auerbach et al. [6] and Caulfield et al. [20] to assess mortality to zooplankton, but uses updated information concerning bioassays, an updated modeling approach and three modified injection scenarios: a point release of negatively buoyant solid CO{sub 2} hydrate particles from a moving ship; a long, bottom-mounted diffuser discharging buoyant liquid CO{sub 2} droplets; and a stationary point release of hydrate particles forming a sinking plume. Results suggest that in particular the first two discharge modes could be successfully designed to largely avoid zooplankton mortality. Sub-lethal and ecosystem effects are discussed qualitatively, but not analyzed quantitatively.

Peter H. Israelsson; E. Eric Adams

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

White, Curt (Pittsburgh, PA); Wells, Arthur (Bridgeville, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Strazisar, Brian (Venetia, PA)

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

436

In-Situ MVA of CO2 Sequestration Using Smart Field Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-Situ MVA of CO In-Situ MVA of CO 2 Sequestration Using Smart Field Technology Background Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) emphasizes monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation and risk assessment, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2 geologic storage sites. MVA efforts focus on the development and deployment of technologies that can provide an accurate accounting of stored CO 2 , with a high level of confidence that the CO 2 will remain stored underground permanently. Effective application of these MVA technologies will ensure the safety of geologic storage projects with respect to both human health and the environment, and can provide the basis for establishing

437

"Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,8.1,5.6,2.5 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,17.5,12.1,5.4 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,14.1,10,4 "Laptop Model",16.9,3.4,2.1,1.3 "Hours Turned on Per Week" "Less than 2 Hours",13.6,3.4,2.5,0.9

438

"Table HC12.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","N","N" "Space Heating Usage During 2005"

439

Geologic Carbon Storage Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corporation 9302005 Enhanced Microbial Pathways for Methane Production from Oil Shale Western Research Institute 1012005 Carbon Sequestration for Existing Power Plants...

440

Enhanced Performance Assessment System (EPAS) for carbon sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is an option to mitigate impacts of atmospheric carbon emission. Numerous factors are important in determining the overall effectiveness of long-term geologic storage of carbon, including leakage rates, volume of storage available, and system costs. Recent efforts have been made to apply an existing probabilistic performance assessment (PA) methodology developed for deep nuclear waste geologic repositories to evaluate the effectiveness of subsurface carbon storage (Viswanathan et al., 2008; Stauffer et al., 2009). However, to address the most pressing management, regulatory, and scientific concerns with subsurface carbon storage (CS), the existing PA methodology and tools must be enhanced and upgraded. For example, in the evaluation of a nuclear waste repository, a PA model is essentially a forward model that samples input parameters and runs multiple realizations to estimate future consequences and determine important parameters driving the system performance. In the CS evaluation, however, a PA model must be able to run both forward and inverse calculations to support optimization of CO{sub 2} injection and real-time site monitoring as an integral part of the system design and operation. The monitoring data must be continually fused into the PA model through model inversion and parameter estimation. Model calculations will in turn guide the design of optimal monitoring and carbon-injection strategies (e.g., in terms of monitoring techniques, locations, and time intervals). Under the support of Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), a late-start LDRD project was initiated in June of Fiscal Year 2010 to explore the concept of an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS) for carbon sequestration and storage. In spite of the tight time constraints, significant progress has been made on the project: (1) Following the general PA methodology, a preliminary Feature, Event, and Process (FEP) analysis was performed for a hypothetical CS system. Through this FEP analysis, relevant scenarios for CO{sub 2} release were defined. (2) A prototype of EPAS was developed by wrapping an existing multi-phase, multi-component reservoir simulator (TOUGH2) with an uncertainty quantification and optimization code (DAKOTA). (3) For demonstration, a probabilistic PA analysis was successfully performed for a hypothetical CS system based on an existing project in a brine-bearing sandstone. The work lays the foundation for the development of a new generation of PA tools for effective management of CS activities. At a top-level, the work supports energy security and climate change/adaptation by furthering the capability to effectively manage proposed carbon capture and sequestration activities (both research and development as well as operational), and it greatly enhances the technical capability to address this national problem. The next phase of the work will include (1) full capability demonstration of the EPAS, especially for data fusion, carbon storage system optimization, and process optimization of CO{sub 2} injection, and (2) application of the EPAS to actual carbon storage systems.

Wang, Yifeng; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; McNeish, Jerry A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dewers, Thomas A.; Hadgu, Teklu; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "midwest geological sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Conceptual Design of a Fossil Hydrogen Infrastructure with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Conference on Carbon Sequestration. 2003. WashingtonTechnology Laboratory Carbon Sequestration program andCONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION DOE/NETL May

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Carbon Sequestration and Gas Emissions in Paddy Field Ecosystem Affected by Nitrogen Application in Purplish Soil, Southwest China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in parentheses. 3.2 Daily carbon sequestrations in growthstage Daily carbon sequestrations at different rice growth>N150. Table 3 Daily carbon sequestrations in growth stage /

Wang, Yuying; Hu, Chunsheng Sr.; Zhu, Bo Sr.; Xiang, Hongyan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Power Quality Investigation at a Midwest Hospital: Magnetic Resonance Imaging System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a Midwest hospital contacted its electric utility about malfunctions involving imaging systems including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). The MRI system was the primary concern for the hospital. The MRI system was manufactured by a leading imaging system manufacturer and the CT system was manufactured by another leading imaging system manufacturer. To begin investigating the problem, the hospital requested that power-line monitoring be conducted at the facility. Th...

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

444

Evaluation of Wind Shear Patterns at Midwest Wind Energy Facilities: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy-Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) has included several wind energy facilities in the Midwestern United States. At several of these projects, a strong diurnal shear pattern has been observed. During the day, low and sometimes negative shear has been measured. During night hours, very high positive shear is frequently observed. These high nighttime shear values are of concern due to the potential for high stresses across the rotor. The resulting loads on turbine components could result in failures. Conversely, the effects of high nighttime wind shear could benefit wind generated energy production in the Midwest by providing a source of greater hub-height wind speeds, particularly for multi-megawatt turbines that utilize tall towers. This paper presents an overview of the observed wind shear at each of the Midwest TVP projects, focusing on diurnal patterns and the frequency of very high nighttime shear at the sites. Turbine fault incidence is examined to determine the presence or absence of a correlation to periods of high shear. Implications of shear-related failures are discussed for other Midwest projects that use megawatt-scale turbines. In addition, this paper discusses the importance of accurate shear estimates for project development.

Smith, K.; Randall, G.; Malcolm, D.; Kelley, N.; Smith, B.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Carbon Sequestration Atlas and Interactive Maps from the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In November of 2002, DOE announced a global climate change initiative involving joint government-industry partnerships working together to find sensible, low cost solutions for reducing GHG emissions. As a result, seven regional partnerships were formed; the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is one of those. These groups are utilizing their expertise to assess sequestration technologies to capture carbon emissions, identify and evaluate appropriate storage locations, and engage a variety of stakeholders in order to increase awareness of carbon sequestration. Stakeholders in this project are made up of private industry, NGOs, the general public, and government entities. There are a total of 44 current organizations represented in the partnership including electric utilities, oil and gas companies, state governments, universities, NGOs, and tribal nations. The SWP is coordinated by New Mexico Tech and encompasses New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Utah, and portions of Kansas, Nevada, Texas, and Wyoming. Field test sites for the region are located in New Mexico (San Juan Basin), Utah (Paradox Basin), and Texas (Permian Basin).[Taken from the SWP C02 Sequestration Atlas] The SWP makes available at this website their CO2 Sequestration Atlas and an interactive data map.

McPherson, Brian

446

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration November 6-7, 2001 Lexington, Kentucky Robert Addington AEI Incorporated 2000 Ashland Drive Ashland, KY 41101 Phone: 606-928-3433 Email: crystalj@aeiresources.com Jim Amonette MSIN K8-96 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: 509-3765565 Email: jim.amonette@pnl.gov Patrick Angel Area Office Manager U.S. Department of Interior Office of Surface Mining P.O. Box 1048 London, KY 40741 Phone: 606-878-6440 Email: pangel@osmre.gov Hugh Archer Commissioner Kentucky Dept of Natural Resources 663 Teton Trail Frankfort, KY 40601 Phone: 502-564-2184 Email: hugh.archer@mail.state.ky.us Victor Badaker Mining Engineering Dept. University of Kentucky MML Bldg. Lexington, KY 40546 Phone: 859-257-3818

447

NETL: ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Logo Projects in this area are funded, in whole or in part, with funds appropriated by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) and will train personnel in the implementation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. While CCS technologies offer great potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating potential climate change, deploying these technologies will require a significantly expanded workforce trained in the various specialties that are currently underrepresented in the United States. Education and training activities undertaken in this area are developing a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing CCS technologies.

448

INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

The specific objective of our project on CO{sub 2} ocean sequestration is to investigate its technical feasibility and to improve the understanding of any associated environmental impacts. Our ultimate goal is to minimize any impacts associated with the eventual use of ocean carbon sequestration to reduce greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The project will continue through March 31, 2002, with a field experiment to take place in the summer of 2001 off the Kona Coast of Hawaii. At GHGT-4 in Interlaken, we presented a paper detailing our plans. The purpose of this paper is to present an update on our progress to date and our plans to complete the project. The co-authors of this paper are members of the project's Technical Committee, which has been formed to supervise the technical aspects and execution of this project.

H.J. Herzog; E.E. Adams

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

Engineered Sequestration and Advanced Power Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Advanced Power Technologies. Klaus Lackner, Columbia Sequestration and Advanced Power Technologies. Klaus Lackner, Columbia University. Predictions of innovative energy technologies for the next century usually include everything from fusion to photovoltaics with the one notable exception of fossil fuels. Because of fears of diminishing supplies, pollution and climate change, the public is reluctant to consider these hydrocarbon fuels for the energy needs of the twenty- first century. An energy strategy for the new century, however, cannot ignore fossil fuels. Contrary to popular belief, they are plentiful and inexpensive. While it is true that fossil fuels are limited by their environmental impact, new technologies to eliminate environmental concerns are currently being developed. Managing the emission of

450

NETL: The Carbon Sequestration Newsletter: July 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

President Bush announces eight new carbon sequestration R&D awards On July 13th, President George Bush delivered an address on a "scientifically sound and effective global effort to reduce the buildup